Dictionary: MUT – MYN


• MUTABILATE
vb. c1685 obs. rare – to change

• MUTABILITY
n. a1425 chiefly literary & poetic usage – disposition to change; variableness, inconstancy, fickleness

• MUTABLE
adj. 1. a1425 – subject to change or alteration
adj. 2. c1425 chiefly literary & poetic usage – inconstant in mind, will, or disposition; fickle; variable

• THE MUTABLE
n. 1850 – that which is liable to change

• MUTABLENESS
n. 1481 rare – changeableness

• MUTABLES
n. 1652 obs. rare – things capable of change
 
• MUTA(H)
n. 1933 US drug culture sl. – marijuana; a marijuana cigarette  

• MUTAL
adj. a1561 obs. rare – changeable
 
• MUTANT
n. 1984 US sl. – a clumsy, foolish, or otherwise unpopular individual; generally used by adolescents

• MUTATE
vb. 1796 obs. rare – to change, to transform

• MUTATION
n. 1. a1513 obs. – change in government; revolution, civil upheaval; revolt, insurrection
n. 2. a1542 obs. – changeableness, fickleness; inconstancy of character
n. 3. 1610 obs. – in Roman history: a place on a highway where post-horses could be changed

• MUTATIVE
adj. 1. 1720 – relating to change or mutation
adj. 2. 1818 obs. rare – given to change; changeable

• MUTATOR
n. 1632 rare – a person who changes; something which effects a change

• MUTATORY
adj. 1890 rare – changing, mutable, variable

• MUTCH
n. 1438 rare – a nightcap

• MUTCHKIN
n. 1632 Sc. & Eng. dial. – a small amount
 
• MUTE
n. 1. c1350 arch. – a pack of hounds
n. 2. 1375 obs. – the cry of hounds on the chase
n. 3. a1475 – liquid bird dung; the dung of hawks  
n. 4. 1579 theatre usage, obs. – an actor who performs in mime
n. 5. 1600 hist. – a servant deprived of the power of speech, usually deliberately; esp. one who serves a Turkish sultan
n. 6. 1838 Eng. dial. rare – a mule
n. 7. 1941 Brit. – a person hired to mourn at funerals  
vb. 1. a1475 rare – of a hawk: to discharge faeces
vb. 2. 1570 obs. – to murmur

• MUTE AS A FISH
adj. 1620 – silent

• MUTE AS A GOOSE IN A HAY-REEK
adj. 1709 – silent

• MUTE AS A MACKEREL
adj. 1760 – silent

• MUTE AS A MAID
adj. 1576 – silent

• MUTE AS A PICTURE
adj. 1761 – silent

• MUTE AS A POKER
adj. 1843 – silent

• MUTE AS A STATUE
adj. a1627 – silent

• MUTE AS A STONE
adj. c1425 – silent

• MUTE AS FISHES GAPING FOR LOAVES
adj. 1807 – silent

• MUTE AS MICE
adj. 1881 – silent

• MUTESS
vb. a1475 obs. rare – of a hawk: to discharge faeces

• MUTESSING
n. a1475 obs. rare – the voiding of excrement by a hawk
 
• MUTHA
n. 1. 1974 US sl. – a contemptible, despicable or obnoxious person; a very unpleasant person; a ‘motherfucker’
n. 2. E20 US drug culture sl. – marijuana; a marijuana cigarette  
 
• MUTHAFUCKA
n. 1956 sl., orig. & chiefly US – an unpleasant or despicable person, usually male  
 
• MUTHAH
n. 20C sl. – used by fans of heavy-metal music to refer to each other or their heroes

• MUTHER
n. 1825 Sc., obs. rare – a great number of things
 
• MUTHY
adj. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – of the weather: sultry, close, mild and damp  

• MUTI
n. 1. 1858 S. Afr., obs. rare – a tree
n. 2. 1908 S. Afr. – medicine of any kind
 
