Dictionary: MON – MONZ


• MON
n. 1. 1889 Amer. sl. – money  
n. 2. 1977 Amer. sl. – man  
 
• MONACK
n. 1666 Amer. dial. – a woodchuck, a marmot, a groundhog  
 
• MONAKER
n. 1. M19 sl. – a sovereign (coin)  
n. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a personal name  
 
• MONA LISA
n. 1. 1980s rhyming sl. – a freezer
n. 2. 1980s rhyming sl. – a pizza  
 
• MONARCH
n. 1. Bk1903 sl. – £1
n. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a personal name  
 
• MONARCHOMACHIST
n. 1639 obs. – one who fights against monarchy; an anti-monarchist  
 
• MONAX
n. 1743 Amer. dial. – a woodchuck, a marmot, a groundhog  
 
• MONDAY AND TUESDAY
adj. 1950s sl. – slow, steady, careful  
 
• MONDAY COMES BEFORE SUNDAY
phr. 1968 Amer. dial. – a warning to a woman that her slip is showing  
 
• MONDAY MORNING HEADACHE
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – an imaginary illness used as an excuse to avoid work or school  
 
• MONDAY MORNING QUARTERBACK
n. 1932 Amer. sl., esp. journalists’ usage – a person who offers hindsight criticisms of problems already faced by others; a second-guesser  
vb. 1950 Amer. sl., esp. journalists’ usage – to criticize with the benefit of hindsight  
 
• MONDAY MORNING SICKNESS
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – an imaginary illness used as an excuse to avoid work or school  
 
• MONDAY SICKNESS
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – an imaginary illness used as an excuse to avoid work or school
 
• MONDAY’S LONGER THAN SUNDAY
phr. 1968 Amer. dial. – used to indicate that a woman’s slip is showing  
 
• MONDO
adj. 1968 Amer. sl. – great in size, amount, prominence, or degree; big, huge; hence, extraordinary  
adv. 1968 Amer. sl. – very, exceedingly  
 
• MONDO BIZARRO
adj. 1966 Amer. sl. – exceedingly strange  
 
• MONET
n. 1993 Amer. jocular usage – a person who seems attractive or desirable from a distance, but isn’t up close
 
• MONEY
adj. 1934 Amer. sl. – winning  
n. 1. L18 sl. – a (generally very young ) girl’s private parts  
n. 2. c1870 Amer. dial. – a mass of bubbles floating on a hot drink, such as cocoa or tea, sometimes on cold drinks, such as root beer; a lot of bubbles in your cup or glass meant you would soon come into some money  
n. 3. 1960 Amer. sl. – a crucial element  
n. 41990 Amer. rap music usage – a friend  
 
• MONEY ARM
n. 1971 Amer. baseball usage – a pitcher’s throwing arm  
 
• MONEY-BAG
adj. 1980s sl. – wealthy  
(nouns as ‘moneybag’)
n. 1. 19C sl. – the vagina  
n. 2. 1912 sl. – a wealthy person  
 
• MONEY-BAG LORD
n. 1. 1885 society colloq. – an ennobled banker
n. 2. L19 sl. – an ennobled millionaire or successful businessman  
 
• MONEY-BAGS
adj. 1980s sl. – wealthy  
n. 1. 1818 sl. – a wealthy person  
n. 2. E19 sl. – a lover of money  
 
• THE MONEY BONE
n. 1962 Amer. baseball usage – a pitcher’s throwing arm  
 
• MONEY-BOX
n. 19C sl. – the vagina  
 
• MONEY-BUG
n. c1898 sl., orig. US – a millionaire
 
• MONEY-CALLED
adj. 1966 Amer. dial. – motivated by money rather than by dedication
 
• MONEY-CALLED PREACHER
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – a professional preacher who would find some other work if he was not paid well  
 
• MONEY CAT
n. 1957 Amer. dial. – a calico cat, esp. one with at least three colours  
 
