Dictionary: PP – PRIM


P.P.
n. 1887 UK criminals’ sl. obs. – a pickpocket
phr. 20C euphemism – a warning from one girl to another that there is someone gazing up her skirts; ‘petticoat peeper’

P.P.D.
n. 1980s US students’ sl. (Possible/Potentional Prom Date) – an attractive person of the opposite sex

P.Q.
n. 1980s US students’ sl. (Polyester Queen) – a person who is out-of-date or unfashionable

P.R.
n. 1. c1910 US criminals’ sl. – a probation, after sentence but before service
n. 2. 1950s US sl. – a Puerto Rica; Puerto Rico
n. 3. 1960s US drug culture sl. – Panama red, a high grade of marijuana grown in Panama

PRABBLE
n. 1598 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – a quarrel, a squabble
vb. 1881 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to chatter noisily

PRACK
n. L19 Amer. dial. – the male genitals, esp. the scrotum

PRACTICE IN THE MILKY-WAY
vb. E17 Brit. sl. – to fondle a woman’s breasts

PRACTISANT
n. 1550 obs. rare – a schemer; a plotter, a conspirator

PRACTITIONER
n. M19 euphemism – a thief

PRAD
n. 1798 sl., now Aust. – a horse

PRADA
n. 1984 Amer. dial. – a herd of cattle or horses

PRADBACK
n. 18C sl. – horseback

PRAD BORROWER
n. L18 UK criminals’ sl. – a person who steals a horse, but sometimes returns him

PRAD-COVE
n. 18C sl. – a horse-dealer

PRADDLE
n. 1798 sl., now Aust. – a horse

PRAD-HOLDER
n. 18C sl. – a bridle

PRAD-NAPPER
n. 18C sl. – a horse thief

PRAD-NAPPING
n. M19 sl. – horse-stealing

PRAD PRIGGER
n. M16 UK criminals’ sl. – a horse thief

PRAG
n. L19 UK criminals’ sl. – a thief

PRAIRIE
n. 1. 1824 Amer. dial. – a swamp, a marsh
n. 2. 1938 Amer. dial. – a vacant lot or city block

PRAIRIE COAL
n. 1929 US colloq. – hunks of dried cow dung used as fuel for a fire

PRAIRIE COCKTAIL
n. 1890 Amer. dial. – a raw egg or egg yolk, seasoned, and drunk with vinegar or spirits

PRAIRIE COLT
n. 1. 1966 Amer. dial. – a horse that was not intentionally bred
n. 2. 1966 Amer. dial. – an illegitimate child

PRAIRIE-DEW
n. M19 US sl. – whisky; home-brewed whisky

PRAIRIE FEATHERS
n. 1858 Amer. dial. – hay used as a mattress or bed covering

PRAIRIE FUEL
n. 20C US colloq. – hunks of dried cattle dung used for fuel

PRAIRIE LAWYER
n. Bk1942 Amer. Western sl. – a coyote

PRAIRIE NIGGER
n. 1993 Amer. dial., offensive & derogatory – an American Indian

PRAIRIE OYSTER
n. 1. 1890 Amer. dial. – a raw egg or egg yolk, seasoned, and drunk with vinegar or spirits
n. 2. 1941 Amer. dial. – a bull’s testicle prepared as food

PRAIRIE SCHOONER
n. 1. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a large glass or mug, esp. for beer
n. 2. 1970 Amer. dial. – a big or clumsy foot

PRAITIE
n. 1837 Amer. dial. – a white potato

PRAM-FACE
n. 2000s sl., derogatory – a working class, council-estate dwelling young woman and single mother

PRAMS
n. 1920s Sc. sl. – the legs

PRANCER
n. 1. M16 UK criminals’ sl. – a spirited horse
n. 2. M16 UK criminals’ sl. – a horse thief
n. 3. M16 UK criminals’ sl. – a highwayman
n. 4. M16 UK criminals’ sl. – a cavalry officer

PRANCERS
n. M18 UK criminals’ sl. – stairs

PRANDICLE
n. 1656 obs. rare – a breakfast, a little dinner, a small meal

PRANG
adj. 1990s African-American sl. – extremely intoxicated, esp. by crack cocaine
n. 1. 1940s sl. – a crash
n. 2. 1945 sl., orig. Royal Air Force – a bombing raid
n. 3. 1950s sl. – a joke or prank
vb. 1. 1940s sl. – to attack; to crash one’s car or plane
vb. 2. 1940s sl. – to break an arm or a leg
vb. 3. 1940s Brit. sl. – to have sexual intercourse
vb. 4. 1942 sl., orig. Royal Air Force – to bomb a target successfully from the air

PRANKER
n. L16 UK criminals’ sl. – a horse

PRANNET
n. 1970s sl. – a fool, an idiot

PRANNIEPRANNY
n. 1. L19 sl. – the vagina
n. 2. 1980s sl. – a term of contempt

PRANSORIOUS
adj. 1656 obs. rare – belonging to breakfast; serving for dinner

PRA-PRA
adj. 20C W. Indies – cheating, mixed up
vb. 20C W. Indies – to snatch, to steal

PRASINOUS
adj. 1924 rare – leek-green in colour
n. 1826 obs. – a leek-green colour

PRAT
n. 1. 1567 sl. orig. criminals’ usage – the buttocks
n. 2. 19C sl. – the vagina
n. 3. 1910s US sl. – a hip pocket
n. 4. 1960s sl. – a term of abuse
n. 5. 1960s African-American sl. – a hoax, a deception, a confidence trick
n. 6. 1968 Brit. sl. – a foolish person
n. 7. 1970s US sl. – a young homosexual man
n. 8. 20C sl. – a young woman
vb. 1. 16C sl. – to beat
vb. 2. 1910s Aust. sl. – to talk to someone
vb. 3. 1930s African-American sl. – of a woman: to play sexually hard to get, to tease physically
vb. 4. 1940s sl. – of a confidence trickster: to play with the potential victim

PRAT ABOUT PRAT AROUND
vb. 1961 Brit. sl. – to behave foolishly, and esp. in a time-wasting way

PRAT-BOY
n. 1. 1940s US sl. – a catamite
n. 2. 2000s US sl. – a person who takes the punishment for another’s crime; a fall guy

PRATCHANT
adj. 1597 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – conceited, forward, swaggering

PRAT-DIGGER
n. 1908 US sl. – a pickpocket

PRATE
n. L18 Anglo-Irish – a potato

PRATEE
n. L18 Anglo-Irish – a potato

PRATER
n. 1. M16 – a boaster
n. 2. L17 sl. – an itinerant, bogus preacher
n. 3. 19C sl. – the mouth

PRATE-ROAST
n. L17 sl. – a talkative boy

PRATFALL
n. 1. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a  backward fall
n. 2. 1950s sl., orig. US – a humiliating defeat; a sudden failure
n. 3. 1950s sl. – a danger, a pitfall

PRAT FOR
vb. 1940s homosexual sl. – to indulge, actively or passively, in anal intercourse

PRATIE
n. 1837 Amer. dial. – a white potato

PRAT IN
vb. 20C Aust. sl. – to push oneself forward, to barge in

PRATING CHEAT
n. M16 cant – the tongue

PRAT-KICK
n. 1910s US criminals’ sl. – the back pocket of one’s trousers

PRATTING-KEN
n. M19 sl. – a cheap lodging house

PRATTISH
adj. 1990s sl. – stupid

PRATTLE-BOX
n. 1. 1671 obs. – a chatterbox; a talkative person; a prattler, a chatterer; a gossip
n. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – the mouth

PRATTLE-BROTH
n. L18 sl. – tea

PRATTLING-BOX
n. M18 sl. – a pulpit

PRATTLING-CHEAT
n. M16 UK criminals’ sl. – a tongue

PRATTLING PARLOUR
n. M19 sl. – a private apartment

PRAT WHIDS
vb. 17C sl. – to break wind

PRATY
n. 1. 1567 sl. orig. criminals’ usage – the buttocks
n. 2. L18 Anglo-Irish – a potato

PRAVITOUS
adj. 1648-9 obs. – characterized by wickedness or depravity; full of evil, bad

PRAWN
n. 1893 sl., chiefly Aust. – a foolish person

PRAWNHEAD
n. 1960s Aust. sl. – a fool, a simpleton

PRAWN-HEADED MULLET
n. 1960s Aust. sl. – a fool

PRAWNIEPRAWNY
n. 1940s Aust. sl. – a fisher or seller of prawns

PRAYER BEETLE
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – a praying mantis

PRAYER BONES
n. 1878 Amer. dial. – the knees

PRAYER BOOK
n. 1. 1941 Amer. dial. – a packet of cigarette papers
n. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a deck of cards

PRAYER BUG
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – a praying mantis

PRAYER-DUKES
n. 1920s African-American sl. – the hands

PRAYER-FACTORY
n. 1930s Irish sl. – a convent

PRAYER-HANDLES
n. 1. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – the knees
n. 2. 1920s African-American sl. – the hands

PRAYER MEETING
n. 1940s US sl. – a game of dice, a crap game

PRAYING GROMPUS
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – a praying mantis

PRAYING HORSE
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – a praying mantis

