Dictionary: SM – SMZ


• SMACK
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – excellent; first-rate
adv. 1. 1828 – exactly, completely, entirely
adv. 2. 1840 Amer. sl. – suddenly
adv. 3. 1892 Amer. dial. – at once, immediately
n. 1. a1000 – a taste or flavour; the distinctive or peculiar taste of something
n. 2. a1000 obs. – scent, odour, smell
n. 3. 1340 obs. – delight or enjoyment; inclination; relish
n. 4. 1551 obs. – a slight or superficial knowledge; a smattering
n. 5. 1604 – a loud kiss
n. 6. 1693 – a small quantity of a liquor; a mouthful
n. 7. 1781 – the crack of a whip, lash, etc.
n. 8. 1775 – a sounding blow delivered with the flat of the hand; a slap
n. 9. 1875 – a powerful hit with a cricket bat
n. 10. 1941 Amer. dial. – food, esp. when taken between regular meals; a snack
n. 11. 1942 sl., orig. US – a narcotic drug
n. 12. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – something excellent
n. 13. 1950s African-American sl. – sexual intercourse
n. 14. 1942 sl., orig. US – heroin
n. 15. 1960s African-American sl. – flirtatious talk; nonsense talk
vb. 1. 1340 obs. – to experience; to suspect
vb. 2. 1398 – to taste or savour of something; to have a taste of flavour
vb. 3. 1570 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to kiss noisily or loudly
vb. 4. a1657 obs. – to have a try at something
vb. 5. 1699 – to crack a whip, thong, etc.
vb. 6. 1882 – to hit a ball vigorously with a cricket bat
vb. 7. 1940s African-American sl. – to sniff heroin

• SMACK-BOTTOM
n. 1970 – a smack on the bottom given in chastisement

• SMACK CALFSKIN
vb. 1785 sl. obs. – to swear on the Bible

• SMACK DAB
adv. 1. 1892 colloq. orig. US – exactly, directly, with a smack
adv. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – suddenly

• SMACKDOWN
n. 1. 1990 orig. & chiefly US – a decisive or humiliating defeat or setback; an instance of repression or severe treatment
n. 2. 1999 orig. & chiefly US – a bitter contest or confrontation
vb. 1880s African-American sl. – (usually as ‘smack down’) to strike hard, esp. on the face

• SMACKER
n. 1. 1549 obs. rare – taste, savour
n. 2. 1611 – a person who kisses loudly
n. 3. 1648 rare – one who takes a taste
n. 4. 1775 – a loud kiss
n. 5. 1920 US sl. – a dollar  
n. 6. 1924 Brit. sl. – a pound  
n. 7. 1966 Amer. dial. – a belly-flop
vb. 1598 obs. rare – to kiss

• SMACKERING
n. 1. 1579 obs. – a slight or superficial knowledge in or of a subject; a smattering
n. 2. a1586 obs. – an inclination towards or hankering after or for a person or thing
n. 3. 1598 obs. rare – a kiss

• SMACKEROO
n. 1. 1940 US sl. – a dollar
n. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – something excellent
n. 3. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a blow
n. 4. 1961 Brit. sl. – a pound

• SMACKHEAD
n. 1967 sl., orig. US – a heroin addict

• SMACKING
adj. 1. 1820 – of a breeze: blowing strongly or vigorously
adj. 2. 1888 Eng. dial. – unusually large or fine
adj. 3. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – excellent; first-rate
n. 1. 1628 – kissing, or the sound made by it
n. 2. 1648 – a tasting; a taste

• SMACKING GOOD
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – excellent; first-rate

• A SMACK IN THE EYE
n. 1941 colloq. – a sharp rebuff; a setback

• SMACKLY
adv. 1582 obs. rare – with a loud kiss

• SMACK-MADAM
n. 1969 Amer. dial. – a loud or vigorous kiss

• SMACKO
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – excellent; first-rate
adv. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – suddenly
n. 1940s African-American sl. – a street person; an unemployed person; a hoodlum

• SMACK-SMOOTH
adj. 1755 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – flat; completely smooth; level or even with the ground or surface
adv. 1. 1802 Eng. dial. – smoothly, without any impediment or obstruction; quietly, pleasantly
adv. 2. 1847 Eng. dial. – in a reckless or random manner, regardless of consequences

• SMACK TALK
n. 1989 colloq., orig. & chiefly US – ostentatiously boastful or insulting banter, often used to humiliate or intimidate an opponent; trash talk

• SMACK-TALKING
adj. 1990 U S colloq. – engaging in boastful or insulting banter
n. 1990 US colloq. – (as ‘smack talking’) an engaging in boastful or insulting banter

• SMACK WEED
n. Bk1998 drug culture sl. – pot cured in heroin

• SMAD
vb. a1525 Sc. rare – to cover with dirt or grime; to stain, to discolour

• SMAHAN
n. 1914 Irish – a drop to drink; a taste

• SMAIK
n. 1513 Sc. arch. – a low, mean, or contemptible fellow; a rascal, a rogue; a disreputable or worthless person; a villain

• SMAIKRY
n. 1573 Sc. obs. rare – mean or contemptible conduct; roguery, trickery

• SMAKE
vb. 1. c1220 obs. – to perceive by scent or smell
vb. 2. c1315 obs. – to smell, to give out a sweet smell or odour
vb. 3. c1315 obs. – to taste, to taste of

• SMALL
adj. 1. c1275 obs. – graceful
adj. 2. a1325 obs. – simple, plain: said of language
adj. 3. 1420 rare – of low alcoholic strength: said of ale, wine, etc.
adj. 4. 1542 – light, slight, gentle: said of a wind
adj. 5. 1700 chiefly Sc. & Eng. dial., rare – consisting of young children: said of a family
adj. 6. 1791 Sc. & Eng. dial., rare – low, shallow: said of a river, water, etc.
adv. 1. a1000 rare – quietly, gently; in a small or low voice
adv. 2. c1300 obs. – to a small extent or degree; slightly
adv. 3. c1450 obs. – slyly; wantonly
n. 1. a1000 obs. rare – a smack, a slap; a blow, a stroke
n. 2. 1695 rare – a small measure of a beverage, esp. of spirits

• THE SMALL
n. 1. a1300 – persons or animals of small size or stature; little ones, children
n. 2. c1450 – the slender part of the leg between the ankle and the calf

• SMALL APPLES
adj. 1887 US sl. – of little consequence; unimpressive

• SMALL-BACK
n. 1823 rare – death, imagined as a skeleton

• SMALL BEER
adj. 1637 – insignificant; trivial; worthless
n. 1. 1498 – beer of a weak, poor, or inferior quality
n. 2. 1710 – trifling matters, trivial occupations, small things; matters or persons of little or no consequence or importance; trifles

• SMALL-BEER CHRONICLE
n. 1801 – a narrative of trivial, usually domestic, events

• SMALL-BORE
adj. 1900 US colloq. – trivial; unimportant

SMALL CATTLE
n. 1535 – orig., livestock smaller in size then oxen, such as calves or sheep; later, bovine animals of a small breed

• SMALL-CHANGE
adj. 1890 – insignificant; trivial; worthless

• SMALL CHOP
n. 1963 W. Afr. – small items of food

• SMALL CLOTHES
n. 1. 1625 rare – small items of clothing; underclothes
n. 2. 1770 – breeches; knee breeches
n. 3. 1825 obs. rare – a person who wears breeches

• SMALL COAL
n. 1591 obs. – charcoal

• SMALL COAL MAN
n. 1. 1643 – orig. a man who supplied small coal (coal that is small in size or fine or powdered coal); later, a retailer of coal on a small scale
n. 2. 1673 cant. obs. – a clergyman

