Dictionary: SCO – SCOR


• SCOAD
vb. to scatter; to pour, to spill; to throw up earth, as moles …1777 Eng. dial.

• SCOANSE
n. the pavement; paving-stones; a flagged floor …1873 Eng. dial.

• SCOAST
vb. to exchange, to barter …1746 Eng. dial.

• SCOB
n. 1. a desk; an oaken chest; a dark cupboard or hole …1790 Eng. dial.
n. 2. a sore on the body …1950 Sc.
n. 3. a barrel hoop …1952 Sc.
vb. to take long stitches in sewing, to sew loosely and clumsily; to baste …1808 Sc.

• SCOBBERLOTCHER
n. an idler …a1697 obs.

• SCOBBLOTCHER
n. a mayfly …1968 Amer. dial.

• SCOBE
n. an instrument for scooping …Bk1904 Sc.
vb. to scoop out roughly; to make hollow …1790 Sc. & Ireland

• SCOBERIE
n. the act of sewing carelessly or with long stitches …Bk1904 Sc.

• SCOBOLOTCH
n. a mayfly …c1942 Amer. dial.

• SCOBRIE
n. the act of sewing carelessly or with long stitches …Bk1904 Sc.

• SCOCHE
n. a blow with a whip or switch …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
vb. to whip …Bk1904 Eng. dial.

• SCODGE
n. 1. one who does light rough or dirty work; a drudge, a menial, as a kitchen-boy or girl; one who does odd jobs about a farm …1782 Sc.
n. 2. a doubtful or suspicious-looking character …1824 Sc.
n. 3. a mean, sneaking fellow …1900 Sc.
n. 4. a shy, retiring person …1910 Sc.
n. 5. a dirty little person …1923 Sc.
vb. 1. to do rough menial work; to act as a drudge; to do odd jobs …1808 Sc.
vb. 2. to look sly; to pilfer; to sneak about idly …1824 Sc.

• SCODGEBELL
n. the earwig …1915 Sc.

• SCODGER
n. a lazy lounger …Bk1904 Sc.

• SCODGES
n. chores, dirty domestic jobs …1969 Sc.

• SCODGIE
n. 1. one who does light rough or dirty work; a drudge, a menial, as a kitchen-boy or girl; one who does odd jobs about a farm …1782 Sc.
n. 2. the earwig …1915 Sc.

• SCODGIE-MAID
n. a female kitchen-maid …1822 Sc.

• SCODGY
n. 1. a boy or girl who cleans boots, or does the dirty work of the kitchen; a drudge …1820 Sc.
n. 2. a mean, underhand fellow; a suspicious-looking person …1824 Sc.
n. 3. a rough apron …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
vb. to act as a drudge; to clean, to scrub …1898 Sc.

• SCOFE
n. a worthless scamp …Bk1904 Eng. dial.

• SCOFF
n. 1. a large draught of liquor …a1838 Sc.
n. 2. food …1846 sl., orig. S. Afr.
vb. 1. to eat noisily and greedily; to swallow food or drink quickly; to devour; to gulp down, to toss off …1826 Sc.
vb. 2. to filch, to steal, to plunder, to sponge …1885 Sc.
vb. 3. to dodge, to avoid doing …1969 Sc.

• SCOFFLE
vb. to speak contemptuously or mockingly; to ridicule; to scoff …1927 Amer. dial.

• SCOFF OFF
vb. of the moon: to keep bad weather away …1939 Amer. dial.

• SCOG
n. 1. shelter; a sheltered place …1823 Sc.
n. 2. a quarrel, a dispute …1874 Eng. dial.
n. 3. a braggart, a boaster …1876 Eng. dial.
n. 4. an offensive or mocking valentine …Bk1904 N. Ireland
vb. 1. to shelter; to take shelter; to secrete, to hide …1822 Sc.
vb. 2. to argue, to dispute, to quarrel, to scold, to make ironical jokes …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
vb. 3. to boast, to brag; to be self-important …Bk1904 Eng. dial.

• SCOGGEL
vb. to eat voraciously; to gulp down …Bk1904 Eng. dial.

