Dictionary: MUD – MUL


MUD
n. 1. 1703 Brit. colloq. – a fool; an oaf; a stupid person  
n. 2. 1875 US sl. – coffee  
n. 3. 1915 sl. – unprocessed opium; opium; heroin  
n. 4. 1920s drug culture sl. – opium, esp. second-rate  
n. 5. 1930s US sl. – cheap plaster figurines  
n. 6. 1950s drug culture sl. – methadone  
n. 7. 1970s drug culture sl. – the residue of heroin or morphine processing  
n. 8. 1980s drug culture sl. –  heroin  
n. 9. 1981 US sl. – in circus and carnival usage: any cheap merchandise used as a prize  
n. 10. 1993 Aust. sl. – excrement  
n. 11. 1993 US sl. – a billiard ball  
n. 12. M20 drug culture sl. – morphine  
n. 13. 2000 US sl. – chemical fire retardant dropped from the air  
vb. 1978 US sl. – of a racehorse: to run well on muddy track conditions  

MUD AND BLOOD
n. 20C sl. – a drink of ‘mild and bitter’  

MUD AND OOZE
n. 20C Aust. rhyming sl. for ‘booze’ – alcohol  

MUD BABY
n. 2003 US sl. – faeces  

MUDBALL
n. 1. 1846 – an insult, slur, jibe
n. 2. 1974 – the earth
n. 3. 1976 US sl. – a doughnut or other pastry eaten with coffee

MUD-BATH
n. 1856 – a muddy place or event

MUD BUD
n. 1980s drug culture sl. – home-grown marijuana  

MUD BUG
n. 1955 Amer. dial. – a crayfish

MUD BUTT
n. 2004 US sl. – diarrhoea  

MUD-CART
n. 1840 US obs. – a dilapidated railway wagon, stagecoach, etc.

MUDCAT
n. 1. 1872 US sl. – a Mississippian  
n. 2. M19 US sl. – a stupid or contemptible person  

MUD CHECK
n. 2000s US prison sl. – a forced confrontation to see how brave a new inmate may be  

MUD CRUNCHER
n. World War I Amer. sl. – an infantryman

MUD-CRUSHER
n. 1. 1864 US Army sl. – an infantryman
n. 2. 1970s African-American sl. – an extreme form of bully whose aim is to crush everyone into the ground  

MUDDAFUKKA
n. 1995 US sl. – a motherfucker; a person; a despised person; a difficult thing or situation  

MUD-DAUBER
n. 1866 US derogatory – a manual worker or labourer

MUDDEN
adj. 1862 rare – made of mud

MUDDER
n. 1. 1892 sl., orig. & chiefly US – a racehorse which runs well on a wet or muddy course  
n. 2. 1912 US sl. – any athlete who performs well in rainy conditions  

MUDDIFY
vb. 1647 – to make unclear; to muddle, to confuse

MUDDING
n. 1892 humorous usage, obs. – modelling, sculpture

MUDDING-FACE
n. L19 sl. – a fool; a weakling  

MUDDLE
n. 1910s sl. – a state of slight drunkenness  
vb. 1. 19C Brit. sl., orig. Sc. – to copulate  
vb. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to intoxicate; to make dead drunk  

MUDDLE-BRAINED
adj. 1808 – confused, foolish, simple  

MUDDLED
adj. 1. L17 colloq. – drunk
adj. 2. 1717 obs. – of wine: thick
adj. 3. 1790 – confused in mind, befuddled; disorganized, disordered
adj. 4. 1828 – of colour: not clear, clouded

MUDDLED-UP
adj. L17 colloq. – drunk

MUDDLEFUG
n. 1960s African-American sl., derogatory – a supreme insult; a contemptible or despicable person

MUDDLEFUGGING
adj. 1961 US euphemism – an intensifier; used for ‘motherfucking’  

MUDDLE-HEAD
n. 1833 – a fool; a simpleton; a stupid person; an oaf; a disorganized or confused person   