• MUTIE
n. 20C Brit. surfers’ & rock music fans usage – a daring exponent, a devotee

• MUTILATED
adj. 1598 obs. – castrated

• MUTILATION
n. 1728 obs. rare – castration

• MUTILE
vb. a1618 obs. rare – to mutilate

• MUTILOUS
adj. 1649 obs. – of a thing: mutilated, imperfect

• MUTINADO
n. 1604 obs. – a mutineer

• MUTINE
adj. 1584 obs. – turbulent, mutinous; rebellious, unsubmissive
n. 1. 1560 obs. – popular disturbance or tumult; rebellion, mutiny
n. 2. 1591 obs. – a rebellious person; a mutineer
vb. 1540 obs. – to rise in revolt against authority; to rebel, to mutiny

• MUTINEER
vb. 1682 – to mutiny; to behave as a mutineer

• MUTINER
n. 1569 obs. – a rebellious or mutinous person; a mutineer

• MUTINERY
n. 1563 obs. – mutiny

• MUTINEWE
n. c1550 obs. rare – popular disturbance or tumult; rebellion, mutiny

• MUTING
n. 1. a1475 – defecation of a hawk or other bird
n. 2. 1542 obs. – a murmuring, esp. of discontent

• MUTINING
adj. 1577 obs. – mutinous; that mutinies

• MUTINIOUS
adj. 1663 obs. rare – mutinous

• MUTINIST
n. 1616 obs. rare – a mutineer

• MUTINIZE
vb. 1603 arch. – to mutiny

• MUTINOUS
adj. 1589 obs. – turbulent, contentious, quarrelsome

• MUTINOUSNESS
n. 1629 rare – a being mutinous; rebelliousness

• MUTINY
n. 1567 obs. – discord, contention, tumult; a dispute, a quarrel
vb. 1597 obs. – to contend or strive with; to quarrel

• MUTISH
adj. 1865 obs. – reminiscent of a mute

• MUTSUDDY
n. 1683 chiefly Anglo-Indian – an accountant, a clerk, an administrator
 
• MUTT
adj. 1973 UK sl. – deaf
n. 1. 1899 sl., orig. US, derogatory – a racehorse, esp. a slow one; any horse in poor condition
n. 2. 1900 sl., orig. US – a mongrel dog  
n. 3. 1901 sl., orig. US – an oaf; a dullard; a stupid person, a slow-witted person 
n. 4. 1983 sl., derogatory – an unattractive woman
 
• MUTT AND JEFF
adj. L1940s Brit. rhyming sl.  – (also ‘Mutt ‘n’ Jeff’) deaf
n. 1. 1917 sl. – a pair of slow-witted men, esp. one tall and one short  
n. 2. 1937 Brit. sl. – a particular pair of medals worn together, esp. the War Medal and the Victory Medal awarded to British service personnel who took part in World War I  
n. 3. 1940 US sl. – a pair of police interrogators, one of whom adopts a threatening approach while the other is sympathetic and conciliatory
 
• MUTTER
vb. a1325 obs. – of a goat: to bleat
 
• MUTTERANCE
n. 1. 1577 obs. – the ability to mutter
n. 2. 1992 – a muttering; a muttered utterance
 
• MUTTER AND STUTTER
n. butter …20C rhyming sl.
 