• MONEY-CATCHER
n. 1896 Amer. dial. – a dandelion blossom gone to seed  
 
• MONEY CHILD
n. 1947 Amer. dial. – a child who is reared by someone for a fee  
 
• MONEY-CLEANER
n. 1969 Amer. dial. – a non-existent item used as the basis of a practical joke

• MONEY-CORMORANT
n. 1840 – one greedy for money
 
• MONEY-CUFFEE
n. L19 W. Indies sl. – a foolish spendthrift  
 
• MONEY DOG
n. 1. 1970 Amer. dial. – a person who saves in a mean way or is greedy in money matters  
n. 2. 1995 Amer. rap music usage – a friend  
 
• MONEY-DROPPER
n. 1748 cant – a swindler who, dropping counterfeit money, gets good change from some ‘flat’  
 
• MONEYFIED
adj. 1641 obs. rare – endowed with money
 
• MONEY FOR DICK
n. 1914 army sl. – money for nothing
 
• MONEY FOR DIRT
n. 1914 army sl. – anything, including money, that is gained through a minimal amount of effort, and is available for purely pleasurable expenditure  
 
• MONEY FOR DUST
n. 1910s sl., orig. military usage – anything, including money, that is gained through a minimal amount of effort, and is available for purely pleasurable expenditure  
 
• MONEY FOR JAM
n. 1. 1919 sl., orig. military usage – anything, including money, that is gained through a minimal amount of effort, and is available for purely pleasurable expenditure
n. 2. 20C colloq. – sure money, or more generally, money easily obtained or earned
 
• MONEY FOR OLD ROPE
n. 1. 1936 sl., orig. services’ usage – something requiring little effort  
n. 2. 20C colloq. – money for nothing or almost nothing
 
• MONEY FROM HOME
n. Bk1913 Amer. dial. – something easily obtained
 
• MONEY GOING TO BED
phr. 1965 Amer. dial. – a great deal of money  
 
• MONEY GOLD LIGHT
n. 1938 Amer. dial. – a will-o’-the-wisp  
 
• MONEY GRIP
n. 1990 Amer. rap music usage – a friend  
 
• MONEY-GRUB
n. 1768 – one who is sordidly intent on amassing money; an avaricious person
 
• MONEY HOUND
n. 1970 Amer. dial. – a person who saves in a mean way or is greedy in money matters  
 
• MONEY LIGHT
n. c1952 Amer. dial. – a will-o’-the-wisp  
 
• MONEY MACHINE
n. 1961 Amer. sl., usually offensive – the vagina, usually of a prostitute
 
• MONEY-MAKER
n. 1. 1729 US – a counterfeiter
n. 2. 1785 sl., usually offensive – the vagina, usually of a prostitute
n. 3. a1972 Amer. sl., usually offensive – the buttocks, usually of a woman
 
• MONEY MAKES THE MARE TO GO
phr. L16 colloq. – money can do most things
 
• MONEY MISER
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – a skinflint, a miserly person  
 
• MONEYOCRACY
n. Bk1991 – government or domination of society by the rich
 
• MONEY OUT
vb. 1868 Amer. sl. – to pay up  
 
• MONEY PLAYER
n. 1. 1922 Amer. sl. – in sports and gambling: one who performs well under the pressure of intense competition  
n. 2. 1934 Amer. sl. – a professional athlete  
 
• MONEY POSITION
n. 1934 Amer. sl. – the winner of a contest, esp. a horse race
 
• MONEY-PUKER
n. 1993 Amer. jocular usage – an automatic teller machine
 
• MONEY PUNCH
n. 1942 Amer. sl. – in boxing, a knockout blow  
 
• MONEY RIDER
n. c1961 Amer. sl. – a jockey who is well-known for riding winning horses  
 
• MONEY SHOWER
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – a shower or wedding at which money is given as a gift

• MONEY-SPINNER
n. 1. 19C sl. – the vagina
n. 2. 1884 Amer. dial. – a spider; if you don’t hurt or kill them, they’ll bring good luck  
n. 3. 1952 sl. – something profitable  
 