MUDDLE-HEADED
adj. 1760 – confused, bewildered, muddled, foolish, simple  

MUDDLE-PATE
n. 1798 colloq. – a disorganized or confused person

MUDDLE-PATED
adj. 1823 colloq. – confused or disorganized in one’s mind, resulting from muddled thinking, illogical

MUDDLER-THROUGH
n. 1907 – a person who conducts affairs without system or foresight

MUDDLINESS
n. 1891 rare – a being in a muddle; confusion, disorder

MUDDLY
adj. 1829 – confused, muddled; confusing, bewildering

MUDDY
adj. 1. 1571 – bewildered; confused; muddled
adj. 2. 1592 – gloomy; sullen; glowering: said of a person, look, etc.
adj. 3. 1600 – sinful; morally impure or corrupt; of questionable morality
adj. 4. 1611 – obscure, vague; confused; illogical; said of writing, speech, etc.
adj. 5. 1776 obs. – partly intoxicated; tipsy
adj. 6. 1841 obs. – of the voice: thick, indistinct, esp. as a result of drinking alcohol
adj. 7. 1950 – of sound: blurred, not clearly defined

THE MUDDY
n. 1825 US colloq. – the Missouri River

MUDDY-BRAINED
adj. 1634 – stupid, dull-witted; confused in mind

MUDDY FEET
n. 1963 US sl. – said of someone who needs to urinate  

MUDDY FUCK
n. 1979 US sl. – anal sex that brings forth faeces or faecal stains on the penis

MUDDY TRENCH
n. 1992 Brit. rhyming sl. – the French  

MUDDY WATER
n. 1981 Brit. sl. – coffee  

MUDDY YORK
n. 2002 Can. sl. – York, a suburb of Toronto  

MUD-FAT
adj. a1908 Ireland – very fat

MUD FENCE
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – an unattractive person  

MUD FLAPS
n. 2003 US sl. – the condition that exists when a tight-fitting pair of trousers, shorts, bathing suit or other garment forms a wedge between a woman’s labia, accentuating their shape

THE MUD FLIES
phr. 1871 – a fight is taking place; disparaging or malicious allegations are made; antagonism is rife

MUDGE
n. 1. 1808 Sc. – a movement
n. 2. 1848 Eng. dial. – mud, sludge
n. 3. 2002 Brit. sl. – a hat  
vb. 1790 Eng. & Amer. dial. – to move from one’s place; to budge; to move slowly

MUDGER
n. E19 Brit. sl. – a coward; a milksop

MUD-GRAPPLER
n. 1844 sl., obs. – a fist. esp. one’s fist

MUDGUARD
n. 1989 Aust. sl. – a person whose outward geniality masks a vicious nature

MUD-HEAD
n. 1. 1838 US colloq., derogatory – a native of Tennessee
n. 2. 1882 sl., derogatory – an oaf; a fool; a stupid person
n. 3. 1991 US sl. – (usually as ‘mudhead’) a fanatic enthusiast for multi-user dungeon computer play  

MUD-HEADED
adj. 1793 – stupid, foolish

MUD HOG
n. 1. 1918 US Military sl., rare – a field artilleryman
n. 2. 1992 Trinidad and Tobago sl. – football played in rainy, muddy conditions

MUD HOLE
n. 1. 1784 – a despised place; a place of filth and squalor
n. 2. 1733 – something that impedes progress or entraps a person
n. 3. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a small town  

MUD-HOLE TOWN
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a small town

MUD-HONEY
n. 1855 rare – worldly or material pleasures

MUD-HOOK
n. 1. 1827 US nautical sl. – an anchor  
n. 2. 1850 sl. – the hand 
n. 3. 1968 Can. sl. – a finger; usually used in the plural  