• MUTTERATION
n. 1753 obs. – a muttering
 
• MUTTERBOAT
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a motor boat
 
• MUTTERCYCLE
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a motorcycle  
 
• MUTTEROUS
adj. 1582 obs. rare – full of muttering sound, murmuring, buzzing  
 
• MUTTERY
adj. 1843 – given to muttering; of a sound: low and indistinct like muttered speech
 
• MUTT-EYE
n. 1946 Aust. sl. – cut corn (as a food)  
 
• MUTTHEAD
n. 1910s US sl. – a stupid or contemptible person  
 
• MUTTI
n. 1905 – in Germany and German-speaking countries: a mother
 
• MUTTON
adj. L1940s Brit. rhyming sl. (Mutt ‘n’ Jeff) – deaf
n. 1. c1335 – a sheep. esp. one intended to be eaten
n. 2. a1513 obs., chiefly Sc. – a man, a fellow
n. 3. a1529 sl. – a woman’s flesh sought for the satisfaction of male lust
n. 4. 1599 sl. – a promiscuous woman; a prostitute; a strumpet
n. 5. 17C sl. – a woman  
n. 6. 17C sl. – the vagina; hence, sexual intercourse, sexual pleasure
n. 7. L18 US sl. – one’s person, self, body, or flesh  
n. 8. M19 sl. – the penis  
n. 9. L19 sl., orig. US – one’s preference, one’s liking; usually in plural  
n. 10. 1910s Aust. sl. – a girlfriend  
n. 11. 1960s US sl. – cowardice  
 
• MUTTON-BIRD
n. 1892 Aust. sl. – a native of northern Tasmania  
 
• MUTTONBIRD-EATER
n. 1941 Aust. sl. – a native of northern Tasmania  
 
• MUTTONBIRDY
adj. 20C Aust. sl. – old-fashioned, unworldly  
 
• MUTTON BONES
n. 1849 obs. rare – the game of knuckle bones
 
• MUTTON-BROKER
n. 1694 obs. rare – a man who is sexually promiscuous or who has dealings with prostitutes
 
• MUTTON CHOPS
n. 1. 1851 – men’s sideburns shaped like a mutton chop, being narrow at the ear and broad and rounded at the lower jaw
n. 2.1864 obs. rare – a sheep’s head
 
• MUTTON-CUMBER
n. 1694 obs. rare – a cucumber or similar fruit
 
• MUTTON DAGGER
n. 20C sl. – the penis  
 
• MUTTON DRESSED LAMB-FASHION
n. 1810 – applied to an old woman dressed in  youthful style  
 
• MUTTON DRIVER
n. a1513 obs. – a sheep stealer
 
• MUTTON-EATER
n. 20C Aust. sl. – a native of northern Tasmania  
 
• MUTTON-FIST
n. 1664 sl., obs. – a large coarse red hand; a person having such hands
 
• MUTTON-FISTED
adj. 1737 – clumsy, awkward
 
• MUTTON-HEAD
n. 1803 colloq., orig. US – a dull, stupid person; a slow-witted person; an uninteresting person, a bore
 
• MUTTON-HEADED
adj. 1768 colloq., orig. US – foolish, slow-witted, unintelligent, stupid  
 
• MUTTONHOOD
n. 1841 humorous usage, rare – the state of being mutton, as opposed to lamb
 
• MUTTON-IN-LONG-COATS
n. 1699 sl. – women
 
• MUTTON MASTER
n. 1729 obs. rare – a man who is sexually promiscuous or who has dealings with prostitutes
 
• MUTTON-MONGER
n. 1. 1532 sl., now rare or obs. – a whoremonger; a man addicted to prostitutes; a debauched man; a pimp, a wencher  
n. 2. 1620 sl., obs. – a great eater of mutton; a butcher, a seller of mutton
n. 3. a1700 sl., obs. – a sheep-stealer
 
• MUTTONSHIP
n. 1632 obs., derogatory – a mock title of respect for a woman, used as a form of address
 
• MUTTON THUMPER
n. 1890 US sl., rare – an incompetent bookbinder
 
• MUTTON TUGGER
n. c1600 obs. rare – a licentious man
 
• MUTUALIZE
vb. 1. 1812 obs. rare – to give and receive in return; to exchange
vb. 2. 1903 – to make equal and reciprocal; to share out equally between parties
 
