Dictionary: PUS – PUSZ


• PUS BAG
n. 1970s US sl. – a despicable person

• PUS BRAIN
n. 1960s sl., orig. US – a despicable or contemptible person

• PUS-GUT
n. 1935 Amer. dial., chiefly derogatory – a fat person, esp. a man; also, a fat stomach, a pot-belly

• PUS-GUTTED
adj. 1915 Amer. dial. chiefly derogatory – having a large stomach, fat, obese

• PUSH
n. 1. a1400 – a pustule, a pimple, a boil
n. 2. 1565 obs. – a vigorous charge, onset or assault; an attack
n. 3. M17 sl. – sexual intercourse
n. 4. 1718 rare – a crowd of people; a throng
n. 5. 1866 sl. – a band or crowd of thieves; a gang of larrikins; an association of violent criminals
n. 6. 1874 sl., obs. – a swindle; a robbery
n. 7. 1876 Eng. dial., rare – a moving shoal of fish
n. 8. 1883 colloq. – something requiring the prolonged exertion of effort, a struggle; a challenge
n. 9. 1886 Eng. dial., rare – a puddle or pool of water, esp. a large one left by a heavy downpour of rain
n. 10. M19 UK criminals sl. – a small gang who mask the activities of a pickpocket by surrounding the victim
n. 11. L19 sl. – money
n. 12. 1908 US sl., orig. & chiefly logging usage – a foreman; a boss
n. 13. 1930s US sl. – a family
n. 14. 1973 rare – a selling drugs illicitly
n. 15. 20C Irish sl. – a scrape, difficulty
n. 16. 20C Irish sl. – assistance, encouragement
vb. 1. 17C sl. – to possess carnally
vb. 2. 1938 sl. – to peddle illegal drugs
vb. 3. 1940s US sl. – to kill someone
vb. 4. 1940s US criminals’ sl. – to distribute and pass counterfeit money
vb. 5. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to go fast
vb. 6. 1960s African-American sl. – to drive a car
 
• THE PUSH
n. 1. 1899 sl. – dismissal, esp. from employment
n. 2. L19 sl. – ejection from a place, as a public house

• PUSH ACROSS
vb. 1940s US sl. – to kill someone
 
• PUSH A FACE
vb. 1758-65 obs. – to exhibit a bold front

• PUSH ALONG
vb. 1910s sl. – to leave

• PUSH-AND-GO
adj. 1916 rare – ambitious, enterprising, determined
n. 1885 orig. US – a being to develop and carry out a scheme energetically; enterprise, initiative; drive, ambition

• PUSH-AND-PULL
n. 1943 – a contest, a tug of war

• PUSH A PEN
vb. 1911 US sl. – to do office work

• PUSH A TURD UPHILL WITH A TOOTHPICK
vb. 20C US sl. – to work, talk, etc. unsuccessfully, against the odds

• PUSH A PIKE
n. E18 sl. – sexual intercourse

• PUSH-BACK
n. 1984 orig. & chiefly US – resistance, disagreement; adverse reaction, negative feedback

• PUSH-BATTLE
n. 1843 rare – a fight, a set-to

• PUSHCAR
n. 1922 Ireland – a pram or pushchair

• PUSHCART
n. 1909 rare – a pram, a pushchair

• PUSH CLOUDS
vb. L19 US sl. – to die; to be dead

• PUSHED
adj. M19 sl. – drunk

• PUSHED OUT
adj. 1970s sl. – drunk

• PUSHED OUT OF SHAPE
adj. 1. 1960s sl. – upset, angry
adj. 2. 1970s sl. – drunk
 
• PUSHEEN
n. 20C Irish sl. – a kitten; an affectionate term for a cat
 
• PUSHEENS
n. 20C Irish sl. – slippers
 
• PUSHER
n. 1. Urquhart usage – the penis
n. 2. 1900s US criminals’ sl. – a bank teller, a cashier
n. 3. 1901 sl., orig. & chiefly US – a foreman of a work crew
n. 4. 1902 sl., chiefly Services’ sl. – a girl or young woman
n. 5. 1925 tennis sl. – a player who prefers to keep the ball in play and wait for the opponent to make an error, rather than attempting to hit winning shots
n. 6. 1929 sl., orig. US – a person promotes or initiates the use or purchase of something; a peddler
n. 7. 1935 sl., orig. US – a supplier of illicit drugs, esp. addictive drugs
n. 8. 1940s US criminals’ sl. – a distributor or passer of counterfeit money
n. 9. 1944 sl. – a prostitute
n. 10. 1953 Aust. colloq. – a pram, a pushchair
n. 11. 1980s drug culture sl. – a thin stick, often a chopstick, used to pack a cocaine pipe