• SCOGGER
n. 1. a footless stocking worn over the shoes as a gaiter, or to protect the arms …1615 Sc. & Eng. dial.
n. 2. a boaster …Bk1904 Eng. dial.

• SCOGGIN
n. 1. a vane, a weathercock …1790 Eng. dial.
n. 2. a butt for ridicule …1938 Amer. dial.

• SCOGGINS
n. a butt for ridicule and tricks …1890 Amer. dial.

• SCOGGY
adj. shady …1802 Sc. obs.

• SCOGIE
n. one who does light rough or dirty work; a drudge, a menial, as a kitchen-boy or girl; one who does odd jobs about a farm …1782 Sc.

• SCOGIE-LASS
n. a female drudge or kitchen-maid …1786 Sc.

SCOG THE BLAST
vb. 1813 Sc. – to shelter from the wind

SCOIL
n. 1815 Sc. obs. – a yell, a scream, a squeal, a shriek, a bellow, esp, of a cow
vb. 1866 Sc. obs. – to yell, roar in a high-pitched voice, to scream, to squeal. to shriek
Etymology
– local variant of squeal

SCOKKY
adj. 1802 Sc. obs. – shady

• SCOLD
n. a scolding, a rebuke; occasionally in plural …1773 Sc.

• SCOLDING LOCKS
n. hair or curls that do not stay in place …1942 Amer. dial.

• SCOLDRUM
n. a beggar who deliberately burns his body with acids and gunpowder to stimulate scars and wounds that should soften the hearts of those from he begs …M19 UK criminals’ sl.

• SCOLD’S BRIDLE
n. an instrument of punishment used for scolding women; it was used as a form of torture and public humiliation; it was an iron muzzle in an iron framework that enclosed the head; a bridle-bit (or curb-plate), about 2 inches long and 1 inch broad, projected into the mouth and pressed down on top of the tongue; it was first recorded in 1567; sometimes called a witch’s bridle, a brank’s bridle, or branks …1899 Sc.

• SCOLECIPHOBIA
n. Bk1991 – an abnormal fear of worms

• SCOLL
n. the drinking of healths; a toast …1629 Sc.
vb. 1. to drink to the health of, to toast …1599 Sc.
vb. 2. to drink hard …1773 Sc.

• SCOLLA
n. a hut, a shed …1952 Sc.

• SCOLLARD
n. 1. a scholar, student …1823 Amer. dial.
n. 2. one who can read and write …1888 Eng. dial.

• SCOLLE
n. the skull, the head; the brain; understanding, ability …Bk1904 Sc.

• SCOLLICK
n. a thing of little or no value …Bk1904 Eng. dial.

• SCOLOPENDRA
n. 1. a fabulous sea-fish which ‘feeling himselfe taken with a hooke, casteth out his bowels, vntill hee hath vnloosed the hooke, and then swalloweth them vp againe’ (from Bullokar Eng. Expos. 1616) …1590 obs.
n. 2. a centipede or millipede; also (with capital S), a Linnena genus of myriapods, including the largest and most formidable of the centipedes …1608
n. 3. a term of reproach to a woman; a nickname for a courtesan; a harlot …1633 obs.

• SCOMFISH
n. 1. a suffocating atmosphere; a state of suffocation …1825 Sc.
n. 2. disgust; a strong dislike; a feeling of repulsion …1899 Sc.
vb. 1. to suffocate, to stifle, to choke; to stop the breath from want of air, from smoke, heat, stench, or the like; to affect or overpower from any of these causes …1766 Sc.
vb. 2. to disgust, to sicken …1891 Sc.

• SCOMFISHED
adj. overpowered with heat, etc. …1818 Sc.

• SCON
n. a blow with the flat of the hand, or with any flat surface …Bk1904 Sc.
vb. 1. to beat, esp. with the flat of the hand or some flat surface; to inflict punishment …1873 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
vb. 2. to crush flat …Bk1904 Sc.

