Dictionary: POK – POL


• POKE
int. 1914 Amer. dial. – used as a call to pigs
n. 1. c1300 – a bag or sack, esp. a small one; now usually a paper bag
n. 2. 1402 – a long full sleeve
n. 3. c1450 – the stomach of a fish
n. 4. c1614 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – a projecting brim or front of a hat or bonnet; the peak of a cap
n. 5. a1616 rare – a small bag or pouch worn on the person; later, a pocket in a person’s clothing
n. 6. 1621 obs. – a goitre
n. 7. 1690 – a punch; a blow with the fist
n. 7. 1700 sl. – the sex act
n. 8. 1844 Amer. dial. – a slow or lazy animal; a stupid, boring, slow, or plodding person; a lazy person; a dawdler; a bore; a worthless fellow
n. 10. 1859 US criminals’ sl. – a purse; a wallet; a pocketbook
n. 11. 1894 – in baseball: a hit; also, a ball that has been hit
n. 12. 1902 sl. – an act of sexual intercourse
n. 13. 1905 Amer. dial. – the stomach
n. 14. 1926 Amer. sl. – money; one’s bankroll
n. 15. 1928 Amer. sl. – a cowboy
n. 16. 1940s Amer. sl. – a slowpoke
n. 17. 1950 Amer. dial. – a jail or prison
n. 18. 1965 colloq. – power, esp. in a car or other vehicle, horsepower; strength, vigour
n. 19. 1965 Amer. dial. – somebody who always follows along behind others
n. 20. 1968 Amer. dial. – a cow’s udder
n. 21. 1992 colloq. – a searching, rummaging, or prying
vb. 1. c1335 – to hold one’s head thrust forward, esp. when walking; to have a stoop
vb. 2. a1400 obs. exc. Sc. – to put in a bag or pocket
vb. 3. c1400 – to stir up; to incite, to goad, to irritate
vb. 4. 1602 sl. – to possess carnally; to do the sex act with
vb. 5. 1811 – to potter about; to move or work in a desultory, ineffective, or dawdling way; to be slow
vb. 6. 1860 colloq. – to confine, to shut up in a poky place
vb. 7. 1880 Amer. – in baseball: to hit the ball, esp. to hit fairly lightly with precise aim
vb. 8. 1898 – to aim a gun at a moving target before firing, as opposed to swinging and firing in one movement
vb. 9. 1906 colloq. – to hit or strike a person
vb. 10. 1913 Amer. dial. – to urge, to push, to pressure
vb. 11. 1940s Amer. sl. – to herd cattle

• POKE AND PLUMB TOWN
n. 1954 Amer. dial. – a very small town

• POKE AROUND
vb. 1809 Amer. sl. – to examine or search, esp. in a dilatory way

• POKE BORAK
vb. 1904 Aust. – to make or poke fun

• POKE-BOY
n. 1799 rare – a boy employed to collect scattered branches after hop-picking, and to carry hops to the kiln

• POKE-CHEEKED
adj. 1843 obs. rare – having baggy cheeks

• POKE DINNER
n. 1954 Amer. dial. – a lunch carried to work in a paper bag

• POKED OUT
adj. 1988 Amer. dial. – put out, upset, offended

• POKE-EASY
adj. 1851 Amer. dial. – slow, lazy, easygoing
n. 1909 Amer. dial. – an easygoing person; a lazy, slow person
vb. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to be slow

• POKEFUL
n. c1400 chiefly Sc. – a bagful, a small sackful

• POKE FUN AT
vb. 1840 Amer. sl. – to ridicule to tease; to jape; to mock

• POKE-HOLE
n. 1931-33 Amer. dial. – a closet, a cubbyhole

• POKE-HORSE
n. 1669 Eng. dial. obs. – a packhorse carrying loads in two bags

• POKE IN THE EYE
n. 1844 colloq. – something undesirable

• POKELOGAN
n. 1848 Amer. dial. – a stagnant backwater; a swamp adjacent to a river, lake, etc.

• POKE-MAN
n. 1583 Sc. obs. – a porter

• POKE-MARKET
n. 1668 Sc. obs. – a wool market

• POKE-NOSE
adj. 1862 Amer. sl. – intrusively inquisitive, prying, curious
n. 1915 Amer. dial. – a prying, snoopy, or inquisitive person; a meddler

• POKE-NOSED
adj. 1942 Amer. sl. – intrusively inquisitive, prying, curious

• POKE OFF ON
vb. 1899 Amer. dial. – to put or push off on

• POKE OF MOONSHINE
n. 1931-33 Amer. dial. – a jack o’ lantern

• POKE ONE’S NOSE INTO SOMETHING
vb. 1860s Amer. sl. – to pry and meddle; to examine

• POKE-OUT
n. 1. 1874 sl. – a bag of food given to a beggar
n. 2. 1907 US sl. – a cookout; an outdoor trip including this

• POKE-PUD
n. 1. 1820 Sc. colloq., rare – a corpulent or gluttonous person
n. 2. 1820 Sc. colloq., rare, derogatory – an English person

• POKE-PUDDING
adj. 1. 1705 Sc. – paunchy, gluttonous
adj. 2. 1783 Sc., derogatory – characteristic of the English
n. 1. 1706 Sc. derogatory – an Englishman
n. 2. 1754 Sc. – a corpulent or gluttonous person

• POKER
n. 1. c1436 obs. rare – a person who stores or conveys something in a bag or sack
n. 2. 1598 rare – a hobgoblin, a mischievous sprite; a demon, a devil
n. 3. 1608 rare – a person who pokes or pries into things
n. 4. 1684 obs. – a sword
n. 5. 1811 sl. – the penis
n. 6. 1812 obs. rare – a person with a rigid or stiff bearing or manner
n. 7. 1841 university sl., rare – a university bedel at Oxford and Cambridge, who carries a stave or mace before the Vice-Chancellor
n. 8. 1880 obs. rare – a lover
n. 9. 1892 Amer. dial. – a ball of mucus in the nose
n. 10. 1967 Amer. dial. – delirium tremens
vb. 1807 obs. – to stiffen up

• THE POKER
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – delirium tremens

• POKER ARM
n. 1890 – a perfectly straight arm

• POKER-BACKED
adj. 1830 – having a very straight or stiff back

• POKER-BEARER
n. 1844 – a mace-bearer; a University bedel

• POKER FACE
n. 1. 1874 – an expressionless face; neutral mask
n. 2. 1885 Amer. sl. – a person whose face is usually expressionless
n. 3. 1956 Amer. dial. – a barn owl

• POKER-FACED
adj. 1915 – without expression; showing a neutral mask; impassive

• POKERISH
adj. 1. 1779 – inclined to be stiff and unyielding in manner
adj. 2. 1825 Amer. dial., rare – somewhat dangerous, alarming, dreadful, spooky, frightful; affected by feelings of dread

• POKERISHLY
adv. 1. 1854 obs. rare – mysteriously; frighteningly
adv. 2. 1867 obs. rare – in a stiff and unyielding manner

• POKER TALK
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a fireside talk

• POKE-SHAKINGS
n. 1808 Sc. – the last remnants of something, esp. the youngest children in a family, or the smallest piglets of a litter

• POKE STALK
n. 1936 Amer. dial. – a shotgun or rifle

 POKE THE BEAR
vb. 1840 – to deliberately provoke or antagonize a person or group, esp. one that is dangerous or powerful

• POKE THE NEB INTO OTHER FOLK’S PORRIDGE
vb. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – to pry into other people’s affairs

• POKE THE PUPPY
vb. 1989 Amer. dial. – to mark time, to loaf, to shirk work

• POKE UP
vb. 1. 1596 rare – to stash away in a bag or pocket; to hoard
vb. 2. 1950 Amer. dial. – to urge, to push, to pressure

• POKE UP ONE’S PIPES
vb. M16 sl. – to cease from an action; to stop talking

• POKEY
adj. 1. 1849 Amer. sl. – insignificant; paltry
adj. 2. 1856 Amer. sl. – slow, dawdling, sluggish
adj. 3. 1858 Amer. dial. – spooky, scary, eerie
n. 1. 1919 sl., orig. & chiefly Amer. – prison; a jail
n. 2. 1968 Amer. dial. – an indoor toilet

• THE POKEY
n. 1919 sl., chiefly US – prison

• POKEY STIFF
n. 1910s US tramps’ sl. – a tramp who subsists on nothing but handouts