• PUSHERMAN
n. 1920s drug culture sl. – a person who sells drugs, usually in his ‘small-time’ role as opposed to a wholesale dealer
 
• PUSHERS
n. Irish sl. – slippers

• PUSHERY
n. 1788 obs. – pushiness

• PUSH FACTOR
n. 1938 – a feature that makes something attractive or liable to rejection; also, a motivating factor, an impetus
 
• PUSH FIRE
vb. 20C W. Indies sl. – to urge others into a fight, with no intention of participating oneself
 
• PUSH-FOOT
n. 1920s W. Indies sl. – a Ford Model T automobile

• PUSHFUL
adj. 1871 – active and energetic in pursuing one’s affairs; thrusting, enterprising; also, excessively or aggressively self-assertive, pushy
 
• PUSHIE
int. Irish sl. – a call to a cat
n. 1. 1966 Ulster sl. – one who takes offense easily; a timorous person; an over-sensitive person
n. 2. 1966 Ulster sl. – a coward
n. 3. Irish sl. – an effeminate man

• PUSH-IN
n. 1. 1948 US sl., rare – a certainty
n. 2. 1976 Aust. & US sl. – a mugging carried out after forced entry into a house when the victim opens the door
 
• PUSHING DAISIES
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – dead and buried
 
• PUSHING-SCHOOL
n. L17 sl. – a brothel
 
• PUSHING THE CLOUDS AROUND
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – dead

• PUSHING TOUT
n. E18 UK criminals’ sl. – a thief’s watchman or scout
 
• PUSHING UP DAISIES
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – dead and buried

• PUSH-IN JOB
n. 1970s sl. – a mugging that takes on the victim’s doorstep

• PUSH IN ONE’S CUT-OFF
vb. 1910s Aust. sl. – to stop talking
 
• A PUSH IN THE BUSH IS WORTH TWO IN THE HAND
phr. 19C Brit. sl. – one act of copulation is worth two acts of masturbation

• PUSH IN THE BUSH
n. 1920s – sexual intercourse
 
• PUSH IN THE PANTS
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – something excellent
 
• PUSH IN THE PUSS
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a blow in the face

• PUSH IN THE TRUCK
n. 1930s rhyming sl. for ‘fuck’ – sexual intercourse

• PUSHITE
n. L19 Aust. sl. – a gang member

• PUSHMI-PULLYU
adj. 1972 – conflicting, contradictory
n. 1972 – a person who behaves in a conflicting or contradictory manner
 
• PUSHMOBILE
n. 1904 Amer. sl. – a wheelbarrow
 
• PUSH MONEY
n. 1939 US sl. – commission on items sold
 
• PUSH OFF
vb. 1. 1918 US sl. – to leave
vb. 2. 1940s US criminals’ sl. – to kill; to murder
vb. 3. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to begin, to commence

• PUSHOLE
n. 1960s sl., orig. US – a despicable or contemptible person
 
• PUSH ON
vb. 18C colloq. – to copulate
 
• PUSH ONE’S FACE
vb. c1760 colloq. – to obtain credit by bluff, bluster, or deceit 

• PUSH ONE’S FACE IN
vb. 1898 sl. – to punch or hit one in the face

• PUSH ONE’S KEY
vb. 1990s US prison sl. – to irritate one, to tease one

• PUSH ONE’S LUCK
vb. 1911 – to take additional risks when things are going well

• PUSH ONE’S OWN BARROW
vb. 1. 1910s Aust. sl. – to brag
vb. 2. 1910s Aust. sl. – to look out for one’s own interests first

