Dictionary: NEE – NEF


• NEEB
vb. 1892 Sc. – to nod, esp. to nod from drowsiness  

• NEECEE PRINCESS
n. L19 UK society usage – a nouveau riche young woman  

• NEED
adv. c893 obs. – of necessity, necessarily
n. c825 obs. – violence, force, constraint, or compulsion, exercised by or upon persons
vb. 1. c825 obs. – to exercise constraint or compulsion upon one
vb. 2. Bk1905 Sc. – to use  

• NEED A HAIR TO MAKE A CABLE
vb. 1821 Sc. – to exaggerate greatly, make much of a trifle

• NEED A HAIR TO MAKE A TETHER
vb. 1821 Sc. – to exaggerate greatly, make much of a trifle

• NEED A REEF TAKEN IN
vb. Bk1903 sl. – to be drunk

• NEED-BE
n. 1728 rare – an essential or necessary reason; a necessity; something compulsory, indispensable, or requisite

• NEED BOILING DOWN
vb. 1884 Amer. dial. – to need correction or rebuke  

• NEEDCESSITATE
vb. 1836 Sc. obs. – to force, to necessitate

• NEEDCESSITIES
n. 1885 Sc. – necessities of life  

• NEEDCESSITY
n. 1795 Eng. & Amer. dial. – necessity, a state of need  

• NEED-DOER
n. 1382 obs. – a trader 

• NEED-DOING
n. 1382 obs. – trading, traffic

• NEED-FIRE
n. 1805 – a beacon or bonfire  

• NEEDFUL
adj. a1175 rare – of persons: needy, necessitous
n. 1. 1771 sl. – money  
n. 2. 1856 – a necessary thing  
n. 3. M19 US sl. – whisky  

• THE NEEDFUL
n. 1. 1709 – what is necessary or requisite  
n. 2. 1774 colloq. – the necessary funds; money, cash  

• NEEDFULLY
adv. a1340 rare – necessarily, upon compulsion or constraint; urgently, pressingly

• NEEDFULS
n. 1863 Sc. – necessaries  

• NEED-GATES
adv. c1375 obs. – of necessity

• NEEDHAM
n. 1573 obs. – need, poverty, beggary

• NEEDHAM’S CROSS
n. L16 sl. – a state of great poverty  

• NEEDHAM’S SHORE
n. L16 sl. – a state of great poverty

• NEEDIHOOD
n. 1648 obs. rare – neediness

• NEEDILY
adv. 1. 1577-87 obs. rare – necessarily
adv. 2. 1642 obs. rare – in a needy fashion

• NEEDING
n. 1. a1300 obs. rare – an occasion or time of need
n. 2. c1475 obs. rare – a necessary act

• NEEDING A REEF TAKEN IN
adj. 19C sl., orig. nautical usage – drunk

• NEEDINGS
adv. a1300 obs. rare – of necessity

• NEEDLE
adj. 1950s drug culture sl. – pert. to narcotics and their injection  
n. 1. a1225 obs. – an object of trifling importance or value; hence, a particle
n. 2. 1632 sl. – the penis  
n. 3. a1790 sl. obs. – a sharper
n. 4. L18 sl. – a confidence trickster  
n. 5. 1821 sl. – a thief  
n. 6. 1834 rare – a woman who works with a needle; a seamstress
n. 7. L19 sl. – resentment, bitterness, irritation 
n. 8. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – the space of time required to knit the stitches off one knitting-needle; a short interval  
n. 9. 1910s sl. – a knife  
n. 10. 1910s rhyming sl. (Needle and Pin) – gin  
n. 11. 1929 drug culture sl., orig. US – a hypodermic needle  
n. 12. 1930s US sl. – repetitious nagging and complaining; aggressive teasing
n. 13. 1930s drug culture sl. – a narcotics addict  
n. 14. 1967 Amer. dial. – a dragonfly  
n. 15. 1970 Amer. dial. – a praying mantis  
n. 16. 1990s US prison sl. – a lethal injection, as used in legal executions  
vb. 1. 1812 sl. – to annoy, to irritate  
vb. 2. 1812 sl. – to haggle in making a bargain
vb. 3. 1835 Sc. – to thread one’s way through  
vb. 4. 1877 Eng. dial. – to work backwards and forwards  
vb. 5. L19 sl. – to become annoyed  
vb. 6. L19 Irish sl. – to scrounge  
vb. 7. 1929 US sl. – to inject alcohol or ether into a drink, esp. beer, to make it more powerful  
vb. 8. 1940s sl. – to find one’s way  
vb. 9. 1950s US sl. – to apply maximum power or acceleration to a vehicle or plane  
vb. 10. 1970s US criminals’ sl. – to drill a hole, such as in a safe  