MUD-HOOKS
n. 1850 sl. – the feet  

MUD HOP
n. 1929 US sl. – a clerk in a railway yard  

MUD KICKER
n. 1. 1934 US sl. – a woman who entices a man with the promise of sexual intercourse, but who robs him instead
n. 2. 1940 US sl. – a prostitute who seeks business on the streets, a streetwalker

MUDLARK
n. 1. 1785 sl. – a pig  
n. 2. 1796 Brit. – a person of any age who made a living by gathering bits of coal, wood, rope, and nails from the mudflats of the River Thames (London) at low tide  
n. 3. 1814 colloq. – an urchin of very low character  
n. 4. 1829 – a dirty or untidy person
n. 5. 1909 sl. – a racehorse which runs well on a wet or muddy course  

MUDLY
adj. a1500 obs. – muddy

MUD PIKE
n. 1851 Amer. dial. – a dirt track; an unpaved road

MUD-PIPES
n. 1848 – gumboots; thick boots for use in muddy conditions

MUD PUP
n. 1955 Can. sl. – a young Englishman sent to western Canada to learn farming; a student of agriculture

MUD-SCATTER
n. 1919 poetic usage – a splash of mud

MUD SCOW
n. 1866 US sl. – a stagecoach  

MUD SCOWS
n. 1. 1860 Amer. sl. – large feet  
n. 2. 1863 Amer. sl. – large, cheap, or clumsy shoes  

MUD SHOW
n. 1909 sl. – an exhibition, carnival, performance, etc. held in the open air

MUDSILL
n. 1858 US – a person of the lowest possible social class

MUD-SLINGING
n. 1858 – the exchange of insults or abuse; the use of criticisms and accusations, esp. unjust ones, to damage the reputation of an opponent

MUD-SLOGGER
n. 1936 US Military sl. – an infantry soldier

MUD STUDENT
n. 1845 colloq. – a student of agriculture

MUDVILLE
n. 1929 N. Amer. – the world of baseball, usually with reference to a particular team and the disappointment or happiness felt after a loss or victory

MUDWORM
n. 1. 1700 obs. – an eel
n. 2. 1814 – a contemptible person
n. 3. 1949 Amer. dial. – an earthworm

MUFF
n. 1. 1682 cant – an oaf, a fool, a stupid person  
n. 2. 1699 sl. – female genitals
n. 3. 1914 sl., orig. US – a woman, usually with an implication of promiscuity
n. 4. 1914 sl., orig. US – a prostitute
n. 5. Bk1913-17 Amer. baseball sl. – an awkward fellow  
n. 6. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – an error; a mistake; a blunder  
n. 7. Bk1942 Amer. theatrical sl. – a false beard  

MUFF-DIVER
n. 1935 sl. – a cunnilinguist

MUFF-DIVING
adj. 1930s sl. – despicable, contemptible  
n. 1930s sl. – performing an act of cunnilingus

MUFFED
adj. c1860 Brit. colloq. – bungled; clumsily spoilt, missed  

MUFFER
n. 1960s US sl. – a lesbian, a woman who performs cunnilingus  

MUFFIN
n. 1. 1830 Brit. sl. – a fool  
n. 2. 1856 Can. sl. obs. – one’s ‘girl’, by arrangement, for the social life of a season; a female companion who accompanies a bachelor on his round of social amusements
n. 3. 1895 Brit. colloq. – at games: a constant misser of a shot or ball  
n. 4. M19 sl. – an incompetent person, one who is awkward  
n. 5. M19 US sl. – a male chaperon  
n. 6. B1923 Brit. sl. – a man that chaperons or acts as companion to women  
n. 7. 1940s US homosexual sl. – an anal virgin  
n. 8. Bk1942 Amer. college sl. – an attractive girl  
n. 9. 1950s US sl. – a girl, a sweetheart  
n. 10. 1960s US homosexual sl. – an attractive youth  
n. 11. 1960s sl. – the vagina  
n. 12. 1970s US college sl. – an admirable person  