• MUTUATE
vb. a1548 obs. – to borrow
 
• MUTUATED
adj. 1598 obs. – borrowed
 
• MUTUATION
n. 1604 obs. – an act of lending or borrowing money
 
• MUTUATITIAL
adj. 1654 obs. rare – borrowed
n. 1654 obs. rare – something borrowed
 
• MUTUATITIOUS
adj. 1625 obs. rare – borrowed; taken from elsewhere, or from another
 
• MUTUOUS
adj. 1683 obs. rare – mutual
 
• MUVVER
n. 1871 colloq. – mother
 
• MUX
n. 1. 1746 Eng. dial. – mud, dirt, mire; a muddy or miry state
n. 2. 1847 Amer. dial. – a disordered or muddled state; disorder
vb. 1806 chiefly Amer. dial. – to make dirty, to soil; to spoil, to ruin, to bungle
 
• MUZHIK
n. 1. 1587 – a Russian peasant or serf
n. 2. 1993 colloq. – a macho Russian male; a Russian man whose behaviour or interests are stereotypically masculine
 
• MUZZ
n. 1. 1788 sl., obs. – a person who studies hard or intently
n. 2. 1843 sl. – a muddle, a state of confusion
vb. 1. 1744 sl., rare – to study hard or intently; to pore over
vb. 2. 1758 sl., obs. – to loiter or hang about aimlessly
vb. 3. 1786 sl. – to make muzzy or confused; to befuddle
 
• MUZZED
adj. a1788 sl. – confused or befuddled, esp. from alcohol; drunk  
 
• MUZZILY
adv. 1903 – vaguely, indistinctly; in bewilderment or confusion
 
• MUZZINESS
n. 1. 1814 – a lacking clarity or definition; vagueness; confusion
n. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – stupidity  
 
• MUZZLE
n. 1. a1450 chiefly offensive or humorous usage – the nose, mouth, and chin of the human face
n. 2. a1640 obs. rare – a beard, esp. one that is long or unkempt
n. 3. 1853 obs. rare – Moselle wine
vb. 1. c1450 obs., chiefly Sc. – to muffle, veil , or mask the face; to provide a person with a veil or mask
vb. 2. 1675 sl., obs. – to kiss; to caress with the mouth
vb. 3. 1706 obs. rare – to render ineffective or inoperative
vb. 4. 1708 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to muffle or deaden the sound of a bell
vb. 5. 1796 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to make muzzy or confused; to befuddle
vb. 6. 1828 Eng. dial. rare – to drink to excess
vb. 7. 1843 sl., obs. – to hit on the mouth; to land a blow on a person
vb. 8. 1876 sl., obs. rare – to get, to appropriate; to appropriate food
 
• MUZZLE-CHOPS
n. 1611 colloq., obs. rare – a nickname for a man with a prominent nose and mouth
 
• MUZZLED
adj. 1. 1581 obs., chiefly Sc. – muffled, veiled, masked
adj. 2. 1630 obs. rare – speckled, brindled, dappled, variegated
 
• MUZZLER
n. 1. a1652 – a person who constrains the speech or actions of another
n. 2. 1811 boxing sl., obs. – a blow on the mouth
n. 3. 1857 nautical usage – a strong headwind
n. 4. 1928 US sl. – an obnoxious or annoying person; someone held in contempt
n. 5. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a treacherous person
 
• MUZZLING
n. 1. 1819 boxing sl., obs. rare – a hitting a person in the mouth
n. 2. 1828 colloq. rare – drinking, esp. to excess; a drinking bout
 
• MUZZY
adj. 1. 1728 – dull, gloomy, tedious; said of a place, occasion, etc.
adj. 2. 1729 – drowsy, spiritless; confused, bewildered; mentally hazy; dazed and unfocused
adj. 3. 1744 – vague, hazy, indistinct; imprecisely defined; said of something presented to the mind or senses
adj. 4. 1754 – misty, foggy; muggy
adj. 5. a1795 – affected by alcohol; dazed or fuddled from drinking
adj. 6. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – disorderly; in confusion  
vb. 1781 colloq. rare – to be dispirited; to behave in a listless, dejected manner
 