• MONEY TALKS
n. 1586 – money is very powerful
 
• MONG
adj. 1970s sl. – stupid, dull  
n. 1. 1903 Aust. sl. – a mongrel dog
n. 2. c1940 Aust. sl. – any dog, even of the best pedigree  
vb. 2000s sl. – to be dully comatose or lethargic
 
• MONGEE
n. 1914 Amer. hobo usage – food  
vb. 1930 Amer. hobo usage – to eat  
 
• MONGEY
n. 1914 military sl. – food
 
• MONGIE
adj. 1. 1970s Eng. sl. – dirty; evil-smelling; nasty  
adj. 2. c1975 teen sl. – dull, stupid  
 
• MONGISH
adj. 1980 teen sl. – stupid
 
• MONGO
adj. 1. 1974 US teen & students’ sl. – considerable, substantial, huge, big  
adj. 2. 1986 Amer. sl.-  very many  
adv. 1990s sl. – extremely  
n. 1. 1975 Amer. sl. – an idiot; a weirdo  
n. 2. 1984 Amer. sl. – objects retrieved from trash; hence, a scavenger  
 
• MONGOL
n. M19 Aust. sl. – a Chinese immigrant to Australia, or the United States  
 
• MONGOLIAN
n. M19 Aust. sl. – a Chinese immigrant to Australia, or the United States  
 
• MONGOLITO
n. 1980s US students’ sl. – a term of endearment  
 
• MONGOLOID
n. 1990s sl. – a stupid, dumb person  
 
• MONGOOSE
n. 1. 1900s W. Indies sl. – an albino, esp. as a term of abuse  
n. 2. 1987 Amer. military aviation usage – a McDonnell-Douglas A-4 Skyhawk strike fighter, as modified for advanced combat training  
 
• MONGOOSE GANG
n. 1950s W. Indies sl. – a group of thugs working for a politician and acting as a form of private army/secret police  
 
• MONG OUT
vb. 2000s sl. – to be dully comatose or lethargic  
 
• MONGREL
adj. 17C sl. – an abusive epithet  
n. 1. 16C UK criminals’ sl. – an accomplice who helps in a confidence trickster’s pose as a poor scholar  
n. 2. L16 Aust. & NZ sl. –a general term of abuse  
n. 3. c1720 cant – a sponger; a hanger-on among cheats
 
• MONGY
adj. 1970s sl. – stupid, dull  
 
• MONICA
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a personal name  
 
• MONICKER
n. 1851 Amer. sl. – a name, esp. a nickname or alias  
 
• MONIKA
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a personal name  
 
• MONIKER
n. 1851 Amer. sl. – a name, esp. a nickname or alias  
 
• MONISH
n. 1804 Amer. Anglo-Yiddish usage – money  
 
• MONK
n. 1. 1841 sl. – a monkey  
n. 2. M19 sl. – a general term of contempt  
n. 3. 1903 Amer. sl., contemptuous usage – a Chinese person
n. 4. 1924 Amer. sl., contemptuous usage – a Black immigrant from the West Indies
n. 5. 1931 US criminals’ sl. – a supreme court judge  
n. 6. Bk1942 Amer. circus sl. – a ferret  
n. 7. 1960s US sl. – addiction to a drug, usually heroin  
n. 8. 1961 Amer. dial. – a woodchuck, a marmot, a groundhog  
vb. 1. 1889-90 Amer. sl. – to tinker, trifle, or fool around; to tamper or interfere with surreptitiously  
vb. 2. 1916 Amer. dial. – to make a fool of  
vb. 3. 1950s US sl. – to neck, to engage in sexual activity  
 
• MONK BAG
n. 1841 Amer. sl., chiefly nautical usage – a small leather wallet or purse worn around the neck, tucked out of sight  
 
