Dictionary: MAO – MARK


• MAORILANDER
n. 1892 colloq., chiefly Aust. – a New Zealander
 
• MAORI P.T.
n. 1961 NZ sl. – laziness; avoidance of work  
 
• MAP
n. 1. 1825 Sc. – a rabbit  
n. 2. 1870 Sc. – a portrait, a likeness  
n. 3. 1908 sl. – the face
vb. 1. c1425 obs. rare – to bewilder
vb. 2. 1813 Sc. – to nibble; to move the mouth as though nibbling; to catch hold with the teeth  
 
• MAP AND MELL
vb. 1861 Sc. – to live with a man at board and bed, as a wife with her husband  
 
• MAPARLA
n. 20C W. Indies sl. – an effeminate man; a homosexual man who plays the female role in sex
 
• MAPARLA-MAN
n. 20C W. Indies sl. – an effeminate man; a homosexual man who plays the female role in sex
 
• MAPKIN
n. 1416 Sc. obs. – a rabbit  
 
• MAPLE FACE
n. 1633 obs. – a spotted face
 
• MAPLE-FACED
adj. 1607 obs. – having a spotted face
 
• MAPLE-HEAD
n. 1953 Amer. dial. – any man with a noticeably small head  
 
• MAPLIN-TREE
n. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – the maple tree, Acer Pseudo-Platanus  
 
• MAPMENT
n. 1877 Eng. dial. – nonsense; foolish talk; a silly rigmarole  
 
• MAP-MOUTHED
adj. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – of a mouth: having lost the teeth  
 
• MAP OF TASSIE
n. Bk1999 Aust. sl. – the female pubic hair area
 
• MAPPEMONDE
n. 1380 obs. – the map of the world
 
• MAPPEN
adv. 1848 Eng. dial. – perhaps, possibly  
 
• MAPPER
n. 1635 – a map-maker  
 
• MAPPERY
n. 1606 – the making of maps; used contemptuously  
 
• MAPPIE
n. 1825 Sc. – a rabbit  
 
• MAPPIST
n. a1618 rare – a map-maker
 
• MAPPLE
n. c1440 obs. – a mop 
 
• MAPPY
n. 1879 Sc. – a rabbit  
 
• MAPSE
vb. 1891 Eng. dial. – to make a smacking noise with the lips when eating or talking  
 
• MAPSIE
n. 1824 Sc. – a pet sheep; a young hare  
 
• MAPSY
n. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – an abscess  
 
• MAPUS
n. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – the head
 
• MAQUE
n. 1. 1960s African-American sl. – a clever, influential person; a smooth operator  
n. 2. 1990s African-American sl. – a person who deceives or tries to charm a member of the opposite sex with seductive words; a successful seducer  
n. 3. 20C US criminals’ & African-American sl. – a pimp  
 
• MAQUERELL
n. 1426 obs. – one who ministers to sexual debauchery; a bawd, a pimp, a procurer or procuress
 
• MAR
n. 1. a1300 obs. – a hindrance, obstruction; an impediment in speech
n. 2. 1551 obs. exc. Sc. – a fault; a defect; an impediment  
vb. 1. c897 obs. – to waste, to squander property
vb. 2. c950 obs. – to err; to go astray; to be or become bewildered or confused
vb. 3. c1000 obs. – to hamper, to hinder, to interfere with, to interrupt or stop a person, event, or thing
vb. 4. c1205 arch. – to harm, to injure a person; later, to mangle, to disfigure 
vb. 5. c1230 obs. – to become deteriorated; to spoil; to perish
vb. 6. a1300 obs. – to confuse, to bewilder; to perplex, to trouble; to grieve, to distress
vb. 7. 1530 obs. exc. Eng. dial. obs. – to spoil a child by indulgence
vb. 8. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – to annoy, to irritate  
vb. 9. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – to waste away; to melt
 