PRAYING SEXTON
n. 1969 Amer. dial. – a praying mantis

PRAY WITH ONE’S KNEES UPWARDS
vb. L18 sl. – to have sexual intercourse; said of a woman

PREACH AT TYBURN CROSS
vb. c1810 cant – to be hanged

PREACHER
n. 1950 Amer. dial. – a term of address for a Black man

PREACHER BUG
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – a praying mantis

PREACHER MEAT
n. 1978 Amer. dial. – a chicken

PREACHER’S NOSE
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – the rump of a cooked chicken; the pope’s nose

PREACHIFICATION
n. 1843 colloq. – a tedious sermon

PREACHIFY
vb. 1775 colloq. – to deliver a tedious sermon; to moralise wearisomely

PREACHIFYING
n. 1828 – tedious moralizing

PREACHING-SHOP
n. c1840 colloq. – a church; more generally, a chapel

PREACHMENT
n. 1774 Amer. dial. – a sermon; a tiresome discourse

PREACH ON TOWER HILL
vb. 16C sl. – to be hanged

PREACHY
adj. 1819 colloq. – given to preaching; tediously moralizing

PREACHY-PREACHY
adj. 1894 colloq. – tediously moral or moralizing

PREALLABLE
adj. 1603 rare – preceding, previous, preliminary; going before

PRECELLENT
adj. 1382 obs. – that excels or surpasses; conspicuously superior; excellent

PRECEPTOR
n. 1400 – an instructor, teacher, tutor; the head of a school

PRECEPTRESS
n. 1712 – a woman who is an instructor; a teacher, tutor; a woman who is the head of a school

PRECHECK
n. 1970s sl. – an inspection of a client’s penis made by a prostitute before intercourse

PRECIOSITY
n. 1350 – fastidious or carefully affected refinement, as in language, style, or taste

PRECIOUS
adj. 1. L16 – arrogant
adj. 2. M17 – awful, terrible, disastrous
adj. 3. E18 – over-fastidious, over-refined
adj. 4. 20C teen & high school sl. – dull or lacking in interest
adv. M19 – very, exceedingly
n. Bk1892 Amer. sl. – a dearly beloved or loved one; a sweetheart; a darling

PRECIOUS FOOLISH
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – foolish; silly; witless

PRECIOUS HEART
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a loved one; a sweetheart

PRECIOUS JUICE
n. 1980s US students’ sl. – any alcoholic drink

PRECIOUS LAMB
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a loved one; a sweetheart

PRECIOUSLY
adv. M19 – very greatly, exceedingly, extremely

PRECISIAN
n. 1571 – a person who adheres punctiliously to the observance of rules or forms, esp. in matters of religion

PRED
n. 1798 sl. – a horse

PREDATITIOUS
adj. 1659 obs. – characterized by plundering, pillaging, or robbing; predatory

PRE-DAWN VERTICAL INSERTION
n. 1980s US students’ sl. – sexual intercourse in the early morning

PREDECESSIVE
adj. 1599 obs. – that has gone before; preceding; previous

PREEM
n. 1930s sl., orig. US – a theatrical or cinematic premiere
vb. 1930s sl., orig. US – to have a premiere

PREEMIE PREEMY
n. 1927 N. Amer. sl. – a premature baby

PREESH!
int. 1980s US students’ sl. – an exclamation of approval; thanks!

PREFACILE
adj. 1623 obs. rare – very easy to be done

PREG
adj. 1955 sl. – pregnant

PREGGERS
adj. 1942 Brit. sl. – pregnant

PREGGIE
adj. 1938 euphemism – pregnant

PREGGO PREGO
adj. 1951 Aust. sl. – pregnant
n. 1951 Aust. sl. – a pregnant person

PREGGY
adj. 1938 euphemism – pregnant

PREHEND
vb. a1500 obs. rare – to seize, to catch, to take, to lay hold of, to apprehend

PREKEPREKY
n. 1. 1940s W. Indies – a fool, a gullible person
n. 2. 1940s W. Indies – a low-class prostitute
n. 3. 1940s W. Indies – a good-for-nothing; an ill-kempt, dirty, slovenly man

PREKKAH
vb. 1990s W. Indies – to be exploited; to be ‘put upon’

PREMIE PREMY
n. 1927 N. Amer. sl. – a premature baby

PREMIOUS
adj. 1855 rare – rich in gifts; abounding in gifts

PREMISES
n. 1. L17 sl. – the vagina
n. 2. 19C euphemism – a brothel

PREMIUMS
n. 1990s US prison sl. – commercially produced branded cigarettes

PREMMIE
n. 1990s sl. – a premature ejaculator

PREMO
adj. 1990s sl. – amazing, excellent, attractive

PREMS
n. 1900s sl. – premises, buildings

PREP
vb. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to exercise

PREPARE TO PUCKER
vb. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – to make ready to do or act

PREP OUT
vb. 1980s US students’ sl. – to get dressed up, esp. overdressed, or elaborately made up

PREPPER
n. 1956 Brit. sl. – preparatory school

PREPPIE
adj. 1. 1900s – silly, immature
adj. 2. 1950s US sl. – mainstream in style and thought, as a result of having been to a major US prep school
n. 1970 US sl. – a pupil at a preparatory school

PREPPY
adj. 1900 US sl. – used to denote students in a preparatory school or their characteristics, esp. immaturity
n. 1970 US sl. – a pupil at a preparatory school

PRE-PRE
vb. 1960s W. Indies – to suffer from diarrhoea

PREPROPEROUS
adj. 1555 obs. – too hasty, precipitate

PRESPREZ
n. 1920S sl. – a present. a gift

PRESBO
n. 1950s Aust. sl. – a Presbyterian

PRESENTERER
n. M19 sl. – a prostitute

PRESENTS
n. L19 sl. – white spots on ones fingernails, supposedly auguring good luck

PRESERVATRICE
n. 1559 obs. – a female preserver; a protectress

PRESERVATRIX
n. 1650 obs. – a female preserver; a protectress

PRESERVE
vb. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to intoxicate; to make dead drunk

PRESERVERS
n. 1773 obs. – spectacles for preserving the eyesight

PRESERVES
n. 1664 Sc. obs. – weak spectacles intended to preserve the eyesight

PRESH
adj. 1980s US students’ sl. – favourable, enjoyable

PRESIDENCE
n. a1500 – a presiding; control, authority

PRESIDENCY
n. 1. 1581 rare – a presiding; control, authority
n. 2. 1608 obs. – superiority, precedence

PRESIDENT
adj. a1450 obs. – that presides or has authority; presiding, in charge
n. 1940s US sl. – a $1 bill

PRESIDENTIARY
adj. 1643 – relating to a president; presiding

PRESIDENTRESS
n. 1650 rare – a female president; the wife of a president

PRESIDIAL
adj. 1. 1598 obs. – occupied by a garrison; fortified
adj. 2. 1598 – relating to a president; presidential

PRESIDIARY
adj. 1599 obs. – serving as a garrison; having a garrison, fortified
n. 1623 obs. – a member of a garrison; a guard

PRESIDIATE
adj. 1543 obs. – garrisoned

PRESIDY
n. 1. a1475 obs. – relief, succour; remedy, aid
n. 2. 1529 obs. – a guard; a garrison

PRESIGN
vb. 1590 obs. – to signify or indicate in advance

PRESS
n. 1. c1387 – a large cupboard, esp. one placed in a recess in the wall, for holding linen, clothes, book, etc., or food, plates, dishes, and other kitchen items
n. 2. a1393 arch. – a crush in battle, the thick of the fight; an affray or mêlée
n. 3. 1405 obs. – a sheet of parchment
n. 4. 1592 hist. – the impressing of men for service in the navy or the army; compulsory enlistment
n. 5. 1601 obs. – a mark made by pressing; a crease
vb. 1. a1382 obs. – to burden, to oppress, to weigh down the feelings, mind, etc.
vb. 2. c1400 obs. – to approach presumptuously, to intrude; to push one’s way into a place or a person’s presence
vb. 3. a1425 obs. – to endeavour or attempt to do something, esp. with eagerness or haste; to aim at or strive after
vb. 4. 1489 Sc. obs. – to push oneself on, to hurry oneself along
vb. 5. 1543 hist. – to compel to enlist in the army or navy; to force into military service
vb. 6. 1897 golf usage – to try to hit a ball too hard or fast, typically resulting in tense, inaccurate play

PRESS AGENT’S YARN
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – an incredible story

PRESS AND SCRATCH
n. 19C rhyming sl. – a safety match

PRESSED
adj. 1. 1963 African-American – well-dressed, stylish
adj. 2. 1980s African-American – used of hair that has been chemically straightened

PRESSED TO THE MAX
adj. 1980s sl. – very well-dressed, very smart

PRESSER
n. 1. 1503 – a cupboard
n. 2. 1641 – a person who presses a cause or idea; an advocate of something
n. 3. 1988 colloq. – a press conference

PRESSERAGE
n. c1450 obs. – something extracted or squeezed out by pressure

PRESS HAM
vb. 1960s US students’ sl. – to press a bare buttock against a window in order to shock passers-by; also, to press the genitals against glass where they can be seen

PRESSIE
n. 1. 1950s Aust. sl. – a Presbyterian
n. 2. 1933 colloq. – a present, a gift