• MONKERY
n. c1790 sl. – the country
 
• THE MONKERY
n. 1851 tramps’ sl. – tramps or other vagrants collectively
 
• MONKEY
n. 1. 1602 – a rascal, a scamp; used jocularly, esp. in reference to a woman or child  
n. 2. 1689 – a man, a fellow, a character; usually used disparagingly  
n. 3. c1810 Royal Navy sl. – a great-coat
n. 4. 1812 sl. – a padlock
n. 5. 1819 sl. – a mischievous child
n. 6. 1832 sl. – £500 or $500  
n. 7. 1834 nautical sl. – a porous earthen vessel for the cooling of water or other beverages  
n. 8. 1838 Amer. nautical sl. – orig. a short, close-fitting jacket; a pea jacket; also, a heavy thigh-length coat, esp. as worn by sailors  
n. 9. 1839-40 Amer. sl., usually offensive and contemptuous – a non-White or dark-complexioned person, esp. a person of African or Asian descent; in World War II, a Japanese person
n. 10. 1839-40 Amer. sl. – a keg, cask or other container for liquor  
n. 11. c1880 Aust. sl. – a sheep
n. 12. c1888 Amer. sl. – the vulva or vagina  
n. 13. 1909 mechanics’ sl. – a clerk, esp. if unimportant  
n. 14. 1909 Amer. dial. – the coconut  
n. 15. 1922 Amer. criminals’ sl. – a victim or intended victim of swindlers  
n. 16. 1928 Amer. sl. – a dancing girl; a chorus girl; also, a taxi dancer  
n. 17. 1930 Amer. sl., now hist. – a federal prohibition agent
n. 18. 1949 Amer. dial. – the winged seed of maple or ash  
n. 19. 1949 Amer. dial. – an addiction, esp. to heroin
n. 20. 1965 Amer. sl. – in construction: a pile driver  
n. 21. 1966 Amer. dial. – nonsense, baloney  
n. 22. 1968 Amer. dial., derogatory  – a Black person
n. 23. 1989 Amer. sl. – the penis  
n. 24. 1990 Amer. sl. – in real estate: a mortgage  
vb. 1877-78 Amer. sl. – to tinker, trifle, or fool around; to fritter away one’s time; usually used with ‘with’  
 
• MONKEY ABOUT
vb. 1889 – to behave mischievously or aimlessly  
 
• MONKEY AROUND
vb. 1884 Amer. colloq. – to act without purpose; to play around; to behave mischievously or aimlessly
 
• MONKEY-ASSED
adj. 1989 Amer. sl. – damned
 
• MONKEYBACK
n. 1928 African-American sl. – a man who dresses in formal dinner clothes
 
• MONKEY BAG
n. 1847 Amer. sl., chiefly nautical usage – a small leather wallet or purse worn around the neck, tucked out of sight
 
• MONKEY BAIT
n. 1950s drug culture sl. – free samples of addictive drugs  
 
• MONKEY-BITE
n. 1. c1930 Can. sl. – a mark left, often on the shoulder, by amorous biting; a hickey
n. 2. 1967 Amer. dial. – a hand grab, as just above the knee, no bruise  
 
• MONKEY BLANKET
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – a pancake  
 
• MONKEY-BOARD
n. 1842 colloq. – the conductor’s or the footman’s place on an old-style omnibus or on a carriage  
 
• MONKEY BONE
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – the funny bone  
 
• MONKEY BUSINESS
n. 1883 Amer. sl. – foolishness; also, underhand actions or trickery; misbehaviour  
 
• MONKEY-CAGE
n. 1. c1870 sl. – a grated room from which a convict sees his relatives and friends  
n. 2. 1950 Amer. dial. – a caboose  
n. 3. 20C sl., chiefly Cockneys’ usage – the steel structure of a modern building  
 
• MONKEY CAP
n. 1919 Amer. Army sl. – an overseas cap
 
• MONKEY CAPERS
n. 1846 Amer. sl. – monkey business  
 
• MONKEY CATCHER
n. Bk1892 W. Indian sl. – a shrewd, level-headed person, one not too scrupulous in his methods, and who adds cunningness to his cleverness  
 
