Dictionary: MUM – MUS


• MUM
adj. 1521 – saying nothing, silent  
int. a1500 obs. – hush! be quiet!
n. 1. 1555 colloq., obs. – refusal to speak, silence
n. 2. 1595 – mother  
n. 3. 1666 obs. rare – a silent person
n. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a secret  
vb. 1. c1390 – to utter a faint sound; to speak softly or indistinctly; to whisper; to mutter, to mumble
vb. 2. 1440 – to keep silent
vb. 3. a1456 – to act in a mime or dumb-show; to perform as a mummer
vb. 4. c1475 – to render mute; to silence

• MUMBLE
vb. 1. a1350 rare – to eat slowly and ineffectually; to chew tentatively with or as with toothless gums
vb. 2. 1588 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to handle roughly or clumsily; to maul; to mix up in confusion, to jumble
vb. 3. 1668 rare – to fondle eagerly with the lips, as if devouring

• MUMBLECRUST
n. a1556 obs. – a person who lacks teeth; a beggar

• MUMBLED
adj. 1. 1839 rare – lightly or partially chewed
adj. 2. 1879 – cooked to a very soft consistency

• MUMBLE-JUMBLE
vb. 1834 rare – to utter indistinctly and incoherently; to babble

• MUMBLE-MATINS
n. 1560 obs. rare – a Roman Catholic priest

• MUMBLEMENT
n. 1595 rare – a mumbling; a mumbled or muttered utterance

• MUMBLE-NEWS
n. 1598 obs. rare – a talebearer

• MUMBLING WORD
n. 1913 orig. & chiefly African-American – a single word, any word at all; used in negative contexts

• MUMBLY
adj. 1. 1847 rare, orig. Eng. dial. – having a soft, sticky, or crumbly consistency
adj. 2. 1849 – inclined to mumble

• MUMBO
n. 1931 rare – obscure or meaningless language or ritual; jargon intended to impress or mystify; nonsense
 
• MUMBO JUMBO
n. 1. 1738 colloq. – obscure or meaningless language or ritual; jargon intended to impress or mystify; nonsense
n. 2. 1773 obs. – an object of superstitious awe or blind veneration

• MUM-BUDGET
adj. 1622 obs. – silent, mute

• MUMCHANCE
adj. 1681 – silent, mute; tongue-tied
vb. 1. 1606 obs. rare – to masquerade
vb. 2. 1821 Eng. dial. – to keep silent, to remain sullenly silent
n. 1. 1579 Eng. dial. rare – a chance, a hazardous venture
n. 2. 1581 Sc. obs. – masquerade; a mumming
n. 3. 1694 Eng. dial. – a person who acts in a mime or dumb-show; hence, a person who has nothing to say

• MUMCHANCENESS
n. 1910 rare – silence; reticence

• MUMCHANCINESS
n. 1920 rare – silence; reticence
 
• MUMMER
n. 1. 1440 obs. exc. Sc. – a person who mutters or murmurs
n. 2. a1456 – a person who acts in a mummers’ play or in a mime
n. 3. 1773 theatrical sl. – an actor, esp. a bad one
n. 4. L18 sl. – the mouth  
vb. 1763 rare – to murmur; to complain in low muttered tones; to grumble

• MUMMERDOM
n. 1893 – the theatrical world

• MUMMERING
n. 1884 chiefly Can. – a disguising oneself, esp. for festivities; esp. participation in a mummers’ play

• MUMMERY
n. 1. 1465 hist. – a disguising oneself, esp. for festivities; esp. participation in a mummers’ play
n. 2. 1549 depreciative usage – ridiculous ceremony; extravagant costume or other paraphernalia associated with or worthy of such ceremony
 
• MUMMERY AND MILLINERY
n. 20C sl. – religious ritualism  
 
• MUMMERY-COVE
n. Bk1891 theatrical sl. – an actor

• MUMMIANIZE
vb. 1613 obs. rare – to embalm as a mummy; to mummify
 
• MUMMICK
n. 1816 Eng. dial. – a fragment, a scrap; a broken piece, esp. of food; a slice  
vb. 1. 1895 Amer. dial. – to soil, as one’s clothing  
vb. 2. 1899 Amer. dial. – to cut awkwardly; to mess or make a mess of   
vb. 3. L19 US sl. – to handle or feel an object or person  
vb. 4. 1966 Amer. dial. – to harass, to tease, to impose on, to annoy, to torment  

• MUMMING
n. 1. 1417 hist. – a disguising oneself, esp. for festivities; esp. participation in a mummers’ play
n. 2. 1440 obs. – inarticulate murmuring; indistinct speech
n. 3. 1528 depreciative usage, obs. – ridiculous or elaborate ceremony; play-acting, pretense, meaningless show
 
• MUMMOCK
n. 1. 1825 Eng. dial. – a scarecrow; an untidily or absurdly dressed person  
n. 2. 1875 Eng. dial. – an untidy heap or mess; a litter; a confused, shapeless mass; a dirty mixture; confusion, muddle  
n. 3. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – a poor eater; one who is dainty in eating  
vb. 1. 1853 Eng. dial. – to break or cut into pieces; to crumble; to tear; to mangle; to carve awkwardly  
vb. 2. 1899 Eng. dial. – to disarrange, to tumble, to throw into confusion; to pull about, to mess, to make dirty; to worry  
vb. 3. 1950 Amer. dial. – to harass, to browbeat  
vb. 4. 1950 Amer. dial. – to make a mess of, to spoil, to confuse
 
• MUMMOX
vb. 1942 Amer. dial. – to botch, to mess up  

• MUM-MUMBLE
vb. 1917 rare – to utter in subdued or indistinct tones
 
• MUMMY
n. 1. a1616 obs. – the flesh of a carcass; dead flesh
n. 2. 1666 obs. rare – dried or desiccated meat
n. 3. 1768 colloq. – mother  
n. 4. 1900s US sl. – an incompetent person
n. 5. 1903 stock market sl., rare – an Egyptian stock or bond
n. 6. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – an idiot
vb. 1970s African-American sl. – to beat a person to death, hence making them into an Egyptian-style mummified corpse  
 
• MUMMYDIDDLE
n. Bk1903 Eng. dial. – a stupid, silly person; a foolish person  
 
• MUMMYHEAD
n. 1990s African-American gang usage – a fool  
 
• MUMMY PUSSY
n. 1970s African-American sl. – a woman who does not respond during sexual intercourse  
 
• MUMP
n. 1. 1592 obs. – a grimace; an exaggerated facial expression
n. 2. 1777 Eng. dial. – a tree stump; a tree root; a large, gnarled piece of wood
n. 3. E18 sl. – a beggar, a scrounger  
n. 4. 1847 – a lump; a protuberance
vb. 1. 1577 chiefly Sc. – to grimace; to form the lips into a grimace or grin
vb. 2. a1586 – to utter indistinctly or inarticulately, as if with toothless gums; to mumble, to mutter
vb. 3. c1610 – to assume a demure, melancholy, or sanctimonious expression; to be silent and sullen; to sulk, to mope
vb. 4. 1649 – to cheat, to cheat out of; to deceive  
vb. 5. M17 sl. – to disappoint  
vb. 6. L18 sl. – to eat  
vb. 7. 1813 Sc. – to grumble, to complain peevishly
vb. 8. 1866 obs. rare – to beg, to visit a house in the course of one’s travels as a beggar  
vb. 9. M19 sl. – to talk seriously  
vb. 10. Bk1903 sl. – to possess carnally  
vb. 11. 1970 UK sl. – of a police officer: to accept a small gift or bribe in return for services
 
• MUMPER
n. 1. 1674 UK criminals’ sl. – a genteel beggar, a scrounger; a vagrant, a tramp  
n. 2. M17 sl. – a prostitute  
n. 3. M19 sl. – a half-breed gypsy, a ‘second-rate’ gypsy, i.e. one who has no van  
vb. 20C African-American sl. – to travel around, to partner someone on their travels  
 
• MUMPER’S BRASS
n. E18 sl. – money  

• MUMPERY
n. 1894 UK sl., rare – a begging
 
• MUMP-HOLE
n. 1983 Brit. sl. – an unofficial place of refreshment for patrolling police officers, as hospitals, cafes, shops, etc.  
 