PRESSION
n. c1540 – pressure; a pressing

PRESSITANT
adj. 1668 obs. – exerting continuous pressure

PRESSIVE
adj. 1. 1619 obs. – pressing, urgent; solicitous
adj. 2. 1623 obs. – oppressive
adj. 3. 1623 obs. – impressive

PRESSLY
adv. a1529 obs. – concisely; precisely, exactly

PRESSNESS
n. 1728 obs. – conciseness

PRESSOUR
n. 1444 obs. – a cupboard, a wardrobe

PRESS PAPER
n. 1821 obs. – a paperweight

PRESS SOMEONE’S BUTTONS
vb. 1936 Amer. sl. – to make another angry or disturbed, to annoy, to irritate

PRESS THE BRICKS
vb. 1. 20C US sl. – to stand around in the street, loafing and gossiping
vb. 2. 20C US sl. – to walk the streets in search of work

PRESS THE BUTTON
vb. 1910s sl. – to set an event or a chain of circumstances in motion

PRESS THE ETHER
vb. 1950s African-American – to play music

PRESS THE FLESH
vb. 1918 colloq., orig. & chiefly US – to greet potential supporters by shaking their hands

PRESS THE PANIC BUTTON
vb. 1962 – to begin panicking or over-reacting

PRESSYLY
adv. a1492 obs. – urgently, pressingly

PREST
adj. 1. c1300 obs. – ready for action or use; at hand; prepared; in proper order
adj. 2. c1300 obs. – ready in mind or disposition; inclined, disposed, willing; eager, keen, prompt
adj. 3. a1382 obs. – clear to the understanding; manifest
adj. 4. c1390 obs. – alert, active, sprightly; brisk, quick
adj. 5. c1450 obs. – close at hand, near
adv. 1. c1300 obs. – readily, quickly
adv. 2. c1400 obs. – eagerly, earnestly
n. 1. 1359 hist. – payment or wages in advance; money paid on account to enable a person to proceed with an undertaking
n. 2. c1430 obs. – a loan; an advance of money; a bequest, gift, or grant
n. 3. 1480 obs. – a sum of money paid to a sailor or soldier on enlistment
vb. 1. 1477 obs. – to lend money; to advance as a loan
vb. 2. 1481 obs. – to engage men for military service on land or sea by giving a gratuity or part-payment of wages in advance
vb. 3. 1548 obs. – to borrow, to get on loan
vb. 4. 1581 obs. – to make haste, to hasten

PRESTANCE
n. 1470 orig. Sc., rare – social pre-eminence or superiority; prestige

PRESTANCY
n. 1615 obs. – pre-eminence, priority, superiority

PRESTANTIOUS
adj. 1638 obs. rare – characterized by excellence, excellent

PRESTER
n. 1601 – a scorching whirlwind

PRESTIDIGITAL
adj. 1856 – relating to sleight of hand; light-fingered

PRESTIDIGITATION
n. 1841 – sleight of hand, legerdemain; conjuring

PRESTIDIGITATOR
n. 1712 – a person who practices sleight of hand or legerdemain; a conjuror; a juggler

PRESTIDIGITATORIAL
adj. 1861 – resembling a conjuring trick; done by prestidigitation

PRESTIGE
n. 1656 rare – an illusion; a conjuring trick; a deception, an imposture

PRESTIGIATE
vb. 1647 obs. – to deceive by illusion, or as by magic; to delude

PRESTIGIATION
n. c1550 – sorcery or magic; deception or delusion by such practice; conjuring, prestidigitation

PRESTIGIATOR
n. 1. 1595 obs. – a deceiver, a cheat
n. 2. 1614 – a conjuror; one who practices prestigiation

PRESTIGIATORY
adj. 1588 obs. – practising ‘prestigiation’; juggling, conjuring; consisting of tricks, impostures, or  deceptive, delusive 

PRESTIGINOUS
adj. 1896 rare – prestigious; viewed in terms of prestige

PRESTIGION
n. 1635 obs. – sorcery or magic; deception or delusion by such practice; conjuring, prestidigitation

PRESTIGY
n. 1615 obs. – an illusion; a conjuring trick; a deception, an imposture

PRESTLY
adv. 1. 1340 obs. – readily; quickly; promptly, immediately
adv. 2. a1375 obs. – eagerly, earnestly, urgently

PRESTNESS
n. 1582 obs. – readiness, preparedness; eagerness

PRESTO
adj. 1. 1644 obs. – ready, at hand, immediate
adj. 2. 1826 – of the nature of a magical transformation; rapid, quick, instantaneous
adv. 1598 obs. – quickly, immediately, at once; suddenly

PRESTOLATE
vb. 1653 nonce word obs. – to await, to wait for

PRESTRICTION
n. 1641 obs. – blindfolding; blinding

PRESULTOR
n. 1633 obs. – a person who leads a dance

PRESULTORY
adj. 1652 obs. – impetuous, presumptuous

PRESUMANT
adj. 1602 obs. – presumptuous, presuming

PRESUMANTLY
adv. c1536 obs. – presumptuously, presumingly

PRESUME
n. 1. a1500 Sc. obs. – anticipation, expectation
n. 2. 1590 obs. – presumption, audacity

PRESUMPTED
adj. 1550 obs. – done presumptuously

PRESUMPTIOUS
adj. a1450 – presumptuous

PRESUMPTORILY
adv. 1681 obs. – in a presumptuous manner; arrogantly, impertinently, forwardly

PRESUMPTUOSITY
n. a1450 obs. – presumption, impertinence

PRESUPPONE
vb. c1475 chiefly Sc., obs. – to presuppose; to assume beforehand

PRET
adj. a1600 Sc. obs. – ready

PRETAXATE
adj. 1570 obs. – declared or fixed beforehand

PRETENCE
n. a1500 obs. – an expressed aim; an intention, purpose, or design
vb. 1. 1548 obs. – to offer or proffer
vb. 2. 1548 obs. – to give a feigned appearance to, as of respectability
vb. 3. 1565 obs. – to intend or purpose
vb. 4. 1567 obs. – to allege, to pretend, esp. falsely

PRETENCED
adj. 1. 1425 obs. – alleged, claimed, or professed, esp. falsely; counterfeit, feigned, spurious
adj. 2. 1543 obs. – intended; designed, purposed

PRETENCEFUL
adj. 1841 rare – pretentious; ostentatious, pompous

PRETEND
vb. 1. a1425 obs. – to indicate, to mean, to signify
vb. 2. c1425 obs. – to foretell, to portend
vb. 3. a1450 obs. – to intend, to plan
vb. 4. a1500 obs. – to plot against
vb. 5. 1652 obs. – to pay court to a prospective spouse; to seek to be married to a person

PRETENDANT
adj. 1595 – claiming to be somebody or something
n. 1. 1600 – a claimant, esp. to a throne or other office or honour; a fraudulent claimant; a mere pretender
n. 2. 1625 obs. – a suitor; a man who pursues a relationship with a particular woman, with a view to marriage

PRETENDENCE
n. 1603 rare – a pretension, a pretending

PRETENDER
n. a1625 obs. – a suitor; a wooer

PRETENDER TO THE THRONE
n. 1. 1950s US homosexual sl. – a heterosexual who poses as gay for the purposes of avoiding the draft
n. 2. 1950s US homosexual sl. – a vice squad policeman who poses as gay to entrap genuine homosexuals

PRETENDMENT
n. 1642 obs. – a pretension, a claim

PRETENDRESS
n. 1700 rare – a female pretender

PRÉTENDU
n. 1847 – an intended husband or wife; a fiancé or fiancée

PRETENSION
n. 1. c1443 obs. – meaning, sense, signification
n. 2. c1456 obs. – an intention; an aim or aspiration

PRETENSIVE
adj. 1. 1607 – characterized by pretense; pretended, feigned
adj. 2. a1868 chiefly US – pretentious, ostentatious, snobbish

PRETENSIVELY
adv. 1607 – pretendedly, feignedly; as a pretext

PRETENSIVENESS
n. 1859 – pretentiousness

PRETENT
vb. c1425 obs. – to pretend

PRETER
adj. 1578 obs. – past, previous, earlier
n. 1618 obs. – the past; past time

PRETERDETERMINEDLY
adv. 1892 obs. – more than determinedly

PRETEREAS
n. a1527 obs. – additional items; extras

PRETEREROGATION
n. 1617 obs. – performance outside or beyond what is demanded or required

PRETERGRESS
vb. 1. 1583 obs. – to go beyond a limit; to surpass
vb. 2. 1615 obs. – to overlook

PRETERGRESSION
n. 1615 obs. – an ignoring or failing to follow a law, authority, etc.; an overstepping bounds

PRETERIENCE
n. 1730 obs. – a passing or going by; transience

PRETERIENT
adj. 1786 obs. – passing or going by; transient

PRETERIST
n. 1864 – a person whose chief interest is in the past; one who favours the past or past beliefs

PRETERITE
adj. 1340 arch. – occurring or existing previously; past, bygone, former
n. 1. a1425 obs. – the past; past time; a past event
n 2. L19 UK society sl. – an old person, esp. a woman

PRETERITENESS
n. 1665 – a being past; pastness

PRETERITION
n. 1. 1609 – a passing over something without notice; omission, disregard
n. 2. 1647 obs. – the passing of time