• MONKEY-CHASER
n. 1. 1924 African-American sl. – a Black immigrant from the West Indies; used contemptuously
n. 2. 1931 Amer. sl. – a man interested in a chorus girl or taxi-dancer  
n. 3. 1942 Amer. sl. – a South Sea Islander, a Polynesian  
 
• MONKEY CLIMB
vb. 1965 Amer. dial. – to climb the trunk of a tree by holding on with your legs while you pull yourself up with your hands
 
• MONKEY CLOTHES
n. 1904 Amer. sl. – a man’s formal dress; evening clothes  
 
• MONKEY DICK
n. 1. 1965 Amer. sl. – Vienna sausage; frankfurter, hot dog  
n. 2. 1988 Amer. sl. – a stupid or contemptible person
 
• MONKEY DICKS
n. 1970s Amer. students’ sl. – link sausages  
 
• MONKEY-DODGER
n. 20C Aust. sl. – a sheep-station hand
 
• MONKEY-DOODLE
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – nonsense  
 
• MONKEY DRILL
n. 1. 1895 Amer. sl., chiefly Navy & US Marine Corps – calisthenics
n. 2. 1901 US Army sl., now Hist. – a mounted cavalry or artillery drill, often involving trick riding
n. 3. 1982 US Army sl. – a scaling or climbing drill  
 
• MONKEYED
adj. 1968 Amer. dial. – exhausted, esp. by heat  
 
• MONKEYED UP
adj. 1966 Amer. dial. – confused, mixed up  
 
• MONKEYFACE
n. 1936 Amer. sl. – a person with a monkey-like face
 
• MONKEY FARE
n. 1939 Amer. dial. – whatever food has been prepared  
 
• MONKEY-FART AROUND
vb. a1970 Amer. sl. – to waste time; to fool about
 
• MONKEY-FARTING
n. 20C Can. sl., esp. soldiers’ usage – silly behaviour, useless employment  
 
• MONKEY FISHING
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – fishing by using an electrical current to stun the fish  
 
• MONKEY FOOD
n. 1. 1940 Amer. dial. – snack food, finger food; a small amount of food eaten between regular meals  
n. 2. 1965 Amer. dial. – peanuts  
 
• MONKEY FRUITS
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – peanuts  
 
• MONKEY HAT
n. 1917 US military sl. – an overseas cap
 
• THE MONKEY HOUSE
n. 1. 1931 Can. railroadmen’s sl. – a caboose
n. 2. 1958 US sl. – an insane asylum  
n. 3. 1982 US military sl. – a jail, prison stockade  
 
• MONKEY HUNT
n. 19C sl. – a beach party; a good time
 
• MONKEY HUT
n. 1977 Amer. dial. – a caboose  
 
• MONKEY IN THE WOODPILE
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – a concealed fact, factor, or motive; something suspicious  
 
• MONKEY ISLAND
n. L19 nautical sl. – the uppermost tier of a big ship’s bridge
 
• MONKEY-JACKET
n. Bk1891 sl. – a coat  
 
• MONKEY-JESUS
n. 20C Jamaican sl. – an ugly person  
 
• MONKEY MAN
n. 1924 US sl. – a weak and servile husband
 
• MONKEY-MEAT
n. 1909 Amer. dial. – the coconut  
 
• MONKEY-MONK
n. L19 US sl. – a superior or important person, whether in fact or through pretension  
 
• MONKEY MOTIONS
n. World War I Amer. sl. – physical exercises
 
• MONKEY-NUT
n. 1909 Amer. dial. – a coconut  
 
• MONKEY NUTS
n. 1. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – peanuts  
n. 2. 20C US prison sl. – prison-cooked meatballs  
 