• SCONCE
n. 1. protection, shelter …1871 Sc. obs.
n. 2. a funny fellow …Bk1890 Eng. dial.
n. 3. a skulking person …Bk1904 N. Ireland
n. 4. a pretext; an apology, an excuse; a trick; deception …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
n. 5. a small cake …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
vb. 1. to shelter, to protect, to screen …1724 Sc. obs.
vb. 2. to extort, to cheat; to trick out of …1796 Sc.
vb. 3. to jilt a woman …1825 Sc.
vb. 4. to guard, to protect; to take up a position of security; to keep off, to turn aside …1861 Sc.
vb. 5. to settle oneself, to take up one’s position; to ensconce oneself …1866 Sc.
vb. 6. to joke, to ridicule; to scold …1884 N. Ireland & Eng. dial.
vb. 7. to beat, esp. about the head; to box the ears …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
vb. 8. to feign illness, so as to escape having to work, to shirk …Bk1904 N. Ireland
vb. 9. to refuse, to neglect, to shirk …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
vb. 10. to seat oneself; to crouch, resting on the limbs …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
vb. 11. to tell tales that are untrue or exaggerated to obtain one’s ends …Bk1904 Eng. dial.

• SCONCE A WOMAN
vb. to jilt or slight her …Bk1904 Sc.

• SCONCER
n. one who pretends to be ill in order to escape work, a shirker …Bk1904 N. Ireland

• SCONCING
n. cheating, fraud …1774 Sc.

• SCONDIES
n. smacks, a spanking …1969 Sc.

• SCONE
n. 1. anything of a particular kind considered as a specimen …1721 Sc.
n. 2. anything round, flat, and soft, resembling a scone …1825 Sc.
n. 3. a slap with the flat of the hand or any flat surface; a smack, a spank …1825 Sc.
n. 4. a piece of dried cow-dung used as fuel …1865 Sc.
n. 5. the head …1942 Aust. & NZ sl.
n. 6. a weak-willed, irresolute person; one who is easily imposed on, a softie …1969 Sc.
n. 7. a mollycoddled or spoiled boy …1969 Sc.
vb. 1. to slap with the open hand, esp. to smack a child’s bottom; to spank …1710 Sc.
vb. 2. to make flat stones skip along the surface of water …1825 Sc.

• SCONEFACE
n. a nickname for a person or thing with a flat, round face …1933 Sc.

• SCONE-FOOTED
adj. flat-footed …1923 Sc.

• SCONION
n. a scallion …1968 Amer. dial.

• SCONKY
adj. very slender and bare, esp. about the head and neck; generally applied to short-woolled sheep …Bk1904 Eng. dial.

• SCOO
adj. askew, awry …Bk1904 Sc.

• SCOOCH
adj. drunk …1920s African-American sl.
vb. 1. to crouch, to squat; to squeeze oneself into a small space …1858 Amer. dial.
vb. 2. to hasten, to run …1897 Amer. dial.
vb. 3. to move over, to make room, to slide oneself along, as on a bench or the like so as to make room for another …1937 Amer. dial.

• SCOOCHDOWN
vb. to crouch, to squat; to squeeze oneself into a small space …1858 Amer. dial.

• SCOOCHER
n. a slide down a snow-slope in a squatting position …Bk1904 Eng. dial.

• SCOOCHUP
vb. to crouch, to squat; to squeeze oneself into a small space …1965 Amer. dial.

• SCOOCHY-PAWED
adj. left-handed; awkward …1867 Eng. dial.

• SCOO’D
adj. twisted, badly made or done …Bk1904 Sc.

• SCOODER
vb. 1. to burn, to scorch, to singe …1810 Sc.
vb. 2. to cause to fall quickly; to take great effect upon …1875 Eng. dial.

• SCOOGER
n. a challenge to a feat of daring …1921 Sc.

• SCOOL
vb. of a horse: to scowl, to draw back the ears and attempt to bite …Bk1904 Eng. dial.

• SCOONERAL
adj. scoundrelly, rascally …1844 Sc.

• SCOONGE
vb. to go about from place to place like a dog; to cadge for invitations …1891 Sc.

• SCOONIE
vb. to cheat, to defraud …1950 Sc.

• SCOOP
n. 1. a wooden drinking cup …1824 Sc.
n. 2. a narrow gully …1871 Eng. dial.
n. 3. a draught of any liquor …Bk1904 Sc.
n. 4. a lady’s bonnet …Bk1904 Sc. obs.
n. 5. a spoonful …Bk1904 Sc.
n. 6. the visor or peak of a cap …Bk1904 Sc.
n. 7. something excellent …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
vb. 1. to quaff, to drink off; to sup …Bk1904 Sc.
vb. 2. to swallow …Bk1904 Eng. dial.