MUFFIN-BAKER
n. 1859 Cockney rhyming sl. for ‘quaker’ – excrement long retained  

MUFFIN-COUNTENANCE
n. 1. 1777 Brit. sl. – an expressionless face  
n. 2. 1823 Brit. sl. – a hairless face  

MUFFIN-FACE
n. 1. 1777 Brit. sl. – an expressionless face  
n. 2. M18 sl. – a foolish or childish face  
n. 3. 1823 Brit. sl. – a hairless face  

MUFFIN-FACED
adj. 1. M18 sl. – having a foolish or expressionless face  
adj. 2. M18 sl. – having a fat face, or a face with protruding muscles

MUFFIN-FIGHT
n. c1885 Brit. sl. – a tea-party  

MUFFIN-HEAD
n. 1892 – a fool, an idiot

MUFFIN-PUNCHER
n. 1909 Cockney sl. – excrement long retained  

MUFFIN-TOP
n. 2003 sl. – a roll of flesh which hangs visibly over a person’s tight-fitting waistband, esp. a woman’s

MUFFIN-WORRY
n. c1860 Brit. sl. – a tea-party  

MUFFISH
adj. 1843 colloq. – characteristic of an incompetent person; foolish; ineffectual; also, old-fashioned

MUFFISM
n. 1854 colloq., obs. – action that is characteristic of an incompetent person; foolishness

MUFFLE-GREENS
n. B1900 Eng. dial. – Brussels sprouts  

MUFFLER
n. World War I Amer. sl. – a gas mask

MUFF-NOSHING
n. 1930s sl. – performing an act of cunnilingus  

MUFFY
n. 1. 1980s US college sl. – a young woman who has the look of a typical sorority member, with bleached blonde hair, an alice band, heavy make-up, and conventional clothes  
n. 2. 1990s UK juvenile sl. – a breaking wind  
n. 3. 20C Aust. sl. – a frill-necked lizard  

MUFTI
n. 19C, orig. military usage – ordinary clothes worn by someone who usually wears a uniform to work  

MUFUGLY
adj. 1980s US college sl. – extremely ugly  

MUG
n. 1. 1682 sl. – a fool; a soft-head
n. 2. 1708 sl. – the face  
n. 3. 1859 Brit. sl. – a gullible person  
n. 4. 1890 US sl. – a violent person; a thug; a ruffian  
n. 5. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a chamber pot  
vb. 1. 1830 Brit. sl. – to buy a drink for someone  
vb. 2. 1864 sl. – to attack and rob someone  

MUG BOOK
n. 1958 sl. – a book kept by the police containing photographs of criminals 

MUG COPMUG COPPER
n. 1930s Aust. sl. – a policeman

MUG-FAKER
n. Bk1891 theatrical sl. – an actor  

MUGGARD
adj. 1746 Eng. dial. obs. – sullen, sulky, morose; displeased, discontented

MUGGEN
adj. 1688 Eng. dial. – made of earthenware, as opposed to china, metal, etc.

MUGGER
n. 1. 1743 Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – an itinerant dealer or tinker specializing in earthenware
n. 2. 1821 Brit. boxing sl. – a blow to the mouth or face
n. 3. US Civil War usage – a prisoner who preyed on fellow prisoners
n. 4. 1865 sl. – someone who commits robbery with violence in a public place  
n. 5. 1883 school sl. – a diligent student
n. 6. Bk1891 theatrical sl. – an actor who makes free play with his face
n. 7. 1945 sl. – a man, a fellow
vb. 1951 sl. – to curse, to damn

MUGGER OFF
vb. 1962 sl. – to go away

MUGGER UP
vb. 2000 sl. – to damage, to ruin

MUGGIE
n. 1920s US drug culture sl. – marijuana

MUGGILL
n. 1610 sl., obs. – a beadle

MUGGINS
n. 1. 1682 sl. – a fool; a soft-head; a simpleton
n. 2. 1896 humorous usage, obs. – a local leader
n. 3. 1973 sl. – a gullible person; used to refer self-deprecatingly to oneself as someone easily fooled or imposed on  