• MONKEY ON A GRIDIRON
n. L19 Cockney’s sl. – a cyclist
 
• MONKEY ON A STICK
n. c1880 colloq. – a thin man with jerky movements  
 
• MONKEY ON A WHEEL
n. L19 sl., derogatory – a bicyclist  
 
• MONKEY ON ONE’S BACK
n. 1. 1860 sl. – an addiction to narcotic drugs, esp. heroin  
n. 2. M19 sl. – anger or a bad temper  
n. 3. 1959 Amer. colloq. – any form of addiction or long-term problem; a burden or great disadvantage; a source of emotional pressure  
n. 4. 1965 Amer. dial. – delirium tremens  
 
• MONKEY ON ONE’S SHOULDER
n. 1930s sl., orig. US – drug addiction, esp. to heroin  
 
• MONKEY PARADE
n. L19 sl. – the evening promenade up and down a main thoroughfare by (Cockney) young people in search of flirtation  
 
• MONKEY PILE
n. 1984 Amer. dial. – a pile of people on top of one another  
 
• MONKEY PISS
n. 1975 Amer. sl. – inferior beer or other liquor  
 
• MONKEY ON THE CHIMNEY
n. 1875 mainly legal usage – a mortgage on a house
 
• MONKEY ON THE HOUSE
n. 1875 mainly legal usage – a mortgage on a house
 
• MONKEY PARADE
n. 1910 Brit. sl., derogatory – a promenade of young men and women in search of sexual partners
 
• MONKEY-PAW
vb. 19C Royal Navy colloq. – to handle with great skill
 
• MONKEY PLAY
n. 1953 Amer. sl. – foolishness; also, underhand actions or trickery; misbehaviour
 
• MONKEY-POOP
n. L19 colloq., nautical usage – the half deck of a flush decked ship
 
• MONKEY ROOST
n. 1970 Amer. dial. – the upper balcony in a theatre  
 
• MONKEYS
n. 1. L18 sl. – (unwanted) sexual advances  
n. 2. 1935 Amer. dial. – delirium tremens  
n. 3. 1950 Amer. dial. – menstrual cycle  
 
• MONKEY’S ALLOWANCE
n. 1. 1785 sl. – more rough treatment than money; a minimum of payment and a maximum of harsh treatment  
n. 2. L18 Royal Navy usage – short rations  
 
• MONKEYS AND SNAKES
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – delirium tremens  
 
• MONKEY’S BREAKFAST
n. 20C nautical sl. – an untidy piece of work  
 
• MONKEY’S CAT
n. 1970 Amer. dial. – a dupe, a stooge  
 
• MONKEY’S COUSIN
n. 1940s rhyming sl. for ‘dozen’ – in bingo: the number 12  
 
• MONKEY SEE: MONKEY DO!
int. c1925 Can. & US – addressed to one who imitates the actions of another, or as warning not to do such and such because someone (usually a child) might follow suit
 
• MONKEY’S FIST
n. L19 Royal Navy usage – something that puzzles  
 
• MONKEY’S GOT A HEMORRHAGE
phr. 1967 Amer. dial. – one is menstruating  
 
• MONKEY SHINE
n. E19 US sl. – tricks or antics  
vb. 20C US sl. – (as ‘monkey-shine) to misbehave; to play tricks  
 
• MONKEY-SHINES
n. c1832 US sl. – foolish behaviour; tricks or antics  
 
• MONKEY SHOW
n. 1931 Amer. sl. – a burlesque show having chorus girls  
 
• MONKEY’S INSTEP
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – something excellent 
 
• MONKEY’S MONEY
n. c1650 colloq. – payment in kind, esp. labour, goods, or fair words
 
• MONKEY’S ORPHAN
n. 20C Brit. nautical sl. – a term of abuse for a lubberly seaman  
 
• MONKEY’S PARADE
n. 1910 Brit. sl., derogatory – a promenade of young men and women in search of sexual partners
 