• MUMPING
adj. 1. 1594 chiefly Sc. – grimacing or assuming a demure, sanctimonious, or melancholy expression; querulous, complaining
adj. 2. 1709 chiefly Eng. dial. – given to begging
n. 1. 1611 chiefly Sc. – a grimacing; a grumbling; a hinting by means of facial expression
n. 2. 1685 – a scrounging, soliciting favours, begging  
n. 3. 1970 Brit. sl. – the acceptance by the police of small gifts or bribes from trades people  

• MUMPISH
adj. 1721 colloq. – sullenly angry; depressed in spirits; sulky

• MUMPS
n. 1576 obs., chiefly derogatory – an old woman; also, a form of address or term of mock endearment for a woman

• THE MUMPS
n. 1599 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – a fit of melancholy or ill humour
 
• MUMPSIMUS
adj. 1680 obs. – stupidly conservative
n. 1. 1530 obs. – one who obstinately adheres to old ways, in spite of the clearest evidence that they are wrong; an ignorant or bigoted opponent of reform  
n. 2. 1575 obs. – a vague term of contempt; an old fogey
n. 3. 1545 – a traditional custom or notion obstinately adhered to however unreasonable it is shown to be; an error obstinately clung to; a prejudice
 
• MUMS
n. 1915 colloq. – mother 

• MUMSINESS
n. 1988 UK colloq. – a being motherly; unadventurous or conventional character, esp. in dress
 
• MUM’S THE WORD
phr. a1704 sl. – used as injunction not to reveal a secret; say nothing, keep quiet  
 
• MUMSY
adj. 1961 colloq. – motherly, homely, conventional
n. 1876 colloq. – mother
 
• MUN
n. 1. c1400 chiefly Sc. & Eng. dial. – the mouth
n. 2. 1889 Amer. sl. – money  

• MUNCH
n. 1819 colloq. – something to eat; a meal, a snack

• MUNCHAUSEN
n. 1. 1834 – an inventor of extravagantly untruthful pseudo-autobiographical stories of amazing adventure and prowess
n. 2. 1840 obs. – a tall story
vb. 1853 rare – to tell extravagantly untruthful pseudo-autobiographical stories; to recount a story with extravagant exaggeration
 
• MUNCHER BOY
n. 1960s US sl. – a fellator  

• MUNCHET
n. 1845 obs. – a small piece of bread
 
• MUNCHIE
n. 1. 1906 sl. – food, esp. snack food
n. 2. 1959 sl., orig. US – a snack or small meal  
n. 3. 1959 sl., orig. US – a snack eaten to assuage the craving for food that afflicts smokers of hashish or marijuana
n. 3. 2000s Irish sl., derogatory – a country person, a rustic
 
• MUNCHIED UP
adj. 1990s sl. – experiencing the pangs of hunger that accompany the smoking of cannabis, or, occasionally, heavy drinking  
 
• THE MUNCHIES
n. 1971 sl. – hunger; esp. a craving for food brought on by the lowering of blood-sugar levels that is a well-known side effect of smoking marijuana  

• MUNCHIN
n. 1657 obs. rare – a lunch; a light meal
 
• MUNCHING HOUSE
n. 1910s sl. – a cheap restaurant or café  
 
• MUNCHING THE TRUNCHEON
n. 1990s sl. – fellatio  
 
• MUNCHKIN
adj. 1930 colloq. – small, childlike; designed for children
n. 1. 1974 colloq. – a child; a small person; a dwarf; an underling; a term of endearment
n. 2. 1981 colloq. – a menial employee or inconsequential person  
 
• MUNCH-OUT
n. 1970s US college sl. – a large meal  
(verbs as ‘munch out’)
vb. 1. 1977 sl., orig. US college usage – to eat voraciously, esp. as a result of smoking cannabis  
vb. 2. 1980s US college sl. – to kiss passionately  
 
• MUNCH-PRESENT
n. M16 sl. – one who takes bribes  
 
• MUNCH THE CARPET
vb. 1981 Amer. sl. – to perform cunnilingus  
 
• MUNCHY
n. 1. 1950s sl., orig. US – a snack or small meal
n. 2. 1950s sl., orig. US – a snack eaten to assuage the craving for food that afflicts smokers of hashish or marijuana

• MUND
n. 1. a1000 obs. – a hand, a palm, esp. used as a measure of length
n. 2. a1000 hist. – protection, guardianship
n. 3. a1000 hist. – a protector, a guardian
n. 4. c1250 obs. – power, strength; force; also, excellence, value, importance, dignity

• MUNDAL
adj. 1614 obs. rare – mundane, worldly
n. 1534 obs. rare – the world, the earth

• MUNDANE
adj. 1. c1475 – belonging to the earthly world, as contrasted with heaven; worldly, earthly
adj. 2. 1850 – ordinary, commonplace; dull, humdrum; lacking interest or excitement
n. 1. 1509 obs. – a dweller in the earthly world
n. 2. 1897 obs. rare – a woman of fashion

• MUNDANITIES
n. 1506 obs. – worldly concerns or pursuits

• MUNDANITY
n. 1. 1596 – a belonging to the world; worldliness
n. 2. 1892 rare – a being in vogue; fashionableness
n. 3. 1959 – a being commonplace, trivial, or ordinary; a humdrum thing; a tedious necessity

• MUNDATION
n. 1633 obs. – a cleansing or washing something; a being cleansed
 
• MUNDATORY
adj. 1706 rare – cleansing; having power to cleanse
n. 1859 rare – a means or implement of cleansing

• MUNDIAL
adj. 1499 obs. – mundane, worldly
 
• MUNDICIDIOUS
adj. 1647 obs. rare – world-destroying; likely or able to destroy the world

• MUNDIFICATION
n. a1425 chiefly medicine usage, obs. – a cleansing an ulcer, wound, etc.; a being cleansed

• MUNDIFY
vb. 1. a1425 rare – to cleanse or purify a thing
vb. 2. 1568 obs. – to make oneself neat or smart; to spruce oneself up

• MUNDIFYING
adj. 1579 obs. – cleansing
n. a1425 obs. – a cleaning or purifying something

• MUNDITIAL
adj. 1876 obs. rare – relating to cleansing or purification
 
• MUNDIVAGANT
adj. 1656 obs. – wandering about the world, roaming through the world  

• MUNDLE
n. c1560 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – a stick or similar wooden utensil used for stirring

• MUNDOWIE
n. 1880 Aust. colloq. – a foot; a footprint

• MUNDUNG
n. 1712 obs. rare – tobacco of poor quality; bad-smelling tobacco

• MUNDUNGUS
n. 1. 1637 obs. – offal, refuse
n. 2. 1671 – tobacco of poor quality; bad-smelling tobacco

• MUNERAL
adj. 1606 obs. rare – relating to duty; official

• MUNERARY
adj. 1721 obs. rare – relating to gifts; of the nature of a gift

• MUNERATE
vb. 1595 obs. rare – to reward

• MUNERATION
n. 1611 obs. rare – a reward; a rewarding
 
• MUNG
adj. 1844 US obs. – of information, news, etc.: false, misleading; confused and contradictory
n. 1. c1175 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – a mingling, a mixture; a confusion, a mess
n. 2. a1728 Eng. & Amer. dial., rare – a crowd
n. 3. 1883 Amer. dial. – dirt, muck; anything filthy or distasteful
vb. 1969 sl., orig. US – to spoil, to ruin, to mangle
 
• MUNGA
n. 1907 Aust., NZ & services’ sl. – food; a meal
 
• MUNGAREE; MUNGARLY 
n. 1846 sl. – food  

• MUNGE
vb. 1. 1660 obs. rare – to wipe a person’s nose
vb. 2. 1660 obs. rare – to cheat someone
vb. 3. 1770 chiefly Eng. dial. – to eat greedily and noisily; to munch, to chew
vb. 4. 1790 Sc. & Eng. dial. rare – to mutter, to grumble; to mope