• SCOOPIE
n. a lady’s bonnet …Bk1904 Sc. obs.

• SCOOPY
vb. to crouch, to stoop down upon the haunches …Bk1904 Eng. dial.

• SCOOR
vb. to run quickly; to scamper, to hurry; of a horse: to rush off sideways …1725 Sc. & Eng. dial.

• SCOORIE
n. a shower; a sudden gust of wind accompanied by rain …1895 Sc.

• SCOORY-LOOKING
adj. disreputable-looking …1833 Sc.

• SCOOSE
n. discourse, altercation, dispute, bad language …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
vb. 1. to exchange, to barter …1746 Eng. dial.
vb. 2. to discourse; to dispute, to use bad language …1869 Eng. dial.

• SCOOSH
vb. to rush for shelter; to plunge …1890 Sc.

• SCOOT
n. 1. a term of contempt applied to both men and women; a braggadocia …1822 Sc. & Eng. dial.
n. 2. a wooden drinking vessel …1824 Sc.
n. 3. a shuttle train …c1870 Amer. dial.
n. 4. a squirt, a syringe; a pea-shooter, a popgun …1887 Sc. & Eng. dial.
n. 5. a gush or flow of water; the pipe or opening from which it flows …Bk1904 Sc.
n. 6. a rabble, a disorderly crowd …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
n. 7. liquid excrement …Bk1904 Sc.
n. 8. a rascal …1906 Amer. dial.
n. 9. a drinking spree …1916 Aust. & NZ sl.
n. 10. a hasty or unceremonious departure …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
n. 11. a sled used for coasting on snow …1943 Amer. dial.
n. 12. a barracuda …1946 Amer. dial.
n. 13. a small child …1967 Amer. dial.
vb. 1. to reject with disdain, to flout, to disparage …1827 Sc.
vb. 2. to play about; to lark …1874 Eng. dial.
vb. 3. to slide, to glide …1875 Eng. dial.
vb. 4. to eject liquid forcibly; to squirt; to flow or gush forth …1897 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
vb. 5. to go about in a lazy, idle manner; to wander about …BK1904 Sc.
vb. 6. to throw off excrement in a liquid state …Bk1904 Sc.
vb. 7. to run; to go fast …Bk1905 Amer. dial.
vb. 8. to depart hurriedly …Bk1942 Amer. sl.

• SCOOT ALONG
vb. to move over, to make room, to slide oneself along, as on a bench or the like so as to make room for another …1965 Amer. dial.

• SCOOT DOWN
vb. to crouch down, to squeeze oneself into a small space …1943 Amer. dial.

• SCOOTER
n. 1. a squirt; a syringe  …Bk1904 Sc. & Eng. dial.
n. 2. a fast car …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
n. 3. a barracuda …1946 Amer. dial.
n. 4. a sled used for coasting on snow …1967 Amer. dial.

• SCOOTER TRACKS
n. faecal stains in underwear …1989 US sl.

• SCOOT-GUN
n. a syringe …1824 Sc.

• SCOOTHER
vb. to stoop; to go along crouchingly; to elude observation; to scuttle …1889 Eng. dial.

• SCOOTIE
adj. low, mean, beggar-like …Bk1904 Sc.
n. 1. a young child …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
n. 2. an unfledged bird …Bk1904 Eng. dial.

• SCOOTIKIN
n. a dram of whisky …1824 Sc.

• SCOOTLE
vb. to spill anything while carrying it …1824 Sc. obs.

• SCOOT OVER
vb. to move over, to make room, to slide oneself along, as on a bench or the like so as to make room for another …1950 Amer. dial.

• (THE) SCOOTS
n. diarrhoea …1891 Amer. dial.

• SCOOTTRAIN
n. a shuttle train …1907 Amer. dial.

• SCOOVE
vb. of a bird: to poise on the wings; to fly equably and smoothly …1885 Sc.