• SMALL COIN
n. 1606 – coins of low value collectively

• SMALL DARBY
n. 1892 Irish sl. – a glass of whisky

• SMALL DRINK
adj. 1656 obs. – trivial, of no consequence
n. c1525 obs. – beer, ale, etc., of a poor, weak, or inferior quality

• SMALLER
n. 1829 colloq., obs. – a small glass of neat spirits; also used in an ironic sense for an ordinary-sized or large glass of liquor

• SMALLEST ROOM
n. 1930 colloq. – the lavatory of a particular building

• SMALL FIGURES
n. a1652 obs. – Arabic numerals

• SMALL FISH
n. 1836 colloq. – a person or thing of relatively small importance or significance

• SMALL FISH IN A BIG POND
n. 1904 colloq. – a person or thing regarded as comparatively insignificant, or whose influence is diminished within the context of a large group or more populous environment

• SMALL FOLK
n. 1785 – fairies

• A  SMALL FORTUNE
n. 1874 sl. – a large amount of money

• SMALL FRY
adj. 1828 – minor, unimportant
n. 1. 1647 – small or insignificant things
n. 2. 1652 – young or unimportant persons

• SMALL-GANG
vb. 1851 sl., rare – to attack a person together; to mob

• SMALL GIRL
n. 1. 1671 obs. – a mistress; a paramour; a prostitute
n. 2. 1734 – a female child below the age of puberty but typically above infancy

• SMALL-GUT MAN
n. a1640 obs. rare – a fencer who can pierce the small guts

• SMALL HALF
n. 1965 Amer. sl. – one’s wife

• SMALL HAND
n. a1513 – cursive handwriting of small size, as opposed to large legal script

• SMALL HELP
n. 1903 rare – children employed to work in factories, etc.

• SMALLIE
n. 1. 1849 colloq. – a person or animal of small size or stature; also, a child
n. 2. 1930 colloq., orig. US – an unimportant or insignificant person

• SMALL-KNOWING
adj. 1598 – knowing or understanding little

• THE SMALL MAN
n. 1800 – a typical small-scale proprietor of land or or a business

• SMALL MEAT
n. a1662 rare – meat other than beef or poultry

• SMALL MULE
n. 1917 Amer. dial. – a hare

• SMALLNESS
n. 1. a1387 obs. – slimness; slenderness
n. 2. c1425 – weakness; lack of vigour or strength

• SMALL NUT
n. c1450 obs. – a hazelnut

• THE SMALL OF THE ARM
n. a1544 – the narrow part of the forearm, above the wrist

• SMALL PEOPLE
n. 1. 1696 Eng. dial. – fairies
n. 2. 1829 – children

• SMALL PIPE
n. an alto saxophone …1940s African-American sl.

• SMALL-POCK(S)
n. c1510 arch. – smallpox

• SMALL-POTATO
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – insignificant; trivial; worthless

• SMALL POTATOES
n. Bk1905 Amer. dial. – applied to persons or things, and signifying petty, mean, or contemptible

• SMALL ROOM
n. 1858 colloq., rare – a lavatory

• SMALLS
n. 1. 1795 rare – breeches, trousers
n. 2. 1934 – underwear, esp. knickers or underpants
n. 3. 1834 – lower-case letters
n. 4. 1863 – products of lesser size than the usual or average
n. 5. 1890 – small kinds of bread; fancy bread, rolls, etc.

• SMALL SALAD
n. 1693 – plants whose leaves, when young, are used in salad

• SMALL SALADING
n. 1710 rare – plants whose leaves, when young, are used in salad

• SMALL-TALKABLE
adj. 1859 obs. – capable of being engaged in small talk

• SMALL TICKET
n. 1909 US Navy sl. – a dishonourable discharge from the Navy

• SMALL TIMBER
n. 20C sl. – lucifer matches

• SMALL-TIME
adj. 1915 – insignificant; trivial; worthless; second-rate, unimportant

• SMALL-TIMER
n. 1. 1910 rare – a small-time theatre
n. 2. 1914 – a small-time operator; an insignificant person

• SMALL-TOWN
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – insignificant; trivial; worthless

• SMALLUM
adv. a1000 obs. – in small pieces or quantities; minutely

• SMALLUMS
n. 1828 Eng. dial. obs. – small quantities

• SMALL-WARE
adj. 1673 obs. – designating a thing considered lowly, insignificant, or trivial

• SMALL WARES
n. 1815 chiefly US – kitchen utensils; any small manufactured items

• SMALLY
adj. 1. 1577 obs. rare – of liquor: weak, thin
adj. 2. 1764 Sc. & Eng. dial. – of a person or animal: small and slight; puny, weakly

• SMALL YEARS
n. 1860 chiefly US, rare – the years of early childhood

• SMALMY
adj. 1924 sl. – insincere in manner; ingratiating

• SMARAGD
n. a1300 rare – an emerald; a precious stone of a bright green colour

• SMARAGDINE
adj. 1591 – of an emerald green

• SMARAGDUS
n. 1382 rare – an emerald; a precious stone of a bright green colour

• SMARALD
n. 1599 obs. rare – an emerald; a smaragd

• SMARM
n. 1937 colloq. – fulsome flattery; flattering or toadying behaviour
vb. 1. 1847 Eng. dial. – to smear, to bedaub
vb. 2. 1902 – to treat in a wheedling, flattering way
vb. 3. 1911 – to behave in a fulsomely flattering or toadying manner; to suck up to a person

• SMARMY
adj. 1. 1909 colloq. – smooth and sleek
adj. 2. 1924 colloq. – in the manner of a sycophant; insincere in manner; ingratiating, obsequious; smug
n. 1957 rare – a smarmy person; a sycophant; a toady

• SMART
adj. 1. a1200 – of a blow, stroke, etc.: sufficiently hard or severe to cause pain; sharp, stinging
adj. 2. a1200 obs. – of an event, time, etc.: dreadful, dire; difficult; testing
adj. 3. c1300 – of pain, sorrow, etc.: sharp, keen, painful, severe
adj. 4. c1330 – of words: sharp, severe; cutting, acrimonious
adj. 5. 1372 rare – of a substance (esp. alcoholic drink) or its taste: pungent, acrid; invigorating the palate
adj. 6. c1380 – quick in action or response; lively, active; prompt
adj. 7. a1400 – of a battle, attack, etc.: fierce, violent; esp. vigorous and quick
adj. 8. c1400 – of a sound: short and sharp; abrupt and loud
adj. 9. c1400 colloq. – forward, impudent; cheeky, pert
adj. 10. 1571 – clever, intelligent, knowledgeable
adj. 11. 1602 – alert, energetic; having a brisk and orderly bearing
adj. 12. 1644 obs. – distinct, sharp, clearly outlined
adj. 13. 1665 obs. – of a person: sharp in criticism or comment upon another
adj. 14. 1670 rare – of a hill: relatively steep
adj. 15. 1704 – of an item of clothing: attractively neat and stylish; relatively formal
adj. 16. 1719 – fashionable, elegant, sophisticated; associated with fashionable or high society
adj. 17. 1760 chiefly horse racing; later also greyhound racing – of a horse or dog: fast; quick
adj. 18. c1778 – of a person: neatly or formally dressed; stylish; tidy
adj. 19. 1788 Amer. dial., rare – healthy, spry
adj. 20. 1758 Amer. dial. – substantial; large; considerable in number, amount, etc.
adj. 21. 1859 Amer. dial. esp. African-American – energetic and effective in working; industrious, diligent
adj. 22. Bk1942 Amer. sl.   excellent; first-rate 
n. 1. a1225 – sharp physical pain, esp. such as is caused by a blow, sting, etc., or by a wound
n. 2. a1400 – mental pain or suffering; grief; sorrow, affliction
n. 3. 1709 rare, often derogatory – a person who affects smartness in dress, manners, or speech
n. 4. 1846 Amer. dial. – a large amount
n. 5. 1967 colloq. – intelligence 
vb. 1. a1000 – to be a source of sharp pain; to sting; to hurt
vb. 2. a1400 – of words, an action, etc.: to cause mental pain or anguish; to be hurtful
vb. 3. a1425 obs. rare – to atone for an offence by suffering