• MARABAS BONNET
n. 1538 Sc. obs. – a large flat cap
 
• MARACA
n. 1940 Amer. sl. – a woman’s breast  
 
• MARAIS
n. 1839 Amer. dial. – a swamp  
 
• MAR-ALL
n. 1611 obs. – one who hinders the success of any undertaking
vb. c1420 obs.  – (as ‘mar all’) to act so as to prevent a project or operation from being carried to a successful issue; to spoil everything; to act badly
 
• MARAUD
n. 1837 rare – the act of raiding or plundering
vb. 1. 1711 – to make a raid for the purpose of plundering  
vb. 2. 1770 – to go about pilfering  
 
• MARAUDER
n. 1698 – one who roves in quest of plunder; a freebooter, a plunderer  
 
• MARB
n. 1942 Amer. dial. – a marble  
vb. 1936 Amer. dial. – to growl or grumble; to complain; to condemn unceasingly  
 
• MARBEL
adj. 1. Bk1905 Sc. – feeble, inactive  
adj. 2. Bk1905 Sc. – slow, lazy, reluctant
 
• MARBLE
n. 1981 Amer. dial. – a cherry tomato  
vb. 1. 1661 obs. – to pickle fish
vb. 2. 1847 Amer. dial. – to depart quickly; to move off in a hurry  
 
• MARBLE-ARCH
n. M19 Brit. sl. – the female genitals  
 
• MARBLE-BOWLS
n. Bk1905 Sc. – marbles; games of marbles  
 
• MARBLE CITY
n. 1936 Amer. dial. – a cemetery  
 
• MARBLE COLOURS
n. 1613 obs. – ostentatious splendour  
 
• MARBLE DOME
n. 1919 Amer. sl. – a dolt, a dullard, a stupid person  
 
• MARBLE EYE
n. 1930 Amer. dial. – a large, round eye  
 
• MARBLE-EYED
adj. 1965 Amer. dial. – round-eyed  
 
• MARBLE FARM
n. 1978 Amer. dial. – a cemetery  
 
• MARBLE FOREST
n. 1950 Amer. dial. – a cemetery  
 
• MARBLE GARDEN
n. 1962 Amer. sl. – a cemetery  
 
• MARBLE GOLF
n. 1950 Amer. dial. – a marble game: a number of holes (usually six) are dug in a smooth bit of ground; the object of the game is to shoot  a marble into each of the holes in rotation  
 
• MARBLEHEAD
n. 1. 1919 Amer. sl. – a dolt, a dullard, a stupid person  
n. 2. 1972 Amer. sl. – a bald man; used derisively  
 
• MARBLEHEAD TURKEY
n. 1859 Amer. dial. – codfish  
 
• MARBLE HILL
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – a cemetery  
 
• MARBLE ORCHARD
n. 1925 US sl. – a cemetery
 
• MARBLE PALACE
n. 20C US sl. – a toilet, esp. a marble-finished public restroom  
 
• MARBLE PARK
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – a cemetery  
 
• MARBLES
n. 1. L16 sl. – syphilis; syphilitic buboes  
n. 2. 19C Brit. & US sl. – the testicles  
 
• MARBLE TOMATO
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – a cherry tomato  
 
• MARBLE TOWN
n. 1945 US sl. – a cemetery  
 
• MARBLE YARD
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – a cemetery  
 
• MARBLIE
adj. 1439 – resembling marble; hence, rigid, cold, or calm like marble  
 
• MARBLISH
adj. 1826 rare – resembling marble  
 
• MARBLY
adj. 1439 – resembling marble; hence, rigid, cold, or calm like marble  
 
• MARBRYN
adj. 1319 obs. – of marble
 
• MARCANTANT
n. 1596 obs. rare – a merchant  
 
• MARCESCIBLE
adj. 1656 obs. – liable to wither or fade
 
• MARCESSIBLE
adj. 1656 obs. – liable to wither or fade
 
• MARCH
n. 1. c1290 – the border or frontier of a country; hence, a tract of land on the border of a country, or a tract of debatable land separating one country from another 
n. 2. a1300 obs. – country, territory 
n. 3. c1410 obs. rare – the footprint of an otter
n. 4. 1513 obs. – a boundary mark; a landmark
n. 5. 1540 chiefly Sc. – the boundary of an estate; the boundary dividing one estate from another  
vb. 1. c1330 – to border upon; to have a common frontier with  
vb. 2. 1541 Sc. obs. – to mark the boundaries of with landmarks
 