MUGGISH
adj. 1655 obs. – damp, musty

MUGGLE
n. 1. 1608 obs. – a young woman; a sweetheart
n. 2. 1926 sl., orig. US – marijuana; a marijuana cigarette
n. 3. 1997 – a person who possesses no magical power; a person who lacks a particular skill, or who is regarded as inferior in some way

MUGGLED UP
adj. 1940s US drug culture sl. – under the influence of marijuana

MUGGLEHEAD
n. 1926 US drug culture sl. – a marijuana user  

MUGGLER
n. 1. E19 Irish sl. – a drink of beer
n. 2. 1935 sl., orig. US – a marijuana cigarette
n. 2. 1938 sl. – a marijuana addict  

MUGGLES
n. 1. M18 sl. – restlessness
n. 2. 1926 sl., orig. US – marijuana; a marijuana cigarette 

MUGGLE-SMOKER
n. 1920s US drug culture sl. – a marijuana smoker

MUGGLING
n. c1275 obs. – a person with a tail resembling that of a fish

MUGGSY
n. 1930s US sl., derogatory – a term of address to a stupid person

MUGGY
adj. 1. 1638 – extremely humid
adj. 2. 1731 – moist, damp, wet; musty, mouldy
adj. 3. 1822 colloq. – drunk; tipsy
adj. 4. 1824 colloq., chiefly US – vague, dulled, confused; bleary, groggy; said of a person, feeling, etc.
adj. 5. L19 UK sl. – stupid, foolish, in the manner of a mug  
adj. 6. 1970s drug culture sl. – causing unpleasant feelings of sweatiness and stupor

MUGGY-CUNT
n. 2000 UK sl. – a fool  

MUGHOUSE
n. 1. 1685 – an alehouse, a tavern
n. 2. 1841 Eng. dial., obs. – a pottery

MUG-HUNTER
n. 1887 sl. – a person who tours the streets late at night in search of drunken men who can be robbed

MUGIENT
adj. 1646 obs. – bellowing, lowing

MUG JOHN
n. 1930s Aust. sl. – a policeman

MUG JOINT
n. 1931 US sl. – in circus and carnival usage: a concession where customers are photographed  

MUG LAIR
n. 1944 Aust. sl. – a showy but foolish person  

MUGLARD
n. c1440 obs. rare – a miser

MUGLET
n. L19 sl. – a young victim of a confidence trick

MUG MONEY
n. 1989 Aust. sl. – in horse racing: money bet by uninformed bettors  

MUG OF MURK
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a cup of coffee  

MUG PUNTER
n. 1943 Aust. sl. – a gambler, viewed as inherently stupid  
MUG’S GAME
n. 1900 UK sl. – a thankless activity; a useless, foolish, or unprofitable activity

MUG SHOT
n. 1. 1950 sl., orig. US – a police photograph of a criminal  n. 2. 1978 UK sl. – a photographic portrait  

MUGSNAPPER
n. 1981 US sl. – in circus and carnival usage: a travelling photographer  

MUGSNATCHER
n. 1979 UK sl. – a photographer who operates in the street, at a fairground, or at the seaside  

MUGSTER
n. 1888 school sl., obs. – a diligent or hard-working student

MUG’S TICKER
n. 1977 UK sl. – a counterfeit Swiss watch  

MUG-UP
n. 1902 sl., chiefly Can. & nautical usage – a snack; a meal, a drink  
(verbs as ‘mug up’)
vb. 1. 1848 UK sl. – to learn a subject by concentrated study; to study hard  
vb. 2. 1897 sl., chiefly Can. & nautical usage – to eat a large meal; to snack; to have a hot drink  
vb. 3. 1947 US sl. – to flirt, to kiss  

MUG UP ON
vb. 1848 UK sl. – to learn a subject by concentrated study; to study hard  