• THE SMART
n. 1831 – those who are neat, clever, witty, etc.; smart people or things as a class

• SMART ALEC;  SMART ALECK;  SMART ALICK; SMART ELICK
n. 1864 colloq., orig. US – a person who is, or wishes to seem clever and knowing, but is regarded as annoyingly smug or obnoxious; a know-all

• SMART-ALECKISM
n. 1886 colloq., orig. US – ostentatious or smug cleverness

• SMART-ALECKRY
n. 1918 colloq., orig. US – ostentatious or smug cleverness

• SMART-ALECKY
adj. 1889 colloq., orig. US – ostentatiously or smugly clever

• SMART APPLE
n. 1. 1940 US colloq. – a person who is or wishes to appear clever or knowledgeable, but is regarded as smug and annoying; a smart alec
n. 2. 1946 US colloq. – a shrewd or intelligent person; a smart cookie

• SMART-ARSE
adj. 1960 sl. – smugly clever
n. 1965 sl. – a smugly clever person who is regarded as annoying
vb. 1982 sl. – to speak or behave in an ostentatiously or smugly clever manner

• SMART-ARSED
adj. 1960 sl. – smugly clever

• SMART AS A NEW PIN
adj. 1. 1893 sl. – first-class
adj. 2. 1893 UK – very smartly dressed

• SMART AS A STEEL-TRAP
adj. 1821 Amer. dial. – extremely bright and clever; very sharp and shrewd; intellectually alert, quick-witted

• SMART AS A WHIP
adj. 1821 colloq., chiefly US – very sharp or lively; extremely intelligent or clever

• SMART-ASS
adj. 1951 sl., orig. & chiefly US – smugly clever
n. 1958 sl., orig. & chiefly US – someone smugly clever
vb. 1965 sl., orig. & chiefly US – to behave in a smugly clever way towards

• SMART-ASSED
adj. 1957 sl., orig. & chiefly US – smugly clever

• SMART-BUTT
n. 1967 Amer. dial. – a person who is disliked because he thinks he knows everything

• SMARTFUL
adj. 1. 1556 obs. – painful; distressing
adj. 2. 1839 – stinging, irritating

• SMARTHEAD
n. a1400 obs. rare – severity; harshness

• SMARTIE-BOOTS
n. 1962 sl. – a know-all

• SMART IKE
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – a mean or disagreeable person

• SMARTISH
adj. 1799 chiefly Eng. dial. – considerable in amount, degree, etc.
adv. 1770 – quite quickly; somewhat smartly

• SMARTISM
n. 1830 rare – smartness of speech; wittiness; a smart or witty saying

• SMARTLE
vb. 1673 Eng. dial. obs. rare – to waste away

• SMARTLESS
adj. 1593 rare – free from pain or irritation

• SMART MOB
n. 2002 – a large group of people organized by means of mobile phones or other wireless devices who assemble together or act collectively, typically for political purposes

• SMART MOUTH
n. 1. 1930s African-American sl. – belligerent, loud talk; disagreeable talk
n. 2. 1966 US sl. – an impudent or cheeky person; a person who makes witty comments at another’s expense
(verbs as ‘smart-mouth’)
vb. 1. 1970 US sl. – to be cheeky to someone or be witty at their expense
vb. 2. 1976 US sl. – to talk insolently to

• SMART-MOUTHED
adj. 1967 US sl. – characterized by impudence or wit

• SMARTNESS
n. 1. 1340 rare – sharp discipline; severity or sharpness of something
n. 2. a1425 obs. – bitterness; sharpness of taste
n. 3. c1425 rare – pain, smarting; irritation
n. 4. 1644 – vigour, force; speed, briskness; liveliness, activity, alertness
n. 5. 1741 – tidiness or fashionableness in dress or appearance
n. 6. 1800 – intelligence, cleverness; astuteness, shrewdness
n. 7. 1859 Amer. dial., esp. African-American – competence, diligence

• SMART OFF
vb. 1902 orig. & chiefly US – to talk to or answer someone in an impertinent or rude manner

• SMARTS
n. 1552 obs. – loss, damage; adversity

• THE SMARTS
n. 1964 colloq., orig. & chiefly US – intelligence; cleverness, acumen’ wits

• SMART SET
n. 1851 colloq. – the extremely fashionable portion of society

• SMART STUFF
n. 1940s African-American sl. – tricky, underhanded activity

• SMART TALK
n. 1. 1731 – clever, witty, or persuasive talk, esp. of an insincere nature
n. 2. 1826 – impertinent or rude remarks or replies; back-chat
(verbs as ‘smart-talk)
vb. 1. 1930 – to engage in clever, witty or persuasive conversation, esp. of an insincere nature
vb. 2. 1936 – to talk to or answer in an impertinent or rude way

• SMART UP
vb. 1. 1780 colloq. – to make smart or spruce; to improve in appearance or style
vb. 2. 1888 orig. & chiefly US – to become more shrewd, wise, intelligent, or aware; to wise up

• SMARTY
adj. 1850 – clever, knowing, esp. ostentatiously or smugly so
n. 1847 colloq., orig. US – a person who is smart or witty, or who would like to be thought of as such; also, a smartly dressed person

• SMARTY-BOOTS
adj. 1962 – overly or obnoxiously clever
n. 1950 UK colloq. – an overly or obnoxiously clever person; a know-all

• SMARTY-PANTS
adj. 1932 colloq., orig. US – overly or obnoxiously clever
n. 1. 1935 colloq., orig. US – an overly or obnoxiously clever person; a know-all
n. 2. 1940s African-American sl. – a boy who has begun to feel mature sexual desire

• SMASH
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – important
n. 1. 1725 Eng. dial. or colloq. – a hard or heavy blow
n. 2. 1785 sl., obs. – mashed turnips
n. 3. 1795 sl. – counterfeit coin
n. 4. 1882 – in tennis: a hard and fast overhand volley
n. 5. 1821 sl. – loose change
n. 6. 1888 – a crushing defeat or overthrow
n. 7. 1890 – a break-up of some kind; a revolution
n. 8. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – something excellent
n. 9. 1959 Amer. sl. – an alcoholic drink; esp. applied to wine
n. 10. 1923 – a great success; a film, person, play, song, etc., which enjoys popular success
n. 11. 1963 Amer. sl. – a party, esp. a noisy and wild one
vb. 1. 1699 sl. obs. – to kick down stairs
vb. 2. 1801 cant – to pass counterfeit money
vb. 4. 1813 – to defeat utterly; to overcome, to overwhelm, to destroy
vb. 4. 1819 cant – to give change for a guinea, note, or other money
vb. 5. 1839 colloq. – to fail financially; to be ruined; to become bankrupt
vb. 6. 1857 – to render bankrupt or insolvent
vb. 7. 1882 – in tennis: to strike the ball violently and swiftly in an overhand volley
vb. 8. 1986 Amer. dial. – to kiss

• SMASH AND GRAB
vb. 1990s African-American sl. – to hurt or kill someone, then rob them  

• SMASHDOM
n. 1859 – a being financially smashed

• SMASHED
adj. 1. 1962 sl. – very drunk; intoxicated
adj. 2. 1968 sl., orig. US – in a drugged state  