PRETERLABENT
adj. 1670 rare – gliding or flowing past

PRETERLAPSED
adj. 1599 – past, bygone; ended, over with

PRETERLETHAL
adj. 1887 obs. – happening after death

PRETERMISSED
adj. c1525 obs. – omitted, passed over

PRETERMISSION
n. 1. 1581 – an overlooking or disregarding something; the omission of something from a speech, etc.; omission of or neglect to do something
n. 2. 1677 obs. – a ceasing to do something for a time; discontinuation

PRETERMIT
vb. 1. 1475 – to neglect or omit an action, duty, etc.; to leave undone or unused; to fail to attend to
vb. 2. 1539 – to suspend or stop temporarily; to interrupt or cause to interrupted
vb. 3. 1542 obs. – to disregard or overlook intentionally

PRETERMITTED
adj. 1619 – passed by, disregarded, overlooked; omitted

PRETERMITTENTLY
adv. 1857 obs. – intermittently

PRETERNATURAL
adj. 1. 1580 obs. – abnormal, unusual
adj. 2. 1696 – supernatural

PRETERNOTORIOUS
adj. a1640 obs. – surpassingly notorious

PRETERNUPTIAL
adj. 1833 obs. – extramarital; not within marital relations

PRETERPERFECT
adj. a1784 obs. – more than perfect; surpassing the point of perfection

PRETERPLURALITY
n. 1647 obs. – an excess in numbers; a multitude

PRETERPLUPARENTHETICAL
adj. 1650 humorous usage, obs. – favouring or tending to use parenthesis (word, clause, or sentence inserted as an explanation or afterthought)

PRETERPLUPERFECT
adj. 1652 chiefly humorous usage – superlatively perfect or faultless

PRETERVECTION
n. 1699 obs. rare – a carrying something past a place

PRETEX
vb. 1545 obs. – to use as a pretext or excuse; to pretend, to feign

PRETEXTATIZED
adj. 1854 obs. – made equivocal, obscene, or unseemly

PRETEXTED
adj. 1606 rare – used as a pretext; pretended, false

PRETEXTUAL
adj. 1837 – of the nature of a pretext; pretended, dubious, spurious

PRETEXTUOUS
adj. 1647 rare – providing a pretext; specious

PRETEXTURE
n. 1618 obs. – a disguise, a pretense; a pretext

PRETINCT
vb. 1641 obs. – to colour or influence beforehand

PRETRUDE
vb. 1693 obs. – to thrust or push a thing

PRETTIES
n. 1. 1900s US sl. – attractive objects, jewellery
n. 2. 1913 Amer. dial. – fine or delicate clothes
n. 3. 1980s US sl. – innocent, hitherto untouched young sex objects, either male or female

PRETTILY
adv. 1. c1450 arch. – in a cunning or clever manner; ingeniously, skilfully
adv. 2. c1500 – gently, softly, quietly
adv. 3. 1533 – considerably, very
adv 4. c1613 – politely, nicely, in a well-behaved manner

PRETTINESS
n. 1. 1604 obs. – pleasantness, agreeableness
n. 2. 1674 obs. – cleverness; amusingness

PRETTY
adj. 1. a1000 – cunning, crafty; later, clever, skilful, able
adj. 2. a1450 – bold, gallant, brave; polite, respectable; worthy, admirable, splendid
adj. 3. c1450 – cleverly made or done; ingenious, artful
adj. 4. a1529 – fine, pleasing, commendable; proper, appropriate, polite
adj. 5. 1533 – awkward, difficult, deplorable, unwelcome
adj. 6. 1878 Amer. dial. – of a child: pleasant, well-behaved
adv. 1878 Amer. dial. – in a pleasant, well-behaved way
n. 1. 1736 Amer. dial. – any little thing of value, esp. a toy
n. 2. 1846 Amer. dial. – a large but unspecified sum of money
n. 3. 1907 golf usage, rare – a fairway
n. 4. Bk1942 Amer. boxing sl. – an easy-hitting boxer

PRETTY ANKLE
n. Bk1942 Amer. college sl. – an attractive girl

PRETTY AS A PICTURE
adj. 1844 – exceedingly pretty

PRETTY AS A SPECKLED PUP
adj. 1906 Amer. dial. – exceedingly pretty

PRETTY AS PAINT
adj. 1918 – exceedingly pretty

PRETTY-BEHAVED
adj. 1768 rare – well-behaved; polite, respectable

PRETTY BOARER
n. Urquhart usage obs. – the penis

PRETTY-BOY
n. 1. 1785 – a thug, a ruffian
n. 2. 1885 sl., mainly derogatory – a male homosexual; an effeminate man

PRETTY COME-OFF
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – bad luck

THE PRETTY DANCERS
n. 1717 Sc. – Aurora Borealis

A PRETTY DEAL
n. 1932 obs. – a good deal

PRETTY FACE
n. 1675 rare – a person with a pretty face; also, a term of endearment

PRETTY FAR GONE
adj. 1929 Amer. dial. – drunk

PRETTY FELLOW
n. 1600 – a fashionable or stylish person; a dandy, a fop

PRETTY GENEVIEVE
n. Bk1942 Amer. college sl. – an attractive girl

PRETTY HORSE BREAKER
n. M19 sl. – a high-class prostitute; originally, a woman hierd to ride in Hyde Park

PRETTY HOT
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – excellent; first-rate

PRETTYISM
n. 1789 – superficial or affected prettiness of style, expression, or manner

PRETTY KETTLE OF FISH
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a confused or awkward state of affairs

PRETTY MAN
n. 1576 chiefly Sc., rare – a courageous, warlike, or hardy man

A PRETTY MANY
n. 1761 – a good many

PRETTY MESS
n. 1. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – disorder
n. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – someone or something unattractive

PRETTY NIFTY
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – excellent; first-rate

PRETTY-PAN
n. Bk1942 Amer. college sl. – an attractive girl

A PRETTY PENNY
n. 1710 colloq. – a considerable sum of money

PRETTY PILLICOCK
n. Urquhart usage obs. – the penis

PRETTY POLICE
n. 1990s sl. – a policeman or police squad specializing in the entrapment of homosexual men

PRETTY-PRETTY
adv. 1877 – in an excessively pretty manner or style
adj. 1897 – excessively or affectedly pretty or sentimental
n. a1882 – something beautiful or attractive; a decorative thing, an ornament

PRETTY ROGUE
n. Urquhart usage – the penis

PRETTY-SPOKEN
adj. 1774 rare – speaking politely

PRETTY STEEP
adj. 1. M19 sl., orig. US – rather expensive
adj. 2. L19 US sl. – threatening

PRETTY SWELL
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – excellent; first-rate

PRETTY UP
vb. 1950s Aust. sl. – to disfigure

PRETYPE
vb. 1659 obs. rare – to prefigure; to foreshadow

PRETZEL
n. 1. 1873 US sl., depreciative usage – a German person
n. 2. 1923 jazz sl. – a French horn
vb. 1933 orig. & chiefly US – to twist or contort, esp. forcefully; to cause to bend or buckle

PRETZEL BENDER
n. 1. 1908 baseball usage – a curve ball; a curve-ball pitcher
n. 2. 1936 jazz sl. – a person who plays the French horn

PRETZELEDPRETZELLED
adj. 1938 orig. & chiefly US – twisted, contorted, tangled

PREUX
adj. 1907 – brave, valiant, gallant

PREVAIL
n. a1460 obs. – advantage or benefit
vb. 1. a1398 obs. – to become very strong; to gain vigour or force; to increase in strength
vb. 2. c1450 obs. – to be of advantage, profit, or use

PREVAILENCY
n. 1650 obs. – power, influence

PREVAILENT
adj. 1623 obs. – powerful, influential

PREVAILMENT
n. 1599 rare – a prevailing, influencing, or gaining ascendancy

PREVALENCE
n. 1. 1612 obs. – effective force or power; influence, weight; efficacy
n . 2. 1646 obs. – existence of greater power or strength

PREVALENCY
n. 1. 1623 obs. – superiority, predominance
n. 2. 1646 obs. rare – a being of greater power or strength

PREVALESCENCE
n. 1653 obs. – a being prevalent; growing ascendancy

PREVALESCENT
adj. 1649 obs. – becoming prevalent; powerful

PREVALID
adj. 1657 obs. rare – excessively strong

PREVARICABLE
adj. 1644 obs. rare – capable of being deviated from; able to be circumvented

PREVARICANT
adj. 1644 obs. rare – deviating from the right course; irregular, improper

PREVARICATE
adj. 1635 obs. rare – deviating; perverse
vb. 1. 1582 obs. – to deviate, to transgress; to depart from a course of action considered to be correct or right
vb. 2. 1595 rare – to pervert, to corrupt, to misrepresent, to falsify
vb. 3. 1788 obs. rare – to plough crookedly

PREVARICATIVE
adj. 1657 – untruthful; evasive

PREVARICATOR
n. a1575 obs. – a person who betrays a cause or violates a trust; a renegade; a traitor

PREVARICATORY
adj. 1645 – untruthful; evasive, equivocating

PREVARICATRICE
n. c1429 obs. rare – a woman who sins or breaches a law; a female transgressor