• MARCHANDYE
n. Bk1905 Sc. – merchandise  
 
• MARCHANTABLE
adj. 1. 1746 Eng. dial. – in good health  
adj. 2. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – fit for sale, in good condition  
 
• MARCH-BIRD
n. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – any person or creature born in March
 
• MARCH CHICK
n. 1599 obs. – a precocious youth
 
• MARCH-DIKE
n. 1843 Sc. – a boundary wall or fence  
 
• MARCHER
n. 1. c1440 obs. – one whose territory adjoins that of another
n. 2. 1470 – an inhabitant of a march or border district  
n. 3. 1475 obs. – a border-territory or march
 
• MARCHESE
vb. 1525 obs. – to border upon; to have a common frontier with  
 
• MARCH FLOWER
n. 1937 Amer. dial. – a daffodil  
 
• MARCH HILL
n. 1832 Amer. dial. – a barrier to be overcome  
 
• MARCHING
adj. 1842 – of things: progressing, advancing  
 
• MARCHING IN MARMALADE
adj. World War II Brit. army sl. – working hard but getting nowhere; struggling to achieve a useful purpose while being hampered and obstructed by red tape or one’s superiors  
n. World War II Brit. army sl. – working hard but getting nowhere; struggling to achieve a useful purpose while being hampered and obstructed by red tape or one’s superiors
 
• MARCHING MONEY
n. 1918 Aust. sl. – travelling expenses  
 
• MARCHING ORDERS
n. 1937 Brit. sl. – dismissal  
 
• MARCHION
n. a1380 obs. – a governor of border regions
 
• MARCHIONESS
n. 1883 – a maid-of-all-work; a slatternly general maid  
 
• MARCH-LAND
n. 1536 – land comprising the marches of a country; a border territory, border-land, frontier-land  
 
• MARCH LILY
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – a daffodil  
 
• MARCH MAD
adj. a1619 obs. – mad as a March hare 
 
• MARCH-MAN
n. a1400-50 obs. exc. Sc. – an inhabitant of the marches or borders
 
• MARCH MANY WEATHERS
n. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – the month of March  
 
• MARCH MUCK-IT-OUT
n. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – the month of March
 
• MARCH OFF
vb. 1. 1683 obs. – to become bankrupt
vb. 2. 1693 obs. – to die
 
• MARCHPANE
adj. 1598 – dainty, fastidious  
n. 1592 obs. – something delicious or exquisite
 
• MARCH PEEPER
n. 1939 Amer. dial. – a tree frog  
 
• MARCH STONE
n. 1536 chiefly Sc. N. Eng. dial. – a stone set up to mark the boundary of an estate  
 
• MARCH UP TO THE CANNON’S MOUTH
vb. 1801 – to walk into danger unflinchingly
 
• MARCH-WAY
n. 1892 Sc. – a boundary road  
 
• MARCID
adj. 1. 1656 obs. – withered, wasted, decayed, rotten
adj. 2. 1656 obs. – weak, feeble, exhausted
 
• MARCIDIOUS
adj. 1656 obs. – rotten, decayed, withered; feeble, weak, exhausted
 
• MARCIDITY
n. 1658 obs. rare – a wasted or withered condition; leanness, the want of flesh; rottenness
 
• MARCOR;  MARCOUR
n. 1646 obs. – decay
 
• MARCUS SUPERBUS
n. 1896 Brit. theatrical sl. – a person of high rank or eminence; an important person  
 