• SMASHER
n. 1. 1794 sl. – anything uncommon, extraordinary, or unusual, esp. unusually large or excellent
n. 2. 1795 sl. – a person who passes counterfeit coin or forged notes
n. 3. 1828 colloq. – a severe reply, article, review, etc.
n. 4. 1829 colloq. – a bad or damaging fall; a heavy blow
n. 5. 1851 sl. rare – a counterfeit coin
n. 6. 1894 sl. – an excellent person
n. 7. 1929 sl. rare – a receiver of stolen property
n. 8. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – something heavy
n. 9. 1948 sl., chiefly Brit. – a sexually attractive person

• SMASHER HAT
n. 1891 – a slouched hat

• SMASHEROO
n. 1948 sl., orig. & chiefly US – a great success

• SMASHERY
n. 1830 – a smashing or destruction

• SMASH-FEEDER
n. 1839 sl. – a silver spoon

• SMASH HIT
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – something excellent  

• SMASHING
adj. 1. 1857 – counterfeit; forged
adj. 2. a1911 colloq. – very good; pleasing; excellent; sensational
n. 1819 sl. – producing counterfeit money

• SMASH-MOUTH
n. 1965 US colloq., rare – passionate kissing

• SMASH THE RECORD
vb. Bk1903 sl. – to surpass all previous performances

• SMATCH
n. 1. a1200 – taste, flavour; also, the sense of taste
n. 2. a1500 – a slight indication or suggestion of some quality, etc.
n. 3. 1647 – a slight touch of illness, pain, etc.4
n. 4. 1571 – a slight knowledge, a smattering of something
vb. c1000 obs. – to have a flavour or taste

• SMATCHET
n. c1582 Sc. – a small, contemptible person; a mischievous, impudent, pert child; used as a term of contempt or dislike 

• SMATCHLESS
adj. c1225 obs. rare – devoid of savour

• SMATHER
vb. 1960 Amer. dial. – to smear, to slather

• SMATTER
n. 1. 1668 – superficial knowledge
n. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a small amount; a bit  
vb. 1. c1386 obs. – to dirty, to pollute, to defile, to smirch
vb. 2. a1450 obs. – to talk ignorantly or superficially of something, to prate, to chatter
vb. 3. 1530 – to have a slight or superficial knowledge of; to dabble
vb. 4. 1893 US – to splash, to splatter

• SMATTERS
n. 1766 Sc. – scraps, trifles, fragments; small sums

• SMATTERY
adj. 1895 – superficial; of a smattering character
n. 1892 – superficial knowledge

• SMAY
vb. 1632 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to shrink, to flinch; to feel disinclined, etc.

• SMAZE
n. 1953 – a mixture of smoke and haze

• SMEAR
n. 1. c725 obs. – fat, grease, lard; ointment
n. 2. c1476 obs. – a ‘company’ of curriers
n. 3. 1600 obs. rare – a smeared or dirty condition
n. 4. 1725 obs. – a painter; a plasterer
n. 5. 1891 Amer. dial. – butter
n. 6. 1943 colloq., orig. US – a slanderous or defamatory remark; an attempt to defame by slander
vb. 1. c950 obs. – to prepare a dead body with unguents before burial
vb. 2. 1549 colloq., orig. US – to attempt to discredit a reputation, etc.
vb. 3. 1935 sl., chiefly Aust. – to kill deliberately; to thrash
vb. 4. 1935 sl. – to destroy a place by bombing 

• SMEAR CAMPAIGN
n. 1938 – a plan to discredit someone or something, or to destroy a reputation by means of smears

• SMEARED
adj. 1. 1950 Amer. dial. – of the sky: overcast
adj. 2. M20 US sl. – intoxicated with alcohol 
adj. 3. M20 US drug culture sl. – drug-intoxicated 

• SMEAR IN
vb. 1975 Amer. dial. – of the weather: to become overcast

• SMEARS
n. Bk1998 drug culture sl. – LSD

• SMEAT
adj. c725 obs. – of gold: refined, pure

• SMECTIC
adj. 1676 rare – cleansing, abstersive, detergent

• SMEDDUM
n. 1790 Sc. – spirit, ‘go’, alertness of mind and vigour in action; energy

• SMEECH
n. a1000 now chiefly Eng. dial. – smoke, esp. foul-smelling or pungent smoke; dense or thick vapour; fine dust suspended in the air; also, a bad smell, a stink
vb. 1. 1611 obs. rare – to blacken, to make dirty
vb. 2. a1794 Eng. dial. – to produce foul-smelling smoke; to smoke; to turn black in the smoke of a fire

• SMEECHER
n. 1611 obs. rare – a person who makes something dirty or grimy

• SMEEK
n. 1. c1175 – smoke from burning or smouldering material
n. 2. c1425 – a strong or foul smell
vb. 1. a1000 – to emit smoke; to smoke
vb. 2. a1382 obs. – to scent a place with incense

• SMEEKY
adj. c1600 Sc. obs. – smoky, that produces smoke; filled with smoke; smelling of smoke

• SMEERIKIN
n. 1824 Sc. obs. – a hearty kiss; a stolen kiss

• SMEETH
adj. c725 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – smooth; free from roughness
n. c1440 Eng. dial. – a level space
vb. c1000 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to make smooth

• SMEETHLY
adv. a1225 obs. – smoothly

• SMEETHNESS
n. c1000 obs. – smoothness

• SMEGHEAD
n. 1988 sl. – a fool; a contemptible person

• SMEGMATIC
adj. 1656 obs. – cleansing; abstersive; detergent
n. 1623 obs. – anything that cleanses

• SMEIGH
adj. c1200 obs. – clever, cunning

• SMEIGHNESS
n. c1200 obs. – wisdom, skill

• SMEKE
vb. c1440 obs. obs. rare – to flatter, to fawn

• SMELLER
n. 1. 1610 cant obs. rare – a garden
n. 2. a1627 – one who has a smell; a stinker
n. 3. 1665 – one of the whiskers of a cat
n. 4. 1699 sl. – the nose
n. 5. 1824 sl. – a blow on the nose
n. 6. 1898 – anything remarkable for exceptional violence, severity, strength, etc.
n. 7. 1899 sl. – a prying fellow; a sneaking spy; one who tries to smell out something
n. 8. 1923 sl. – a heavy fall

• SMELLERS
n. 1854 sl. – the nostrils

• SMELL-FEAST
adj. 1566 – sponging, parasitic
n. 1519 arch. – a person who scents out where feasting is to be had; one who comes uninvited to share in a feast; a parasite; a greedy sponger

• SMELLFUNGUS
n. 1807 – a discontented person; a grumbler; a faultfinder 

• SMELLING CHEAT
n. 1. 1567 cant obs. – a garden or orchard
n. 2. 1573 cant. obs. – the nose
n. 3. 1610 cant. obs. – a nosegay

• SMELL LIKE A POLE-CAT’S ASS
vb. 1928 Amer. sl. – to smell bad

• SMELL OF OIL
vb. 1650 – to bear marks of laborious study

• SMELL OF THE BABY
vb. 1618 – to be childish

• SMELL OF THE CANDLE
vb. 1542 – of literary work: to show signs of being laboured and artificial

• SMELL OF THE LAMP
vb. 1579 – of a literary composition: to be the manifest product of nocturnal or laborious study

• SMELL OF THE ROAST
vb. 1696 sl. – to get into prison

• SMELL ONESELF
vb. 1934 Amer. dial. – to be aware of or feel the emotional effects of one’s sexual maturity

• SMELL ONE’S PEE
vb. 1966 Amer. dial. – to be aware of or feel the emotional effects of one’s sexual maturity

• SMELL ONE’S PISS
vb. 2002 Amer. dial. – to be aware of or feel the emotional effects of one’s sexual maturity