• MUZZY-HEADED
adj. 1798 colloq. rare – confused, befuddled
 
• MUZZY-HEADEDNESS
n. 1930 – a befuddled or intoxicated condition
 
• MWAH
int. 1986 – represents the sound of a kiss, deliberately exaggerated to convey superficiality or pretentiousness
n. 1966 – an exaggerated kiss, esp. one given on the cheek to a social acquaintance; an air kiss
 
• MWAH-MWAH
vb. 1993 – to kiss in exaggerated fashion, esp. on the cheek; to give air kisses
 
• MY ACHING ASS!
int. 1955 Amer. sl. – used to express negation or contempt; also as an exclamation of dismay, anger, etc.  
 
• MYALL
adj. 1. 1827 Aust., derogatory – retaining a traditional Aboriginal lifestyle; ignorant of the ways of White society
adj. 2. 1848 Aust. – of an animal or plant: wild, feral; inhabiting the bush
adj. 3. 1983 Aust. Aboriginal usage, derogatory – ignorant of traditional Aboriginal culture
n. 1. 1818 Aust. Aboriginal usage, derogatory – a stranger; a person who is ignorant of traditional Aboriginal culture
n. 2. 1837 Aust., derogatory – an Australian Aboriginal person retaining a traditional lifestyle; a person who is ignorant of the ways of White society and often hostile to contact with White people
 
• MYANCE
n. 1. a1513 Sc. obs. – means, resources; influence exerted on behalf of another
n. 2. 1552 Sc. obs. – information, news; grounds for believing something
 
• MY ARMPIT!
int. 1976 Amer. sl. – not at all! no indeed!  
 
• MY ARSE!
int. 1890 Amer. sl. – used to express negation or contempt; also as an exclamation of dismay, anger, etc.  
 
• MY ASS!
int. 1890 Amer. sl. – used to express negation or contempt; also as an exclamation of dismay, anger, etc.
 
• MY ASSHOLE!
int. 1973 Amer. sl. – exclamation of dismay, anger etc.  
 
• MY AUNT!
int. 1869 – an exclamation of surprise or astonishment  
 
• MY AUNT FANNY!
int. 1945 Amer. sl. – used to express disbelief or derision  
 
• MY AUNT NELLIE!
int. 1965 Amer. dial. – an exclamation; “God!”  
 
• MY BAD
phr. L20 US colloq. – used to acknowledge responsibility for a mistake
 
• MY BALLS!
int. 1935 US sl. – not at all!  
 
• MY BELLY THINKS MY THROAT’S CUT
phr. ?1540 – I am very hungry
 
• MY BLOODY OATH!
int. 19C Aust. sl. – a statement of emphatic agreement 
 
• MY BUCKO
n. 1907 Amer. dial. – a term of address, often disparaging  
 
• MY CABBAGE
n. 1840 – a sweetheart; a darling; often as a term of endearment or affectionate form of address
 
• MY CANE!
int. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – an exclamation of surprise
 
• MYCE
vb. 1381 obs. – to cut into small pieces, to dice food, ingredients
 
• MYCOLATRY
n. Bk1991 – the worship of fungi, especially mushrooms
 
• MY COLONIAL OATH!
int. 20C Aust. sl. – a statement of emphatic agreement  
 
• MYCOMYSTICISM
n. 1962 rare – the use of certain mushrooms or their extracts as a means of inducing mystical experiences
 
• MY CONSCIENCE!
int. 19C Sc. – exclamation of surprise
 
• MYCOPHAGE
n. 1958 – a person who eats mushrooms, esp. ones collected from the wild
 
• MYCOPHAGIST
n. 1861 – a person who eats mushrooms, esp. ones collected from the wild
 