• PUSH-OUT
n. 1962 sl., chiefly US – a person who is made to leave somewhere, esp. school
 
• PUSH-OVER
n. 1. 1891 colloq., orig. US – an easily accomplished task; a simple or ready victory
n. 2. 1907 colloq., orig. US – a gullible person; a dupe; one who is easily persuaded, outwitted, or overpowered
n. 3. 1908 boxing sl. – a fighter who is easily knocked out or beaten
n. 4. 1916 colloq., orig. US – a woman who is regarded as easy to persuade to copulate
n. 5. 1930s US sl. – a trick; a hoax
 
• PUSH PAPER
vb. 20C sl. – to do boring or unimportant work in an office

• PUSH PONIES
vb. 1960s sl. – of a pimp: to promote prostitutes

• PUSH-PUSH
n. Bk1997 US sl. – the sex act

• PUSH SHIT UPHILL
vb. 1. 20C US sl. – to work, talk, etc. unsuccessfully, against the odds
vb. 2. 1980s US homosexual sl. – to have anal intercourse

• PUSH SHORTS
vb. 1930s drug culture sl. – to sell in small amounts; to sell short measure
 
• PUSH SOMEONE’S BUTTONS 
vb. 1927 Amer. sl. – to elicit a strongly favourable or unfavourable emotional response from someone, esp. anger or sexual excitement
 
• PUSH THE BOAT OUT
vb. 1. 1937 sl., orig. naval usage – to be more than usually open-handed, esp. in buying drinks for others
vb. 2. 1910s sl. – to do something to excess
vb. 3. 1960s sl. – to exaggerate

• PUSH THE BOTTLE ABOUT
vb. 1781 rare – to push the liquor from one person to another when drinking convivially
 
• PUSH THE BUTTON
vb. 1967 Amer. sl. – to panic
 
• PUSH THE CART UP HOLBORN HILL
vb. M17 sl. – to go to the gallows

• PUSH THE ENVELOPE
vb. 1970 – to exceed or extend the boundaries of what is considered possible or permissible; to take risks

• PUSH THE GLASS ABOUT
vb. E19 sl. – to drink

• PUSH THE QUEER
vb. 1930s US criminals’ sl. – to pass counterfeit money
 
• PUSH THE RIGHT BUTTONS
vb. 1970 Amer. sl. – to manage to get the desired results, esp. by manipulating another person

• PUSH-THROUGH
n. 1888 colloq. – a narrow passage through something
 
• PUSH TO THE WALL
vb. to force into an awkward situation

• PUSH-UP
adj. 1990s W. Indies – presumptuous, arrogant
n. 1919 Aust. sl., rare – an act of pickpocketing in which the victim’s arm is pushed away from his or her pocket by the pickpocket’s accomplice
 
• PUSH UP DAISIES
vb. a1918 sl. – to be dead and buried

• PUSH-UP MAN
n. 1910s Aust. sl. – a pickpocket’s accomplice who pushes up the arm of the victim to facilitate access to their wallet

• PUSH UP ON
vb. 1. 1990s African-American sl. – to make romantic moves towards someone, usually in the hope of seduction
vb. 2. 1990s African-American sl. – to frighten, to intimidate
 
• PUSH UP ZEDS
vb. Bk1981 Aust. colloq. – to go to sleep

• PUSH-WAINLING
n. 1878 – a perambulator, a pram, a baby carriage

• PUSH WATER
n. 1938 US sl. – gasoline
 
• PUSHY
adj. 1874 colloq., orig. US – said of someone who is unpleasantly self-assertive in getting their way; demanding, aggressive
 
• PUSILL
adj. 1599 obs. – small, insignificant, petty, mean, weak
n. 1. 1615 obs. – a variety of pear
n. 2. 1884 rare – a little or weak one, a child

• PUSILLAGE
n. 1610 obs. rare – smallness, insignificance

• PUSILLANIME
adj. 1570 obs. – lacking in courage and strength of mind; of weak spirit; faint-hearted, cowardly, mean-spirited

• PUSILLANIMITY
n. a1393 – lack of courage or fortitude; cowardice, faint-heartedness
 