• SMELLSIP
vb. 1922 – to smell and sip almost simultaneously

• SMELL-SMOCK
n. 1. 1550 obs. – a licentious man; one who runs after women; a great wencher; a lover of women; a whoremonger  (in early use employed suggestively as a surname)
n. 2. 1876 Eng. dial. – a plant name, applied to: a. the cuckoo-flower, Cardamine pratensis; b. the wood-anemone, Anemone Nemorosa; c. the wood-sorrel, Oxalis Acetosella

• SMELL THE FLOWERS
vb. 1957 orig. US colloq. – to appreciate or fully enjoy life’s pleasures, esp. those things which are transitory or regarded as inessential

• SMELL THE PLACE UP
vb. M20 US sl. – to defecate; to use the bathroom

• SMELL THE ROSES
vb. 1930 orig. US colloq. – to appreciate or fully enjoy life’s pleasures, esp. those things which are transitory or regarded as inessential

• SMELL TO HIGH HEAVEN
vb. 1963 sl. – to smell unpleasantly

• SMELLY
adj. 1923 rare – suspicious

• SMELT
n. 1. 1607 obs. – a simpleton
n. 2. 1635 sl. obs. – half a guinea; 10 shillings and sixpence

• SMERL
n. a1300 obs. – ointment

• SMERLES
n. a1000 obs. – ointment

• SMEUSE
n. 1819 – a hole in a hedge, wall, etc.
vb. 1851 – to go or escape through a hole in a hedge, wall, etc.

• SMICKER
adj. 1. c725 obs. – beautiful, elegant, fair, handsome
adj. 2. 1589 obs. – gay, spruce
adj. 3. 1606 obs. – wanton, loose, amorous
adj. 4. B1900 obs. – of men: finical, effeminate
vb. 1. 1668 obs. – to look amorously or wantonly at or after a person
vb. 2. 1802 Sc. – to smile fawningly; to smirk; to grin

• SMICKERING
adj. 1930 rare – smirking
n. 1699 obs. – an amorous inclination

• SMICKLY
adv. c1639 obs. rare – elegantly, finely

• SMICK-SMACK
adj. 1802 rare – elegant, first-rate
n. 1550 obs. – a smacking noise; a smacking or frequent kissing

• SMIDGE
n. 1866 colloq. – a tiny amount of something; a little bit

• SMIDGEN
n. 1. 1841 colloq., orig. US – a tiny amount; a little bit
n. 2. 1952 colloq., orig. US – a very small person or thing

• SMIDGET
n. 1. 1893 Amer. dial. – a small amount; a small piece of food
n. 2. 20C Amer. dial., derogatory – a nickname for a Black person

• SMIG
n. E20 sl. – a mistress

• SMIGGINS
n. 1825 cant. – ‘soup that was served to convicts on board the hulks’

• SMIGGOT
n. 1823 Eng. dial. rare – a particle, an atom

• SMILE
n. 1839 colloq., orig. US – a drink of any alcoholic liquor, esp. whisky
vb. 1. 1608 obs. rare – to treat with contempt or disdain; to deride, to laugh at
vb. 2. 1858 sl. – to take a drink of wine, beer, or spirits

• SMILEFUL
adj. 1609 – smiling; full of smiles

• A SMILE LIKE A PO
n. 1976 sl. – a round, benign and full-hearted smile

• SMILER
n. 1892 UK sl. – a shandy, a mixture of beer and lemonade

• SMILESMIRK
vb. 1922 – to smile in a smirking manner

• SMILET
n. 1592 rare – a little or slight smile

• SMILEY; SMILY
adj. 1. 1848 – inclined to smile; readily smiling
adj. 2. 1970 – smiling; cheerful

• SMILING
n. 1858 US – drinking, tippling

• SMILO
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – alcoholic cider

• SMIRCH
n. 1. a1688 – a dirty mark or smear; a stain; a smudge
n. 2. 1862 – a moral stain or flaw; a blot or blemish; a fault or defect
vb. 1. 1495 – to make dirty, to soil, to sully, to discolour something by contact or touch
vb. 2. 1615 – to stain, smear or befoul with something dirty or having staining properties
vb. 3. 1820 – to cast discredit or disgrace upon a person; to bring into ill-repute; to taint or tarnish
vb. 4. 1828 rare – to tan the face

• SMIRK
adj. 1. 1534 – neat, trim, spruce in dress or appearance; pleasant; agreeable; smug
adj. 2. 1607 obs. – of mental faculties: quick, ready, smart
adj. 3. 1674 obs. rare – eager, ardent
n. 1699 sl., obs. rare – a finical, spruce fellow
vb. 1. c888 – to smile; later, to smile in an affected, self-satisfied, or silly manner; to simper
vb. 2. 1596 obs. – to trim up; to make neat or spruce

• SMIRKING
adj. 1648 obs. – of wine, etc.: sparkling

• SMIRKISH
adj. 1674 rare – smiling, pleasant; somewhat simpering

• SMIRKLE
n. 1825 Sc. – a smile; a smirk; a suppressed laugh
vb. c1590 Sc. – to smirk or smile; to giggle; to laugh in a suppressed manner

• SMIRKLY
adv. a1586 obs. rare – smirkingly

• SMIRKY
adj. a1758 Sc. & US – smart, neat, smiling; simpering

 SMIRR
n. 1914 Amer. dial. – a drizzle or wet mist
vb. 1914 Amer. dial. – to become foggy or cloudy

• SMIRTLE
n. 1801 Sc. – a smirk
vb. a1650 Sc. – to smile, to smirk

• SMISH
n. 1807 cant – a shirt or chemise

• SMIT
n. 1. a1000 obs. – a spot; a stain; a blemish
n. 2. c1330 rare – a very small amount; a little bit; also, a very small thing
n. 3. a1425 obs. exc. Sc. & Eng. dial. – a blow; a stroke; also, a sound made when something is struck
n. 4. 1763 Sc. & Eng. dial. – a particle of soot; a spot of dirt; a smut; also, sooty matter
n. 5. 1838 Sc. & Eng. dial. – an infectious disease; an infection
vb. 1. a1000 obs. – to stain; to soil; to colour; to tinge
vb. 2. a1000 obs. – to defile; to taint with pride a vice, etc.; to contaminate morally
vb. 3. a1413 obs. – to bring into disgrace or discredit; to tarnish; to sully
vb. 4. 1428 chiefly Sc. – of a disease, sickness, etc.: to infect

• SMITCH
n. 1. c1330 chiefly Eng. dial. – smoke from burning or smouldering material
n. 2. 1638 chiefly Sc. & Eng. dial. – a dirty mark; a sport of dirt; a blemish
n. 3. 1822 orig. Sc. – a tiny amount; a little bit
vb. 1626 chiefly Eng. dial. – to blacken, esp. with smoke; to scorch; to make dirty; to mark