• THE NEEDLE
n. 1. 1874 sl. – anger, a fit of anger  
n. 2. 1887 – a fit of irritation or nervousness  
n. 3. 1955 sl., orig. US – addiction to injected drugs  

• NEEDLE AND COTTON
adj. 20C rhyming sl. – rotten  

• NEEDLE AND PIN
adj. 1930s rhyming sl. – thin  
n. 1910s rhyming sl. – gin  

• NEEDLE-AND-THREAD
n. 1859 rhyming sl. – bread  

• NEEDLE BEER
n. 1928 sl. – beer with added alcohol or ether  

• NEEDLE-BOOK
n. 19C Brit. sl. – the female genitals  

• NEEDLE BUG
n. 1. 1967 Amer. dial. – a dragonfly  
n. 2. 1968 Amer. dial. – a praying mantis  

• NEEDLE-CANDY
n. M20 US drug culture sl. – a narcotic which is injected  

• NEEDLE-CASE
n. 19C Brit. sl. – the female genitals  

• NEEDLE CUSHION
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – a porcupine  

• NEEDLEDICK
n. 1969 Amer. sl. – a man having a small penis; hence, a contemptible fellow; a term of abuse  

• NEEDLE-DODGER
n. Bk1902 sl. – a dressmaker  

• NEEDLEDOM
n. 1847 – the ‘world’ of sewing  

• NEEDLE-DUMPER
n. 1896 Sc. – a seamstress  

• NEEDLE-EYED
adj. 1965 Amer. dial. – having very sharp or piercing eyes  

• NEEDLE FLY
n. 1950 Amer. dial. – a dragonfly  

• NEEDLE-JERKER
n. 1807 sl. – a tailor  

• NEEDLEMAN
n. 1. 1823 – a man who works with the needle, esp. a tailor  
n. 2. 1925 US sl. – a drug addict, esp. one who is addicted to injecting drugs  
n. 3. 1945 Amer. dial. – a person (or demonic figure) thought to kill people, esp. Blacks, usually to obtain bodies for dissection  
n. 4. 1965 Amer. dial. – a doctor  

• NEEDLE OF DIFFER
n. 1883 Sc. – the least possible difference  

• NEEDLE-POINT
n. 1. c1696 sl. – a sharper 
n. 2. 1965 Amer. dial. – a sharp-pointed shoe  

• NEEDLE-POINTED SHOE
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – a sharp-pointed shoe  

• NEEDLE-POINTER
n. c1696 sl. – a sharper 

• NEEDLE-POINT SHOE
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – a sharp-pointed shoe  

• NEEDLE PUNCHER
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – a doctor

• NEEDLE-PUSHER
n. 1. 1920 Amer. sl. – a tailor  
n. 2. 1929 Amer. sl. – one who injects narcotics  
n. 3. 1965 Amer. dial. – a doctor  

• NEEDLE QUEEN
n. 1976 Amer. dial. – a nurse  

• NEEDLER
n. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – a keen, active, thrifty person; a niggard  

• NEEDLE’S EYE
n. 1579 – a minute opening or space  

• NEEDLE-SPEED
n. 1774 Sc. – the utmost speed  

• NEEDLE-SPITTER
n. 1805 nonce word – one who uses sharp language

• NEEDLESS
adj. 1. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – shiftless, helpless; unruly, heedless  
adj. 2. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – of an unbaptized infant: nameless

• NEEDLETOE
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – a sharp-pointed shoe  

• NEEDLE-TOED SHOE
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – a sharp-pointed shoe

• NEEDLE TO SEW UP YOUR MOUTH
phr. 1965 Amer. dial. – said to a child when he asks “What are you making?”