• MUNGED
adj. 1987 sl., orig. US – that has been spoiled, corrupted, or ruined
 
• MUNGER
n. 1907 Aust., NZ & services’ sl. – food  

• MUNGEY
n. 1907 Aust., NZ & services’ sl. – food  

• MUNGO
n. 1. 1752 – a mongoose
n. 2. 1768 hist. – a Black person, esp. a slave
n. 3. 1770 sl., obs. – a person of influence, position, or fashion
 
• MUNGY
adj. 1. 1632 obs. – dark, gloomy
adj. 2. 1658 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – moist, damp; mouldy
adj. 3. 1809 chiefly Eng. dial. – of the weather: muggy, close; also, foggy; damp
adj. 4. 1989 US colloq. – unpleasantly messy, soiled or dirty
n. 1907 Aust., NZ & services’ sl. – food  

• MUNIATE
vb. 1657 obs. rare – to fortify

• MUNICIPY
n. 1882 obs. rare – a municipality
 
• MUNIFEROUS
adj. 1656 obs. – bringing gifts

• MUNIFIC
adj. 1745 obs. rare – very generous, bountiful

• MUNIFICAL
adj. 1583 obs. – very generous, bountiful

• MUNIFICATE
vb. 1623 obs. rare – to enrich

• MUNIFICATION
n. 1653 obs. rare – protection, defense

• MUNIFICENCE
n. 1. c1425 – great generosity or liberality in giving
n. 2. 1596 obs. rare – fortification, defense

• MUNIFICENCY
n. c1550 arch. – generosity

• MUNIFICENT
adj. 1565 – characterized by abundance; very generous; bountiful

• MUNIFICENTLY
adv. 1594 – with great generosity or liberality

• MUNIFIENCE
n. 1596 obs. rare – fortification, defense

• MUNIFY
vb. 1596 obs. – to fortify; to provide with defenses

• MUNIMENT
n. 1546 obs. – something serving as a defense or protection

• MUNIMENTS
n. 1485 obs. – things with which a person or place is provided; furnishings

• MUNISH
vb. 1633 obs. rare – to fortify, to provide with means of defense

• MUNITE
adj. 1440 obs. rare – fortified, protected
vb. 1533 obs. – to fortify, to strengthen, to protect

• MUNITION
n. 1. 1480 obs. – a providing something; provision
n. 2. c1500 obs. – a fortifying or defending something; a fortification, a defensive structure
n. 3. 1962 – an item of military equipment; a weapon, esp. a missile

• MUNITION BREAD
n. 1629 rare – bread supplied to soldiers as rations

• MUNITIONEER
n. 1916 – a worker in a munitions factor; a maker or supplier of ammunition

• MUNITIONER
n. 1. 1632 – a person who supplies military stores; a supply officer
n. 2. 1888 obs. rare – a person responsible for guarding ammunition

• MUNITIONETTE
n. 1915 UK colloq. – a young female worker in a munitions factory, esp. during the First World War (1915-18)

• MUNITIONMENT
n. 1915 rare – munitions collectively

• MUNITOR
n. 1669 obs. rare – a person who works on fortifications
 
• MUNJARI
n. 1889 – food  

• MUNJON
n. 1945 Aust. sl., often derogatory – an Australian Aboriginal person who has little experience of White society and its customs
 
• MUNLEE
n. Bk1892 Chinese Pidgin – money  

• MUNPINS
n. c1475 obs. – the teeth

• MUNS
n. 1667 chiefly Sc. & Eng. dial. – the jaws, the jowls, the face

• MUNSIE
n. 1. 1724 Sc. sl., obs., derogatory – a Frenchman
n. 2. 1808 Sc. – a person who invites contempt or ridicule, esp. by being foppishly or extravagantly dressed; a person who is in a mess or sorry state
n. 3. 1819 Sc. rare – the knave of a suit in a set of playing cards
 
• MUNSTER HEIFER
n. Bk1892 Chinese Pidgin – a thick-legged and/or thick-ankled woman  
 
• MUNSTER PLUMS
n. c1850 Anglo-Irish – potatoes  
 
• MUNT
n. 1948 S. Afr. sl., derogatory & offensive – a Black person

• MUNTED
adj. 1. 1996 NZ sl. – ruined, spoiled; damaged
adj. 2. 1997 Aust. & NZ sl. – intoxicated by alcohol or drugs
adj. 3. 2001 NZ sl. – extremely tired, exhausted

• MUNTER
n. 1. 1594 Sc. obs. – a watch
n. 2. 1997 UK sl., derogatory – an unattractive person, esp. a woman

• MUNTERED
adj. 1998 UK sl. – drunk; intoxicated

• MUNTU
n. 1920 S. Afr. derogatory & offensive – a Black African
 
• MUOGH
n. 18C Irish cant – a pig  
 
• MUPPET
n. 1. 1988 UK prison sl., derogatory – a prisoner with psychiatric problems; a vulnerable inmate liable to be bullied or harassed by others
n. 2. 1989 sl. – an incompetent or ineffectual person; an idiot; an enthusiastic but inept person; a person prone to mishaps through naivety

• MUR
n. 1859 back-slang – rum  

• MURAGE
n. 1450 obs. rare – the building of walls; also, a system of defensive walls

• MURAL
n. 1. 1473 obs. – a wall
n. 2. 1684 obs. – a fruit tree grown against and fastened to a wall

• MURALLY
adv. 1872 obs. – in a regular manner, like bricks in a wall

• MURATED
adj. 1727 obs. rare – surrounded by walls

• MURAY
n. c1400 obs. rare – a fortification, a wall

• MURCHE
n. 1440 obs. rare – a dwarf

• MURCID
adj. 1656 obs. rare – slothful; cowardly

• MURCOUS
adj. 1684 obs. rare – lacking a thumb
 
• MURDER
n. 1. a1000 obs. – wickedness, sin
n. 2. a1000 obs. – torment, punishment; severe injury or damage
n. 3. a1475 – a flock of crows
n. 4. 1924 sl. – a very irksome experience  
n. 5. 1927 US sl. – an excellent person or thing  
vb. 1. c1175 arch. – to commit suicide
vb. 2. 1644 – to spoil though lack of skill or poor execution, as music, writing, etc.
vb. 3. 1700 rare – to waste time, to spend time unprofitably
vb. 4. 1839 colloq. – to chastise or punish severely; to reprimand violently
vb. 5. 1876 obs. rare – to mangle cruelly
vb. 6. 1935 colloq. – to devour ravenously; to consume to the last drop or crumb
vb. 7. 1952 sl., orig. US – to defeat an opponent, rival, etc., totally, esp. in a sporting match

• MURDERABILIA
n. 1989 orig. US – objects connected with a murder, esp. a notorious one, treated as collectable items

• MURDERABLY
adv. c1485 Sc. obs. rare – murderously; by means of murder
 
• MURDERATE
vb. 20C  sl. – to murder; to defeat

• MURDERATION
int. 1862 Amer. dial. – an exclamation of annoyance or surprise
n. 1. 1715 US colloq. – murder
n. 2. 1862 Amer. dial. – a calamitous state of affairs; a disaster
 
• MURDER BAG
n. 20C Scotland Yard usage – a bag made of hide and containing all such equipment as is necessary in the investigation of a murder  
 
• THE MURDER BAGS ARE OUT
phr. 20C Scotland Yard usage – a murder is being investigated

• MURDER BOARD
n. 1944 US sl., orig. Army usage – an interview or selection board

• MURDERDOM
n. 1514-46 obs. rare – the practice of murder

• MURDEREE
n. 1846 – a person who is murdered; a murder victim

• MURDERER
n. 1. c1390 obs. – a traitor
n. 2. c1500 obs. rare – a dagger, a knife
n. 3. a1685 obs. rare – a kind of knot used to gather curls

• MURDERERS’ ROW
n. 1. 1871 police & prison sl., orig. & chiefly US – a row of prison cells in which condemned murderers or other violent criminals are held
n. 2. 1905 baseball sl. – a group of powerful hitters batting in succession for a particular team
n. 3. 1952 sl. – an elite or notorious group