• SMITCHEL
n. 1856 US colloq., rare – a tiny amount; a little bit

• SMITCHY
adj. 1888 colloq., rare – tiny

• SMITE
n. 1. a1200 arch. – a heavy blow or stroke, esp. with a weapon; the sound made by such a blow
n. 2. 1640 obs. rare – a slight indication or intimation of something
n. 3. 1843 – a tiny amount of something; a little bit
n. 4. 1861 – in cricket: a hit made by striking the ball very hard
vb. 1. a1000 obs. – to smear a substance on something; to smear something
vb. 2. a1000 obs. – to pollute; to taint; to stain
vb. 3. a1000 arch. – to deal a blow; to strike; to fight
vb. 4. c1200 arch. – to beat; to slap
vb. 5. c1225 obs. – of a bird or animal: to strike with the beak, claw, hoof, etc.
vb. 6. c1225 obs. – to move quickly; to rush; to dart
vb. 7. c1275 obs. – to come together in conflict or battle; to clash
vb. 8. c1300 – to deliver a blow with a weapon
vb. 9. a1325 – of a disease, disorder, or other condition: to attack; to affect suddenly or seriously
vb. 10. c1325 obs. – to engage in or fight a battle
vb. 11. c1350 – of light, the sun, etc.: to shine on; to beat down on
vb. 12. 1370 rare – of a bell or clock: to strike
vb. 13. 1382 arch. – to strike down, esp. in battle; to kill; to slay; to defeat
vb. 14. a1382 arch. – of lightning, fire, etc.: to strike a person or thing causing injury, damage, or death; to destroy
vb. 15. a1382 arch. – of the heart, conscience, or spirit: to cause a person to have painful feelings such as guilt or remorse; to distress; to disquiet
vb. 16. a1387 obs. – to coin money; to strike a coin or metal into coin
vb. 17. a1398 arch. – to clap one’s hands; to strike two or more things together
vb. 18. c1450 arch. – of the wind, waves, etc.: to beat or dash against something
vb. 19. a1475 obs. rare – to fire a cannon
vb. 20. 1652 – to inspire passion or love, esp. romantic love in a person; to enamour
vb. 21. 1665 – to create a favourable impression on a person, the mind, etc.; to impress
vb. 22. 1797 – of a thought, idea, etc.: to occur suddenly to a person; to strike; to enter the brain or mind
vb. 23. 1868 – in cricket: to produce a hit by striking the ball very hard

• SMITE DOWN
vb. c1225 arch. – to knock, beat, or strike down; to cut down with a sword or other weapon

• SMITE FIRE
vb. c1300 obs. – to produce fire, esp. by striking a flint or other stone

• SMITE OFF
vb. a1225 arch. – to cut off a person’s head, hands, etc., with a sword or other weapon

• SMITE ONE’S TUTOR
vb. 1785 Cambridge University sl., obs. rare – to get money from one’s tutor

• SMITER
n. 1. c1230 – a person who strikes or beats someone or something; a person who deals a blow or blows
n. 2. c1390 obs. – an executioner
n. 3. 1591 obs. – a sword
n. 4. 1673 sl., obs. – an arm
n. 5. 1823 Eng. dial., obs. – a person who performs an action, task, etc., energetically
n. 6. 1878 cricket usage – a batter who is able to strike the ball very hard

• SMITE TO (THE) DEATH
vb. c1175 – to kill a person or animal, often with a sword or other weapon

• SMITHCRAFT
n. a1000 arch. – the art, craft, or skill of a smith

• SMITHE
n. a1000 obs. – the workshop of a smith; a forge

• SMITHER
n. 1. a1525 rare – a person who works with iron or other metals, making items by forging and hammering; a smith
n. 2. 1845 – a small piece or fragment; a small amount

• SMITHEREEN
n. 1841 – a tiny fragment; a little bit
vb. 1878 – to smash or blow up into tiny fragments

• SMITHEREENS
n. 1795 orig. Irish English – tiny fragments, small pieces

• SMITHERY
n. 1. 1548 – the trade or occupation of a smith
n. 2. 1755 – the workshop of a smith

• SMITHFIELD
n. 1647 – a cattle market; a meat market

• SMITHFIELD BARGAIN
n. 1. 1664 obs. – a bargain in which the seller takes advantage of the buyer
n. 2. 1687 obs. – a marriage or marriage agreement made for convenience, esp. one made for money

• SMITHFIELD MATCH
n. 1703 obs. – a marriage or marriage agreement made for convenience, esp. one made for money

• SMITHIER
n. 1379 obs. – a smith; a person who works with iron or other metals

• SMITHMAN
n. 1408-9 obs. – an ironworker

• SMITH WIFE
n. a1425 obs. – a female smith; a smith’s wife

• SMITHY
n. 1. a1250 – the workshop of a smith or blacksmith; a forge
n. 2. 1804 – the art or craft of a smith; work carried out or produced by a smith
n. 3. 1847 US – a blacksmith
n. 4. 1990s US criminals’ sl. – a firearm manufactured by Smith & Wesson
vb. 1733 obs. – to work at a forge; to perform the work of a smith

• SMITHY-COOM
n. 1611 Eng. dial. – soot, ash, and other debris from a smithy

• SMITHY CRAFT
n. a1522 arch. – the art or craft of a smith; work carried out by a smith

• SMITHY DANDER
n. 1828 chiefly Sc., obs. – a cinder from a forge or smithy

• SMITHY MAN
n. 1308 rare – a person who works in a smithy; a smith

• SMITHY SLACK
n. 1813 rare – cinders, iron flakes, and other waste material from a forge

• SMIT SMOKE
n. 1940s African-American sl. – a highly intelligent Black person

• SMITTABLE
adj. 1487 Sc., obs. – capable of being infected; later, infectious

• SMITTED
adj. 1862 Eng. dial. – stained, marked

• SMITTING
adj. c1450 chiefly Eng. dial. – infectious; contagious

• SMITTLE
adj. 1583 chiefly Eng. dial. – infectious; contagious; easily transmitted; said of a disease or infestation
n. 1838 Eng. dial. – infection, contagion
vb. 1625 chiefly Eng. dial. – to infect; to contaminate

• SMITTLING
adj. 1845 chiefly Eng. dial. – infectious; contagious
n. 1625 Eng. dial. – infection, contagion

• SMITTLISH
adj. 1787 chiefly Eng. dial. – infectious; contagious; of a place: liable to be a source of infection

• SMOCK
n. 1. a1000 arch. – a woman’s undergarment; a shift or chemise
n. 2. L16 sl. – an immoral woman
n. 3. 17C sl. – a woman; women considered sexually
n. 4. 18C Brit. sl. – the female genitals
vb. 1. 1614 obs. – to make effeminate or womanish
vb. 2. 1719 obs. rare – to consort with women; to chase women; to act as a lecher
vb. 3. L16 sl. – to have sexual intercourse
vb. 4. 1940s African-American sl. – to sniff heroin

• SMOCKAGE
n. 1612 – chasing women; copulating with women; copulation

• SMOCK ALLEY
n. 1. 17C sl. – those streets occupied by brothels
n. 2. L17 sl. – the vagina

• SMOCK CASTLE
n. L17 sl. – the vagina

• SMOCKER
n. 1708 obs. – a person who consorts with women

• SMOCKFACE
n. 1605 rare – a pale and smooth or effeminate face; a person having such a face

• SMOCK-FACED
adj. 1. 1693 rare – having a pale smooth face; effeminate-looking
adj. 2. M17 sl. – attractive
adj. 3. 19C sl. – homosexual

• SMOCK FAIR
n. 17C sl. – a gathering place of prostitutes

• SMOCK-MILL
n. 1802 – a windmill having a revolving top

• SMOCK-RAVELLED
adj. 1904 Eng. dial. – perplexed

• SMOCKSTER
n. 1. 1608 Brit. sl. – a madam or a pimp
n. 2. 17C Brit. sl. – a whoremonger; a lecher

• SMOD
n. c1400 obs. rare – stain, filth

• SMOG
n. 1954 – a state or condition of obscurity or confusion; something designed to confuse or obscure