MUGWUMP
n. 1. 1828 chiefly N. Amer. – an important person; a leader; a boss
n. 2. 1884 chiefly N. Amer. – a person who remains aloof from party politics, professing political disinterest
n. 3. 1887 chiefly N. Amer. – a person who remains neutral or non-committal; an aloof, independent, or self-important person
vb. 1889 US – to remain aloof or independent, esp. politically

MUGWUMPISH
adj. 1. 1883 chiefly N. Amer. – professing (political) disinterestedness
adj. 2. 1923 chiefly N. Amer. – pompous, snobbish

MULAT
n. 1678 obs. – a woman with one Black and one White parent

MULATTA
n. 1622 now offensive – a woman with one Black and one White parent

MULATTRESS
n. 1805 – a woman with one Black and one White parent

MULCIBLE
adj. 1656 obs. – which may be appeased

MULCIFY
vb. 1653 obs. – to allay, to soothe

MULE
n. 1. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – an obstinate person
n. 2. 1935 sl., orig. US – someone employed as a courier to smuggle illegal drugs into a country and often to pass them on to a buyer

MULE LIGHTNING
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – whisky; cheap liquor  

MULE-MOUTH
n. 1970s African-American sl. – one who works regularly as a police informer  

MULENYAM
n. 1960s US Italian’s usage – a Black person  

MULE SHIT!
int. 1920s US – a mild oath, used to express surprise or disbelief  

MULE-SKINNER
n. 1. L19 US sl. – a mule-driver  
n. 2. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – a cruel teamster
n. 3. 1980s drug culture sl. – one who organizes, pays, and supervises a drug courier or ‘mule’  

MULET
n. c1330 obs. – a mule, esp. a young or small one

MULETTO
n. 1656 obs. – a mule, esp. a small one

MULE-WHACKER
n. L19 US sl. – a mule-driver  

MULEY
adj. 1871 – mulish, stubborn; also, sulky
n. 1570 – a hornless cow; any cow

MULFERED AND FALDERED
adj. 1884 Eng. dial. – overcome with fatigue, worn out, exhausted  

MULGA
n. 1. 1899 Aust. sl. – the bush telegraph; misleading information, rumour  
n. 2. L19 Aust. – an uninhabited, sparsely populated or inhospitable region  
n. 3. L19 Aust. – a rumour, a lie

MULGA BILL
n. L19 Aust. – a bushman  

MULGA MADNESS
n. 1905 Aust. sl. – temporary eccentricity or insanity due to living alone in the outback

MULGA WIRE
n. 1. 1899 Aust. – a ‘bush telegraph’, the ‘grapevine’  
n. 2. 1899 Aust. – a rumour, a lie

MULIEBRAL
adj. 1651 – relating to women or womanhood

MULIEBRIOUS
adj. 1652 – effeminate; feminine

MULIEBRIOUSNESS
n. 1652 obs. – effeminacy

MULIEBRITY
n. 1592 chiefly literary usage – the characteristics of a woman; womanhood, womanliness

MULIER
adj. c1400 – born in wedlock, legitimate
n. c1400 – a legitimate child; a child born in wedlock

MULIERAST
n. 1894 humorous usage – a heterosexual man

MULIEROSE
adj. 1721 literary usage, rare – excessively lustful or libidinous towards women

MULIEROSITY
n. 1623 obs. – excessive lustfulness for women; addiction to women  

MULIEROUS
adj. 1650 obs. – fond of women; excessively lustful or libidinous towards women

MULIERY
adj. c1475 obs. – born in wedlock
adv. 1530 obs. – in wedlock
n. c1400 obs. – legitimate offspring collectively

MULING
n. 1965 colloq. – the use of a courier to smuggle drugs

MULION
n. a1500 obs. – a keeper of mules

MULISH
adj. 1600 – sulky, stubborn, intractable; resembling a mule

MULISM
n. 1798 obs. – a piece of obstinacy; a mulish characteristic

MULL
vb. 1862 Brit. colloq., orig. & chiefly athletics usage – to spoil, to muddle  