• MURDERESS
n. a1393 – a woman who commits murder

• MURDER HOUSE
n. 1. a1000 poetic usage, obs. – a house of torment
n. 2. 1964 NZ sl. – a school dental clinic

• MURDERING PIECE
n. 1797 obs. rare – a literary or artistic depiction of a scene of carnage

• MURDERISH
adj. 1550 rare – murderous
 
• THE MURDER IS OUT
phr. 18C colloq. – the mystery is solved  

• MURDER MAN
n. 1. a1450 – a murderer
n. 2. 1890 – a writer of murder stories

• MURDERMENT
n. a1400 obs. rare – murder, slaughter

• MURDERMONGER
n. 1. 1785 rare – a writer of murder stories
n. 2. 1900 – a person who commits or incites murder

• MURDERMONGERESS
n. 1957 – a female writer of murder stories

• MURDER-MONGERING
adj. 1840 rare – dealing in or inciting murder
n. 1891 rare – the purveying of news or stories about murder

• MURDER ONE
n. 1971 US sl. – first-degree murder  

• MURDEROUSLY
adv. 1916 colloq. – extremely; to a great or overpowering extent

• MURDERSOME
adj. 1585 – capable of killing; deadly, fatal

• MURDRES
vb. c1480 Sc. obs. – to murder, to kill a person

• MURDRESAR
n. a1500 Sc. obs. – a murderer

• MURDRIER
n. 1481 obs. rare – a murderer

• MURDRUM
n. 1767 obs. – murder

• MURE
adj. c1390 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – grave, modest, demure
n. a1000 obs. – a wall
vb. 1. a1425 obs. – to wall in, to surround with a wall; to fortify
vb. 2. a1450 – to imprison; to confine as in a prison or fortress

• MURE-HEARTED
adj. 1790 – tender-hearted; meek-spirited

• MURELY
adv. 1474 obs. – demurely; with consideration

• MURE-MOUTHED
adj. a1825 obs. rare – mild-spoken

• MURENGER
n. 1580 hist. – an officer responsible for keeping the walls of a city in good repair

• MURE UP
vb. 1550 obs. – to wall up the doors of a building, etc.; to block the means of access to
 
• MURFLES
n. 1. 1777 Eng. dial. – freckles  
n. 2. B1900 Eng. dial. – pimples  

• MURGEON
n. c1450 Eng. dial. – dirt, refuse, dregs; later, wet peaty soil
vb. 1. 1568 Sc., rare – to grimace at; to make faces at a person
vb. 2. 1808 Sc., rare – to mutter, to complain

• MURGEONS
n. a1513 – grimaces; bodily contortions, exaggerated postures

• MURGI
n. 1863 S. Asian – a chicken; chicken meat
 
• MURGULLIE
vb. 1721 Sc. – to spoil, to destroy, to mangle; to mar any business  
 
• MURGULLY
vb. 1721 Sc. obs. – to disfigure, to mar, to mangle; to mismanage, to abuse

• MURIATE
vb. 1699 obs. rare – to pickle in brine

• MURICIDAL
adj. 1966 – involving the killing of mice

• MURICIDE
n. 1. 1857 rare – a killer of mice or rats; specifically, a cat or dog
n. 2. 1924 rare – the killing of rodents

• MURIEL
n. 1955 Brit. colloq. – a mural

• MURINE
n. 1879 – a mouse or a rat
vb. 1656 obs. – to marinate or pickle fish, etc.

• MURING
n. 1624 obs. – the process of building walls

• MURK
adj. 1. a1000 chiefly Sc. & Eng. dial. – dark, gloomy, deficient in light
adj. 2. a1000 obs. – wicked, evil
adj. 3. a1300 obs. – of a person’s eyes: having the vision obscured; dim-sighted
adj. 4. a1325 Sc. – dark in colour
adj. 5. a1400 obs. – obscure, hard to understand
adj. 6. c1480 obs. – obscured or darkened by mist or fog
adj. 7. 1596 rare – gloomy, depressing
n. 1. a1000 chiefly Sc. – darkness, gloom
n. 2. a1400 – thick mist or fog
vb. 1. a1000 obs. rare – to complain, to murmur, to grumble
vb. 2. c1330 rare – to darken, to grow dark
vb. 3. c1425 rare – to blacken, to smudge, to besmirch; to make dark or obscure

• MURKEN
vb. 1. a1000 obs. – to complain, to murmur, to grumble
vb. 2. a1000 obs. – to grieve
 
• MURKER
n. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – a bounder

• MURKFUL
adj. a1400 obs. rare – full of darkness

• MURKILY
adv. 1830 – obscurely, indistinctly

• MURKINESS
n. a1425 – darkness, obscurity, gloom

• MURKISH
adj. 1869 rare – somewhat dark
 
• MURKLE
n. B1900 Sc. – a term of reproach or contempt  

• MURKLINS
adv. 1568 obs. – in the dark

• MURKLY
adv. a1400 rare – darkly; obscurely

• MURKNESS
n. 1. a1325 chiefly Sc., rare – intense darkness; darkness caused by fog, smoke, etc.
n. 2. c1390 obs. – lack of spiritual or intellectual enlightenment; sorrow, gloom, despair

• MURK NIGHT
n. c1300 chiefly Sc. & poetic usage – the darkest part of the night

• MURKSOME
adj. 1590 Sc. – dark, obscure, gloomy

• MURKY
adj. 1. 1779 – morally questionable, sinister; shady, suspect
adj. 2. 1830 rare – sullen, cheerless, gloomy; said of a look, a person’s demeanour, etc.

• MURL
vb. 1. a1525 Sc. – to reduce to fragments; to cause to crumble or decay
vb. 2. 1600 Sc. – to crumble, to break easily into crumbs

• MURLIMEWES
n. 1583 obs. – foolish gestures or antics

• MURLING
adj. 1827 Sc. – of a fire: smouldering

• MURLONGA
n. 1912 Aust. Aboriginal usage – a White man who sexually exploits Aboriginal women

• MURLY
adj. 1600 Sc. – of cheese: crumbly, friable
 
• MURLY-FIKES
n. B1900 Sc. – a term of endearment for an infant  

• MURMELL
n. 1535 Sc. obs. rare – a murmuring; the murmured expression of discontent
vb. 1. 1546 Sc. obs. – to mutter, to mumble; later, to complain of, to bemoan
vb. 2. 1881 Sc., rare – of a baby: to coo, to gurgle

• MURMUR
n. a1522 – a rumour
vb. 1. c1390 rare – to complain in low muttered tones; to give voice to an inarticulate discontent; to grumble
vb. 2. 1424 Sc. – to criticize the actions of a person; to accuse
vb. 3. c1460 obs. – to whisper a rumour, etc.

• MURMURANT
adj. 1669 obs. – murmuring

• MURMURATION
n. 1. c1390 chiefly literary usage – complaining, grumbling; a continuous utterance of low, barely audible sounds
n. 2. a1450 – a flock of starlings; a large gathering of starlings creating intricate patterns in flight
n. 3. c1485 Sc. obs. – rumouring; a spreading a rumour

• MURMURATOR
n. 1670 obs. – a murmurer; a detractor

• MURMURHEAD
n. a1500 obs. rare – discontent

• MURMURISH
adj. 1851 rare – resembling the sound of a murmur

• MURMUROUS
adj. a1525 rare – querulous, complaining, grumbling
 
• MURPHY
n. 1. 1750 colloq., rare – the god of dreams, used with reference to his ability to induce dreams or sleep; sleep; a soporific substance, etc.
n. 2. 1811 Brit. sl. – a potato
n. 3. 1959 US sl. – a type of confidence trick in which the victim is duped by unfulfilled promises of money, sex, etc.  
vb. 1965 US sl. – to deceive or dupe someone by means of the Murphy game

• THE MURPHY
n. 1966 Amer. sl. – a confidence trick whereby valuables lodged for safekeeping are stolen or substituted by worthless goods
 
• MURPHY DOG
n. 1990s sl. – a swindler  
 
• MURPHY GAME
n. 1. 1959 US sl. – a type of confidence trick in which the victim is duped by unfulfilled promises of money, sex, etc.
n. 2. 1950s sl., orig. US criminals’ usage – of a prostitute: luring a client either to a room or a deserted alley, hallway, etc., and then, instead of having sex, the client is beaten and robbed by a male accomplice, why may just strike, but may also pose as an aggrieved father, lover, brother, etc.  
 