• SMOKABLE
adj. 1818 rare – able to be ridiculed

• SMOKABLES
n. 1849 – things which may be smoked

• SMOKE
n. 1. 1530 obs. – the fumes of incense
n. 2. 1581 – false information to distract opponents
n. 3. 1605 rare – a hearth, a fireplace, a house
n. 4. c1616 obs. – tobacco
n. 5. 1648 – a mist or fog; damp rising out of the earth
n. 6. 1882 – a cigar or cigarette
n. 7. 1884 – opium
n. 8. 1893 – a Persian cat of a deep cinder-colour, with a white undercoat
n. 9. 1902 Amer. dial., derogatory or offensive – a Black person
n. 10. 1904 US sl. – illicit or inferior whisky 
n. 11. 1904 US sl. – a cheap drink based on raw alcohol, methylated spirit, solvent, etc.
n. 12. 1909 Amer. dial. – an imaginary object used as the basis of a practical joke
n. 13. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – something worthless 
n. 14. 1946 drug culture sl. – heroin and crack; crack; marijuana
vb. 1. 1548 obs. – to be angry, to fume
vb. 2. 1548 obs. – to suffer severely; to smart
vb. 3. 1608 arch. – to get an inkling of; to smell or suspect a plot, design, etc.
vb. 4. 1697 – to ride, drive, sail, etc. at a rapid pace or great speed; to go fast
vb. 5. 1699 arch. – to make fun of, to jest at; to ridicule, to banter
vb. 6. 1716 arch. – to observe, to take note of
vb. 7. 1862 school sl. – to blush
vb. 8. 1893 Aust. sl. – to depart, to decamp, to make off
vb. 9. 19C Brit. sl. – to coit a woman 
vb. 10. 1926 US sl. – to shoot
vb. 11. 1975 US drug culture sl. – to smoke marijuana; to smoke any drugs
vb. 12. 20C Brit. & US sl. – to perform an act of penilingus 

• THE SMOKE
n. 1864 colloq. – London

• SMOKE-ARCH
n. 1864 US – the smoke-box of a locomotive

• SMOKE A THERMOMETER
vb. World War I Amer. sl. – to have one’s temperature taken

• SMOKE BALL
n. 1907 Amer. dial. – a puffball

• SMOKE-BOAT
n. 1867 nautical sl. – a steamship

• SMOKE CANADA
n. Bk1998 drug culture sl. – marijuana

• SMOKED
adj. 19C US sl. – intoxicated with alcohol

• SMOKED BACON
n. 1939 Amer. dial. – a Black person; an American Indian

• SMOKED BEEF
n. 1829 Amer. dial. – a Black person; an American Indian

• SMOKED HAM
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – a Black person; an American Indian

• SMOKED-IRISHMAN
n. 1915 Amer. dial., derogatory – a nickname for a Black person

• SMOKED YANKEE
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – a man who marries an Indian woman

• SMOKEFALL
n. 1936 rare – the moment when the wind drops and smoke that had ascended descends

• SMOKE-HEAD
n. 1942 nautical usage – a funnel

• SMOKE-HO
n. 1865 Aust. & NZ sl. – a stoppage of work for a smoke; also, a party at which smoking is allowed

• SMOKE-HOLE
n. 1. 1580 obs. – an imposture, a trick
n. 2. 1673 obs. – a smoking-room
n. 3. a1704 obs. – the mouth of a smoker

• SMOKE-HOUND
n. 1932 US sl. – an alcoholic who drinks ‘smoke’ (a concoction based on raw alcohol, etc., used as a substitute for whisky)

• SMOKE-HOUSE
n. 1. a1687 obs. rare – a dwelling-house
n. 2 a Bk1942 Amer. sl. – fast throw
n. 3. M20 US sl. – a privy; an outhouse

• SMOKEHOUSE THROW
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a fast throw

• SMOKE-JACK
n. 1761 obs. – the head, as the seat of confused ideas

• SMOKE JOINT
n. 1931 US sl. – a bar selling inferior liquor

• SMOKE MEAT
n. 1958 Amer. dial. – a Black person; an American Indian

• SMOKE-MERCHANT
n. a1618 obs. – a tobacconist

• SMOKE-O;  SMOKE-OH; SMOKO
n. 1865 Aust. & NZ sl. – a stoppage of work for a smoke; also, a party at which smoking is allowed

• SMOKE ONE OUT
vb. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – to find and bring from concealment

• SMOKE ON THE WATER
n. 1986 US sl. – a cheap drink based on raw alcohol, methylated spirit, solvent, etc. 

• SMOKE-OUT
adj. Bk1998 drug culture sl. – under the influence of drugs

• SMOKE OVER
vb. 1928 Amer. dial. – to look over, to give the once-over to

• SMOKE-POLE
n. 1849 Amer. dial. – a gun 

• SMOKER
n. 1. 1812 – a person who jests at or ridicules others
n. 2. 1825 colloq., obs. rare – a steamer
n. 3. 1866 school sl. – a person who blushes
n. 4. 1883 – a smoky chimney, locomotive, etc.
n. 5. Bk1896 sl. – a chamber-pot
n. 6. 1899 US – a social gathering of men, sometimes with organized entertainment
n. 7. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a fast throw
n. 8. 1951 colloq. – a vehicle or engine that emits excessive fumes
n. 9. 20C Brit. & US sl. – someone who is known to perform penilingus

• SMOKERY
n. 1. 1837 – articles or materials used in smoking
n. 2. 1901 – a place used for smoking; a smoking-room, an opium den, etc.

• SMOKE-SCREEN
n. 1926 – something designed to conceal or mislead; a deliberate distraction or diversion
vb. 1950 – to conceal or divert attention from by a smoke-screen

• SMOKE-SELLER
n. a1618 obs. – a person who deals fraudulently in the fulfilment of bargains or promises

• SMOKESHELL
n. Bk1896 sl. – a chamber-pot

• SMOKE-SHOP
n. 1937 – a bar, esp. one selling inferior or cheap liquor

• SMOKESHOW
n. 2007 sl., chiefly US – a sexually attractive person, esp. a woman

• SMOKE-STACK
n. 1965 Amer. dial. – a gun 

• SMOKE-STICK
n. 1907 Amer. dial. – a gun 

• SMOKE THE BLUE-VEINED HAVANA
vb. 1990s sl. – to fellate someone

• SMOKE-UP
n. 1927 US sl. – an official notice that a student’s work is not up to the required standard

• SMOKE WAGON
n. 1. 1891 sl., orig. & chiefly US – a gun
n. 2. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – an automobile

• SMOKE-WRITING
n. 1932 – skywriting

• SMOKEY
n. 1974 US sl. – a state police officer; sometimes also applied collectively to the state police

• SMOKEY BEAR; SMOKY BEAR
n. 1. 1969 US sl. – a wide-brimmed hat
n. 2. 1974 US sl. – a state police officer; sometimes also applied collectively to the state police

• SMOKIFIED
adj. 1819 – discoloured or blackened by smoke

• SMOKING
n. 1. 1781 obs. – a bantering or quizzing
n. 2. 1862 school sl. – blushing

• SMOKING GUN
n. 1. 1974 US – a piece of incontrovertible incriminating evidence
n. 2. Bk1998 drug culture sl. – heroin and cocaine

• SMOKING PISTOL
n. 1975 US – a piece of incontrovertible incriminating evidence

• SMOKISH
adj. 1477 – somewhat smoky; resembling smoke

• SMOKO
n. 1865 Aust. & NZ sl. – a stoppage of work for a smoke; also, a party at which smoking is allowed

• SMOKOLOTIVE
n. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – a locomotive

• SMOKY
adj. 1. 1596 – addicted to the smoking of tobacco; associated with the smoking of tobacco
adj. 2. 1688 obs. – quick to suspect or take note; shrewd, sharp, suspicious
adj. 3. 1769 US rare – foggy, misty
adj. 4. 1899 US – of horses: vicious
adj. 5. 1923 US – bad-tempered
n. 1. 1891 Sc. – a smoked haddock
n. 2. 1898 – a smoke or smoke-blue cat
n. 3. 1974 US sl. – a state police officer; sometimes also applied collectively to the state police

• SMOKY HOLLOW
n. 1852 Amer. dial. – a nickname for a community or neighbourhood

• SMOKY JOE
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – a branch railroad that is not very important or gives poor service

• SMOKY ROW
n. c1903 Amer. dial. – a nickname for a community or neighbourhood

• SMOKY THE BEAR
n. 1974 US sl. – a state police officer; sometimes also applied collectively to the state police

• SMOLE
adj. 1858 jocular usage, rare – smiled
vb. 1894 jocular usage, rare – to smile

• SMOLEY HOKE!
int. 20C – a deliberate spoonerism for ‘Holy Smoke!’