MULLA
n. 1930s sl., orig. US – money  

MULLARKEY
n. 1929 sl., orig. US – insincere or exaggerated talk intended to flatter or deceive; humbug or flattery; nonsense  

MULL BOWL
n. 1995 Aust. sl. – a bowl used to mull marijuana  

MULLER
n. 1. 1939 Brit. sl. – a German  
n. 2. 1979 Brit. sl. – a murderer  
n. 3. 2003 Brit. teen sl. – an ugly or unattractive person  
vb. 1. 1990 Brit. sl. – to ruin, to wreck, to destroy
vb. 2. 1997 Brit. sl. – to roundly beat the opposition in a physical fight  

MULLERED
adj. 1. 1993 Brit. sl. – drunk; drug intoxicated
adj. 2. 2000 Brit. sl. – dead 

MULLERING
n. 1997 Brit. sl. – a beating  

MULLET
n. 1. 1955 US sl. – a gullible person  
n. 2. 1959 US sl. – a socially inept outcast  
n. 3. 1997 US sl. –a hairstyle; the hair is worn short at the front and long at the back; it was fashionable in the 1980s and much derided by the fashion-conscious generations that followed  

MULLET-HEAD
n. 1857 US colloq. – a fool, a stupid person; a slow-witted person  

MULLET-HEADED
adj. 1857 US colloq. – foolish, slow-witted, unintelligent, stupid

MULL HEAD
n. 1996 Aust. sl. – a habitual smoker of marijuana  

MULLIER
n. 20C Brit. market-traders’ sl. – a murderer  

MULLIGAN
n. 1. 1904 US – a stew made without a recipe, relying on ingredients that are left over from previous meals
n. 2. 1939 US sl. – a prison guard; used derisively by prisoners  

MULLIGAN BATTERY
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – an army cook wagon  

MULLIGAN MIXER
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a cook

MULLIGANS
n. 20C Aust. sl. – playing cards  

MULLIGAN STEW
n. 1904 US – a stew made without a recipe, relying on ingredients that are left over from previous meals

MULLIGA STEW
n. c1925 Aust. tramps’ sl. – a soupy sort of stew  

MULLIGATAWNY
adj. 1998 Brit. rhyming sl. for ‘horny’ – desiring sex  

MULLIGRUBBER
n. 20C Brit. sl. – in cricket: a low-keeping bowled ball  

MULLIGRUBS
n. 1. 1599 – depression of spirits; a fit of the blues; peevishness, sullenness; the sulks; ill temper
n. 2. a1625 – a pain in the stomach; a stomach-ache; diarrhoea
n. 3. 1633 – a sulky or ill-tempered person

MULLION
n. 1959 US sl. – an ugly person  

MULLIPUFF
n. E17 sl. – a weakling; also, a term of contempt  

MULLOCK
n. 1. c1390 – rubbish, refuse matter  
n. 2. 1866 – worthless information; nonsense
n. 3. 1890 derogatory – a worthless or foolish person
vb. 1. 1854 Eng. dial. – to idle, to loiter or trail around aimlessly
vb. 2. 1861 Eng. dial. – to make a thing dirty
vb. 3. 1893 Aust. – to work shoddily

MULLOCKER
n. 1856 Aust. & NZ – a manual labourer; a careless or inept labourer

MULLOCKY
adj. 1839 Eng. dial. – dirty, untidy; rotten

MULLY
adj. 1570 obs. – dusty, powdery
n. 1548 obs. – a term of endearment to a woman; darling, sweetheart

MULLY-GRUB-GURGEON
n. 1746 Eng. dial. obs. – a term of abuse

MULLYPUFF
n. 1629 obs. – a despised person; a weakling; also, a term of contempt  

MULOMEDIC
adj. 1678 obs. – relating to the care of mules
n. 1678 obs. – a person who has the care of mules