• POKIE
n. 1. 1965 Aust. colloq. – an electronic poker machine, used in casinos
n. 2. 1980s sl. – a person or vehicle that travels slowly

• POKIE BANDIT
n. 1960s Aust. sl. – an electronic poker machine, used in casinos

• POKINESS
n. 1886 US – dullness, slowness

• POKING
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – stuffy
n. 1864 sl. – sexual intercourse

• POKING BORAK
n. 1898 Aust. – a jest

• POKING SLOW
adv. 1942 Amer. dial. – excessively or ploddingly slow

• POKING STICK
n. 1954 Amer. dial. – a fire poker

• POKY
adj. 1. 1828 – small in size or accommodation; cramped, confined; said of a room, building, etc.
adj. 2. 1828 chiefly Amer. – dull, unstimulating; concerned with petty matters; slow, dawdling, sluggish
adj. 3. 1849 Amer. sl. – insignificant; paltry
adj. 4. c1854 obs. – shabby, dowdy; said of dress, etc.
adj. 5. 1858 Amer. dial. – spooky, scary, eerie
n. 1919 Amer. sl. – a jail

• POKY-DOTTED
adj. 1969 Amer. dial. – polka-dotted

• POKY HAT
n. 1927 Sc. colloq. – an ice-cream cone

• POL
n. 1. 1600 obs. rare – a declaration or assertion
n. 2. 1907 colloq., orig. & chiefly Amer. – a politician
n. 3. 1920s US criminals’ sl. – an illegal racket based on a political project
n. 4. 1940s UK prison sl. – a talkative person; a chatterer or gossip
n. 5. Bk1942 US sl. – a toady

• POLAC; POLACK; POLACKI; POLACQUE; POLAK; POLLACKY; POLLOCK; PULLACK
adj. 1603 now derogatory & offensive – Polish; of Polish origin or descent
n. 1. 1561 now derogatory & offensive – a native or inhabitant of Poland; a Pole
n. 2. 1834 Jewish usage, rare, derogatory & offensive – a Jewish person from Poland
n. 3. 1898 Amer., derogatory & offensive – a Polish immigrant; a person of Polish descent

• POLACKER
n. 1. 1605 obs., now derogatory & offensive – a native or inhabitant of Poland
n. 2. 1883 Amer., now derogatory & offensive – a Polish immigrant; a person of Polish descent

• POLACK TOWN
n. E17 – the Polish community within an urban area

• POLAN
n. 1502 rare – a native or inhabitant of Poland

• POLANDER
n. 1. 1587 – a native or inhabitant of Poland
n. 2. 1624 Amer. dial. –
a person of Polish birth or descent; broadly, a central European

• POLARCH
n. 1647 obs. rare – a member of a polyarchy

• POLARCHY
n. 1647 rare – rule or government by many people; a state or polity ruled by many

• POLARI
n. 1846 orig. & chiefly Brit. – a form of slang incorporating Italianate words, rhyming slang, cant terms, and other elements of vocabular, which originated in England in the 18th and 19th centuries as a kind of secret language within various groups, including sailors, vagrants, circus people, entertainers etc.; generally, talk, patter

• POLARIC
adj. 1863 – characterized by directly opposing qualities, actions, etc.

• POLARISTIC
adj. 1859 rare – characterized by opposing qualities or characteristics

• POLARITY
n. 1767 obs. – direction of feeling, inclination, etc., towards a single point; tendency or trend in a particular direction; attraction towards a particular object

• POLAR LIGHTS
n. 1841 – the aurora borealis; the aurora australis

• POLAR LINE
n. 1658 obs. – either of the Arctic and Antarctic Circles

• POLAR STAR STATE
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – Maine

• POLBORON
n. 1977 US sl. – heroin

• POLDER
n. 1. 1602 Eng. dial. – a piece of low-lying land reclaimed from the sea, a river, etc., and protected by dykes
n. 2. a1669 Eng. dial., rare – a marsh; a piece of marshy or boggy land
n. 3. 1704 rare – a tree which has had its upper trunk and branches cut back, so as to produce new growth and a uniform shape

• POLDERBOY
n. 1895 rare – a labourer employed in making polders or farming polderland

• POLDERMAN
n. 1884 rare – a labourer employed in making polders or farming polderland

• POLE
n. 1. 1572 poetic usage, arch. & rare – the sky, the heavens
n. 2. c1600 sl. – the penis, esp. when erect
n. 3. 1633 obs. – a peg or axle on which something turns
n. 4. 1828 Eng. dial. rare – the long handle of a scythe or similar implement
n. 5. 1851 horse racing usage – the rails; hence, the starting position closest to them
n. 6. 1864 hunting usage, rare – the tail of an otter, pheasant, or other quarry
n. 7. 1882 Amer. – a slender tree
n. 8. 1976 motor racing usage – the position on the front row of the starting grid nearest to the inside of the first bend
vb. 1. 1882 baseball usage – to hit the ball hard; to earn a hit
vb. 2. 1892 Amer. dial. – to move, walk, or travel, esp. in a slow, leisurely, or aimless manner; to saunter, to amble
vb. 3. M19 US students’ sl. – to work hard
vb. 4. 1900s Aust. sl. – to arrive, to appear
vb. 5. 1906 Aust. & NZ sl., rare – to take advantage of someone; to impose or sponge on; to shirk, to do less than one’s share; also, to steal
vb. 6. Bk1903 sl. – to possess carnally
vb. 7. 1960s sl. – to make pregnant
vb. 8. 1990s sl. – to stab

• POLEAXE
n. M19 sl. – (as ‘pole-axe’) a policeman
vb. 1959 – to shock someone into helplessness; to stupefy someone, to stun, to overwhelm

• POLEAXED
adj. 1. 1983 – stupefied, astounded, overwhelmed
adj. 2. 2002 UK sl. – drunk

• POLECAT
n. 1. 1593 derogatory – a sexually promiscuous woman; a prostitute
n. 2. c1612 Amer. dial. – a skunk
n. 3. 17C sl. – a lecherous man
n. 4. 1896 Amer. dial. – a despicable, contemptible or deceitful person; a disreputable person; a sneaky person
n. 5. 1950s African-American sl. – a dirty, untrustworthy woman
n. 6. 1966 Amer. dial. – a thief
n. 7. 1972 Amer. dial. – an informer
n. 8. 1976 US sl. – a police car
n. 9. 1981 Amer. dial., derogatory – a Black person
n. 10. 1990 US sl. – in the television and film industries: a lamp support

• POLECAT UNDER  THE TABLE
phr. 1932 Amer. dial. – a concealed fact, factor, or motive; something suspicious

• POLECLIMBERS
n. 1995 US sl. – heavy work boots with steel-reinforced toes and arches

• POLED
adj. 1930s Aust. sl. – stolen

• POLEDAD
n. 1964 US sl. – an annoying, new-to-the-sport skateboarder

• POLE DAY
n. 1973 US sl. – in motor racing: the first day of qualifying heats when the pole position is decided

• POLE HOLE
n. 1970s sl. – the vagina

• POLE IT
vb. a1975 Amer. dial. – to move, walk, or travel, esp. in a slow, leisurely, or aimless manner; to saunter, to amble

• POLEKITTY
n. 2000 Amer. dial. – a skunk

• POLEMAN
n. 1615 obs. – a man employed to empty cesspools, outdoor privies, etc., at night and to remove the waste matter

• POLEMARCH
n. 1579 – in Ancient Greece: a military commander

• POLEMIC
adj. 1614 – given to dispute or controversy; contentious, disputatious, combative
n. 1. 1626 – a controversial argument; a strong verbal or written attack on a person
n. 2. 1639 – a person who argues or writes in opposition to another; a controversialist

• POLEMICAL
adj. 1. 1615 – given to dispute or controversy; contentious, disputatious; combative
adj. 2. 1640 obs. – relating to war; martial, military
n. 1808 – a diatribe; a polemic; usually in plural

• POLEMICALLY
adv. 1653 – controversially, disputatiously

• POLEMICIAN
n. 1871 rare – a controversialist

• POLEMICIST
n. 1864 – a controversialist

• POLEMICIZE
vb. 1881 – to argue; to carry on a controversy

• POLEMICS
n. 1656 obs. rare – poetical or other literary discourse dealing with war