PREVARY
vb. 1541 obs. rare – to corrupt, to pervert

PREVENANCE
n. 1823 obs. – courteous anticipation of the needs of others; courtesy, complaisance, obligingness of manner

PREVENANCY
n. 1768 obs. rare – courtesy, politeness

PREVENANT
adj. 1750 obs. – courteously anticipating the needs of others; obliging, polite
n. 1. 1869 obs. – a polite or courteous person
n. 2. 1876 obs. – something that precedes; an antecedent

PREVENE
vb. 1. c1485 chiefly Sc., obs. – to anticipate, to take precautions against a danger, evil, etc.; to prevent, to frustrate, to evade
vb. 2. 1596 chiefly Sc., obs. – to come or go before; to precede

PREVENIENCE
n. 1751 – anticipation, forethought

PREVENIENT
adj. 1656 – coming before, preceding, prior

PREVENING
n. 1557 obs. – an anticipating, forestalling, preventing, or obstructing something

PREVENT
vb. 1. a1500 obs. – to come, arrive, or appear before; to precede
vb. 2. 1540 obs. – to outdo, to surpass, to excel

PREVENTATIVE
n. 1901 – a contraceptive

PREVENTER
n. 1598 obs. rare – a person who precedes; a predecessor; an anticipator

PREVENTIAL
adj. 1657 – precautionary; preventing something from occurring or being done

PREVENTING
adj. 1. 1605 obs. – going before, preceding, anticipating
adj. 2. 1751 obs. rare – courteously anticipating the needs of others; obliging
n. 1530 obs. rare – anticipation

PREVENTION
n. 1. 1601 obs. – a premonition, a presentiment
n. 2. 1671 obs. – a prejudice, bias, or prepossession

PREVENTIVE
adj. 1641 obs. – occurring before something else; antecedent, anticipatory
n. 1822 – a contraceptive

PREVENTIVELY
adv. 1646 obs. – previously; in advance

PREVENTORIUM
n. 1907 orig. US – an institution where preventive care is given to people at risk from disease, esp. tuberculosis

PREVERT
n. 1962 colloq. – a pervert
vb. a1522 obs. rare – to go beyond; to overtake, to outstrip

PREVIAL
adj. 1613 obs. – going before, previous

PREVIANT
adj. 1601 obs. rare – going before, previous

PREVIDE
vb. 1. a1425 obs. – to provide; to arrange or provide for in advance
vb. 2. c1475 obs. – to foresee

PREVIDENCE
n. a1425 obs. – foresight; provident care

PREVIEW
n. 1855 obs. rare – foresight

PREVIOUS
adj. 1. 1920s sl. – forward, cheeky; unacceptable or in poor taste
adj. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – impatient
adj. 3. 20C US sl. – of clothing: tight, snug
n. 1935 Brit. sl. – previous criminal convictions; a criminal record

PREVIOUSNESS
n. 1881 colloq. – a being over-hasty or premature in one’s actions

PREVISE
vb. 1. 1543 obs. – to provide or supply with an amount of something
vb. 2. 1597 – to foresee, to forecast
vb. 3. 1834 rare – to advise or inform beforehand

PREVISION
n. a1425 – foresight; a foreseeing; insight into the future
vb. 1. 1868 – to foresee; to have anticipatory knowledge of
vb. 2. 1891 obs. rare – to endow with foresight

PREVISIONAL
adj. 1643 – based on foresight; foretold; foreseen

PREVISIONARY
adj. 1818 – endowed with foresight

PREVISIVE
adj. 1736 rare – relating to foresight

PREVIVATION
n. 1657 obs. rare – a living before another; greater age, seniority

PREVOYANCE
n. 1767 rare – foresight

PREVOYANT
adj. 1785 obs. – having foresight

PREW
adj. 1340 obs. – brave, valiant, or gallant; also, proud, haughty
n. a1400 obs. – advantage, benefit, well-being

PREX
n. 1828 colloq., rare – the president of a college, corporation, etc.

PREXY
n. 1858 sl. – the president of a college, corporation, etc.

PREY
n. 1. c1300 obs. – a company or troop of soldiers; an army
n. 2. a1375 obs. – a seizing or taking by force or violence; pillaging, ravaging
n. 3. a1382 obs. – something which is procured as or serves for food, not necessarily meat; provisions or rations
n. 4. L17 UK criminals’ sl. – money
vb. 1. c1325 obs. – to take booty or plunder; to commit pillage
vb. 2. 1596 obs. rare – to take or capture by force; to seize as booty

PREYFUL
adj. 1598 rare – predatory, rapacious; given to preying

PREZ
n. 1. L19 US – a president of a college, corporation, etc.
n. 2. 1919 Brit. colloq., rare – a present
n. 3. 1950s African-American – an important, influential person

PREZACTLY
adv. 1835 Amer. dial. – exactly; precisely

PREZZIE
n. 1930s sl., orig. Aust. – a present

PRIAPE
vb. 1589 obs. rare – to have sexual intercourse with; to rape

PRIAPEAN
adj. 1623 – lascivious, sexual

PRIAPIAN
adj. 1727 rare – lascivious, sexual
n. 1598 rare – a lascivious person

PRIAPIC
adj. 1786 – lascivious, sexual

PRIAPISH
adj. 1531 obs. rare – lewd, obscene

PRIAPISM
n. 1694 – licentiousness, obscenity; also, debasement, corruption

PRIAPIST
n. 1532 – a lascivious person, usually a man; a lecher

PRIAPIZE
vb. 1648 obs. – to have sexual intercourse; to behave in a lascivious manner

PRIAPUS
n. c1487 chiefly literary and poetic usage – the penis, esp. when erect

PRIBBLE AND PRABBLE
n. 1603 – a petty or pointless dispute, a squabble; trivial or nonsensical speech or writing; a squabbling, a quarrelling; idle chit-chat

PRIBBLE-PRABBLE
n. 1595 chiefly Eng. dial. – a petty or pointless dispute, a squabble; trivial or nonsensical speech or writing; a squabbling, a quarrelling; idle chit-chat

PRICASOUR
n. c1387-95 obs. rare – a rider, a mounted huntsman

PRICE
adj. 1. c1300 obs. – worthy, noble; praiseworthy, commendable
adj. 2. c1330 obs. – the most excellent or noteworthy
n. 1. c1225 obs. – an expression of commendation, esteem, or honour; praise
n. 2. c1225 obs. – general recognition of worth or excellence; honour, glory, renown
n. 3. a1275 obs. – an excelling others; place of honour; first or highest place; pre-eminence
n. 4. a1350 obs. – superiority in a match or struggle; victory
n. 5. a1382 obs. – money paid as the equivalent of labour, wages
vb. 1. c1480 orig. Sc., obs. – to value or esteem highly
vb. 2. 1533 obs. rare – to raise the price of, to make expensive

PRICEFUL
adj. 1. a1400 obs. – worthy
adj. 2. 1605 rare – valuable, expensive

PRICEHEAD
n. c1540 obs. rare – worthiness, excellence, valour

PRICELESS
adj. 1907 colloq. – very funny or amusing; excellent; first-rate

PRICELY
adv. c1450 obs. rare – excellently, nobly, choicely

PRICE OF A PINT
n. L19 sl. – any sum less than 6 pence

PRICE OF GREENS
n. M19 sl. – the cost of hiring a prostitute

PRICE OF MEAT
n. 19C sl. – the cost of hiring a prostitute

THE PRICE OF ONE’S HAT ISN’T THE MEASURE OF ONE’S BRAIN
phr. 19C African-American – one’s material possessions have no bearing on one’s intelligence and wisdom

PRICEY
adj. 1932 sl. – expensive, costly

PRICK
n. 1. a1000 obs. – a minute part, particle, or quantity of something; a jot
n. 2. 1340 – a moment; an instant of time
n. 3. a1350 obs. – a dagger or pointed sword
n. 4. c1350 obs. – the sting of a bee, scorpion, etc.
n. 5. c1384 obs. – a thing that causes annoyance, irritation, or torment
n. 6. a1387 obs. – something which serves as a stimulus, prompt, or incitement; an incentive
n. 7. c1422 obs. – the precise instant of time when anything happens; the critical moment
n. 8. a1450 obs. – that at which one aims; an end or objective
n. 9. 1497 obs. – the upright pole of a tent
n. 10. 1540 colloq., obs. – a term of endearment for a man; darling, sweetheart
n. 11. c1555 sl. – the penis
n. 12. 1598 – the footprint or track of a hare
n. 13. 1598 sl. – a stupid, contemptible or annoying person; an ineffectual or incompetent man
n. 14. 1666 – a small roll of tobacco
n. 15. 1950s US drug culture sl. – a hypodermic syringe
vb. 1. a1000 – to cause mental pain or discomfort to; to sting with sorrow or remorse; to grieve, to pain, to torment
vb. 2. c1230 – to urge as with a spur; to impel, to incite, to stimulate, to provoke
vb. 3. c1540 obs. rare – to write down, to record
vb. 4. 1594 obs. – of wine, beer, etc.: to turn sour or vinegary
vb. 5. 1602 obs. – of a hare: to make a track when running
vb. 6. 1637 obs. rare – to insert the points or stops in a document; to punctuate
vb. 7. Bk1903 sl. – to possess carnally