• MYCOPHAGY
n. 1865 – the practice of eating mushrooms, esp. those collected from the wild
 
• MYCOPHILE
n. 1885 – a person fond of eating mushrooms; one who has an enthusiasm for mushrooms and other edible fungi
 
• MYCOPHILIA
n. 1957 rare – an enthusiasm for fungi, esp. edible ones; a fondness for eating
mushrooms
 
• MYCOPHILIC
adj. 1957 – having an enthusiasm for mushrooms and other edible fungi
 
• MYCOPHOBE
adj. 1957 – wary of eating mushrooms
n. 1957 – a person who is wary of eating mushrooms
 
• MYCOPHOBIA
n. 1957 – suspicion of or a reluctance to eat mushrooms, toadstools, or other fungi
 
• MYCOPHOBIC
adj. 1957 – wary of eating mushrooms
 
• MY COUNTRY COUSIN IS HERE
phr. 20C US euphemism – I am having my period
 
• MYCTERISM
n. 1593 rare – a subtle or scornful jibe; a piece of sarcasm or irony; subtle mocking
 
• MY DEAR NUG
n. L17 cant  – a term of endearment  
 
• MY DYING ASS!
int. 1976 Amer. sl. – used to express negation or contempt; also as an exclamation of dismay, anger, etc.  
 
• MYE
vb. 1. a1350 obs. – of teeth: to grind, to gnash
vb. 2. 1381 obs. – to crumble or grate bread, etc.
 
• MY ELBOW!
int. 20C NZ sl. – an exclamation of surprise or disbelief  
 
• MY EYE!
int. 1842 sl. – I don’t believe it  
 
• MY EYE AND A BANDBOX!
int. E19 – nonsense! rubbish!  
 
• MY EYE AND BETTY MARTIN
phr. 1785 – nonsense  
 
• MY EYES!
int. E19 – an exclamation of astonishment  
 
• MY EYES AND A BANDBOX!
int. E19 – nonsense! rubbish!
 
• MY EYES AND LIMBS!
int. E19 – an exclamation of astonishment  
 
• MY EYES DRAWS STRAWS
phr. 1790 obs. – I am very sleepy  
 
• MY FACE IS RED!
int. c1954 sl. – I am indeed embarrassed or ashamed  
 
• MY FATHER!
int. 1965 Amer. dial. – an exclamation  
 
• MY FEET ARE STAYING
phr. 1980s US college sl. – a farewell  
 
• MY FOOT!
int. 17C sl. – exclamation expressing disbelief, usually contemptuous  
 
• MY FRIEND
n. 20C – menstruation  
 
• MY FRIEND HAS COME
phr. 19C – announcement of the menstrual flux  
 
• MY FUCK!
int. 2000s sl. – an exclamation of amazement  
 
• MYGALE
n. a1382 obs. – a shrew; a ferret
 
• MY GAWD
n. L19 Brit. rhyming sl. – a sword  
 
• MY GODFREYS!
int. 1916 Amer. dial. – an exclamation  
 
• MY GOOD CHAPPIE
n. c1880 – a term of address  
 
• MY GOODNESS
n. 1940s Brit. sl. – a drink of Guinness  
 
• MY GOODY!
int. L19 sl. – my goodness!  
 
• MY GORSH!
int. 1940 Amer. dial. – hell!  
 
• MY GOSH!
int. 1920s euphemism – my God!  
 
• MY GOT!
int. 1966 Amer. dial. – My God!  
 
• MY GOT ALMIGHTY!
int. 1966 Amer. dial. – My God almighty!  
 
• MY GRANDMOTHER!
int. L18 – nonsense! rubbish!  
 
• MY GRANNY!
int. M19 Brit. colloq. – nonsense!
 