• POLEMIST
n. 1825 – a controversialist

• POLEMIZE
vb. 1828 – to argue; to carry on a controversy

• POLEMOLOGICAL
adj. 1964 – relating to war

• POLEMOLOGIST
n. 1970 – a student of, or an expert in polemology

• POLEMOLOGY
n. 1938 – the study of war, esp. as an academic discipline

• POLEMOMANIA
n. 1874 obs. – an excessive desire for conflict; militant anger

• POLEMY
n. 1. 1642 rare – controversy, opinionated argument; polemics; a dispute
n. 2. 1691 obs. – warfare

• POLE OF COLD
n. 1850 – the place with the lowest mean annual temperature

• POLE ON
vb. 1. 1906 Aust. sl. – to cadge or sponge money
vb. 2. 1930s Aust. sl. – to steal

• POLE PLEASER
n. 1990s US sl. – a (passive) homosexual man

• POLER
n. 1. M19 US students’ sl. – a very diligent student
n. 2. 1938 Aust. sl. – a borrower or cadger
n. 3. 1938 Aust. sl., rare – a shirker, a sponger

• POLES
n. 1960s S. Afr. sl. – the legs

• POLES APART
adj. 1830 colloq. – completely different; having nothing in common

• POLE SITTER
n. 2000s African-American sl. – a homosexual man

• POLESMOKER
n. 2000s sl. – a term of abuse

• POLESS
n. 1828 rare – a Polish woman

• POLES-SCREAMER
n. 1651 obs. rare – a tradesman with a shop

• POLESTAR
n. 1590 – a person or thing which serves as a guide; a governing principle, a guiding light; also, a centre of attention, a landmark

• POLE WORK
n. M19 sl. – sexual intercourse

• POLEY
adj. M19 Aust. criminals’ sl. – wanted by the police
n. 1. 1992 Amer. dial. – the backside
n. 2. 2000 Amer. dial. – a cow’s backside

• POLEYN
n. c1445 obs. – a young male horse; a colt

• POLIAD
n. 1818 obs. – a nymph who inhabits a city

• POLIBLE
adj. a1500 obs. rare – capable of being polished

• POLICE
n. 1. c1450 obs. – policy
n. 2. 1530 obs. – social or communal organization; civilization
n. 3. 1698 orig. Sc., obs. – the regulation and control of a community; the maintenance of law and order, provision of public amenities, etc.
n. 4. 1740 orig. Sc., obs. – a department of a government or state concerned with maintaining public order and safety, and enforcing the law
n. 5. 1761 military usage, chiefly US, obs. – the cleaning or keeping clean of a camp or garrison; the cleanliness or orderliness of a camp or garrison
n. 6. 1767 orig. Sc., rare – public regulation or control of trade in a particular product
n. 7. 1990s US prison sl. – a prison guard
vb. 1. a1600 Sc. obs. – to enclose and develop land, esp. by cultivation
vb. 2. a1631 obs. – to maintain civil order in a state or country; to organize or regulate
vb. 3. 1828 orig. & chiefly US – to make or keep clean or orderly; to clean a military camp, etc.
vb. 4. 1910s US prison sl. – to maintain prison discipline and rules

• POLICE BLOTTER
n. 1861 orig. & chiefly US – a record of arrests and charges at a police station

• POLICE BOY
n. 1914 now offensive – a native-born male employed by the police force of a colonial or White-dominated administration as an assistant, security officer, or tracker

• POLICE CLOTHES
n. 1930s Irish sl. – free secondhand clothes distributed to the poor by the police

• POLICED
adj. 1. 1603 obs. – politically organized or ordered; regulated governed; disciplined
adj. 2. 1950s African-American sl. – aware, knowledgeable

• POLICE DOG
n. 1920s US sl. – one’s fiancé

• POLICEFUL
adj. 1903 – well served by the police; having police everywhere

• POLICEMAN
n. 1. 1877 obs. – a soldier ant
n. 2. M19 sl. – a bluebottle fly
n. 3. M19 sl. – ‘among the dangerous classes, a man who is unworthy of confidence, a sneak or mean fellow’
n. 4. 1920s US prison sl. – a term of abuse
n. 5. 1923 sl. rare – an informer
n. 6. 1929 nautical usage, rare – a member of the watch who stays awake so as to be able to rouse other members of the crew if so ordered by an officer
n. 7. 1951 rare – an object regarded as a deterrent, obstacle, or check
n. 8. 1959 ice hockey usage – a player whose primary role is to defend teammates from particularly aggressive play by the opposing team
n. 9. 1980s Amer. sl. – an enforcer

• POLICEMAN’S HELMET
n. 1930s sl. – the glans penis

• POLICE MANURE
n. 1825 Sc. obs. – manure collected in t he streets of a town or city; street-sweepings

• POLICE-MONGER
n. 1808 rare – a person who is preoccupied with the policing of a community

• POLICEOCRACY
n. 1887 – a country dominated by the police; also, the rule of the police

• POLICE PIMP
n. 1940s Aust. criminals’ sl. – an informer

• POLICE RUNNER
n. 1781 hist. – a police officer of the lowest rank

• POLICE UP
vb. 1857 US Army usage – to clean up a camp, barracks, parade ground, etc.; to make neat and orderly

• POLICIAL
adj. 1843 – pertaining to the police

• POLICIAR
n. 1562 Sc. obs. rare – a person who improves or develops an estate

• POLICIED
adj. 1596 obs. – politically or socially organized; civilized

• POLICIER
n. 1. a1500 obs. – an officer responsible for checking and certifying the quality of a product
n. 2. 1956 – a film based on a police novel

• POLICING
n. 1. 1567 Sc. obs. – an improving or developing land, esp. by cultivation
n. 2. 1589 obs. – the ordering, regulation, or administration of a state
n. 3. 1862 US military usage – a cleaning and keeping order in a camp, garrison, etc.

• POLICIZED
adj. 1840 obs. rare – politically organized or ordered; regulated, governed, disciplined

• POLICIZER
n. 1809 obs. rare – a person who practises policy; a schemer

• POLICY
n. 1. c1390 obs. – the art, study, or practice of government or administration; the conduct of public affairs; political science
n. 2. a1393 obs. – an organized state; a commonwealth, a polity
n. 3. 1406 obs. – a device, a contrivance, an expedient; a stratagem, a trick
n. 4. a1439 obs. – civil order, polity; an organized and established system or form of government or administration, esp. in a state or city
n. 5. c1440 obs. – cunning, craftiness
n. 6. 1472 Sc. obs. – the improvement, development, or embellishment of an estate, building, etc.
n. 7. a1522 Sc. obs. – the polishing or refining of manners; refinement, elegance; culture, civilization
n. 8. 1623 obs. – a conditional promissory note, dependent on the result of a bet
n. 9. 1670 obs. – a voting paper; also, a voucher
n. 10. M19 US sl. – a form of street gambling that involves predicting a combination of the winning numbers at a racetrack
vb. 1. a1500 obs. rare – to provide with a certificate; to examine and certify to the purity or quality of
vb. 2. 1565 obs. – to organize, order, or regulate a state, country, etc.

• POLICY KING
n. 1894 US – a person who controlled a network of ‘policy’ shops; one who makes large profits from running policy games

• POLICY OFFICER
n. 1693 obs. – a person who issues policies of insurance

• POLICY RUNNER
n. M19 US sl. – a person who acts as a go-between between bettors and the policy ‘banker’

• POLICY WONK
n. 1984 sl., orig. US – a person who takes an excessive interest in minor details of policy

• POLIORCETIC
adj. 1744 – relating to the besieging of cities or fortresses

• POLIORCETICS
n. 1569 – a conducting and resisting sieges; siegecraft

• (THE) POLIS
n. 1833 chiefly Irish & Sc. – a police officer

• POLISH
n. 1. 1900s US sl. – a fool
n. 2. 1900s sl. – effrontery, arrogance
n. 3. 1980s NZ sl. – fellatio
n. 4. 1990s sl. – an act of masturbation
vb. 1. c1450 obs. rare – to gloss over a sin, treacherous act. etc.
vb. 2. 1712 obs. – to become refined
vb. 3. 1868 colloq. – to eat up every scrap of food; to eat every last trace of food from one’s plate
vb. 4. M19 sl. – to hoodwink; to exploit
vb. 5. M19 sl. – to beat, to thrash

• POLISH A BONE
vb. 1788 obs. – to eat a meal

• POLISH AIRLINES
n. 1960s homosexual sl. – walking

• POLISH APPLES
vb. 1927 US sl. – to curry favour, as with a teacher

• POLISH DOZEN
n. 1995 Amer. dial. – fourteen

• POLISHED
adj. E20 US sl. – intoxicated with alcohol

• POLISHED-UP
adj. E20 US sl. – intoxicated with alcohol

• POLISHER
n. 1. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a toady
n. 2. 20C sl. Aust. sl. – a jailbird