• MURPHY LAND
n. M19 sl. – Ireland  
 
• MURPHY MAN
n. 1960s sl. – a man who specializes in the ‘Murphy game’   

• MURPHY’S COUNTENANCE
n. 1937 Brit. – a pig’s face  
 
• MURPHY’S FACE
n. 1937 Brit. – a pig’s face

• MURR
vb. 1. 1662 obs. – to make a harsh noise
vb. 2. 1807 Sc. rare – of a cat: to purr

• MURRAIN
adj. 1575 obs. – disagreeable, foul, contemptible
adv. 1575 obs. – exceedingly, excessively, confoundedly
n. 1. a1382 obs. – the flesh of animals that have died of disease; generally: dead flesh, carrion
n. 2. a1387 obs. – death, mortality, esp. by infectious disease or pestilence
n. 3. a1387 arch. – infectious disease, plague; an epidemic of such a disease; a plague]

• MURRAINLY
adv. 1548 obs. – exceedingly, excessively, confoundedly
 
• MURRAY WHALER
n. M19 Aust. sl. – an itinerant tramp whose ‘beat’ focuses on the rivers of New South Wales  

• MURREY
adj. 1. c1400 – mulberry-coloured; reddish purple or blood red in colour
adj. 2. 1623 obs. – of the complexion: sanguine, ruddy

• MURREY-COLOURED
adj. 1657 – of the colour of a mulberry; blood red

• MURRI
n. 1884 Aust. – an Australian Aboriginal person
 
• MURRUMBIDGEE WHALER
n. 1878 Aust. sl. – an itinerant tramp whose ‘beat’ focuses on the rivers of New South Wales

• MURRUMBIDGEE WHALING
n. 1873 Aust. sl., rare – fishing with a hook and twine
 
• MURTH
n. 1. c893 obs. – murder, slaughter
n. 2. a1450 Sc. & Eng. dial. – plenty, abundance; a great quantity

• MURTHER
n. a1000 obs. exc. Sc. – a murderer, an assassin

• MURTRISH
vb. 1490 obs. rare – to murder, to kill a person unlawfully

• MURYAN
n. 1865 Eng. dial. – an ant

• MUSARD
n. c1330 obs. – a dreamer, a fool, an idler; a wretch

• MUSARDRY
n. c1450 obs. – foolish or idle dreaming; sloth 

• MUSARDY
n. 1481 obs. rare – foolish or idle dreaming; sloth

• MUSCADIN
n. 1794 arch. – a dandy, a fop; hence, in a depreciative sense, a member of a Moderate party, that was chiefly composed of young men of the upper middle class, in the early years of the French Revolution (c1794-6)

• MUSCADINE
n. 1794 obs. rare – a Parisian lady of fashion
 
• MUSCADOODLE
n. 1950s US sl. – cheap muscatel wine  

• MUSCARDIN
n. 1774 obs. rare – the common or hazel dormouse

• MUSCARIOUS
adj. 1857 obs. rare – relating to flies

• MUSCARIUM
n. 1. 1853 obs. rare – a garden in which mosses are grown
n. 2. 1872 obs. – a place were flies are kept
 
• MUSCATEER
n. 1930s Aust. sl. – a drinker of cheap muscat wine  

• MUSCATELLINE
adj. 1673 obs. rare – resembling muscatel wine
 
• MUSCLE
n. 1. 1879 sl., orig. US – force, violence, coercion; the threat of physical violence used as a means of obtaining submission or cooperation
n. 1942 sl., orig. US – a muscular man employed to intimidate others with violence, or threats of violence  
vb. c1802 sl., orig. US – to coerce by means of threats or violence; to threaten or subject to force in order to obtain compliance

• MUSCLE BOY
n. 1. 1940 US sl. – a male who uses violence or threats to intimidate people, esp. on behalf of another
n. 2. 1956 US sl. – a fit, athletic young man; a bodybuilder

• MUSCLE CAR
n. 1966 chiefly US – a high-performance car; one of a class of sports cars having V-8 engines, produced in the United States mainly in the 1960s and 1970s

• MUSCLEDOM
n. 1982 – the world of bodybuilding, esp. professional bodybuilding

• MUSCLEHEAD
n. 1923 sl., derogatory – a brawny person, esp. a bodybuilder or a muscular athlete; generally as contrasted with someone having more intellectual interests
 
• MUSCLE MARY
n. 1992 homosexual usage – a homosexual man devoted to body-building and the resultant musculature  
 
• MUSCLE-MAN
n. 1. 1805 sl. – a man with highly developed muscles; esp. a bodybuilder or a wrestler; one having an outstanding physique
n. 2. 1929 sl., orig. US – a thug, usually as employed by a gangster for purposes of intimidation, or any strong, aggressive man  
 
• MUSCLER
n. 1940s US sl. – a thug  

• MUSCLE READING
n. 1877 – though-reading by the interpretation of muscular movements
 
• MUSCLE SHIRT
n. 1970s US sl. – a T-shirt with very short sleeves or no sleeves, thus displaying the wearer’s physique  
 
• MUSCLE TEE
n. 1970s US sl. – a T-shirt with very short sleeves or no sleeves, thus displaying the wearer’s physique  
 
• MUSCLE-UNCLE
n. 2000s sl. – a butch homosexual  

• MUSCOSE
adj. 1707 chiefly botany usage, obs. – resembling moss; mosslike

• MUSCOSITY
n. 1656 obs. rare – mossiness; abundance of moss

• MUSCOUS
adj. 1658 chiefly botany usage, rare – mossy; resembling moss

• MUSCOVIAN
adj. 1579 – relating to Moscow or Muscovy, or their inhabitants; generally, a Russian
n. 1577 rare – a native or inhabitant of Moscow or of the former principality of Muscovy; generally, a Russian

• MUSCOVITE
adj. 1577 – relating to Moscow or Muscovy, or their inhabitants; generally, a Russian
n. 1535 arch. – a native or inhabitant of Moscow or of the former principality of Muscovy; generally, a Russian

• MUSCOVITER
n. 1650 – an inhabitant of Muscovy; generally, a Russian

• MUSCOVITISH
adj. 1622 arch. – relating to Muscovy or its inhabitants (Muscovy – an alternative name for the Grand Duchy of Moscow and the Tsardom of Russia)

• MUSCOVY RAT
n. 1693 obs. – the muskrat

• MUSCULADE
n. a1475 obs. – a dish or a sauce containing mussels

• MUSCULAGE
n. 1547 obs. – muscle tissue; a muscle or tendon

• MUSCULARIZE
vb. 1809 rare – to become muscular; to put on muscle

• MUSCULATED
adj. 1731 rare – composed of muscle; provided with muscles

• MUSCULATION
n. 1. 1853 obs. rare – movement produced by muscular action
n. 2. 1876 – muscular development

• MUSCULOSITY
n. 1721 obs. – a being muscular; muscularity

• MUSCULOUS
adj. 1. a1425 rare – composed of muscle; containing muscle
adj. 2. 1609 – characterized by muscular development; powerful, strong

• MUSCULOUSNESS
n. 1727 obs. rare – largeness or fullness of muscles

• MUSE
n. 1. a1393 – a poet’s particular genius; the character of a particular poet’s style
n. 2. a1425 obs. – a poem, a song, a melody
n. 3. 1484 obs. rare – a bagpipe
n. 4. 1578 obs. – the fruit of a plantain or banana plant
n. 5. 1592 – a person or thing regarded as the source of an artist’s inspiration
n. 1. c1650 Sc. obs. – a room used for study or meditation; a study
vb. 1. a1382 obs. – to murmur discontentedly; to grumble, to complain
vb. 2. c1450 obs. rare – to wait or look expectantly
vb. 3. 1673 obs. rare – to bewilder, to cause puzzlement