• MARCUS SUPERFLUOUS
n. 1896 Brit. theatrical sl. – a person of high rank or eminence; an important person
 
• MARDEL
adj. 1865 Sc. – big, clumsy, fat  
n. 1897 Sc. – a fat, clumsy woman  
 
• MARDISH
adj. 1886 Eng. dial. – somewhat spoiled  
 
• MARDLE
n. 1. 1893 Eng. dial. – a gossip; a long talk  
n. 2. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – a festive meeting; a drinking bout  
n. 3. Bk1905 Sc. – one who gossips; a lounging, idle woman 
vb. 1. 1892 Eng. dial. – to gossip; to waste time in gossiping; to dawdle  
vb. 2. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – to drawl  
vb. 3. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – to indulge in merrymaking; to drink together
vb. 4. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – to quarrel; to interfere
 
• MARDLER
n. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – a gossip; one given to gossiping
 
• MARDLE UP
vb. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – to coddle, to nurse; to take pains about
 
• MARDNESS
n. 1885 Eng. dial. – softness, lack of endurance, indulgence  
 
• MARDO
n. 1891 Eng. dial. – dung, manure  
 
• MARD UP
vb. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – to be spoiled; to pet, to caress  
 
• MARDY
adj. E20 Eng. dial. – of a child: spoiled, sulky, whining
n. 1874 Eng. dial. – a spoiled child  
vb. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – to spoil, to indulge  
 
• MARDY UP
vb. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – to spoil, to indulge
 
• MARE
n. 1. a700 obs. – a kind of goblin supposed to produce nightmare by sitting on the chest of the sleeper; the nightmare itself
n. 2. 1303 – an unpleasant,  despicable, bad-tempered female; a term of contempt  
n. 3. c1440 obs. – a spectre, a hag
n. 4. 1881 Ireland – a horse of either sex  
n. 5. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – a term of abuse  
n. 6. 1930s sl. – a prostitute  
 
• THE MARE
n. a1529 obs. – the blues; melancholy
 
• MARECHAL
n. 1676 obs. – a scent or perfume
 
• MARECHELLE
n. 1676 obs. – a scent or perfume
 
• MARE-HAG
n. 1638 obs. – a female evil spirit
 
• MARE-RODE
adj. 1855 Sc. & Eng. dial. – oppressed with an incubus, having the nightmare

• MARE’S EGG
n. 1973 Amer. dial. – a puffball  
 
• MARE’S-NEST
n. 1. a1619 – an illusory discovery, esp. one that is much vaunted and displays foolish credulity; a false discovery or illusion 
n. 2. 1948 Amer. dial. – an untidy jumble; a mess; a tangle of debris in a stream  
 
• MARE’S SON
n. 1470-85 – a horse  
 
• MARE’S TAILS
n. 1775 – long straight streaks of cirrus, supposed to foretoken stormy weather  
 
• MARE TAIL
n. 1897 colloq. – a long, thin cirrus cloud  
 
• MARE-WOOD
adj. 1613 obs. – of a stallion: mare-mad  
 
• MAR-FIRE
n. 1887 Eng. dial. – the luminous appearance of the sea at night  
 
• MARG
n. 1922 sl. – margarine  
 
• MARGARET
n. 1. 1310 arch. – a pearl  
n. 2. a1500 obs. – a daisy; esp. Bellis Perennis
n. 3. 1854 Eng. dial. – a magpie  
 
• MARGARETTE
n. 1. a1500 obs. – a daisy; esp. Bellis Perennis
n. 2. 17C sl. – a prostitute  
 
• MARGARINE
adj. 1891 – sham, bogus, falsified, false  
 
• MARGARITACEOUS
adj. 1826 – pearly  
 
• MARGARITAL
adj. a1618 obs. – pearl-like
 
• MARGARITE
n. 1. 1310 obs. exc. arch. – a pearl  
n. 2. a1450 – something precious 
n. 3. a1500 obs. – a daisy; esp. Bellis Perennis
 