• POLISH FIRE DRILL
n. 1978 Amer. dial. – a scene of great confusion; a chaotic situation

• POLISH HANDBALL
n. 1970s homosexual sl. – dried nasal mucus

• POLISHING DOWN
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – a sharp scolding

• POLISH IT UP
vb. 1960s US students’ sl. – to toady; to act sycophantically

• POLISHMENT
n. 1594 rare – a polishing, improving, or bringing to completion

• POLISH OFF
vb. 1. 1827 colloq. – to complete quickly or easily
vb. 2. 1827 colloq. – to drink or eat up completely
vb. 3. 1827 colloq. – to get rid of; to destroy; to kill

• POLISH SHOWER
n. 2000s sl. – a cursory wash or the application of deodorant to unwashed armpits

• POLISH THE APPLE
vb. 1920s sl. – to curry favour; to act the sycophant

• POLISH THE KING’S IRON WITH ONE’S EYEBROW(S)
vb. 1785 sl. – to look out of grated or prison windows

• POLISH UP
vb. 1965 Amer. dial. – to curry favour with

• POLISHURE
n. 1611 obs. rare – a being polished; smoothness, refinement

• POLISMAN
n. 1850 chiefly Irish & Sc. – a police officer

• POLISSON
n. 1866 – an urchin; a rascal; a dishonest or rude person

• POLITARCH
n. 1852 – a civic magistrate or governor in some cities of the eastern part of the Roman Empire

• POLITBURO
n. 1923 – the highest policy-making committee of a communist party or country, esp. of the Soviet Union

• POLITE
adj. 1. a1398 obs. – smoothed, polished, burnished
adj. 2. 1602 obs. – clean; neat, orderly
vb. 1535 obs. – to polish or refine; to clear up

• THE POLITE
n. 1. 1711 – refined or cultured people as a class
n. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – politeness

• POLITE AS A BASKET OF CHIPS
adj. Bk1905 Amer. dial. – very polite and smiling

• POLITEFUL
adj. 1832 rare – polite, courteous

• POLITELY
adv. 1598 obs. – smoothly

• POLITENESS
n. 1. 1627 obs. – intellectual refinement; polish, elegance, good taste
n. 2. 1638 obs. – polish, smoothness of surface

• POLITESSE
n. 1683 – formal politeness; etiquette

• POLITIAN
n. 1584 obs. – an expert in politics; a politician

• POLITIC
adj. 1. c1430 – judicious, expedient, sensible; skilfully contrived; said of an action or thing
adj. 2. a1439 – prudent, shrewd, sagacious; said of a person
adj. 3. 1543 derogatory – scheming, crafty, cunning
adj. 4. c1550 Sc. obs. rare – ingenious; well adapted to the purpose
adj. 5. 1596 Sc. obs. rare – polished, refined, cultured
n. 1. 1429 obs. – the political state, life, or condition of a country or government; the polity; also, the art or knowledge of government
n. 2. 1533 obs. – a temporizer, esp. in matters of religion; as worldly-wise person
n. 3. 1559 arch. – a politician
n. 4. 1588 – policy; politics
vb. 1. 1892 – to engage in political activity, esp. in order to strike political bargains or to seek votes; to campaign
vb. 2. 1966 – to influence politically; to propagandize; to lobby

• POLITICAL
adj. 1577 obs. – judicious, expedient, sensible; skilfully contrived; said of an action or thing
n. 1833 – a politician; a political writer

• THE POLITICAL
n. 1845 – that which is political; politics

• POLITICAL ANIMAL
n. 1. 1710 – a person viewed as tending to live and act with others, esp. in an organized community
n. 2. 1892 – a person who is interest in or concerned about political issues, or who actively participates in politics

• POLITICAL FOOTBALL
n. 1833 – a subject of contentious political debate; an issue not resolved by succeeding governments

• POLITICALIZE
vb. 1. 1859 – to make political
vb. 2. 1869 rare – to practise or comment on politics

• POLITICALS
n. 1621 rare – political matters, political ideas; politics

• POLITICASTER
n. 1641 arch., derogatory – an inadequate or contemptible politician

• POLITICIAN
n. 1. 1586 – a schemer or plotter; a shrewd, sagacious, or crafty person; one whose behaviour is likened to that of a professional politician
n. 2. 1911 US Navy & prison sl. – a person who obtains preferential treatment, esp. an easy or desirable job, through manipulation
n. 3. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a toady
n. 4. World War I Amer. sl. – a soldier with a job that excuses him from assemblies and musters

• POLITICIANER
n. a politician …1838 Amer. dial.

• POLITICIANESS
n. 1785 – female politician; a woman who is an expert in politics

• POLITICIDE
n. 1. 1968 – a killing or extermination of a particular group because of its political or ideological beliefs
n. 2. 1974 – a course of action which is irreparably damaging to one’s political career

• POLITICIST
n. 1856 – a political scientist; a person who studies political groups or actions

• POLITICKER
n. 1604 chiefly depreciative usage – a politician, esp. one motivated by political expediency; a person who engages in political activity out of self-interest

• POLITICLESS
adj. 1556 obs. rare – impolitic, unwise

• POLITICO
n. 1630 sl., usually derogatory – a politician

• POLITICO-MANIA
n. 1785 – a passion for, or an obsession with, politics

• POLITICONE
n. a1734 obs. rare, derogatory – a politician

• POLITICOPHOBIA
n. 1830 – an irrational fear of politics or politicians

• POLITIED
adj. 1816 obs. rare – having a polity or administration

• POLITION
n. 1623 obs. rare – an adorning or decorating something

• POLITIQUE
n. 1. 1581 often derogatory – a politician, esp. a pragmatic or unprincipled one
n. 2. 1958 – a political concept or doctrine; an expression of political ideas

• POLITIST
n. 1598 – a politician; a student of or a writer on politics

• POLITITIONER
n. 1859 Amer. dial. – a politician

• POLITITIOUS
adj. 1638 obs. – political

• POLITIZE
vb. 1. 1598 obs. rare – to deal with or treat a matter shrewdly or diplomatically
vb. 2. 1623 – to engage in political affairs or relations; to play the politician
vb. 3. 1884 rare – to make into citizens

• POLITRICKS
n. 1908 sl., chiefly Jamaican, depreciative usage – politics. regarded as characterized by dishonesty or self-interest; the use of underhand methods to achieve political ends regarded as self-serving or contemptible

• POLITURE
n. 1. 1592 obs. – polishing; polish, smoothness
n. 2. 1593 – elegance; refinement; polish of style or manners

• POLITY
n. 1. a1538 rare – civilization; civil order or organization; civil society
n. 2. 1558 rare – administration of a state; a process of civil government or a constitution
n. 3. 1555 – an organized society; the state as a political entity
n. 4. 1562 rare – management, administration, policy; statecraft; a method of government
n. 5. 1642 obs. – a political principle

• POLK
vb. 1845 colloq., rare – to dance the polka

• POLKAMANIA
n. 1844 – a mania for dancing the polka

• POLKERY
n. 1845 obs. – a social gathering for the purpose of dancing the polka

• POLKING
adj. 1856 obs. – dancing the polka; said of a person
n. 1845 rare – the act of dancing the polka

• POLKIST
n. 1844 obs. – a person accomplished at dancing the polka

• POLK STALK
n. 1936 Amer. dial. – a shotgun or rifle

• POLKY
adj. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – of potatoes: diseased

• POLL
n. 1. c1300 arch. – the part of the head on which the hair grows; the scalp of a person or animal
n. 2. a1398 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – the back of the head or neck
n. 3. a1400 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – the head of a person or animal
n. 4. 1568 chiefly Sc., rare – a skull
n. 5. 1591 obs. – a measure of land formerly used in Ireland, equivalent to 50 or 60 acres
n. 6. 1600 – a parrot; a pet name for a parrot
n. 7. a1613 obs. – the number of people assembled on a particular occasion, as determined by the counting of heads; the muster
n. 8. 1625 – the counting of voters or of votes cast in an election
n. 9. 1704 obs. – the top or crown of a hat or cap
vb. 1. a1325 rare – to cut the hair of a person or animal; to shave, to shear; to barber
vb. 2. a1449 – to cut off the top of a tree or plant; to top or head a tree a few feet from the ground so it throws out more branches; generally, to lop the branches of, to prune
vb. 3. 1490 rare – to plunder or pillage by excessive taxation; to rob, to fleece, to strip, to cheat
vb. 4. a1500 obs. – to count the heads of persons or animals; to enumerate
vb. 5. 1521-2 obs. – to plunder, to steal, to practice extortion; to cheat
vb. 6. 1577 obs. – to cut off the head of a person, animal, etc.; to behead
vb. 7. 1673 rare – to take the vote of a person; to record a vote