• PUSILLANIMOUS
adj. a1425 – lacking in courage and strength of mind; of weak spirit; faint-hearted, cowardly, mean-spirited

• PUSILLING
n. 1891 rare – a small, weak, or insignificant person
 
• PUSILLITY
n. a1619 obs. – littleness, pettiness, meanness, weakness

• PUS POCKET
n. 1960s sl., orig. US – a despicable or contemptible person

• PUSS
adj. 1990s US sl. – excellent; wonderful
n. 1. a1530 – a cat, used esp. as a calling name
n. 2. 1575 – a hare
n. 3. 1602 rare – a girl or woman, esp. one who exhibits characteristics like those of a cat, as spitefulness, slyness, attractiveness, playfulness, etc.; orig. used as a term of contempt; later also used as a term of endearment
n. 4. 1699 sl. – the female genitals
n. 5. M17 sl. – a prostitute; a madame
n. 6. 1844 sl., chiefly US – the face; the mouth
n. 7. 1899 sl., chiefly US – a sour or sulky facial expression; a pout
n. 8. 1942 chiefly US – a sweet or effeminate man; a weakling, a coward
n. 9. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – milk or cream
n. 10. 1950s sl. – a thief
n. 11. 1950s W. Indies – an albino
n. 12. 1970s sl. – the ‘female’ of a lesbian couple
n. 13. 1970s homosexual sl. – the buttocks
n. 14. 1970s US homosexual sl. – an underage boy
n. 15. sl. – women viewed as sex objects
vb. a1953 – to move silent and stealthily, like a cat

• PUSS-BAG
n. 1960s sl., orig. US – a despicable or contemptible person

• PUSS-BOOTS
n. 1940s W. Indies – rubber-soled canvas shoes

• PUSS-BUCKET
n. 1960s sl., orig. US – a despicable or contemptible person

• PUSSEL-GUT
vb. 1930 – to fatten; to render obese
 
• PUSSENS
n. 1866 colloq. – a cat; a term of endearment for a cat
 
• PUSSER
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – blow in the face
 
• PUSSER’S GRIN
n. 1929 sea sl., rare – a sneer (pusser = purser)

• PUSSERY
n. 1. 1950s W. Indies – trickery
n. 2. 1950s W. Indies – theft

• PUSS-EYE
n. 1950s W. Indies – an albino
 
• PUSSFUL
n. 1922 Irish sl. – a mouthful

• PUSS-GENTLEMAN
n. 1. 1782 obs. rare – a man perfumed with civet; a dandy, a fop; an effeminate man
n. 2. 1960s African-American sl. – a weak man
 
• PUSSICKIE
n. 1. B1900 Sc. – a kitten
n. 2. B1900 Sc. — a fondling name for a child

• PUSS-IN
n. 20C W. Indies – a young woman

• PUSSING
n. 1990s Irish sl. – a crying, a whingeing
 
• PUSSIVANT
vb. 1. 1858 obs. rare – to push or pull a person unceremoniously; to hustle
vb. 2. 1882 Eng. dial. rare – to meddle or fuss; to bustle around in an ineffectual way
 
• PUSSIVANTING
adj. 1880 Eng. dial. rare – fussing, intruding, or causing a disturbance; interfering, meddling
n. 1888 Eng. dial. rare – a fussing, meddling; also, ineffectual activity; pointless bustle

• PUSSLE-GUTTED
adj. 1906 Amer. dial., chiefly derogatory – having a large stomach; fat, obese
 
• PUSSOCK
n. 1622 obs. rare – a term for an old maid, an ‘old tabby’
 