PRICKADO
n. 1592 obs. rare – a stab with a sword

PRICK AND PRAISE
n. a1534 obs. – the praise of excellence or success; success and its acknowledgement

PRICK AND PRANCE
vb. a1393 obs. – to ride proudly and ostentatiously; to caper

PRICK AND PRICE
n. 1569 obs. – the praise of excellence or success; success and its acknowledgement

PRICKANT
adj. 1. 1613 humorous usage, obs. – riding; errant
adj. 2. 1613 humorous usage, obs. – sticking or pointing up or out

PRICK AROUND
vb. 1980s sl. – to mess about

PRICK-CAST
n. 1580 fencing usage, obs. rare – a thrust with a long pointed sword

PRICK-CHINKING
n. 18C sl. – a having sexual intercourse

PRICK-EAR
n. 1642 rare – a person whose ears protrude conspicuously

PRICK-EARED
adj. 1. a1425 – of a dog, etc.: having erect ears
adj. 2. 1550 – listening attentively; attentive, alert
adj. 3. 1641 obs. – of a person: having ears made prominent as a result of the hair being short and close-cropped
adj. 4. 1707 arch. – puritanical, priggish

PRICK EARS
n. 1. 1573 – the erect pointed ears of dogs, etc.; ears that are pricked up or stand erect
n. 2. 1641 obs. – the ears of a person that are conspicuous by naturally standing out, or through having the hair cut short

PRICKED
adj. 1. 1579 – of the ears of a dog, etc.: erect and pointed, cocked up
adj. 2. 1600 rare – of wine, beer, etc. – turned or turning sour or vinegary

PRICKER
n. 1. a1350 – a person who spurs or rides a horse; a rider, a horseman; a mounted warrior or soldier, esp. a light horseman employed as a skirmisher or scout
n. 2. a1382 – a person who goads someone; a person who incites, provokes, or stimulates another
n. 3. 1575 – a mounted attendant at hunt; a huntsman
n. 4. 1661 Sc. – a person who professed to discover if a woman was a witch by sticking pins into her
n. 5. 1743 colloq. – a thorn, prickle, or burr, bramble
n. 6. 1920s sl. – a fool, an idiot, an incompetent person

THE PRICKER
n. 1945 Aust. & NZ sl. – anger, a fit of anger

PRICKET
n. 1. a1425 – a male deer, esp. a fallow buck, in its second year, having straight unbranched antlers.
n. 2. 1582 obs. – a boy, a young man
n. 3. 1663 obs. – a thorn, a prickle; a small sharp point or spike

PRICKET’S SISTER
n. 1657 obs. – a female fallow deer in its second year

PRICKFACE
n. 1960s sl. – a term of abuse

PRICK-FARRIER
n. 1961 Services’ sl. – a medical officer

PRICK FAST UPON
vb. 1565 obs. – to approach closely a time or age

PRICKHEAD
n. 1. 1688 obs. rare – the first set of antlers of a fallow deer
n. 2. 1965 Amer. dial. – a person who likes to brag
n. 3. 1980s sl. – a fool, a simpleton
n. 4. 1990s sl. – a bald-headed man

PRICK-HOLDER
n. 19C sl. – the vagina

PRICK HOLE
n. L19 sl. – the vagina

PRICKISH
adj. 1960s US sl. – obnoxious

PRICKLE
n. 1. a1000 obs. – an urging or prompting
n. 2. a1000 obs. – a small mark or written character; an iota; a minute fraction, part, or particle
n. 3. c1425 obs. – the sting of an insect
n. 4. 1638 – a cause of discomfort, contention, or irritation; something that pricks the mind or feelings; chiefly used in plural
vb. 1. a1513 obs. – to affect with a feeling of mental pain, sorrow, or remorse
vb. 2. 1972 – to react defensively or angrily; to bristle

PRICKLES
n. 1956 Brit. rare – a tendency to react argumentatively; defensiveness, prickliness, touchiness

PRICK-LICK
vb. 1970s US sl. – to perform fellatio

PRICK-LICKER
n. 1970s US sl. – a fellator

PRICK-LINE
n. 1653 obs. – a dotted line

PRICKLISH
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – hot-tempered

PRICKLOUSE
n. a1513 arch., usually a term of derision or contempt – a tailor

PRICK-LUGGED
adj. 1847 Eng. dial. – having erect ears; said of a dog, pig, etc.

PRICKLY
adj. 1. 1853 – of a person: quick to react angrily, ready to take
offense; touchy, oversensitive
adj. 2. c1862 – of an argument, etc.: involving sensitive issues; difficult to deal with

PRICKLY PIG
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – a porcupine

PRICK-MARK
n. 1553 obs. – an archer’s target or mark; the bullseye

PRICK-ME-DAINTY
adj. 1583 chiefly Sc. – finicky in dress, language, and behaviour; affectedly dainty; over-precise; excessively particular or fastidious
n. a1529 chiefly Sc. – one who is finicky and conceited in dress and carriage; one who affects airs of superiority; a dandy

PRICK NEAR
vb. 1574 obs. – to approach closely an attainment or quality

PRICKNIC
n. 1980s US homosexual sl. – fellatio

PRICK OFFICE
n. M17 sl. – a brothel staffed by heterosexual male prostitutes, or a group of regular brothel patrons

PRICK OF THE DAY
n. c1422 obs. – daybreak

PRICK OF TIME
n. c1475 obs. – a moment; an instant of time

PRICK ON
vb. 1905 Amer. dial. – of wind: to increase

PRICK ON A CLOUT
vb. 1584 obs. – to sew

PRICK-PRIDE
n. L19 sl. – an erect penis

PRICK-PURSE
n. 19C sl. – the vagina

PRICK-SCOURER
n. 19C sl. – the vagina

PRICK-SKINNER
n. 19C sl. – the vagina

PRICK-SUCKER
n. 1868 sl. – a fellator or fellatrix

PRICKTEASE
n. 1950s sl. – a woman who appears to be offering unrestrained sexual favours but stops short of intercourse, leaving the male partner frustrated

PRICK-TEASER
n. 1939 sl., derogatory – a sexually provocative woman who evades or refuses intercourse

PRICK-THE-LOUSE
n. a1513 arch. – a tailor

PRICK THE MASTER VEIN
vb. L17 sl. – of a man: to have sexual intercourse

PRICKY
adj. 1960s US sl. – obnoxious

PRICKY-BACK
n. 1864 Eng. dial. – a hedgehog

PRICKY-URCHIN
n. 1796 Eng. dial. – a hedgehog

PRICY
adj. 1932 sl. – expensive

PRIDE
n. 1. a1000 chiefly poetic usage, obs. – magnificence, splendour; pomp, ostentation, display
n. 2. c1275 obs. – honour, glory
n. 3. c1330 rare – vitality, mettle, or spirit in a horse
n. 4. 1486 obs. – sexual desire, esp. in a female animal; heat
vb. 1. c1225 obs. – to ornament or adorn magnificently
vb. 2. c1225 obs. – to be proud; to become proud

PRIDE AND JOY
n. 1. 1918 – a cherished person or thing
n. 2. 1930s rhyming sl. – a boy
n. 3. 1930s sl. – the penis

PRIDED
adj. 1773 rare – proud; highly valued

PRIDEFUL
adj. c1429 chiefly Sc. & Amer. – haughty, arrogant, having a proud character

PRIDELING
n. 1825 obs. – a proud young person

PRIDE OF LIFE
n. c1384 arch. – worldly pride or ostentation, vainglory

PRIDE OF THE MORNING
n. 1. 1777 Eng. dial. – a light shower, or dew at sunrise, traditionally taken as indicating a fine day to come
n. 2. L19 sl. – an early morning erection, more due to the need to urinate than to sexual desire

PRIDES
n. 1923 Amer. dial. – the male genitals

PRIDIAN
adj. 1656 obs. rare – pertaining to the previous day; relating to yesterday

PRIDING
adj. 1592 obs. rare – affecting or displaying pride
n. 1594 obs. – a showing pride

PRIDY
adj. c1485 Eng. & Amer. dial. – proud; characterized by pride

PRIESTAL
adj. 1839 rare – priestly; having the character of a priest

PRIESTEEN
n. 1907 humorous usage, or mildly depreciative – a priest, esp. a young or unimportant one

PRIESTERY
n. 1650 rare – priests collectively

PRIESTESS
n. 1. 1594 – a female priest
n. 2. 1709 colloq., obs. – a priest’s or clergyman’s wife

PRIESTIAL
adj. c1449 obs. rare – ecclesiastical, clerical

PRIESTIANITY
n. 1720 obs., derogatory – a religious system or doctrine dominated by or serving the interests of priests

PRIEST-ILL
n. 1847 Eng. dial. rare – the ague

PRIESTLET
n. 1880 humorous usage, or mildly derogatory – a young, small, or insignificant priest

PRIESTLING
n. 1. 1629 chiefly derogatory – a young, small, or insignificant priest
n. 2. 1720 rare, chiefly derogatory – a person devoted, in a servile manner, to a priesthood or priestly system