• POLLACK
n. 1. 1774 Sc. obs. rare – a porpoise
n. 2. 1879 Amer. sl., somewhat derogatory – a Pole or a person of Polish extraction

• POLLANTINE
n. 1558 obs. rare – ? a porpoise

• POLLARCHY
n. 1853 chiefly political usage, rare – rule or government by the masses; also, the masses as a ruling body or political force

• POLLARD
adj. 1856 humorous usage, obs. – bald-headed; said of a person
n. 1. 1546 obs. – a male deer that has cast its antlers; later: a hornless domestic animal of a breed that is typically horned
n. 2. 1588 – a tree which has had its upper trunk and branches cut back, so as to produce new growth and a uniform shape
n. 3. Bk1903 sl. – penny (1d)
vb. 1670 – to cut back the upper trunk and branches of a tree

• POLLART
n. a1300 obs. rare – a hare

• POLL-AXE
n. 16C Shakespeare usage – the penis

• POLL-CLAWED
adj. 1855 humorous usage, obs. rare – having dishevelled or cropped hair

• POLLED
adj. 1. a1325 arch. – having the hair cut short; shorn, shaven; cut off, cropped; said of a person or animal
adj. 2. 1538 obs. rare – plundered, pillaged
adj. 3. 1577 – that has cast its antlers; later of a domestic animal: hornless
adj. 4. 1587 – cut back, lopped: said of a tree

• POLLED-UP
adj. L19 Brit. sl. – living with a mistress or concubine

• POLLEE
n. 1939 orig. & chiefly US – a person who is questioned in an opinion poll

• POLLENCY
n. 1623 arch. & rare – power, strength

• POLLENT
adj. 1660 rare – powerful, strong, mighty

• POLLER
n. 1. a1513 obs. – a plunderer, a pillager, a robber
n. 2. 1578 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – a person who cuts hair; a barber
n. 3. 1715 rare – a person who votes, esp. in an election
n. 4. 1828 obs. rare – a person who lops or polls trees
n. 5. 1828 obs. rare – a person who registers voters for an election

• POLL-HATCHET
n. 1279 obs. rare – a poleaxe

• POLL-HIGH
adj. 1838 obs. rare – head-high

• POLL-HILL
n. 1827 humorous usage, obs. rare – a bump or lump on the head

• POLLICAR
adj. 1. 1656 obs. rare – relating to a thumb or toe
adj. 2. 1656 obs. rare – measuring an inch in length or breadth

• POLLICITATE
vb. 1657 obs. rare – to promise or assure

• POLLICITATION
n. c1455 chiefly hist. – a promising; a promise; a document conveying a promise

• POLLINCED
adj. 1623 obs. rare – of a corpse: embalmed

• POLLINCTOR
n. 1606 chiefly Roman history, rare – a person who prepares a corpse for burial, cremation, or embalming, by washing, anointing, etc.; one who is employed to do this; an undertaker

• POLLINCTURE
n. 1656 obs. rare – a washing, anointing, or otherwise preparing a dead body for cremation or burial

• POLLING
adj. 1526 obs. – plundering or robbing; extortionate, cheating

• POLLINGER
n. 1570 chiefly Eng. dial., obs. – a pollarded tree

• POLL-MAD
adj. 1577 obs. – mad-brained, uncontrolled, scatterbrained

• POLLOCK
n. 1879 Amer. sl., somewhat derogatory – a Pole or a person of Polish extraction

• POLLOI
n. 1803 colloq. – the common people; the masses

• POLLONEY
n. 1938 UK sl. – a girl, a usually young woman

• POLL-PARROT
n. 1768 – a parrot
vb. 1865 – to chatter like a parrot; to talk incessantly or inconsequentially; to prattle; also, to repeat words or phrases without apparent understanding or thought

• POLL-PARROTY
adj. 1837 rare – loud and raucous, like a parrot; talkative, chattering

• POLLRUMPTIOUS
adj. c1860 sl. – unruly or restless; foolishly confident

• POLL-SHORN
adj. 1556 obs. – having a shorn head

• POLL-SHRED
vb. 1530 obs. rare – to cut back the upper trunk and branches of a tree

• POLLUCIBLE
adj. 1623 obs. rare – sumptuous, lavish

• POLLUTE
vb. 1. a1382 – to make morally impure; to violate the purity or sanctity of; to profane or desecrate; to corrupt, to sully
vb. 2. 1548 – to make physically impure, foul, or filthy; to dirty, to stain, to taint
vb. 3. 17C sl. – to masturbate
vb. 4. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to intoxicate; to make dead drunk

• POLLUTED
adj. 1. 1900 US sl. – intoxicated with alcohol
adj. 2. 1938 sl., orig. US – in a drugged state
adj. 3. 1967 Amer. dial. – tired, exhausted, without energy
adj. 4. 1981 Amer. dial. – thoroughly furnished with

• POLLUTION
n. 1. c1390 arch. – ejaculation of semen without sexual intercourse, esp. a nocturnal emission
n. 2. 16C sl. – masturbation

• POLLUTIONATE
adj. 1593 obs. – polluted, desecrated

• POLLUVE
vb. 1533 Sc. obs. rare – to pollute

• POLLY
n. 1. 1826 – a parrot
n. 2. 1896 Amer. dial. – attaching a handsled to sleighs drawn by horses, etc.
n. 3. L19 UK school sl. – a prefect
n. 4. 1932 Aust. & NZ sl. – a politician
n. 5. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a toady
n. 6. 1968 Amer. dial. – a female mule
n. 7. 1968 Amer. dial. – a hair bun or ponytail
n. 8. 1970 Amer. dial. – a chamber pot

• POLLYANNA
adj. 1917 – naively cheerful and optimistic; unrealistically happy
n. 1. 1921 – a person able to find cause for happiness in the most disastrous situations; a person who is unduly optimistic or achieves happiness through self-delusion
n. 2. 1985 Amer. dial. – an arrangement by which each member of a group gives a gift to one other member chosen at random; a gift given according to such an arrangement; the person to whom one gives or from whom one receives such a gift

• POLLYANNAISH
adj. 1922 – naively cheerful and optimistic; unrealistically happy

• POLLYBOG
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – a tadpole

• POLLY-BOO
n. 1. 1895 Amer. dial. – attaching a handsled to sleighs drawn by horses, etc.
n. 2. 1967 Amer. dial. – a person of French background

• POLLYCON
n. 20C undergraduates’ sl. – political economy

• POLLYDODDLE
n. 1894 Eng. dial. – an effeminate man; one who busies himself with woman’s or household work 

• POLLY FLINDER
n. L19 Cockney rhyming sl. – a window

• POLLYFOX
vb. 1. 1873 Amer. dial. – to dilly-dally, to delay and discuss, to quibble or equivocate
vb. 2. 1936 Amer. dial. – to move quietly, to pussyfoot

• POLLYFOX AROUND
vb. 1970 Amer. dial. – to equivocate, to quibble, to procrastinate; to waste time, to dilly-dally, to delay and discuss

• POLLYFROG
n. Bk1942 Amer. Western sl. – a tadpole

• POLLYMARBLES
n. 1971 Amer. dial. – collywobbles; depression or nervousness; some imaginary or undefined illness

• POLLYNOSE
n. 1978 Amer. dial. – a maple seed which children play with by splitting the bract and sticking it on the bridge of the nose

• POLLY-POUTS
n. 1915 Amer. dial. – a fit of sulking

• POLLY-POUTY
adj. 1942 Amer. dial. – sulky, sullen

• POLLY RIDE
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – attaching a handsled to sleighs drawn by horses, etc.