• MY GREAT GUTS ARE READY TO EAT MY LITTLE ONES
phr. L18 sl. – I’m very hungry  
 
• MY GREAT JEHOSAPHAT!
int. 1965 Amer. dial. – an exclamation or mild oath  
 
• MY GUM!
int. c1815 – an exclamation of surprise or astonishment  
 
• MY GUTS BEGIN TO THINK MY THROAT’S CUT
phr. L18 sl. – I’m very hungry  
 
• MY GUTS CHIME TWELVE
phr. M19 sl. – I’m very hungry  
 
• MY GUTS CRY CUPBOARD
phr. 18C sl. – I’m very hungry  
 
• MY GUTS CURSE MY TEETH
phr. L18 sl. – I’m very hungry  
 
• MY GUTS THINK MY THROAT’S CUT
phr. L18 sl. – I’m very hungry
 
• MY HAT!
int. 1968 Amer. dial. – my God!
 
• MY HEAVENLY FATHER!
int. 1965 Amer. dial. – an exclamation  
 
• MY HOLY AUNT!
int. 1869 – an exclamation of surprise or astonishment  
 
• MY IKINS!
int. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – an exclamation; replaced by ‘my eye’  
 
• MY IVERS!
int. 1847 Eng. dial. – an exclamation of surprise; my eyes!  
 
• MY JAWS ARE TIGHT
phr. 1971 Amer. dial. – I am angry  
 
• MY KING OATH!
int. c1910 Aust. sl. – an expletive (king is short for ‘fucking’)
 
• MY LAND!
int. 1894 Amer. dial. – an exclamation  
 
• MY LAND OF LIVING!
int. 1914 Amer. dial. – an exclamation of surprise  
 
• MY LAWS!
int. 1966 Amer. dial. – My God!  
 
• MY LEFT FOOT!
int. 20C colloq. – an exclamation of denial  
 
• MY LEFT KNICKER!
int. 20C colloq. – an exclamation of denial
 
• MY LEFT TIT!
int. 20C colloq. – an exclamation of denial
 
• MY LIGHTS AND LIVERS!
int. 1942 Amer. dial. – a facetious exclamation  
 
• MY LIGHTS, LUNGS, AND LIVERS!
int. 1942 Amer. dial. – a facetious exclamation
 
• MY LITTLE CABBAGE
n. 1896 – a sweetheart; a darling; often as a term of endearment or affectionate form of address
 
• MY LITTLE FRIEND
n. 20C – menstruation  
 
• MY LITTLE FRIEND HAS COME
phr. 1920s sl., orig. Aust. & Can. – I am menstruating  
 
• MY LITTLE WOMAN ROUND THE CORNER
n. 20C middle-class colloq. – one’s dressmaker or sewing-woman  
 
• MY LORD BALDWIN IS DEAD
phr. c1670 – a retort on old news  
 
• MY LOT
n. 19C Brit. sl. – one’s genitals (male)  
 
• MY MAN
n. 1960s Amer. sl. – a term of greeting for a very good friend  
 
• MY MAN THOMAS
n. 17C Brit. colloq. – the penis  
 
• MY MOMMY
n. 1970 Amer. dial. – an affectionate name for a sweetheart  
 
• MY NAME IS TWYFORD
phr. L17 – I know absolutely nothing about it  
 
• MY NAME IS WALKER
phr. M19 – I’m leaving, I’m off  
 
• MY NECK!
int. L19 Irish – an exclamation of surprise or disbelief  
 
• MYNHEER
n. 1. 1605 – a polite or respectful form of address to a Dutchman or an Afrikaner; sir, Mr.
n. 2. 1701 – a Dutchman, an Afrikaner; esp. one who is a gentleman
 
• MYNHEERIFY
vb. 1804 obs. – to study Dutch
 
• MY NIGGA;  MY NIGGER
n. 1. 1960s African-American sl. – a general term of address  
n. 2. 1960s African-American sl. – a major influence, a role-model, a close friend
 
• MY NUG
n. L17 cant – a term of endearment  


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