MULSED
adj. 1547 obs. – mingled with honey

MULTEITY
n. 1814 – a being multiple, or of consisting of many parts

MULTEOUS
adj. 1589 obs. – numerous

MULTIBIBE
n. 1727 obs. – a great drinker; one that drinks much

MULTICAVOUS
adj. 1721 obs. – having many holes

MULTIFARY
adj. c1460 obs. – of many or diverse kinds
adv. a1450-1500 adv. obs. – in various or many ways

MULTIFEROUS
adj. 1860 – having great variety or diversity

MULTIFLUVIAN
adj. 1807 poetic usage, obs. – entered by many rivers

MULTIGENEROUS
adj. 1721 – of many or diverse kinds

MULTIGRAVIDA
n. 1890 – orig., a woman who has been pregnant more than once, or many times; later, a pregnant woman who has had at least one or two previous pregnancies

MULTI-LOQUACIOUS
adj. 1819 obs. – highly talkative or loquacious

MULTILOQUENCE
n. 1760 – excessive talkativeness or loquaciousness

MULTILOQUENT
adj. 1656 rare – highly talkative or loquacious

MULTILOQUIOUS
adj. 1640 obs. – speaking much, very talkative, loquacious

MULTILOQUIOUSNESS
n. 1727 obs. – excessive talkativeness or loquaciousness

MULTILOQUOUS
adj. 1591 – speaking much, very talkative, loquacious

MULTILOQUY
n. 1542 obs. – talkativeness, loquaciousness

MULTIMODOUS
adj. 1727 obs. – of various or diverse kinds

MULTINOMINAL
adj. 1656 – having several or many names

MULTINOMINOUS
adj. a1631 obs. – having several or many names

MULTIP
n. 1948 colloq. – a woman who produces several offspring at one time

MULTIPARA
n. 1855 – a woman who produces several offspring at one time

MULTIPLET
n. 1856 – a set of more than three or four similar things

MULTIPLICIOUS
adj. 1617 – having many parts or aspects; manifold

MULTIPLIE
n. 1488 Sc. obs. – a multitude; great numbers or quantity

MULTIPLYING EYE
n. 1655 – an eye that sees double or confusedly, esp. because of intoxication

MULTIPLYING-GLASS
n. 1628 – a magnifying glass

MULTIPLY SILENCE
vb. a1475 obs. – to be silent

MULTIPOTENT
adj. 1609 – very powerful

MULTISCIENCE
n. 1816 rare – knowledge of many things

MULTISCIENT
adj. 1861 rare – having knowledge of many things

MULTISCIOUS
adj. 1656 obs. – having much or varied knowledge; knowing much  

MULTISONANT
adj. 1656 poetic usage – producing many sounds; also, making much noise

MULTISONOUS
adj. 1834 poetic usage – producing many sounds

MULTITUDINARIOUS
adj. 1810 obs. – consisting of a multitude

MULTITUDINARY
adj. 1838 rare – consisting of a multitude

MULTITUDINE
n. 1547 obs. – numerousness; a multitude, a crowd

MULTITUDINOSITY
n. 1840 rare – numerousness, multiplicity

MULTITUDINOUS
adj. 1. 1603 – consisting of a multitude or large number of individuals
adj. 2. a1631 – very numerous; existing in multitudes or great numbers

MULTIVAGANT
adj. 1656 obs. – wandering continually or in many directions
n. 1895 obs. – a person who wanders about continually or in many directions

MULTIVAGOUS
adj. 1727 obs. – wandering continually or in many directions

MULTIVERSITY
n. 1926 chiefly US – a very large university having many different departments and activities, esp. one having several campuses

MULTIVIOUS
adj. 1656 – having many ways or roads; going or leading in many directions; manifold 

MULTIVOLENT
adj. 1656 obs. – having many different desires, wishes, etc.; changeable, fickle, vacillating

MULTUOUS
adj. 1586 obs. – numerous


Back to INDEX M

Back to DICTIONARY


Updated: September 22, 2022