• MUSEAU
n. 1816 chiefly literary usage – a person’s face

• MUSEFUL
adj. a1618 – thoughtful, pensive; absorbed in thought

• MUSELESS
adj. 1644 – without learning; uncultured; also, uninspired

• MUSEN
vb. 1623 obs. rare – of a deer: to shed its antlers

• MUSEOGRAPHER
n. 1880 rare – a person who classifies and catalogues the contents of museums

• MUSEOGRAPHIST
n. 1776 obs. rare – a person who classifies and catalogues the contents of museums

• MUSEOGRAPHY
n. 1895 – the description of the contents of museums

• MUSEOLOGICAL
adj. 1949 – adapted or suited for display in a museum

• MUSEOLOGY
n. 1885 – the organizing and managing of museums; museum curation

• MUSERY
n. c1450 obs. rare – an amusement, a pastime

• THE MUSES
n. 1582 – the liberal arts; polite literature, belles-lettres

• MUSET
n. 1. 1594 rare – a gap in a hedge or fence through which hares, rabbits, or other animals may pass
n. 2. 1601 obs. rare – a shrew
 
• MUSEUM PIECE
n. 1928 colloq. – a person or thing regarded as antiquated or decrepit  
 
• MUSH
adj. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – rotten
n. 1. c1790 colloq., orig. Aust. & US – the face or mouth  
n. 2. L18 US criminals’ sl. – a thief’s girlfriend  
n. 3. 1815 – melting snow or ice; slush
n. 4. 1821 UK criminals’ sl. – an umbrella  
n. 5. 1840 usually derogatory – a confused muddle; an incoherent jumble of thoughts and ideas
n. 6. 1892 UK sl. – a cab driver who owns a small number of cabs
n. 7. 19C Brit. sl. – a familiar or contemptuous term of address
n. 8. M19 US – sentimental nonsense; a silly demonstration of affection  
n. 9. 1906 US sl. – a fool; an idiot; a weak-minded person 
n. 10. 1917 sl. – a guardroom or cell; a military prison  
n. 11. 1936 UK sl. – a man; a chap  
n. 12. 1940s US criminals’ sl. – a short-con game played at a ball park where a confidence trickster poses as a bookmaker, taking bets, then raises an umbrella and disappears into the area where everybody is holding umbrellas  
n. 13. 1945 Aust. sl. – prison food, often porridge  
n. 14. 1950s Brit. sl. – an unnamed person
n. 15. 1967 colloq. – a moustache  
n. 16. 1969 surfing usage – the foam produced when a wave breaks
n. 17. 1972 UK sl. – a prostitute’s client  
n. 18. 1990s sl. – mushrooms  
n. 19. 2000s sl. – a fight  
vb. 1. 1781 – to crush, to crumble, to pulverize; to mash or reduce to a pulp
vb. 2. 1900s US sl. – to go, to leave  
vb. 3. 1919 sl. – to kiss and caress, to cuddle
vb. 4. 1920s US sl. – to court a woman in a sentimental manner, to ‘chat up’  
vb. 5. 1941 sl., orig. US – of an aircraft: to lose airspeed or altitude, esp. with the engine stalling repeatedly
vb. 6. 1948 – to sink in or into a soft surface
vb. 7. 1980s African-American sl. – to beat up, to hit  
vb. 8. 1990s US sl. – to urge forward  
 
• MUSHA!
int. a1745 Irish sl. – an expression of surprise or disbelief; Well! Well!  
 
• MUSH AND MOLASSES
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – nonsense  
 
• MUSHBALL
n. 1. 1980s US sl. – a stupid person; a dolt; a mawkishly sentimental person  
n. 2. 1980s US sl. – stupidity
 
• MUSHBRAIN
n. 1. 1980s US sl. – a stupid person; a dolt; a mawkishly sentimental person
n. 2. 1980s US sl. – stupidity
 
• MUSH-BRAINED
adj. 1980s US sl. – stupid; sentimental; nonsensical

• MUSHBURGER
n. 1979 surfing usage – a type of wave which is shapeless or poorly formed
 
• MUSHE
n. 1940s W. Indies sl. – a Syrian or a Chinese  
 
• MUSHER
n. 1. 1883 Eng. dial. – a mushroom
n. 2. 1887 UK sl. – a cab driver who owns a small number of cabs
n. 3. 1900s US sl. – one who moves from place to place
n. 4. 1900s US sl. – an itinerant fakir
n. 5. 1940s US sl. – one who kisses and cuddles
 
• MUSH-FACE
n. 1920s sl. – a fool; a sentimental idiot
 
• MUSH-FACED
adj. 1910s sl. – stupid, foolish
 
• MUSH-FAKER; MUSH-FAKIR
n. 1821 sl. – one who advertises themselves as a mender of umbrellas, or peddler, but may well use this respectable job as a cover for more fraudulent pursuits
 
• MUSH-HEAD
n. 1846 US sl. – an ineffectual or incompetent person; one who is easily influenced

• MUSH-HEADED
adj. 1884 US sl. – easily taken in or influenced; stupid

• MUSHIE
n. 1935 Aust. colloq. – a mushroom
 
• MUSH IT UP
vb. 1920s US sl. – to kiss and cuddle  
 
• MUSHMOUTH
n. 1868 US sl. – a person who speaks indistinctly or inarticulately; one who drawls

• MUSH-MOUTHED
adj. 1909 US sl. – of a person: having a drawling or indistinct accent; of speech: indistinct, imprecise, sloppy

• MUSHRAT
n. 1842 N. Amer. – a muskrat
 
• MUSH-RIGGER
n. E19 sl. – one who advertises themselves as a mender of umbrellas, or peddler, but may well use this respectable job as a cover for more
fraudulent pursuits
 
• MUSHROOM
n. 1. 1594 obs. – a contemptible person
n. 2. 1648 obs. rare – an outgrowth or excrescence; a spontaneous growth
n. 3. 1839 colloq., rare – an umbrella
n. 4. 1954 US firefighting usage – a fire that spreads out and downward when reaching a ceiling  
n. 5. 1979 Brit. sl. – a person who is given no information  
n. 6. 1988 US sl. – an innocent bystander killed in crossfire
vb. 1. 1747 obs. – to elevate a person in social position with great suddenness
vb. 2. 1893 – of a bullet: to expand and flatten on impact so as to resemble a mushroom

• MUSHROOM-FAKER
n. 1839 sl., obs. – one who advertises themselves as a mender of umbrellas, or peddler, but may well use this respectable job as a cover for more fraudulent pursuits

• MUSHROOM HALL
n. 1872 rare – a house or hut erected overnight

• MUSHROOMIC
adj. 1859 – upstart

• MUSHROOMING
n. 1889 – the flattening and expansion of a bullet on impact
 
• MUSHROOM-PICKER
n. 20C US sl., derogatory – a nickname for a Czechoslovakian
 
• MUSHROOM PILLS
n. 1999 UK drug culture sl. – psilocybin or psilocin, in powder or capsule form, a strong psychedelic drug extracted from Psilocybe mexicana and Stropharia cubensis mushrooms; one capsule has an equivalent effect to forty or more ‘magic mushooms’  
 
• MUSH-TOPER
n. E19 UK criminals’ sl. – an umbrella  
 
• MUSHY
adj. 1. 1839 – lacking clarity or definition, indistinct
adj. 2. 1848 US colloq. – excessively sentimental or emotional, insipidly or gushingly romantic  
adj. 3. 1924 – of sound: poorly reproduced, indistinct
adj. 4. 1967 surfing usage – of a wave: without power, foamy
n. 1964 US sl.  – a weak, slow wave  
 
• MUSHYROOM
n. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – a mushroom

• MUSIC
n. 1. 1600 – the cries of a pack of hounds on seeing the chase
n. 2. 1650 sl., chiefly military usage – the sound of gunfire or other ordnance
n. 3. a1674 obs. rare – pleasure, amusement
n. 4. 1859 US colloq. – liveliness; excitement; fun. sport
n. 5. 1915 US military usage – in the Marines, a soldier responsible for sounding signals on a musical instrument; a trumpeter; a bugler