• MARGARITIFEROUS
adj. 1. 1656 – producing pearls  
adj. 2. 1838 nonce usage – wearing pearls 
 
• MARGARITOMANCY
n. Bk1991 – divination involving the examination of pearls
 
• MARGE
n. 1. 1551 now poetic usage –  edge, border, margin  
n. 2. 1922 sl. – margarine  
vb. 1852 – to form the edge of, to provide with an edge  
 
• MARGENT
n. 1. 1538 arch. – margin, edge, or brim of anything  
n. 2. 1579 arch. – the margin of a book as being the place for a commentary upon or summary of the text; hence, the commentary or summary itself  
n. 3. 1859 Sc. & Eng. dial. – a margin, beach, bank  
vb. 1610 obs. – to add marginal notes to
 
• MARGERIE;  MARGERY
n. a1300 obs. – a pearl
 
• MARGERY PRATER
n. 1567 cant obs. – a fowl, a hen
 
• MARGIN
n. c1586 obs. – a boundary
 
• MARGINALIA
n. 1832 – marginal notes  
 
• MARGINATE
vb. 1. 1609 obs. – to annotate with marginal notes
vb. 2. 1623 – to furnish with a margin or border  
 
• MARGINEAN
adj. 1656 obs. – marginal
 
• MARGUERITE
n. 1866 rare – the common daisy, Bellis perennis
 
• MARGULLIE
vb. 1721 Sc. obs. –  to disfigure, to mar, to mangle; to mismanage, to abuse; to mar any business; to bungle
 
• MARIAN
adj. 1701 – pert. to the Virgin Mary, or characterized by special devotion to her  
n. 1. 1567 obs. – an unchaste or loose woman
n. 2. 1635 – a worshipper or devotee of the Virgin Mary  
 
• MARIANIC
adj. 1845 – pert. to the Virgin Mary, or characterized by special devotion to her  
 
• MARIANOLATRIST
n. 1736 obs. rare – one who worships the Virgin Mary
 
• MARIANOLATRY
n. 1755 obs. rare – worship of the Virgin Mary
 
• MARICOLOUS
adj. B1900 – inhabiting the sea
 
• MARIGENOUS
adj. 1599 – produced in or by the sea  
 
• MARIGOLD
n. 1. 1663 sl. obs. – a gold coin; a sovereign
n. 2. Bk1903 sl. – £1,000,000
 
• MARIHOOCH
n. 1971 US college sl. – marijuana  
 
• MARIHOOCHIE
n. 1971 US college sl. – marijuana
 
• MARINADO
vb. c1682 obs. – to steep in marinade; to marinate
 
• MARINAGE
n. 1511 obs. – seamanship
 
• MARINAL
adj. 1. 1614 obs. – pert. to the sea
adj. 2. 1620 obs. – nautical
n. a1300-1400 Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – a mariner, a sailor
 
• MARINALLER
n. 1470 obs. – a mariner
 
• MARINARY
n. 1684 obs. rare – seamanship; knowledge of navigation
 
• MARINATE
vb. 1673 sl. obs. – to transport over sea  
 
• MARINE
n. 1. a1300 obs. – the sea coast or shore; a promenade by the sea; also, the country or district in immediate proximity to the coast
n. 2. c1575 obs. – a sailor, a mariner
n. 3. 1831 sl. – an empty bottle or container  
n. 4. 1840 nautical sl. – a man who is ignorant and clumsy about seaman’s work; a greenhorn; a land-lubber
vb. c1682 obs. – to marinate 
 
• MARINE OFFICER
n. 1785 sl. – an empty bottle  
 
• MARINE RECRUIT
n. L18 sl. – an empty bottle  
 
• MARINE-SET
adj. 1632 obs. – placed on the sea-coast
 
• MARINE STORES
n. 1831 – the ironwork, cordage, sails, provisions, etc. with which a vessel is supplied  
 