• SCOP
n. a smart blow …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
vb. 1. to hit, to beat, to strike; to fell to the ground …1881 Eng. dial.
vb. 2. to throw stones, etc., so as to injure …Bk1904 Eng. dial.

• SCOPE
n. 1. abundance of room, range; liberty of conduct, licence …1773 Sc.
n. 2. a tract of land, woods, etc. …1895 Amer. dial.
n. 3. a scoop, a ladle with a long handle; a large, hollow shovel …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
vb. 1. to stride, to go fast …1861 Eng. dial.
vb. 2. to accomplish …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
vb. 3. to scoop, to ladle …Bk1904 Eng. dial.

• SCOPE A VIC
vb. 1960s African-American teen sl. – to look for someone to rob, mug, etc.

• SCOPER
n. a term of depreciation for a man or woman …Bk1904 Eng. dial.

• SCOPIOUS
adj. 1. wide, spacious …1599 obs.
adj. 2. copious, plentiful …Bk1895 Eng. dial.

• SCOPOLOT
n. quantity …1818 Eng. dial. obs.

• SCOPOPHILIA
n. 1. Bk1991 – the deriving of sexual pleasure from viewing nude bodies, sexual acts, or erotic photographs
n. 2. Bk1991 – an abnormal desire to be seen, especially genitally

• SCOPOPHOBIA
n. Bk1991 – an abnormal fear of being looked at

• SCOPPER
vb. to scamper off, to run away …Bk1904 Eng. dial.

• SCOPPERIL
n. 1. an insignificant person …1854 Eng. dial.
n. 2. a lively, restless person or animal; an active, agile child; a young rascal …1874 Eng. dial.
n. 3. a squirrel …1897 Eng. dial.
n. 4. a spinning-top; a teetotum, esp. one made with a disc of a button …Bk1904 Eng. dial.

• SCOPPERLOIT
n. 1. a time of idleness; a play-time …1691 Eng. dial. obs.
n. 2. a romp; rough, indelicate play …1878 Eng. dial.
vb. to romp; to play roughly and rudely …B1900 Eng. dial.

• SCOPTIC
adj. mocking, scoffing, jesting, satirical …1670 obs. rare

• SCOPTOPHOBIA
n. Bk1991 – an abnormal fear of being looked at

• SCOR
n. a slide made on the ice …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
vb. to slide or skate on the ice …Bk1904 Eng. dial.

• SCORCH
n. a block under a wheel to prevent it from moving …1982 Amer. dial.
vb. 1. to shrivel up, caused by frost or cold …1806 Eng. & Amer. dial.
vb. 2. to escort …1934 Amer. dial.
vb. 3. to go fast, esp. in a vehicle …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
vb. 4. to block a wheel …1982 Amer. dial.

• SCORCHED
adj. darkened by frost …1856 Amer. dial.

• SCORCHER
n. 1. a sexually attractive person …1881 sl.
n. 2. in sports: an extremely hard shot or hit; a fast throw …1900 sl.
n. 3. a killing frost; a period of very cold weather …1916 Amer. dial.
n. 4. a fast car …Bk1942 Amer. sl.

• SCORCHING
adj. 1. very cold …1876 Amer. dial.
adj. 2. excellent; first-rate …Bk1942 Amer. sl.

• SCORCH THE HIGHWAY
vb. to go fast, esp. in a vehicle …Bk1942 Amer. sl.

• SCORCH THE PAVEMENT
vb. to go fast, esp. in a vehicle …Bk1942 Amer. sl.