• MONKEYSPRING
n. 1969 Amer. dial. – a handspring, a somersault  
 
• MONKEY’S TAIL
n. L19 Brit. rhyming sl. – a nail  
 
• MONKEY SUIT
n. 1. 1895 US – a formal evening dress suit; a tuxedo  
n. 2. 1901 US – any uniform worn by a railway employee on a passenger train  
n. 3. 20C Can. carnival sl. – a uniform provided by carnival proprietor
 
• MONKEY’S WEDDING
n. 1. 1884 Amer. dial. – a state of disorder or disarray  
n. 2. 20C Royal Navy sl. – an unpleasant smell 
 
• MONKEY’S WEDDING BREAKFAST
n. 1884 Amer. dial. – a state of disorder or disarray  
 
• MONKEY-SWILL
n. 1929 Amer. sl. – strong or inferior liquor; moonshine  
 
• MONKEY TIE
n. 1940s S. Afr. sl. – a particularly gaudy tie  
 
• MONKEY TRACK
n. 1960s sl. – the scarred veins that are the product of and indicate heroin addiction  
 
• MONKEY-TRAPS
n. c1930 sl. – female finery, to ‘catch’ men
 
• MONKEY TRICKS
n. 1. 1653 sl. – foolish behaviour  
n. 2. 18C sl. – dubious activities  
n. 3. c1890 colloq. – sexual liberties
n. 4. c1920 sl. – any annoying or irritating action
 
• MONKEY UP
vb. 1965 Amer. dial. – to climb the trunk of a tree by holding on with your legs while you pull yourself up with your hands
 
• MONKEY WAGON
n. 1. 1960s US sl. – an estate car; a ‘family’ car  
n. 2. 1977 Amer. dial. – a caboose  
 
• MONKEY WARD COWBOY
n. 1910s US sl. – a would-be cowboy, who has the clothes but is otherwise spurious  
 
• MONKEY WITH
vb. 1895 Amer. sl. – to tamper or interfere with surreptitiously  
 
• MONKEY WITH A LONG TAIL
n. 1886 legal usage – a mortgage  
 
• MONKEY WITH THE BANDWAGON
vb. 1895 Amer. sl. – to meddle in a dangerous situation
 
• MONKEY WITH THE BUZZ SAW
vb. 1895 Amer. sl. – to meddle in a dangerous situation; to risk injury of any kind
 
• MONKEY WORK
n. 1. 1898 Amer. dial. – mischievous or underhanded activity, monkey business
n. 2. 1933 Amer. dial. – trifling or insignificant work  
 
• MONKEY WRENCH
vb. 1961 US sl. – to repair a car or truck engine  
 
• MONK-ON
n. 2003 Antarctica usage – a gloomy, introspective mood  
 
• MONMOUTH STREET FINERY
n. c1850 Brit. colloq. – tawdry clothes, furniture, etc.; pretense, pretentiousness  
 
• MONNIKER
n. 1882 – a person’s name  
 
• MONNISHER
n. 1765 sl. – a girl, a young woman, esp. a prostitute
 
• MONO
n. 1970 UK sl. – a black and white television set; a monophonic sound reproductions system  
 
• MONOBROW
n. 1990 Aust. sl. – two eyebrows joined by hair growth above the nose  
 
• MONOCRACY
n. Bk1991 – a system ruled by one person
 
• MONOCULAR EYEGLASS
n. c1860 Brit. jocular usage – the anus
 
• MONOGLOT
adj. 1. 1830 – speaking or using only one language
adj. 2. 1890 – written in only one language
n. 1894 – one who knows only one language
 
• MONOLATRY
n. Bk1991 – the worship of one god without excluding belief in others
 
• MONOLITHIC
adj. 1971 US sl. – extremely drug-intoxicated  
 
• MONOMANIA
n. Bk1991 – an excessive interest in or enthusiasm for a single thing, ideal, or the, like; obsession
 
• MONONEIRIST
n. 1762-71 – a person who has never dreamed but once
 
• MONOPATHOPHOBIA
n. Bk1991 – an abnormal fear of sickness in a specified part of the body
 