• MUSICAL
adj. 1815 US colloq., obs. – amusing, humorous; ridiculous
n. 1. a1450 obs. rare – a musical instrument
n. 2. 1579 obs. rare – melody, sweet music

• MUSICAL BEDS
n. 1972 colloq. – a situation in which a person engages in a large number of casual sexual relationships in quick succession

• MUSICAL FRIGHT
n. 1871 rare – the game of musical chairs
 
• MUSICAL FRUIT
n. 20C US sl. – any variety of beans  

• MUSICAL-HEADED
adj. 1587 obs. rare – music-loving

• MUSICALIZE
vb. 1919 – to set to music, as a novel, play, etc.; to express in a manner suggestive of music
 
• MUSICAL MARINE
n. Bk1913-17 Amer. navy sl. – a bandsman
 
• MUSICAL MOKE 
n. 1895 Amer. sl. – a Black minstrel who plays a number of different instruments in succession

• MUSICALNESS
n. 1678 rare – a being musical
 
• MUSICAL VEGETABLES
n. 1988 Brit. sl. – baked beans

• MUSICASTER
n. 1838 rare, depreciative usage – a musician of mediocre ability

• MUSICATE
vb. 1614 obs. rare – to set to music

• MUSIC BOX
n. 1. 1773 obs. rare – a barrel organ
n. 2. 1850 humorous usage – a piano

• MUSIC-GRINDER
n. 1803 – an itinerant street musician; a person paid to supply music on request

• MUSICIANER
n. 1540 colloq. – a musician

• MUSICIANESS
n. 1829 rare – a female musician

• MUSICIST
n. 1873 rare – a musician
 
• MUSICKER
n. c1450 – a musician
 
• MUSIC MACHINE
n. 1960s Amer. sl. – a radio, jukebox, or phonograph

• MUSIC MAN
n. 1569 – a musician, a singer; a man who provides music

• MUSICNESS
n. 1633 rare – a being musical

• MUSICO
n. 1724 arch. – a musician, esp. a singer or other performer

• MUSICOGRAPHER
n. 1884 – a writer on musical subjects

• MUSICOGRAPHY
n. 1. 1839 obs. rare – the art of writing music; musical notation
n. 2. 1901 – a writing on the subject of music
 
• MUSICOMANIA
n. 1833 obs. – a mania for music
 
• MUSICOPHILE
n. 1931 rare – a music lover
 
• MUSICOPHOBIA
n. 1903 – an intense dislike of music

• MUSICRY
n. 1598 rare – the art or practice of music

• MUSIC-SMITH
n. 1856 obs. – a craftsman who makes the metal parts and implements required by musicians

• MUSING
adj. 1449 obs. rare – troubling, worrisome
n. a1425 obs. – a complaining, complaint

• MUSK BEAVER
n. 1771 obs. – the muskrat

• MUSK-CAT
n. 1567 obs., derogatory – a prostitute; a courtesan; also, a foppish man

• MUSK-COD
n. 1600 obs. – a heavily perfumed gentleman; a fop; often used as a derogatory form of address

• MUSK-COLOURED
adj. 1684 rare – of a dark reddish-brown colour

• MUSKEG
n. 1806 chiefly Can. – a swamp or bog consisting of a mixture of water and partly dead vegetation, often covered by moss

• MUSKEGGY
adj. 1894 chiefly Can. – consisting of muskegs or swamps
 
• MUSKEL
n. 1856 Eng. dial. – the common green caterpillar  

• MUSKEN
n. 1585 obs. – a titmouse

• MUSKET
n. a1398 arch. – a male sparrowhawk

• MUSKETADE
n. 1. 1649 obs. – an attack with muskets; heavy musket fire
n. 2. 1667 obs. rare – a wound inflicted by a musket shot

• MUSKIN
n. 1. 1530 obs. – a pretty face; hence, a term of endearment for a girl or a young woman
n. 2. 1756 rare – a strange or eccentric person

• MUSKISH-MINDED
adj. 1610 obs. – lecherous, lustful
 
• MUSKRA
n. 1979 Brit. sl. – a police officer  
 
• MUSKRAT
n. 1. 1823 US colloq., usually derogatory – a person thought to resemble a muskrat in some way; an inhabitant of a low-lying district, esp. the state of Delaware, or the St Clair Flats, Michigan
n. 2. 1976 US sl. – a child  

• MUSKWA
n. 1861 chiefly Can. – the American black bear, Ursus americanus

• MUSK-WEASEL
n. 1835 obs. rare – a civet

• MUSK-WORM
n. 1616 obs. rare, derogatory – a dealer in perfumes

• MUSKY
n. 1884 US colloq. – a muskrat

• MUSLIMAH
n. 1851 – a Muslim woman

• MUSLIMIC
adj. 1903 rare – Islamic

• MUSLIMIN
adj. 1844 obs. – Muslim
n. 1819 obs. – a Muslim

• MUSLIMITE
adj. 1829 obs. rare – Muslim
n. 1840 obs. rare – a Muslim

• MUSLIN
n. 1. 1822 nautical sl., rare – sailcloth; sails collectively
n. 2. 1823 Brit. sl. – a woman considered sexually  

• MUSLIN KALE
n. 1786 Sc. – broth made from water, shelled barley, and vegetables, without any meat stock
 
• MUSO
n. 1. 1950s Brit. sl., derogatory – a musician, esp. a pop musician, regarded as being overconcerned with technique rather than musical content or expression
n. 2. 1967 Aust. sl. – any musician, esp. a professional one
 
• MUSOMANIA
n. 1. 1833 obs. rare – an abnormal fondness for music
n. 2. Bk1991 – an abnormal love for mice

• MUSON
n. a1552 obs. rare – in hunting: the horn of a deer, when shed
 
• MUSOPHOBIA
n. 1. Bk1991 – an abnormal fear of dirt, especially of being contaminated by dirt
n. 2. Bk1991 – an abnormal fear of mice

• MUSOPHOBIST
n. 1880 obs. – a person who dislikes or mistrusts poetry

• MUSQUASH
n. 1616 – a muskrat

• MUSQUASHING
n. 1833 obs. rare – the hunting of muskrats
 
• MUSS
n. 1. a1529 Eng. dial., playful usage – the mouth; a person’s mouth
n. 2. 1591 obs. – a scramble, a sudden skirmish
n. 3. 1598 obs. – a girl or young woman; chiefly used as a term of endearment or an affectionate form of address
n. 4. 1829 colloq., rare – a disturbance, a row, an affray
n. 5. 1839 colloq. – a state of untidiness or disorder; a muddle, a mess; messiness, confusion
vb. 1. 1823 US & Can. colloq. – to make untidy; to rumple; to mess; to disarrange
vb. 2. 1851 US obs. rare – to fight
vb. 3. 1856 Eng. dial. – to grab at suddenly and violently; to grapple with
vb. 4. 1876 obs. rare – to busy oneself in a confused, unmethodical, and ineffectual manner
vb. 5. 19C Brit. sl. – to coit a woman  
vb. 6. 1922 rare – to manhandle or treat roughly

• MUSSASCUS
n. 1612 obs. rare – a muskrat
 
• MUSSED UP
adj. 1857 colloq., chiefly US – untidy, messy, disordered; rumpled; confused; of hair: ruffled, tousled

• MUSSEET
n. 1621 S. Asian, obs. – a mosque

• MUSSEL SCALP
n. 1496 chiefly Sc. – a mussel bed

• MUSSEL SHELL
n. 1602 obs., derogatory – a person who gapes; a form of address
 
• MUSSIE
n. 1953 Brit. sl. – a tough woman  

• MUSSING
n. 1846 colloq., chiefly US, rare – confusion, trouble; a fuss
 
• MUSSITANT
adj. 1681 obs. – speaking in an undertone, muttering, murmuring  
 
• MUSSITATE
vb. 1626 obs. – to mutter; to speak through the teeth
 
• MUSSITATION
n. 1649 obs. – a speaking in a low tone; a grumbling, mumbling, muttering, murmuring

• MUSSOLINI
n. 1926 – a person with fascist or domineering tendencies; one who embodies the characteristics of Mussolini; a dictator; a tyrant