• POLLY-WAD
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – a hair bun or ponytail

• POLLYWIGGLE
n. Bk1942 Amer. Western sl. – a tadpole

• POLLYWOG 
n. 1. 1440 chiefly Eng. dial. & US – a tadpole
n. 2. 1854 rare – a person, esp. a politician, who is considered untrustworthy
n. 3. 1925 nautical sl. – a sailor who is crossing the equator for the first time

• POLLYWOGGLE
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – a tadpole

• POLLYWOGGY
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – a tadpole

• POLOIST
n. 1876 – a polo player

• POLONAISE
n. 1807 rare – a female native or inhabitant of Poland; a Polish woman

• POLONE
n. 1. M19 theatrical sl. – a girl or woman
n. 2. 1969 sl., derogatory – an effeminate man

• POLONESE
adj. 1736 – Polish
n. 1. 1668 obs. – a native or inhabitant of Poland
n. 2. 1781 obs. rare – the Polish language

• POLONEY
n. 1938 UK sl., derogatory – a girl, a usually young woman

• POLONI
n. 1934 sl., derogatory – a young woman

• POLONIAL
adj. 1. 1872 – characteristic of Polonius (the elderly and sententious courtier in Shakespeare’s ‘Hamlet’); given to using moralistic aphorisms, sententious
adj. 2. 1922 rare – Polish

• POLONIAN
adj. 1. 1576 – Polish, of Polish descent
adj. 2. 1847 – characteristic of Polonius (the elderly and sententious courtier in Shakespeare’s ‘Hamlet’); given to using moralistic aphorisms, sententious
n. 1533 – a native or inhabitant of Poland; later, a Polish immigrant or person of Polish descent living in the United States

• POLONISM
n. 1. 1842 – Polish identity and culture
n. 2. 1859 – a Polish idiom or turn of phrase; a Polish characteristic

• POLONIZATION
n. 1866 – a making something Polish

• POLONIZE
vb. 1844 – to make Polish; to give a Polish character to

• POLONOIS
n. 1606 obs. – a native or inhabitant of Poland; a person of Polish descent

• POLONY
adj. 1610 obs. – Polish, from Poland; designating a fashionable high stacked heel and shoes having such a heel
n. 1. 1934 sl., derogatory – a young woman
n. 2. 1969 sl., derogatory – an effeminate man

• POLPISY
adj. 1916 Amer. dial. – countrified, outlandish; awkward, ungainly

• POLRUMPTIOUS
adj. 1790 Eng. dial. – restive, rude, unruly, obstreperous; foolishly confident

• POLSKI
n. 1950 Amer. dial. – a person of Polish ancestry; a Polish immigrant

• POLT
n. 1. c1610 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – a blow; a hard knock
n. 2. 1614 obs. rare – the club-shaped stem and bulb of a leek
vb. 1652 Eng. dial. rare – to beat, to strike, to thump; also, to knock fruit down from a tree

• POLTALLOCH TERRIER
n. 1887 – the West Highland white terrier

• POLT-FOOT
adj. 1589 obs. – club-footed
n. 1578 obs. – a club foot

• POLT-FOOTED
adj. 1589 obs. – club-footed

• POLTHOGUE
n. 1808 Irish English, colloq.- a blow, esp. a thump; a punch

• POLTING LUG
n. 1789 Eng. dial. rare – a long stick used to knock down fruit from trees

• POLTROON
adj. 1649 rare – resembling a poltroon; cowardly; wretched
n. a1529 arch. or humorous usage – an utter coward; a mean-spirited person; a worthless wretch

• POLTROONERY
n. 1. 1590 obs. – laziness
n. 2. a1637 – cowardice, pusillanimity

• POLTROONISH
adj. 1801 – fearful, timid, cowardly

• POLTROONISM
n. 1644 rare – cowardice

• POLTROONIZE IT
vb. 1611 obs. rare – to act like a poltroon; to play the coward

• POLTROON TIGER
n. 1790 obs. – a puma

• POLTY
adj. c1890 cricketers’ usage – easy

• POLY
n. 1. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a toady
n. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a politician

• POLYACOUSTIC
n. 1684 obs. – an instrument that amplifies a sound

• POLYAD
n. 1851 – a group of more than two, or of an indeterminate number of things, persons, etc.

• POLY-AFFECTIONED
adj. 1893 obs. – displaying many affections or emotions

• POLYAMORIST
n. 1992 orig. US – a person practicing or advocating polyamory

• POLYAMOROUS
adj. 1990 orig. US – practicing, advocating, or characterized by polyamory

• POLYAMORY
n. 1992 orig. US – a having simultaneous close emotional relationships with two or more other individuals, viewed as an alternative to monogamy, esp. in regard to matters of sexual fidelity

• POLYANDRIA
n. 1866 rare – a form of polygamy in which one woman has two or more husbands or male sexual partners at the same time

• POLYANDRIAN
adj. 1809 rare – having more than one husband or male sexual partner

• POLYANDRIC
adj. 1856 – having more than one husband or male sexual partner

• POLYANDRION
n. c1612 chiefly Ancient Greece usage – a place of burial for a number of people; a common grave

• POLYANDRISM
n. 1801 rare – a form of polygamy in which one women has two or more husbands or male sexual partners at the same time

• POLYANDRIST
n. 1833 – a woman who has two or more husbands or male sexual partners at the same time

• POLYANDROUS
adj. 1855 – having more than one husband or male sexual partner

• POLYANDRUM
n. 1. 1627 obs. rare – a tomb, a grave
n. 2. a1661 obs. rare – a place of burial for a number of people; a common grave

• POLYANDRY
n. 1680 – a form of polygamy in which one woman has two or more husbands or male sexual partners at the same time

• POLYANGLE
n. 1612 rare – a figure having many angles, a polygon

• POLYARCHAL
adj. 1896 political usage – of the nature of a polyarchy

• POLYARCHIC
adj. 1892 political usage – of the nature of a polyarchy

• POLYARCHICAL
adj. 1653 political usage – of the nature of a polyarchy

• POLYARCHIST
n. 1678 political usage, rare – a person who advocates or believes in a polyarchy

• POLYARCHY
n. 1. 1606 chiefly political usage – rule or government by many people
n. 2. 1648 obs. – a group of many kingdoms

• POLYBATHIC
adj. 1898 obs. rare – capable of living at great depths

• POLYBIGAMY
n. 1823 obs. – repeated bigamy or remarriage during the life of a first spouse; polygamy

• POLYCEPHALIC
adj. 1850 – having many heads

• POLYCEPHALIST
n. 1659 obs. – a person who has many heads; fig. a person who acknowledges many rulers

• POLYCEPHALOUS
adj. 1659 – having many heads

• POLYCHARACTERISTIC
adj. 1706 obs. rare – having many differing characteristics

• POLYCHREST
n. 1656 – a thing adapted to several different uses

• POLYCHRESTIC
adj. 1850 obs. – adapted to several different uses
n. 1694 obs. – a thing adapted to several different uses

• POLYCHRESTICAL
adj. 1657 obs. – adapted to several different uses
n. 1657 obs. – a thing adapted to several different uses

• POLYCHRESTY
n. 1889 obs. rare – adaptation to various uses; the ability to be used in several different ways

• POLYCHROMATISM
n. 1860 chiefly Art usage – the condition or quality of being multicoloured

• POLYCHROMATIST
n. 1854 obs. rare – a person who applies coloured paint to a statue or other work of art; a colourist

• POLYCHROMATIZE
vb. 1848 rare – to paint or adorn a surface with many colours

• POLYCHROMATOUS
adj. 1889 rare – having various colours; multicoloured

• POLYCHROME
adj. 1819 – multicoloured, esp. painted, decorated or printed in many colours
n. 1801 – a work of art executed or decorated in many colours, esp. a coloured statue, carving, or painting
vb. 1899 – to paint or decorate a drawing, sculpture, etc. with many colours

• POLYCHROMED
adj. 1847 – multicoloured

• POLYCHROMIC
adj. 1825 – having various colours; multicoloured

• POLYCHROMING
n. 1899 – a painting or decorating with many colours

• POLYCHROMISM
n. 1903 chiefly Art usage, rare – a being multicoloured

• POLYCHROMIST
n. 1842 Art hist., rare – a person who applies coloured paint to a statue or other work of art; a colourist

• POLYCHROMIZE
vb. 1860 obs. – to make an object multicoloured; to decorate with several colours

• POLYCHROMOUS
adj. 1880 – multicoloured, esp. painted, decorated, or printed in many colours

• POLYCHROMY
n. 1845 – the art of painting or decorating in many colours, esp. as used in ancient pottery, sculpture, architecture, etc.