PRIEST-LINKED
adj. L17 sl. – married

PRIEST OF THE BLUE BAG
n. M19 sl. – a barrister

PRIESTRESS
n. a1439 – a female priest

PRIEST-RID
adj. 1653 obs. – managed or controlled by a priest; held in subjection by priestly authority

PRIEST-RIDDEN
adj. 1647 – managed or controlled by a priest; held in subjection by priestly authority

PRIEST-RIDE
vb. 1733 obs. – of a priest: to control, to dominate

PRIEST-RIDING
n. 1700 obs. – the domination or tyranny of priests

PRIEST’S CROWN
n. c1300 obs. – an old name for the common dandelion

PRIEST’S SHARE
n. L19 Irish sl. – one’s soul

PRIESTYBULOUS
adj. 1545 obs. rare – relating to or suggestive of a prostitute

PRIG
adj. 1776 rare – priggish, precise; proper, exact
n. 1. 1567 cant obs. — a disreputable person; a tinker
n. 2. 1567 sl. – a thief; a petty thief
n. 3. L16 sl. – a horse
n. 4. 1676 sl. – a dandy, a fop; a particular or excessively precise person
n. 5. 1677 – a person who is offensively punctilious and precise in speech or behaviour; a conceited or self-important and didactic person
n. 6. 1679 obs. – an unpleasant or unsympathetic person
n. 7. 18C sl. – a cheat
n. 8. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – a female cad
vb. 1. 1567 sl. – to ride
vb. 2. 1567 sl. – to steal, to pilfer
vb. 3. a1628 chiefly Sc. & Eng. dial. – to haggle over the price of something offered for sale
vb. 4. 1632 Sc. obs. – to try to drive a hard bargain; to negotiate with
vb. 5. 17C sl. – to possess carnally; to copulate
vb. 6. 1700 Sc. – to beg, to entreat; to plead with
vb. 7. 1845 US obs. – to dress up; to preen

PRIGABLE; PRIGGABLE
adj. 1827 obs. – that can be stolen

PRIG A CASTOR
vb. Bk1890 sl. – to steal a hat

PRIG AND BUZZ
n. L18 sl. – pickpocketing

PRIG-BEARD
n. L16 sl. – a degenerate, a seducer

PRIGG
n. 1950s Aust. sl. – a busybody

PRIGGER
n. 1. 1567 sl. – a thief
n. 2. a1640 obs. rare – a rider; specifically, a mounted highwayman
n. 3. E19 sl. – a fornicator, a womanizer

PRIGGER OF CACKLERS
n. L17 UK criminals’ sl. – a chicken thief

PRIGGER OF PAULFREYS
n. M16 UK criminals’ sl. – a horse thief

PRIGGER OF PRAINERS
n. M16 UK criminals’ sl. – a horse thief

PRIGGER OF PRANCERS
n. M16 UK criminals’ sl. – a horse thief

PRIGGERY
n. M16 criminals’ sl. – theft

PRIGGESS
n. 1890 rare – a female prig

PRIGGING
adj. 1. 1567 rare – thieving, pilfering
adj. 2. a1627 obs. – acting like a dandy or fop; affected
adj. 3. a1653 Sc. obs. – bargaining, haggling
n. 1. 1591 sl. – stealing, thieving; later, petty theft, pilfering
n. 2. 1591 chiefly Sc. – haggling over a price or the terms of a deal; hard bargaining
n. 3. M16 sl. – horse riding
n. 4. 17C sl. – having sexual intercourse

PRIGGING LAW
n. 1591 obs. – the occupation or practice of thieving

PRIGGING LAY
n. 1829 obs. – the occupation or practice of thieving

PRIGGISH
adj. 1. 1699 cant obs. – dishonest, thief-like
adj. 2. 1701 obs. – foppish, dandified; excessively particular in matters of dress
adj. 3. 1731 – excessively precise in matters of learning, conduct, etc.; self-righteously correct; moralistic

PRIGGISM
n. 1. 1743 rare – thievery as a profession or occupation
n. 2. 1753 rare – priggishness, self-righteous moralism; excessive precision in matters of learning, manners, etc.

PRIGGUMS
n. B1900 Eng. dial. – the private parts of a man

PRIGMAN
n. 1567 hist. – a thief

PRIG-NAPPER
n. 1. 1676 cant obs. – a horse thief
n. 2. 1699 cant obs. – a thief-taker

PRIG-PENNY
vb. a1522 Sc., obs. – to haggle over small amounts of money; to drive a hard bargain

PRIGSTER
n. 1. 1628 obs. – a thief, a pilferer
n. 2. 1688 obs. – an excessively precise or particular person; generally, an objectionable person
n. 3. L17 sl. – a rival in love

PRILL
n. 1. 1440 obs. – a spinning top
n. 2. 1587 obs. rare – a girl, a lass
n. 3. 1603 – a small stream of running water; a rill
vb. 1598 rare – to flow, to spurt

PRIM
n 1. 1509 obs. – an attractive woman, esp. a young one; also, a lover, a paramour
n. 2. 1699 obs. – an excessively formal or precise person; a prude
n. 3. a1825 obs. rare – a primming or screwing up the mouth

PRIMA
n. 1768 – a self-important or temperamental person

PRIMA BALLERINA
n. 1923 – a self-important or temperamental person; also, a person who takes a leading role, or is considered the best in a particular field

PRIMA BALLERINA ASSOLUTA
n. 1870 – a prima ballerina of outstanding excellence

PRIMA BUFFA
n. 1789 – the leading female singer or role in a comic opera, esp. in the 18th century Italian opera buffa

PRIMA DONNA
adj. 1897 – self-important, temperamental
n. 1862 – a self-important or temperamental person
vb. 1929 – to act in a self-important or temperamental manner

PRIMA DONNA ASSOLUTA
n. 1854 – a prima donna of outstanding excellence

PRIMA FRONTE
adv. 1622 obs. – at first sight; on the face of it; as it appears at first without investigation

PRIMAL BORN
adj. 1874 rare – firstborn

PRIMALTY
n. a1400 obs. – a being first in order, rank, important, or authority; a being more or most important; the first or chief place; superiority, pre-eminence

PRIMAR
adj. a1603 obs. – first, primary
n. 1. 1620 Sc. – the principal of a Scottish university or university college
n. 2. 1642 Sc. – a student of the highest rank at the University of St. Andrews or the University of Glasgow

PRIMARIAN
n. 1. 1858 US rare – a pupil in a primary school; a member of a junior class in a school
n. 2. 1918 political usage – a candidate in a primary election

PRIMATE
adj. a1425 obs. – first, earliest; most important
n. 1. c1384 rare – a person who is first in rank or importance; a chief, a leader
n. 2. a1402 obs. – chief place, primacy
n. 3. 1596 obs. – a principal point or article

PRIMAVERAL
adj. 1823 – taking place in early spring

PRIME
adj. 1. 1402 – of food or other goods: of the best or highest quality, first class, excellent
adj. 2. c1429 – first in order of time or occurrence; early, young, youthful; primitive
adj. 3. a1591 – of a person or group of people: very important or powerful; foremost, leading, greatest
adj. 4. a1616 obs. rare – sexually excited, lustful
adj. 5. a1637 colloq. – excellent, splendid; marvellous
adv. 1648 colloq. – excellently; in prime order
n. 1. c1300 obs. – the early morning; the period between 6 a.m. and 9 a.m.; a point at the beginning or end of this period; the time just after sunrise
n. 2. a1387 obs. – the young crescent moon, esp. when half way to first quarter; the beginning or first appearance of the new moon
n. 3. c1425 rare – the beginning or first age of something
n. 4. 1541 obs. – spring, as the first season of the year when this began in March)
n. 5. 1579 rare – the chief or most important member of a group of people or things
n. 6. 1625 rare – the best, choicest, or most desirable part of something
n. 7. 1658 obs. – a first coat of paint; a priming
n. 8. 1847 obs. rare – the print of a deer’s foot
vb. 1. a1450 obs. – of the moon: to begin its first phase; to become new
vb. 2. 1513 obs. – to fill, charge, load
vb. 3. 1565 rare – to prune or trim a tree or shrub
vb. 4. 1616 colloq., obs. – to make up the face, etc., with cosmetics
vb. 5. 1756 obs. – to domineer, to act as the leader
vb. 6. 1788 colloq. – to fill with alcoholic drink; to intoxicate; to make dead drunk
vb. 7. 1789 – of a fish: to leap or rise out of the water
vb. 8. 1791 – to prepare or equip, esp. with information, for a particular purpose, or to perform a specific task

PRIME ARTICLE
n. 1811 sl. – a handsome girl

PRIME CUT
n. 1970s sl. – the vagina

PRIMED
adj. 1. L19 – prepared, ready
adj. 2. 1940s sl. – intoxicated by drugs
adj. 1960s Amer. sl. – tipsy, slightly intoxicated

PRIME FLAT
n. E19 UK criminals’ sl. – an extremely susceptible person; the ideal victim for a confidence trickster

PRIMEFUL
adj. 1606 obs. – characterized by being in the prime of life; youthful

PRIME MOVER
n. 1633 – a person who instigates or originates something

PRIME ONE’S PUMP
vb. 1990s sl. – to masturbate

PRIME PLANT
n. M19 UK criminals’ sl. – a potential victim, as assessed by a villain