• PUSSOMANIAC
n. 1890 obs. – a person with a mania for cats
 
• PUSSOPHILIST
n. 1891 obs. – a cat lover
 
• PUSSUMS
n. 1912 colloq. – a term of endearment for a cat or a woman
 
• PUSSY
adj. 1. 1688 rare – stout, fat, pot-bellied
adj. 2. 1842 colloq. – weak, cowardly
adj. 3. 1960s sl. – effeminate, implying homosexuality
adj. 4. 1970s sl. – female
adj. 5. 1970s US sl. – pert. to sex; pornographic
adj. 6. 1980s sl. – useless; insignificant
n. 1. a1560 – a girl or woman exhibiting characteristics associated with a cat, esp. sweetness or amiability
n. 2. 1900s sl. – the cat-o’-nine-tails
n. 3. 1904 sl., chiefly US – a sweet or effeminate male; later; a weakling, a coward, a sissy; also, a homosexual man
n. 4. 1699 – a cat  
n. 5. 1699 sl. – the female genitals; the vagina or vulva
n. 6. 1715 rare – a hare, a rabbit
n. 7. 1858 colloq. – something soft and furry, esp. a willow catkin
n. 8. L19 sl. – female pubic hair
n. 9. 1920s sl. – a gentle or kind person
n. 10. 1920s sl. – an old woman, usually a spinster, who is inquisitive and meddling
n. 11. 1937 sl. – sexual intercourse with a woman
n. 12. 1937 criminals’ sl. – a fur coat  
n. 13. c1947 sl. – a woman considered as a sex object  
n. 14. 1960s sl. – the anus
n. 15. 1970s sl. – cowardice
vb. 1. 1889 obs. rare – to treat a person like a pet cat; to mollycoddle
vb. 2. 1919 – to act like a cat; to pussyfoot
vb. 3. 1973 – of a man: to have sex with a woman; to engage in sexual play

• PUSSY-ASS
adj. 1970s US sl. – cowardly, weak

• PUSSY BANDIT
n. 1990s US sl. – a man who is obsessed with sex and seduction
 
• PUSSY-BAUDRONS
n. 1894 Sc. – a cat

• PUSSYBOY
n. 1. 1950s sl. – a passive male homosexual; a catamite
n. 2. 1980s sl. – a cowardly person

• PUSSY-BULLY
n. 1990s W. Indies – a male sexual athlete

• PUSSY BUMPER
n. 1. 1940s US criminals’ sl. – a male homosexual
n. 2. 1940s US criminals’ sl. – an effeminate whipping boy
n. 3. 1940s US criminals’ sl. – a lesbian
 
• PUSSY-BUMPING
n. 20C sl. – lesbian activity

• PUSSY BUTTERFLY
n. 1980s US sl. – an intrauterine contraceptive device; IUD
 
• PUSSYCAT
adj. 1867 – gentle, amiable, submissive
n. 1. 1698 colloq. – a cat
n. 2. 1823 colloq. – a gentle, amiable, or submissive person
n. 3. 19C sl., orig. African-American – the vagina
n. 4. 1911 obs. rare – cattiness, spitefulness
 
• PUSSYCLAAT
n. 1957 sl., orig. & chiefly Jamaican – a despicable or contemptible person; a term of abuse

• PUSSY-EATING
n. 1980s sl., orig. US – cunnilingus
 
• PUSSYFOOT
adj. 1. 1899 rare – characterized by excessive caution or hesitation; non-committal, evasive; also, carried out in an underhand manner; stealthy, furtive, sly
adj. 2. 1910s – cowardly, weak
adj. 3. 1919 rare – committed to or advocating total abstinence; teetotal
n. 1. 1907 rare – a person who acts evasively, non-committally, or in an excessively
cautious or hesitant manner; also, a person who behaves in an underhand manner; someone who proceeds stealthily or furtively
n. 2. 1910s US criminals’ sl. – a detective
n. 3. 1919 rare – an advocate or supporter of prohibition; a teetotaller; also, a person who interferes with or spoils the fun of others; a killjoy
n. 4. 1930s sl. – a coward, a weakling
vb. 1. 1902 rare – to tread softly or lightly so as to avoid being notice; to move warily or stealthily; also, to behave in a sly, furtive, or underhand manner
vb. 2. 1910 – to speak or act with excessive caution; to behave in a hesitant, non-committal, or evasive manner

• PUSSYFOOT AROUND
vb. 20C sl. – to compromise, to act in a cowardly or weak manner
 
• PUSSY-FOOTED
adj. 1893 – light-footed; also, excessively cautious or hesitant; non-committal, evasive
 
• PUSSYFOOTER
n. 1. 1911 – a person who moves quietly or stealthily; also, someone who behaves in a sly, furtive, or underhand way
n. 2. 1913 – a person who acts evasively, non-committally, or in an excessively cautious or hesitant manner
n. 3. 1930s sl. – a coward, a weakling
 