• NEEDLE-WIRE
n. 1899 Amer. dial. – a knitting needle  

• NEEDLEWOMAN
n. 1. 1611 – a seamstress  
n. 2. 1849 Brit. sl. – (usually as ‘needle-woman’) a prostitute; a harlot  

• NEEDLE-WROUGHT
adj. 1562 – worked or ornamented with the needle; embroidered  

• NEEDLING
adv. 1. c1000 obs. – forcibly; by force
adv. 2. a1225 obs. – necessarily
n. 1608 obs. rare – a needy person

• NEEDLINGS
adv. a1300 obs. exc. N. Eng. dial. – necessarily; of necessity 

• NEEDLINS
adv. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – of necessity; advisedly  

• NEEDLY
adv. 1. c900 obs. – zealously, carefully; earnestly
adv. 2. 1303 obs. —necessarily

• NEED-MADE-UP
n. Bk1905 Sc. – anything hastily prepared because immediately required  

• NEEDMENTS
n. 1. 1590 – things needed; necessaries; personal requisites carried as luggage  
n. 2. 1603 chiefly Sc. rare – needs, requirements

• NEEDMORE
n. 1. c1960 Amer. dial. – a nickname for a ratty little country store 
n. 2. 1966 Amer. dial. – a section of town, esp. a poor or disadvantaged one  
n. 3. 1968 Amer. dial. – an avaricious or greedy person  

• NEED-NOT
n. 1650 obs. – something unnecessary or superfluous  

• NEED ONE’S HEAD EXAMINED
phr. 1949 sl. – used jocularly to suggest that someone is crazy  

• NEEDS
n. 1. c1000 obs. – one’s errands or business
n. 2. 1297 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – defecation, urination  

• NEEDS-BE
n. 1727 Sc. & Eng. dial. – a necessity; an expediency  

• NEEDS COST
adv. c1385 obs. – necessarily

• NEEDS-END
n. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – difficulties 

• NEEDSLY
adv. c1449 obs. – necessarily  

• NEEDS MUST WHEN THE DEVIL DRIVES
phr. 1831 – one must submit however ungracefully to hard necessity

• NEEDSOME
adj. 1. c1650 obs. – marked by necessity; necessary
adj. 2. 1870 rare – marked by need; needy, poor

• NEED-STEAD
adj. 1456 obs. – in difficulty or danger 

• NEEDS THAT LIKE A MOOSE NEEDS A HAT RACK
phr. 1966 Amer. sl. – doesn’t need it at all  

• NEED-SWEAT
n. a1225 obs. – sweat of distress

• NEED-TIME
n. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – a fitting time; a suitable opportunity  

• NEED-TURN
n. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – an immediate requirement

• NEEDWAYS
adv. a1300 Sc. & N. Eng. dial. obs.- necessarily; by necessity

• NEEDY
adj. 1487 obs. exc. Amer. dial. – necessary, required
n. 1893 sl. – a poor ragged person of either sex  

• NEEDY-HOOD
n. 1648 obs. rare – neediness

• NEEDY-MIZZLER
n. 1819 sl. – a poor ragged person of either sex  

• NEEF
n. 1742 Sc. – difficulty; need  

• NEEGER
n. 1587 Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – a Black person  

• NEEK-NACK
adv. Bk1905 Sc. – rapidly moving in and out, backwards and forwards as in a game  