PRIMER
adj. 1589 obs. – first in position, rank, or importance; chief, leading, foremost, premier
n. 1. c1390 – an elementary school book for teaching children to read
n. 2. 1596 obs. rare – the first, the foremost
n. 3. 1611 obs. rare – a person who prunes trees
n. 4. 1640 – something which serves as a first means of instruction
n. 5. 1722 – a small introductory book on any subject
n. 6. 1885 chiefly NZ – a class covering one of the first years of instruction in a primary school; a child in a primary school class
n. 7. 1890 obs. rare – a person who loads or charges detonators
n. 8. 1896 obs. rare – a person who prepares canvas, etc., for a painter

PRIME SOMEONE’S PUMP
vb. 1. 1940s sl. – to fellate
vb. 2. 1950s sl. – to excite sexually

PRIME TEMPS
n. a1425 obs. – springtime, spring; the beginning, the earliest time

PRIME THE PUMP
vb. 1819 – to stimulate or support growth or success by supplying initial investment, encouragement, etc.; especially said of economic growth

PRIMETIDE
n. 1. a1300 obs. – the time of prime, early morning
n. 2. 1549 obs. – springtime, spring; fig. the ‘springtime’ of life, or of any movement

PRIME TIME
n. 1. 1503 obs. – springtime, spring
n. 2. a1556 obs. – the beginning or early period of youth, life, the world, etc.

PRIME UP
vb. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to intoxicate; to make dead drunk

PRIMEUR
n. 1. 1775 – a wine to be drunk when new
n. 2. 1878 – a vegetable or piece of fruit which is grown before its ordinary season or is of the first harvest
n. 3. 1900 – an early piece of news

PRIMEVE
adj. a1640 obs. – original, primal, primitive; specifically, relating to the earliest history of the world
n. 1619 obs. – youth

PRIMEVITY
n. 1610 obs. – primitiveness; a being primeval

PRIMEVOUS
adj. 1656 obs. – primeval, primitive

PRIMEVOUSNESS
n. 1731 obs. rare – the being of the first age

PRIMICES
n . a1325 – first fruits

PRIMIFESTE
n. 1551 obs. – a first feast

PRIMIGENE
adj. 1623 obs. – formed or produced first; original, primary

PRIMIGENIAL
adj. 1602 – generated or produced first; of the earliest stage of existence; original, primitive, primary

PRIMIGENIALNESS
n. 1731 obs. rare – originalness; the being the first of the kind

PRIMIGENIE
adj. 1615 obs. rare – generated or produced first; of the earliest stage of existence; original, primitive, primary

PRIMIGENIOUS
adj. 1620 rare – generated or produced first; of the earliest stage of existence; original, primitive, primary

PRIMIGENOUS
adj. 1677 – generated or produced first; of the earliest stage of existence; original, primitive, primary

PRIMIGRAVID
adj. 1949 obstetrics & veterinary medicine usage – pregnant for the first time
n. 1981 obstetrics & veterinary medicine usage – a female in her first pregnancy

PRIMIGRAVIDA
n. 1884 obstetrics & veterinary medicine usage – a female in her first pregnancy

PRIMINARY
n. 1837 Amer. dial. – a predicament

PRIMIP
n. 1927 obstetrics usage – a female who is giving or has given birth for the first time; one who is pregnant for the first time

PRIMIPARA
n. 1833 obstetrics & veterinary medicine usage – a female who is giving or has given birth for the first time; one who is pregnant for the first time

PRIMIPILARY
adj. 1693 obs. rare – prime, first-class

PRIMIPOTENT
adj. 1656 obs. rare – most powerful

PRIMITIAL
adj. 1602 obs. – first, original; primitive, primeval

PRIMITIST
n. 1818 obs. rare – a person who prefers simple, unsophisticated, or old-fashioned methods

PRIMITIVE
adj. Bk1902 colloq. – of drinks: unmixed with water
n. 1. c1400 obs. – a firstborn child or animal
n. 2. 1486 obs. – an ancestor or progenitor; a predecessor
n. 3. 1628 obs. – a thing from which something else is derived; a foundation, a basis
n. 4. 1967 derogatory – an uncivilized, unintelligent, or uncouth person

PRIMITIVELY
adv. 1581 obs. – originally

PRIMITIVES
n. 1602 obs. rare – the earliest stages; the beginnings

PRIMITIVIST
n. 1910 – a person who prefers simple, unsophisticated, or old-fashioned methods

PRIMITIVITY
n. 1759 – primitiveness

PRIMITIVIZE
vb. 1940 – to make primitive; to simplify

PRIMITY
n. 1. 1546 obs. – the first part; the beginning
n. 2. 1643 obs. – a being first in rank or order; priority, supremacy

PRIMMY
adj. 1857 rare – rather prim

PRIMO
adj. 1. 1740 – of a musician, performer, etc. – first, principal, chief; of highest quality or importance
adj. 2. 1973 sl., orig. & chiefly US – excellent; first-rate; of top quality
n. 1. 1972 US sl., rare – marijuana of high quality
n. 2. 1986 US sl. – a cigarette containing marijuana mixed with cocaine, esp. crack

PRIMO BALLERINO
n. 1840 – the principal male dancer of a ballet company

PRIMO BASSO
n. 1826 – the principal bass singer in an opera

PRIMO BUFFO
n. 1826 – the principal male singer or role in a comic opera, esp. in the 18th century Italian opera buffa

PRIMOGENIAL
adj. a1631 – generated or produced first; of the earliest stage of existence; original, primitive, primary

PRIMOGENIAN
adj. 1650 obs. – generated or produced first; of the earliest stage of existence; original, primitive, primary

PRIMOGENIOUS
adj. 1625 rare – generated or produced first; of the earliest stage of existence; original, primitive, primary

PRIMOGENIT
adj. 1619 obs. rare – firstborn, eldest
n. c1429 – the firstborn child in a family; the eldest child of a monarch considered as heir to the throne

PRIMOGENITAL
adj. a1706 – relating to primogeniture

PRIMOGENITARY
adj. 1827 – relating to primogeniture

PRIMOGENITIVE
adj. 1842 – relating to primogeniture
n. a1616 obs. rare – the right of the firstborn child of a family, esp. a son, to succeed or inherit property or title to the exclusion of other claimants

PRIMOGENITOR
n. 1643 – the earliest ancestor, esp. of a people; a forefather; a person from whom another is originally descended

PRIMOGENITRIX
n. 1875 rare – a female progenitor; a female from whom another is originally descended

PRIMOGENITURE
n. 1. a1500 – a being the firstborn child in a family
n. 2. 1596 obs. rare – a firstborn child, esp. a firstborn son
n. 3. 1614 – the right of the firstborn child of a family, esp. a son, to succeed or inherit property or title to the exclusion of other claimants

PRIMOGENITURESHIP
n. 1622 – the right of the firstborn child of a family, esp. a son, to succeed or inherit property or title to the exclusion of other claimants

PRIMOGENITURIST
n. a1849 rare – a person who believes that the right of succession or inheritance belongs to the firstborn

PRIMO-PRIME
adj. 1672 obs. – the very first, absolutely primary

PRIMO-PRIMITIVE
adj. 1678 rare – relating to the earliest of those who are primitive; characterized by extreme primitiveness

PRIMORDIAL
adj. a1398 – existing from the very beginning of time, earliest in time; primeval, primitive; generally, ancient, distant in time
n. c1487 – an original or fundamental thing; a beginning or origin

PRIMORDIALLY
adv. 1. 1603 – from the very beginning; at first, originally
adv. 2. 1604 – basically, fundamentally; essentially

PRIMORDIATE
adj. 1599 obs. rare – existing from the very beginning of time; earliest in time; primeval, primitive; generally, ancient, distant in time

PRIMORDIUM
n. 1577 – the very beginning, the earliest stage; a starting point, an introduction

PRIMORE
n. 1625 obs. rare – a chief, a leader

PRIMORITY
n. 1727 obs. – foremost place or importance

PRIMORTIVE
adj. 1620 obs. rare – originating from that which is prime, primary, or primitive

PRIMOSITY
n. a1839 humorous nonce word obs. – a state of primness, prudery

PRIMP
adj. c1590 – orig. (of the mouth, etc.): pursed, set, primly shut; later, prim, neat; affected
vb. 1943 – to move or walk affectedly or mincingly

PRIMPED
adj. 1625 – elaborately dressed or made up; fussily neat or smart; affected; vain

PRIMPY
adj. 1859 Amer. dial. – fastidious, finicky; affected

PRIMROSE
n. 1. a1450 arch. – the first or best; the finest or a fine example of something
n. 2. a1450 arch. – a term of endearment

PRIMROSE PATH
n. 1604 – an appealing course or route; the pursuit of pleasure which might bring ruin or disastrous consequences

PRIMROSE-TIME
n. 1. 1606 – springtime
n. 2. a1784 – youth

PRIMROSE WAY
n. a1616 – an appealing course or route; the pursuit of pleasure which might bring ruin or disastrous consequences

PRIMROSY
adj. 1901 – easy or pleasurable

PRIMSY
adj. 1786 chiefly Sc. – prim, demure, formal; precise


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Updated: September 13, 2022