• POLYCHRONIC
adj. 1. 1907 – taking place in several distinct periods of time
adj. 2. 1972 – performing elements of different tasks concurrently

• POLYCHRONICON
n. 1570 obs. rare – a chronicle of many events or periods

• POLYCHURCH
adj. 1883 Anglican Church usage, obs. rare – relating to a system permitting a multiplicity of denominations

• POLYCLINIC
n. 1. 1884 – a hospital outpatient department; later, a centre, usually independent of a hospital, providing secondary health care
n. 2. 1898 – an institution providing postgraduate medical training and free consultations by specialists

• POLYCOERANY
n. 1640 obs. rare – a government by many rulers or princes

• POLYCRACY
n. 1581 political usage – government by the many

• POLYCRATIC
adj. 1956 political usage – governed by many; esp. with reference to Nazi Germany

• POLYCULTURE
n. 1915 – the simultaneous cultivation or exploitation of several different crops or animals

• POLYDAEMONISM; POLYDEMONISM
n. 1699 – belief in many divinities or supernatural beings

• POLYDAEMONISTIC; POLYDEMONISTIC
adj. 1877 – believing in or worshipping many divinities

• POLYDIABOLICAL
n. 1876 obs. – a person who believes in many devils or evil spirits

• POLYDIABOLIST
n. 1876 obs. – a person who believes in many devils or evil spirits

• POLYDOGGERY
n. 1875 humorous usage, obs. – the keeping of a number of dogs

• POLYDYNAMIC
adj. 1787 – possessing, affected by, or relating to many forces or powers; capable of acting in many ways

• POLYEPIC
adj. a1832 obs. – consisting of more than one word

• POLYFENESTRAL
adj. 1838 obs. – having many windows

• POLYGAMIC
adj. c1741 – practising polygamy

• POLYGAMICAL
adj. 1781 rare – practising polygamy

• POLYGAMIST
n. 1637 – a person who practises or favours polygamy; a man who has several wives at one time

• POLYGAMIZE
vb. 1605 rare – to practise polygamy

• POLYGAMOUS
adj. 1547 – practising polygamy; having more than one wife or sexual partner; said of a man

• POLYGENEOUS
adj. 1818 rare – of many kinds; mixed

• POLYGLOSSIC
adj. 1983 – involving two or more voices or languages

• POLYGLOT
adj. 1650 – speaking, writing, or understanding a number of languages; written or uttered in a number of languages
n. 1. 1650 – a person who speaks, writes, or understands a number of languages
n. 2. 1666 – a book written in several languages
n. 3. 1770 obs. – a bird that imitates the calls or song of other birds

• POLYGLOTTAL
adj. 1837 – speaking, writing, or understanding a number of languages

• POLYGLOTTED
adj. 1868 rare – speaking several languages, multilingual

• POLYGLOTTER
n. 1912 rare – a person who speaks several languages

• POLYGLOTTERY
n. 1834 – the knowledge or use of several languages

• POLYGLOTTIC
adj. 1801 – speaking, writing, or understanding a number of languages

• POLYGLOTTISH
adj. 1860 rare – multilingual

• POLYGLOTTISM
n. 1852 – the knowledge or use of many languages; a being multilingual

• POLYGLOTTIST
n. 1663 rare – a person who speaks, writes, or understands a number of languages

• POLYGLOTTIZE
vb. 1871 obs. rare – to make multilingual

• POLYGLOTTOLOGY
n. 1658 obs. rare – a use of many languages

• POLYGLOTTOUS
adj. 1861 rare – speaking or writing in many or several languages; using or knowing many languages

• POLYGONAR
adj. 1715 obs. rare – having the form of a polygon

• POLYGONIAL
n. 1702 obs. – a polygon

• POLYGRAPH
n. 1. 1794 obs. – a person who imitates or very closely resembles another; an imitator, an imitation
n. 2. 1799 – a writer of many or various works; a prolific author; a writer on many subjects
n. 3. 1882 obs. rare – a collection of writings; a work on several subjects

• POLYGRAPHER
n. 1. 1588 rare – a person who uses, studies, or invents a code or cipher
n. 2. 1791 – a writer of many works; a prolific author
n. 3. 1810 obs. – a mimic

• POLYGRAPHIC
adj. 1. 1735 rare – writing much, prolific: said of a person; of a book, etc.: voluminous, copious; comprising several works
adj. 2. 1805 obs. – that very closely resembles or copies another
n. 1797 obs. rare – a person who imitates or very closely resembles another

• POLYGRAPHIST
n. 1891 – a writer of many works; a prolific author

• POLYGRAPHY
n. 1. 1593 – a code or cipher; a creating, writing, or deciphering such a code
n. 2. 1654 rare – copious writing or literary work; writing dealing with many subjects

• POLYGNAIKY
n. 1880 obs. rare – a form of polygamy in which a man has more than one wife at the same time

• POLYGYNANDRY
n. 1962 – a form of polygamy in which two or more men share two or more wives

• POLYGYNE
n. 1851 rare – a person whose character and behaviour is governed by several passions

• POLYGYNIA
n. 1865 obs. rare – a form of polygamy in which a man has more than one wife at the same time

• POLYGYNIC
adj. 1866 – having several wives

• POLYGYNIST
n. 1876 – a man who has several wives

• POLYGYNOUS
adj. 1874 – having several wives

• POLYGYNY
n. 1780 – a form of polygamy in which a man has more than one wife at the same time

• POLYHISTOR
n. 1588 – a person of great or varied learning; a great scholar

• POLYHISTORIAN
n. 1669 – a person of great or varied learning; a great scholar

• POLYHISTORIC
adj. 1878 – relating to a person of great learning; widely erudite

• POLYHISTORY
n. 1799 – wide or varied learning

• POLYLINGUAL
adj. 1857 – involving several or many languages; multilingual

• POLYLINGUIST
n. 1749 – a person skilled in many languages

• POLYLOGUE
n. 1876 – a discussion involving more than two people

• POLYLOGY
n. 1602 rare – loquacity; talkativeness; verbosity

• POLYLOQUENT
adj. 1656 – talking much, very talkative, loquacious, garrulous

• POLYLYCHNOUS
adj. 1839 obs. – having many lamps or lights

• POLYMATH
adj. 1881 – very learned
n. 1621 – a person of much or varied learning; one acquainted with various subjects of study; an accomplished scholar

• POLYMATHIC
adj. 1754 – relating to extensive or varied learning

• POLYMATHIST
n. 1621 rare – a person of great or varied learning; an accomplished scholar

• POLYMATHY
n. 1642 rare – great or varied learning; acquaintance with many branches of learning

• POLYMECHANY
n. 1592 obs. rare – invention

• POLYMICRIAN
adj. 1829 obs. rare – containing much within a small space; compressed

• POLYMITE
adj. c1425 obs. rare – woven out of many different or different-coloured threads; multicoloured
n. a1475 obs. rare – a multicoloured precious stone

• POLYMORPH
adj. 1872 – of very varied composition, character, or appearance

• POLYMORPHEAN
adj. 1656 obs. rare – occurring in different forms, shapes, or varieties

• POLYMORPHIC
adj. 1816 – occurring in many different forms

• POLYMORPHISM
n. 1839 – the occurrence of something in several different forms

• POLYMORPHOUS
adj. 1798 – occurring in different forms, shapes, or varieties

• POLYMORPHY
n. 1846 – the occurrence of something in several different forms

• POLYMYTHIA
n. 1695 obs. – a combination of a number of different stories in one narrative or dramatic work

• POLYMYTHY
n. 1728 rare – a combination of a number of different stories in one narrative or dramatic work

• POLYNOME
adj. 1830 obs. rare – that has many names

• POLYNOMIAL
adj. 1890 – containing many names or terms

• POLYNYA
n. 1852 – an area of open water in the middle of an ex\panse of sea ice, esp. in Arctic waters

• THE POLYOCRACY
n. 1975 – a section of the establishment characterized by progressive, esp. left-wing, politics and social activism, and supposed to consist typically of people educated at or associated with polytechnics

• POLYOMMATOUS
adj. 1864 obs. rare – having many eyes

• POLYONYM
n. 1858 rare – each of a number of different words having the same meaning; a synonym

• POLYONYMOSITY
n. 1923 rare – a using several different names for the same person or thing

• POLYONYMOUS
adj. 1678 – having many names or titles; called or known by several different names

• POLYONYMY
n. 1678 – the use of several different names for the same person or thing

• POLYPED
adj. 1829 obs. rare – having many feet
n. 1822 obs. rare – an animal having many feet