• MONOPHAGIAN
n. 1625 obs. – one who eats alone, or who eats only one kind of food  
 
• MONOPHAGIZE
vb. 1854 – to eat alone
 
• MONOPHAGUE
n. 1854 – one who eats alone, or who eats only one kind of food  
 
• MONOPHOBIA
n. Bk1991 – an abnormal fear of being by oneself
 
• MONO-RUMP
n. 1974 US sl. – the buttocks formed into a single mass by a garment  
 
• MONOSYLLABLE
n. E19 Brit. sl. – the female genitals  
 
• MONSOON BUCKET
n. 1997 Can. – a helicopter-borne water container used for aerial bombardment of forest fires  
 
• MONSTA
adj. 1999 US sl. – formidable; excellent  
 
• MONSTER
adj. 1953 US sl., orig. African-American usage – excellent, very good; impressive, large, big, formidable  
n. 1. 1759 Brit. – something that is extremely and unusually large  
n. 2. 1954 US teen sl. – a term of endearment  
n. 3. 1955 US sl. – a formidable piece of equipment  
n. 4. 1975 US drug culture sl. – any powerful drug; cocaine  
n. 5. 1982 US sl. – in poker: a great hand or large amount of money bet  
n. 6. 1987 US sl. – an immense wave, surfed by a special and small class of surfers  
n. 7. 1996 Brit. prison sl. – a sex offender, a convicted paedophile  
n. 8. 2002 Brit. sl. – an extremely unattractive woman who is seen as a sex object, esp. one who is ravaged by age  
vb. 1. 1967 Aust. sl. – to harass, to threaten, to victimize someone  
vb. 2. 1967 Aust. sl. – to make a verbal attack on someone or something; to put pressure on
 
• MONSTERED
adj. 2003 Brit. sl. – drunk  
 
• MONSTRATIOUS
adj. 1836 Amer. dial. – monstrous  
 
• MONSTROPOLOUS
adj. 1937 Amer. dial. – monstrous  
 
• MONSTROUS
adj. 1710-11 obs. exc. Amer. dial. – an intensifier  
adv. 1590 – exceedingly, very  
 
• MONSTROUS GOOD
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – excellent; first-rate  
 
• MONTANIC
adj. 1799 obs. rare – pertaining to mountains; consisting of mountains
 
• MONTE-MAN
n. 1900s Aust. sl. – a confidence trickster  
 
• MONTEZUMA GOLD
n. 1970s US drug culture sl. – good-quality marijuana from Mexico  
 
• MONTEZUMAS
n. 20C rhyming sl. – bloomers  
 
• MONTEZUMA’S REVENGE
n. 1962 sl. – diarrhoea; originated by tourists in Mexico afflicted with diarrhoea  
 
• MONTH HAND
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – a temporary farm worker hired by the month  
 
• MONTHLIES
n. L19 Brit. & US colloq. – the menses  
 
• MONTHLY
n. L19 sl. –the menstrual period  
 
• MONTHLY BILL
n. 20C US sl. – menstruation  
 
• MONTHLY DUES
n. 20C US sl. – menstruation
 
• MONTHLY FLOWERS
n. 19C euphemism – the menses  
 
• MONTHLY HAND
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – a temporary farm worker hired by the month  
 
• MONTHLY PAIN
n. 20C US sl. – menstruation  
 
• MONTHLY RAG
n. 20C US colloq. – a menstrual cloth  
 
• MONTHLY TERMS
n. E17 – the menses  
 
• MONTH OF SUNDAYS
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a long time  
 
• MONTHS
n. 1694 – menstrual discharge  
 
• MONTICOLINE
adj. 1890 rare – inhabiting mountains  
 
• MONTICULOUS
adj. 1656 rare – having little hills; dwelling in hills or mounts
 
• MONTIVAGANT
adj. 1656 obs. rare – wandering on the mountains
 
• MONTIVAGOUS
adj. 1658 obs. – wandering up and down the hills and mountains


Back to INDEX M

Back to DICTIONARY