• MUSSULMAN
adj. 1616 arch. – relating to Islam or Muslims
n. 1570 arch. – a Muslim

• MUSSULMANIC
adj. 1801 rare – relating to Islam or Muslims

• MUSSULMANISH
adj. 1638 obs. rare – relating to Islam or Muslims

• MUSSULMANISM
n. 1731 arch., rare – Islam; the religion of Muslims

• MUSSULMANLIK
n. 1625 obs. rare – Islam; the religion of Muslims

• MUSSULMANLY
adv. 1849 obs. rare – in the manner of a Muslim

• MUSSULMEN
n. 1953 sl. – in Nazi concentration camps: inmates in a state of physical and emotional exhaustion who have lost the will to live

• THE MUSSULMIN
n. 1679 obs. rare – Muslims collectively

• MUSSULWOMAN
n. 1671 chiefly humorous usage, arch. – a female Muslim

• MUSSY
adj. 1859 colloq., chiefly US – untidy, rumpled; of hair: tousled, ruffled

• MUST
n. 1. 1602 – mustiness; mould
n. 2. 1796 Sc. – hair powder
vb. 1. 1530 rare – to become mouldy, musty, or mildewed; to acquire a musty or sour smell
vb. 2. 1734 Sc. obs. – to dress or dust with hair powder
 
• MUSTA
n. 1. 16C Anglo-Chinese & Anglo-Indian – the make or pattern of anything; a sample  
n. 2. 20C US sl. – marijuana  

• MUSTACHIO
n. 1551 arch., humorous usage – a moustache, esp. a large and luxuriant one

• MUSTACHIOED
adj. 1820 – having a moustache, esp. a large one

• MUSTACHOES
n. 1605 obs. – the whiskers of a cat
 
• MUSTAFA CRAP
phr. 1930s Brit., chiefly services’ usage – refers to the need to defecate  
 
• MUSTANG
n. 1. 1847 sl. – an officer in the US forces who has been promoted from the ranks  
n. 2. 1877 Aust. obs. – a wild or unbroken horse

• MUSTANGER
n. 1849 chiefly US – a person who catches or tames wild mustangs
 
• MUSTAPHA CRAP
phr. 1930s Brit., chiefly services’ usage – refers to the need to defecate  
 
• MUSTARD
adj. 1. 1925 Brit. sl. – excellent, best, skilled  
adj. 2. 1925 Brit. sl. – very keen  
adj. 3. 1930s rhyming sl. for ‘hot’ (Mustard Pot) – angry  
adj. 4. 1930s rhyming sl. (Mustard Pot) – of the weather: hot  
n. 1. 1821 sl., chiefly US – something which adds zesty or piquancy
n. 2. 1996 US sl. – AIDS  
n. 3. 1998 Brit. rhyming sl. (Mustard and Cress) – a dress  
n. 4. 1998 Brit. imperfect rhyming sl. (Mustard Pickle) – a cripple  
 
• MUSTARD AND CRESS
n. 1. 19C Brit. sl. – the female pubic hair  
n. 2. 1998 Brit. rhyming sl. – a dress  
 
• MUSTARD CASE
n. 2001 US sl. – a supreme show-off  
 
• MUSTARD CHUCKER
n. 1989 US sl. – a pickpocket who spills mustard on the victim as a diversion and excuse to approach  
 
• MUSTARD KEEN
adj. 1979 Brit. sl. – very keen  
 
• MUSTARD PICKLE
n. 1998 Brit. imperfect rhyming sl. – a cripple  
 
• MUSTARD POT
adj. 1. 1930s Brit. rhyming sl. – hot  
adj. 2. 1930s rhyming sl. for ‘hot’ – angry  
n. 1. L16 Brit. rhyming sl. for ‘twat’ – the female genitals, ‘hot like mustard’; the vagina  
n. 2. L19 Brit. sl. – a carriage with a light yellow body  
n. 3. 1930 US prison sl. – a catamite in a prison  
n. 4. 1940s US sl. – the anus  
 
• MUSTARD ROAD
n. 1970s US sl. – the anus  
 
• MUSTARD SEED
n. 1926 African-American sl., rare- a light-skinned Black person  
 
• MUSTARD-YELLOW
n. E20 US sl. – a mulatto  

• MUST-BE
n. 1868 – the inevitable; that which is fated to happen

• MUST CAT
n. 1504 Sc. obs. – an animal which secretes musk, esp. a musk deer or a civet

• MUSTED
adj. 1. 1632 Sc. & poetic usage – mouldy
adj. 2. 1760 – dressed or dusted with hair powder
 
• MUSTEE
n. 1699 chiefly hist. – a person of mixed European and African descent; a person with one White-skinned parent and the other one-quarter Black; generally, a person of mixed racial descent

• MUSTEEFINO
n. a1818 chiefly hist. – a person having one White-skinned parent and the other a mustee

• MUSTELLE
n. 1481 obs. rare – a weasel
 
• MUSTER
n. 1. a1382 – an assembly; a collection; the number of people or things assembled on a particular occasion
n. 2. 1400 obs. – the make or pattern of anything; a sample
n. 3. c1400 obs. – a showing something; exhibition, display
n. 4. a1450 – a company or group of peacocks
n. 5. 1841 Aust. & NZ – a collecting together cattle, sheep, etc., by riding round a scattered herd and driving it together; a round-up of stock
vb. 1. a1400 obs. – to show; to display, to exhibit; to report, to tell, to explain
vb. 2. 1440 – to whisper; to speak privately; also, to talk volubly
vb. 3. 1440 – to collect or assembly to be counted, inspected as to condition and equipment, exercised, displayed, enlisted into service, or sent into battle
vb. 4. c1560 – to assemble, to collect, to gather together in a body
vb. 5. 1813 Aust. & NZ – to round up cattle, sheep, etc., for counting, shearing, branding, etc.

• MUSTERER
n. 1. c1443 obs. rare – a person who offers or presents something
n. 2. c1450 obs. rare – a person who whispers; a rumour-monger; a talebearer
n. 3. 1790 rare – a person who gathers together people, etc.
n. 4. 1863 Aust. & NZ – a person employed to round up livestock

• MUSTERING
n. 1. a1439 obs. – a showing; an exhibition; an outward display
n. 2. 1440 – an assembling or being gathered together
n. 3. 1440 obs. – whispering; talebearing

• MUSTER-MASTER
n. 1711 obs. rare – a drill sergeant
 
• MUSTER ONE’S BAG
vb. L19 Brit. nautical sl., esp. Royal Navy usage – to be ill
 
• MUSTER OUT
vb. US Civil War usage – to be killed in action

• MUSTER ROLL
n. 1605 – a comprehensive list of names, items, etc.

• MUSTER STRONG
vb. 1790 obs. – to assemble or be present in great numbers
 
• MUST-HAVE
adj. 1989 – essential, mandatory; usually used in the context of material objects  
n. 1839 – something which is regarded as being essential or highly desirable to have

• MUSTIED
adj. 1572 obs. – musty, mouldy

• MUSTIFY
vb. 1828 rare – to make musty or mouldy

• MUSTILY
adv. 1620 obs. – with ill humour; dully, glumly

• MUSTINESS
n. 1. a1625 obs. – crossness; ill humour
n. 2. 1867 – dull and unoriginal character; old-fashioned quality; outmodedness

• MUSTLE
vb. 1570 obs. rare – to murmur, to make a noise
 
• MUSTN’T-MENTION-‘EMS
n. M19 Brit. jocular usage – trousers

• MUSTULENT
adj. 1611 humorous usage, obs. rare – intoxicated by wine

• MUSTY
adj. 1. 1575 – outmoded; old-fashioned; archaic
adj. 2. 1603 – of a person: dull and unadventurous; having an old-fashioned or unoriginal outlook; fogeyish
adj. 3. 1620 Eng. dial. – peevish, sullen, bad-tempered
adj. 4. 1868 rare – of an elephant, camel, etc.: in musth

• MUSTY-FUSTY
adj. 1. 1857 – having a stale smell; mouldy
adj. 2. 1980 – old-fashioned; outmoded


Back to INDEX M

Back to DICTIONARY