• POLYPHAGE
n. 1623 obs. rare – a person who eats to excess

• POLYPHAGIAN
adj. 1825 rare – relating to excessive eating or appetite
n. 1658 obs. – a person who eats to excess

• POLYPHAGIC
adj. 1976 – characterized by excessive eating or appetite

• POLYPHAGIST
n. 1819 obs. rare – a person who eats to excess; also, one who eats many kinds of food

• POLYPHAGOUS
adj. 1837 obs. rare – eating much; voracious

• POLYPHAGY
n. 1802 rare – excessive eating or appetite, esp. as a sign or symptom of disease

• POLYPHARMACAL
adj. 1656 obs. rare – using many drugs or medicines

• POLYPHARMACIST
n. 1886 – a person who takes multiple medicines or drugs for concurrent disorders; also, one who prescribes such a course of action

• POLYPHEME
n. 1583 obs. – a person or thing likened in some way to Polyphemus (a Cyclops, a one-eyed giant); a giant

• POLYPHEMIAN
adj. 1602 rare – characteristic of Polyphemus; gigantic; Cyclopean

• POLYPHEMIC
adj. 1796 – characteristic of Polyphemus; Cyclopean

• POLYPHEMOUS
adj. 1695 – characteristic of Polyphemus; Cyclopean

• POLYPHEMUS
n. 1. 1642 – a monster reminiscent of Polyphemus
n. 2. 19C obs. – the penis

• POLYPHEMUS EYE
n. 1867 – a single eye

• POLYPHILOPROGENITIVE
adj. 1919 – very prolific or fecund

• POLYPHLOISBIC
adj. 1915 humorous usage – that roars loudly; noisy, boisterous

• POLYPHLOISBOIAN
adj. 1824 humorous usage – that roars loudly; noisy, boisterous

• POLYPHLOISBOIIC
adj. 1863 humorous usage , obs. – that roars loudly; noisy, boisterous

• POLYPHLOISBOIOISM
adj. 1823 humorous usage , obs. – noisy bombast

• POLYPHLOISBOIOTATOTIC
adj. 1843 humorous usage, obs. – that roars most loudly or very loudly indeed

• POLYPHLOISBOIOTIC
adj. 1843 humorous usage, obs. – that roars loudly; noisy, boisterous

• POLYPHLOISBOISTEROUS
adj. a1875 humorous usage – noisy, boisterous

• POLYPHOBIA
n. 1890 – fear of many things

• POLYPHONAL
adj. 1924 – many-voiced

• POLYPHONIAN
adj. 1635 chiefly poetic usage, rare – simultaneously produced by many voices; harmonious

• POLYPHONISM
n. 1713 – multiplication of sounds or voices; also, mimicry

• POLYPHONIST
n. 1836 rare – a person capable of producing a variety of vocal sounds; a mimic, a ventriloquist

• POLYPHONOUS
adj. 1677 – involving the production of many sounds or voices; many-voiced

• POLYPHONY
n. 1828 – multiplicity of sounds or voices; mimicry, ventriloquism

• POLYPIETY
n. 1647 rare – the tolerance or practice of many different types of worship

• POLYPONOUS
adj. 1853 obs. – occupied with many tasks

• POLYPOSIST
n. 1821 obs. – one who drinks much; a hard drinker

• POLYPRAGMATIC
adj. 1616 – busying oneself about many affairs; meddlesome, interfering, officious
n. 1636 obs. –
a meddlesome person; an interfering or officious person; a busybody

• POLYPRAGMATICAL
adj. 1597 obs. – overly interested in the business of others; meddlesome, interfering, officious

• POLYPRAGMATISM
n. 1890 rare – busyness or concern with many affairs; officiousness

• POLYPRAGMATIST
n. 1631 rare – a person who is busy or concerned with many affairs; a busybody

• POLYPRAGMATY
n. 1852 obs. – a being occupied with a large or excessive number of matters

• POLYPRAGMIST
n. 1613 obs. – a person who is busy or concerned with many affairs

• POLYPRAGMON
n. 1596 rare – one given to meddling; a busybody; an interfering or officious person

• POLYPRAGMONETIC
adj. 1693 obs. – busy or concerned with many affairs; overly concerned with the affairs of others, interfering, officious

• POLYPRAGMONIST
n. 1609 obs. rare – one given to meddling; a busybody; an interfering or officious person

• POLYPRAGMONY
n. 1602 obs. rare – officiousness, interference

• POLYPRAGMOSYNE
n. 1607 rare – meddlesomeness

• POLYPRAGMOSYNIC
adj. 1886 obs. rare – officious, meddling

• POLYPSEUDONYMOUS
adj. 1876 rare – having many pseudonyms or assumed names

• POLYP STONE
n. 1583 obs. rare – a precious stone supposed to change colour

• POLYSARCOUS
adj. 1890 rare – corpulent, obese

• POLYSEME
adj. 1930 rare – having several meanings
n. 1953 – a word that has several or multiple meanings

POLYSEMIA
n. 1900 – a having several meanings; the possession of multiple meanings, senses, or connotations

• POLYSEMIC
adj. 1930 – having several meanings

• POLYSEMOUS
adj. 1884 – having a multiplicity of meanings; bearing many different interpretations

• POLYSEMY
n. 1928 – a having several meanings; the possession of multiple meanings, senses, or connotations

• POLYSYLLABE
n. 1584 Sc. obs. rare – a word of many syllables

• POLYSYLLABIC
adj. 1774 – consisting of many syllables; said of a word

• POLYSYLLABICAL
adj. 1656 – consisting of many syllables; said of a word

• POLYSYLLABICISM
n. 1807 rare – polysyllabic or abstruse style

• POLYSYLLABICITY
n. 1871 – a being syllabic; polysyllabism

• POLYSYLLABILINGUAL
adj. 1824 obs. – relating to polysyllabic languages

• POLYSYLLABISM
n. 1859 – a having or using words of many syllables

• POLYSYLLABLE
adj. 1589 – having or using many syllables
n. 1570 – a word of many syllables; esp. a difficult or unfamiliar long word

• POLYTASTED
adj. 1709 obs. – having many tastes or flavours

• POLYTECH
n. 1900 chiefly colloq. – a school giving instruction in various technical subjects; later, an institution of higher education that offers courses mainly in technical, scientific, and vocational subjects

• POLYTECHNIC
adj. 1798 – giving instruction in various subjects, esp. technical and vocational ones; said of an educational institution
n. 1836 – a school giving instruction in various technical subjects; later, an institution of higher education that offers courses mainly in technical, scientific, and vocational subjects

• POLYTECHNICAL
adj. 1. 1798 – giving instruction in various subjects, esp. technical and vocational ones; said of an educational institution
adj. 2. 1880 obs. rare – practising many trades

• POLYTECHNICIAN
n. 1871 – a student of a French polytechnic school

• POLYTECHNICS
n. 1850 rare – the mechanical arts or applied sciences collectively; a subject involving many arts or sciences

• POLYTELIC
adj. 1930 rare – comprising or connecting several diverse aims or interests; said of a system, group, behaviour, etc.

• POLYTHEISM
n. 1613 – the belief that there is more than one god; worship of several gods

• POLYTHEIST
adj. 1872 – worshipping or believing in more than one god
n. a1620 – a person who believes in or worships more than one god

• POLYTHEISTIC
adj. 1706 – worshipping or believing in more than one god

• POLYTHEISTICAL
adj. 1678 rare – worshipping or believing in more than one god

• POLYTHEISTICALLY
adv. 1778 – involving or referring to more than one god

• POLYTHEIZE
vb. 1. 1864 obs. – to believe in more than one god
vb. 2. 1924 rare – to be converted to polytheism

• POLYTHEOUS
adj. 1702 obs. rare – involving the worship of more than one god

• POLYTOKY
n. 1702 obs. – the condition of having borne many children

• POLYTOPIAN
n. 1611 rare – a person who visits many places

• POLYTRAGIC
adj. 1607 obs. – containing many tragedies

• POLYTROPHIC
adj. 1659 obs. rare – highly nutritious

• POLYTROPHY
n. 1667 obs. rare – abundant or excessive nutrition

• POLYTROPIC
adj. 1. 1838 – capable of taking various courses of action; adaptable, versatile
adj. 2. 1899 – visiting the flowers of many species: said of a bee or other insect

• POLYVERSITY
n. 1970 chiefly Brit. – an educational institution which combines features of a university and a polytechnic

• POLY-WOLY
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – a very fat person


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