• SCORE
n. 1. absolution from scandal …1787 Sc.
n. 2. the core of an apple or pear …1790 Eng. dial.
n. 3. matter, affair …1790 Sc.
n. 4. a crack, crevice, fissure …1825 Sc.
n. 5. a narrow street on a slope; a gangway down a cliff; a cutting through a ridge of hills …1835 Sc. & Eng. dial.
n. 6. a great pace …1896 Eng. dial.
n. 7. a field, a public pasture; a patch of land …Bk1904 Ireland & Eng. dial.
n. 8. a slide made on the ice …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
n. 9. of vegetables such as cucumbers, asparagus, etc., sold for growing: twenty-one …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
n. 10. the parting of the hair on the head …1910 Sc.
n. 11. the proceeds of a robbery …1914 sl.
n. 12. $20 or £20 …1929 sl.
n. 13. a victory …1960s Amer. sl.
n. 14. the victim of a theft or swindle …colloq.
n. 15. a prostitute’s client …1961 sl.
n. 16. a scar or mark left by a wound, a weal …1966 Sc.
vb. 1. to scratch; to mark by flogging …1865 Sc. & Eng. dial.
vb. 2. to remove the core of an apple or pear …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
vb. 3. to slide or skate on the ice …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
vb. 4. to steal …1942 sl., orig. US
vb. 5. of a man: to be successful in seducing a person; to attain sexual relations with a date …1960s Amer. sl.
vb. 6. to criticize harshly; to berate …chiefly US & Can.
vb. 7. to obtain something desired, esp. to purchase an illegal drug …1935 colloq.

• SCORE ABOVE THE BREATH
vb. to mark a supposed witch with a cut cross cut on the brow …1787 Sc.

• SCORE BETWEEN THE POSTS
vb. to have sexual intercourse; to seduce a woman …1960s Aust. sl.

• SCORE-CARD
n. 1. a menu …1930s US sl.
n. 2. an address book …1970s US homosexual sl.

• SCORE DOUGH
n. money set aside or offered for a purchase of drugs …1930s drug culture sl.

• SCORE MONEY
n. money set aside or offered for a purchase of drugs …1930s drug culture sl.

• SCORE OFF
vb. to make a point at another’s expense …L19 sl.

• SCORE ON
vb. to inform against …1910s Aust. criminals’ sl.

• SCORE OUT
vb. of the tide: to wash down the beach …1855 Eng. dial.

• SCOREY
n. the young of any kind of gull …1805 Sc.

• SCORGE
vb. to scorch …Bk1904 Eng. dial.

• SCORIE
n. the young of any kind of gull …1805 Sc.

• SCORK
n. the core of an apple …1889 Eng. dial.

• SCORKLE
n. the core of an apple or pear …B1900 Eng. dial.
vb. to scorch …c1374 obs. rare

SCORLINS
n. 1899 Sc. – slimy, cord-like seaweed

SCORN
n. 1. c1746 Sc. – a snub, a brusque rejection, esp. of an offer of marriage; a slight in love
n. 2. 1790 Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – jest, ridicule; banter; satire
vb. 1. 1769 Sc. – to tease or rally, esp. a girl about a lover
vb. 2. 1790 Sc. & Eng. dial. – to mock, to jeer at; to slight in love

SCORN AT
vb. 1724 Sc. – to jeer, to scoff

SCORN ONE’S NAME UP
vb. 1931 Amer. dial. – to incur disgrace, to expose oneself to condemnation

SCORNSUM
adj. 1. Bk1904 Sc. – scornful
adj. 2. Bk1904 Sc. – troublesome, bothering

SCORNSUM-GANGING
n. Bk1904 Sc. – slippery walking, as on ice

SCORNY
adj. 1836 Eng. dial. – scornful

SCORP
n. 1912 Brit. services’ sl. – a person from Gibraltar

SCORPION
n. 1. 1845 Brit. services’ sl. – a person from Gibraltar
n. 2. 20C sl. – in dominoes; 4-4

SCORPIONIST
n. 1676 obs. rare – one born under the zodiac sign Scorpio

SCORRICK
n. Bk1904 Eng. dial. – a fragment; the least particle

SCORRIE
n. 1961 Sc. – an avaricious, quarrelsome person

SCORRIL
n. Bk1904 Eng. dial. – the least particle

SCORRIPIN
n. 1909 Amer. dial. – a scorpion

SCORSE
vb. 1746 Eng. dial. – to exchange, to barter

SCORT
vb. Bk1904 Eng. dial. – to walk proudly; to be arrogant

SCORT ABOUT
vb. Bk1904 Eng. dial. – to disturb, to injure

SCORTATORY
adj. 1794 rare – pertaining to fornication or lewdness; lewd

SCORTLE
n. Bk1904 Eng. dial. – the core of an apple or pear

SCORY
adj. 1846 Eng. dial. – wrinkled, lined


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Updated: September 10, 2022