MARINETTE
n. World War I Amer. sl. – a woman who enlisted in the Marines to do clerical work
 
MARINORAMA
n. 1832 – a panoramic representation of sea views
Etymology
– from marine (adj.) + –orama, after panorama
 
MARIOLA
n. 1876 – an image of the Virgin Mary  
 
• MARIOLATER
n. 1861 – one who worships the Virgin Mary  
 
• MARIOLATROUS
adj. 1844 – worshipping the Virgin Mary  
 
• MARIOLATRY
n. 1612 – worship of the Virgin Mary attributed by opponents to Roman Catholics  
 
• MARIS
n. a1340 obs. – the womb
 
• MARISH
adj. 1. 1543 obs. – of the nature of a marsh; marshy
adj. 2. 1679 rare – like a mare
n. c1330 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – a marsh or low-lying ground liable to be flooded   
 
• MARISHNESS
n. 1652-62 obs. – marshiness
 
• MARISHY
adj. 1607 obs. – marshy
 
• MARISSE
vb. c1315 obs. – to marry
 
MARITALITY
n. 1812 – excessive affection of a wife for her husband
 
MARITATED
adj. 1727 obs. – having a husband; married
Etymology
– from Latin marītātus pa. pple. of marītāre (to marry) + -ed
 
MARITE
n. c1330 obs. – a husband
 
• MARITICIDAL
adj. 1819 rare – husband-killing
 
• MARITIMAL
adj. 1586 obs. – maritime, on the sea
 
• MARITIMATE
adj. 1601 obs. – maritime
 
• MARITIME
n. 1. 1591 obs. – the sea-coast; a country or region adjoining the sea
n. 2. 1655 obs. rare – a person living near the sea
 
• MARITIME REGIMENT
n. 1668 obs. – the marines
 
• MARITORIOUS
adj. 1607 nonce word obs. – fond of one’s husband
 
• MARITURIENT
adj. 1765 nonce word – eager to marry; wishing to become a husband  
 
• MARJERY
n. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – a pet name for a cat  
 
• MARK
n. 1. 701 obs. exc. arch. – a boundary, frontier, limit  
n. 2. c1000 obs. – the stone or other monument set up or standing as a memorial, or as a guide
n. 3. c1000 obs. – a standard or banner
n. 4. c1250 obs. – a pillar, post, stone, fence, etc., placed to indicate the position of a boundary
n. 5. 1377 obs. – attention, notice
n. 6. 1747 boxing sl. – –the pit of the stomach  
n. 7. 1845 sl. –  a gullible person; a dupe  
n. 8. 1883 sl., orig. US – the intended victim of confidence tricksters
n. 9. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – a male sweetheart; an admirer  
n. 10. 1950s Amer. sl. – one’s signature
vb. 1. c888 now poetic usage – to trace out boundaries for; to plot out ground; to set out the ground plan of a building; to plan out, to design  
vb. 2. c1175 obs. – to make the sign of the cross upon one’s breast, etc.; to cross oneself
vb. 3. a1300 obs. – to aim a blow or missile at; to strike, to hit
vb. 4. 1340-70 poetic usage – to mete out, to allot, to apportion
vb. 5. 1377 now poetic usage – to observe, to watch, to see, to spy
vb. 6. a1400 Sc. obs. – to aim, to intend to do something
vb. 7. c1400 obs. – to embroider
vb. 8. c1400 poetic usage, obs. – to fashion, to frame
 
• MARKABLE
adj. c1449 obs. – worthy or capable of being marked or noted; remarkable
 
• MARKABLY
adv. 1650 obs. – remarkably
 
• MARKER
n. 1. c1550 obs. – one who notes or observes
n. 2. 1591 sl. obs. – the member of a pickpocketing team who takes the stolen item from the person that steals it
n. 3. 1887 US sl. – an IOU  
n. 4. 1895 sl. – something worthy to be compared  
n. 5. Bk1902 sl. – a police spy; an informer  
n. 6. 1921 Amer. dial. – a license plate  
 