• NEEL
adj. Bk1902 back-slang – lean  

• NEEMEST
adv. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – foremost  

• NEEN
adj. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – straight, direct
n. 1684 Eng. dial. obs. – eyes

• NEEP
n. 1. c725 – a turnip 
n. 2. 1896 Sc. – a bulky, old-fashioned watch  
n. 3. Bk1905 Sc. – a person of disagreeable temper; an ugly person or thing  
n. 4. Bk1905 Sc. – a parsnip

• NEEP-HEAD
n. 1880 Sc. – a stupid person  

• NEEP-HEADED
adj. 1875 Sc. – stupid, dull  

• NEEPYUN
n. 1875 Sc. – a handkerchief  

• NEER
n. a1300 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – a kidney 

• NE’ER-BE-GOOD
n. 1675 – a ne’er-do-well; a good-for-nothing, disreputable, or worthless person   

• NE’ER-BE-LICKIT
n. 1885 Sc. – nothing whatsoever  

• NE’ER-DO-GOOD
n. 1814 – a ne’er-do-well; a good-for-nothing, disreputable, or worthless person  

• NE’ER-DO-WELL
adj. a1773 – good-for-nothing, worthless; incorrigible 
n. 1737 – one who never does, and is never likely to do, well; a good-for-nothing, worthless, disreputable person  

• NEERGS
n. Bk1902 back-slang – greens  

• NE’ER-THRIFT
n. c1440 obs. – a good-for-nothing or worthless person

• NEESE
n. 1788 Sc. & Eng. dial. – the nose  

• NEESHIN
n. 1. Bk1905 Sc. – sneezing 
n. 2. Bk1905 Sc. – snuff
vb. Bk1905 Sc. – of an animal: to desire the male

• NEEST
n. 1886 Sc. – a spark of fire, a live coal; a very small fire  

• NEESTER
vb. 1. 1892 Sc. – to creak  
vb. 2. Bk1905 Sc. – to throw off sparks; to crackle 

• NEESTERIN
n. 1898 Sc. – a creaking noise; a squeaking  

• NEET
n. Bk1905 Sc. – a parsimonious person; a niggard  

• NEETY
adj. 1892 Sc. & Ireland – miserly, stingy, niggardly  

• NEETY-CUD
n. 1824 Sc. – a low fellow who commits mean actions 

• NEETY-NECK
n. Bk1905 Ireland – a rascal  

• NEEVER-DAY
n. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – New Year’s day  

• NEEVER-EVEN
n. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – New Year’s eve

• NEEZE
n. c1340 obs. exc. Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – a sneeze 
vb. c1340 obs. exc. Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – to sneeze 

• NEEZING
n. 1382 – sneezing, a sneeze  

• NEEZING-BOUT
n. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – a prolonged or violent fit of sneezing  

• NEEZLE
vb. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – to nestle; to insinuate oneself into some good situation or snug position  

• NEFAND
adj. 1490 obs. – not to be spoken of; unmentionable; abominable, atrocious

• NEFANDOUS
adj. 1649 arch. – not to be spoken of; unmentionable, shocking; abominable, atrocious, heinous, horrible

• NEFARIOUS
adj. 1604 – wicked, iniquitous, villainous  

• NEFAST
adj. 1849 rare – wicked, abominable, detestable, vile

• NEFASTOUS
adj. 1727 rare – wicked, iniquitous, villainous

• NEFFEY
n. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – a nephew  

• NEFFIT
n. Bk1905 Sc. – a puny person; a pygmy  

• NEFFOW
adj. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – dexterous with the hands  
n. 1. 1874 Sc. – a handful; a small quantity  
n. 2. Bk1905 Sc. – anything small and puny
vb. 1. Bk1905 Sc. – to deal out or take in handfuls
vb. 2. Bk1905 Sc. – to handle, to take in the hands  

• NE-FOR-THI
adv. a1300 obs. rare – nevertheless


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