• PUSSYFOOTING
adj. 1926 – evasive, non-committal; excessively cautious or hesitant
 
• PUSSYFOOTISM
n. 1. 1916 rare – excessive caution or hesitation; evasiveness; lack of commitment or resolve
n. 2. 1923 rare – opposition to or prohibition of the consumption of alcohol

• PUSSY GAME
n. 1950s US sl. – the world of prostitution

• PUSSY GLOMMER
n. 1920s Can. tramps’ sl. – a hand
 
• PUSSY-GUT(S)
n. 1909 Amer. dial. chiefly derogatory – a fat person, esp. a man; also, a fat stomach, a pot belly
 
• PUSSY-GUTTED
adj. 1906 Amer. dial., chiefly derogatory – having a large stomach; fat, obese
 
• PUSSY HAIR
n. 1945 sl. – a woman’s pubic hair
 
• PUSSY-HOISTING
n. 1962 criminals’ sl., rare – a stealing fur garments

• PUSSY HOLE
n. 1980s sl. – the vagina

• PUSSY-HOUND
n. 1970s sl. – a man who is obsessed with the pursuit of sex

• PUSSY IN A CAN
n. 1960s US prison sl. – sardines sold in a can at a prison commissary

• PUSSY JUICE
n. 1960s sl. – vaginal secretions

• PUSSY-KISSER
n. 1960s US sl. – a cunnilinguist

• PUSSYLAPPER
n. 1960s US sl. – a cunnilinguist

• PUSSYLICKER
n. 1960s US sl. – a cunnilinguist
 
• PUSSY MAGNET
n. 1994 sl. – a person, typically a man, who is very sexually attractive to women
 
• PUSSY MOB
n. 1967 criminals’ sl., rare – a gang of fur thieves
 
• PUSSY OUT
vb. 1967 sl., orig. & chiefly US – to back down, to back out; to act like a coward

• PUSSY-PARLOR
n. 1980s US sl. – a striptease club

• PUSSY-PELMET
n. 1960s sl. – a very short miniskirt

• PUSSY PICTURE
n. 1940s US sl. – a pornographic photograph of a woman
 
• PUSSY POSSE
n. 1. 1963 sl. – a police squad, or vice squad dealing with prostitution
n. 2. 1973 US sl. – a group of men each actively seeking a woman for a sexual encounter

• PUSSY-PRINTER
n. 1990s W. Indies – shorts so tight they outline the genital area

• PUSSY-PROBER
n. 1980s US sl. – a gynaecologist

• PUSSY PUSHER
n. 1970s US homosexual sl. – a heterosexual

• PUSSY QUEEN
n. 1960s US sl. – a lesbian

• PUSSY QUEER
n. 1960s US sl. – a lesbian
 
• PUSSY-SIMPLE
adj. 20C Amer. dial. – obsessed with women sexually
 
• PUSSY’S MEOW
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – something excellent
 
• PUSSY’S PAJAMAS
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – something excellent
 
• PUSSY POWER
n. 1968 US – power exercised by women; a woman’s use of her sexual allure or femininity in order to exert influence over men
 
• PUSSY-STRUCK
adj. 20C colloq. – obsessed with women sexually
 
• PUSSY’S TWISTER
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – something excellent
 
• PUSSY-TALK
n. 1937 rare – female gossip

• PUSSY-TICKLER
n. 1940s sl., orig. African-American – a moustache
 
• PUSSY-WHIP
vb. 1968 sl., orig. US – of a woman: to dominate or control a man; to henpeck
 
• PUSSY-WHIPPED
adj. 1. 1953 sl., orig. US – henpecked; dominated or controlled by a woman
adj. 2. 1980s African-American & students’ sl. – besotted with, infatuated by

• PUSSY WILLOW
n. 1960s rhyming sl. – a pillow
 
• PUST
n. 1527 obs. rare – a pustule

• PUSTLE-GUT
n. 1935 Amer. dial., chiefly derogatory – a fat person, esp. a man; also, a fat stomach, a pot-belly


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