• MARKET-BEATER
n. c1380 obs. – one who idles or lounges about a market
 
• MARKET DAME
n. 1705 obs. – a strumpet  
 
• MARKET-DASHER
n. c1440 obs. – one who idles or lounges about a market
 
• MARKETEER
n. Bk1874 horse racing sl. – a betting man who devotes himself, by means of special information, to the study of favourites, and the diseases incident to that condition of equine life  
 
• MARKET FAIR
n. 1821 Eng. dial. – a present from the market  
 
• MARK FOY
n. Bk1999 Aust. rhyming sl. based on the name of a once-famous Sydney department store – a boy
 
• MARKET-FRESH
adj. 1841 Eng. dial. – lively and excited with drink; tipsy, slightly the worse for drink; said of farmers who often returned home from market in this state  
 
• MARKET-FUDDLED
adj. 1896 Eng. dial. – lively and excited with drink; somewhat intoxicated  
 
• MARKET LASH
n. 1627-77 obs. – a public flogging .
 
• MARKET-MERRY
adj. 1847 Eng. dial. – lively and excited with drink, tipsy, slightly the worse for drink  
 
• MARKET-MONGER
n. 1629 obs. – one who engrosses the market
 
• MARKET-NITCH
n. 1891 Eng. dial. – the amount of ale or spirits indulged in after market  
 
• MARKET-PEART
adj. 1895 Eng. dial. – lively and excited with drink; somewhat intoxicated  
 
• MARKET-PLACE
n. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – the front teeth  
 
• MARKET-RIPE
adj. 1891 Eng. dial. – old enough for marriage  
 
• MARKETSTEAD
n. 1386 arch. – a market-place  
 
• MARKET-TROT
n. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – a slow trot, a pace slightly quicker than walking  
 
• MARKING
adj. 1. 1577-87 obs. – observing, observant
adj. 2. 1766 obs. – expressive
n. 1585 obs. – notice, consideration
 
• MARKING-BIRD
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a mockingbird  
 
• MARKINGLY
adv. a1586 obs. – attentively 
 
• MARK, LUKE, AND JOHN
n. 1894 Eng. dial. – a four-post bed, of which one leg is broken or gone  
 
• MARKLY
adv. 1533 Sc. obs. – definitely
 
• MARK-MEAR
n. 1582 obs. – a boundary  
 
• MARK OF ADMIRATION
n. 1845 – an exclamation mark
 
• MARKS
n. 1. a1700 – the footprints of an otter 
n. 2. 1930s drug culture sl. – the signs of narcotic injections  
 
• MARKSMAN
n. 20C Ireland – a man who cannot write his name and therefore has to make his mark  
 
• MARK SOMEONE’S CARD
vb. 1. 1930s sl. – to watch someone; to place someone under surveillance; to pick someone out as a potential victim  
vb. 2. 1940s sl. – to explain, to point out, to warn  
vb. 3. 1960s sl. – to realize, to see and understand  
vb. 4. 1960s sl. – to categorize, usually either as a good or trustworthy person, or a bad an untrustworthy person; to put someone in vb. 5. 1961 Brit. sl. – to tip someone off or put someone right  
a specific position  
 
• MARK SOMETHING IN THE CHIMNEY CORNER
vb. 1968 Amer. dial. – to take note of something  
 
• MARK’S POINT
n. 1553 obs. – the bull’s-eye of a target
 
• MARKSTONE
n. 1364 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – a boundary stone  
 
• MARK UP
vb. 1. 1910s sl. – to bruise; to leave scars after a fight  
vb. 2. 1980s Aust. prison sl. – to tattoo  
 
• MARK-WHITE
n. 1596 obs. – the bull’s-eye of a target
 
• MARKWORTHY
adj. 1827 – worthy of note  


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Updated: September 9, 2022