• SMOLICK; SMOLLICK
vb. 1913 Amer. dial. – to romp, to cavort; esp. to engage in sexual play

• SMOLT
adj. 1. c950 obs. – of weather: fine, fair, calm
adj. 2. c1400 obs. – pleasant, agreeable, affable
adj. 3. 1837 Eng. dial. – bright, shining; smooth, polished
n. 1. a1000 obs. rare – lard, fat
n. 2. 1808 – a small person or thing
vb. c1400 obs. rare – to make off, to go, to escape

• SMOOCH
n. 1. 1825 Amer. dial. – a smudge, a smear
n. 2. 1942 orig. & chiefly US – a kiss; a fondling embrace or caress
vb. 1. 1631 – to sully, to dirty
vb. 2. 1828 Amer. dial. – to smudge, to smear
vb. 3. 1904 Eng. dial. – to sneak, to creep; to wander or prowl round
vb. 4. 1905 Amer. dial. – to steal, to pilfer; to appropriate to one’s own use or benefit
vb. 5. 1932 colloq., orig. US – to kiss; to kiss and cuddle 
vb. 6. 20C Aust. sl. – to act like a sycophant 

• SMOOCHER
n. 1976 – a song or piece of music suitable for accompanying slow, close dancing

• SMOOCH UP
vb. 1895 Amer. dial. – to become cloudy

• SMOOCHY
adj. 1966 – amorous; sexy; of music: suitable for accompanying slow, close dancing

• SMOODGE
n. 19C colloq. – a kiss
vb. 1906 Aust. & NZ colloq. – to act in an ingratiating or fawning manner; to display affection; to behave amorously

• SMOODGER
n. 1898 Aust. & NZ colloq. – a flatterer; a sycophant

• SMOOGE
n. 19C colloq. – a kiss
vb. 1906 Aust. & NZ colloq. – to act in an ingratiating or fawning manner; to display affection; to behave amorously

• SMOOGER
n. 1898 Aust. & NZ colloq. – a flatterer; a sycophant

• SMOOK
n. a1513 Sc. & Eng. dial., rare – smoke, vapour
vb. c1520 – Sc. & Eng. dial. – to smoke

• SMOOLY
adj. B1900 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – sly and demure; smooth-spoken but deceptive

• SMOONGY
n. World War I US sl. – a brothel

• SMOOR
n. 1894 Sc. – a stifling or suffocating atmosphere; smoke, etc.
vb. 1. 1508 Sc. & Eng. dial. – to undergo smothering
vb. 2. 1513 Sc. & Eng. dial. – to conceal or hide; to suppress; to deaden, to stupefy
vb. 3. 1535 Sc. & Eng. dial. – to smother, to stifle; to suffocate; to deprive of life by suffocation
vb. 4. 1721 Sc. & Eng. dial. – to put out or extinguish a light or fire

• SMOOT
n. 1. 1615 N. Eng. dial. – a hole or opening at the foot of a wall, the bottom of a fence, etc., esp. one allowing the passage of rabbits, hares, or sheep
n. 2. 1642 N. Eng. dial. – a narrow passage or entrance in a beehive
vb. 1788 N. Eng. dial. – to creep under or though, as a hare or sheep through a hedge

• SMOOTH
adj. 1. c1400 – of words, looks, etc.: pleasant, affable, polite; seemingly amiable or friendly
adj. 2. c1402 rare – of wind or weather: not rough or stormy; agreeable, pleasant
adj. 3. c1450 – speaking fair or smoothly; using specious or attractive language; insinuating, flattering
adj. 4. 1743 – of liquor: soft or pleasing to the taste; free from sharpness or acidity
adj. 5. 1757 – free from disturbance or excitement
adj. 6. 1893 colloq., orig. US – excellent; first-rate, superior; clever, ‘neat’
adj. 7. 1920 colloq. – stylish, suave, chic; said of dress, manners, etc.
adj. 8. 1941 Amer. dial. – of a horse: unshod
adv. 1984 Amer. dial. – completely, entirely
n. 1. c1440 obs. – a level space
n. 2. 1595 obs. rare – a polite or veiled rebuke or retort
n. 3. 1612 – the agreeable or pleasant part, side, or aspect of anything
n. 4. 1845 US – a meadow; a grass field
vb. 1. 1589 – to allay, assuage, mitigate the force of trouble, etc.
vb. 2. 1591 obs. – to use smooth, flattering, or complimentary language
vb. 3. 1604 – to render the mind, etc. clam or tranquil; to soothe
vb. 4. 1644 obs. – to refine a person, or his manners; to free from rudeness or rusticity

• SMOOTH ARTICLE
n. Bk1942 Amer. college sl. – an attractive girl

• SMOOTH AS A BABY’S BOTTOM
adj. 1935 colloq. – pert. to something which is very smooth or soft

• SMOOTH-BOOTED
adj. 1706 obs. – flattering, fawning, soft-spoken

• SMOOTH-BOOTS
n. 1599 obs. – one who uses flattering, ingratiating, or plausible language; a bland or smooth-tongued person

• SMOOTHED
adj. 1600 obs. – indulged, pampered

• SMOOTHEDNESS
n. 1574 obs. – smoothness

• SMOOTHEN
vb. 1. 1655 – to assuage, to mollify, to tone down a passion, etc.; to reduce the harshness or violence of something
vb. 2. 1661 – to make easy or plain; to free from difficulty, obstruction, etc.; to lighten or lessen a difficulty

• SMOOTHER
n. 1611 obs. – a person who uses flattering language; a flatterer

• SMOOTH-FACED
adj. 1. 1609 – having or assuming a bland, ingratiating, or insinuating
expression
adj. 2. 1677 – of words, etc.: specious, plausible

• SMOOTHIE
adj. 1959 – pleasant, affable, polite; seemingly amiable or friendly; said of words, looks, etc.
n. 1. 1929 colloq., orig. US – a person who is suave or stylish in conduct or appearance; generally a man
n. 2. 1939 sl., orig. US – an ingratiating person
n. 3. Bk1942 Amer. college sl. – an attractive girl

• SMOOTHIFICATION
n. 1799 – a smoothing

• SMOOTHIFY
vb. 1694 – to render smooth

• SMOOTHING-LEATHER
n. 1710 obs. – a razor-strop

• SMOOTH MOUTH
n. 1. 1942 Amer. sl. – an old truck
n. 2. 1995 Amer. dial. – a toothless horse; a toothless person

• SMOOT-HOLE
n. a1828 Eng. dial. – a hole in a fence, though which a hare or rabbit can pass

• SMOOTH OVER
vb. 1. 1608 obs. rare – to win over; to appease
vb. 2. 1611 – to remove a difficulty; to make smoother in some way
vb. 3. 1684 – to gloss over, to minimize

• SMOOTH-PATE
n. a1616 obs. – a smooth-headed person

• SMOOTH-SAYER
n. 1872 US – a smooth-tongued or plausible person

• SMOOTH-SPOKEN
adj. 1821 – smooth-tongued; soft-spoken

• SMOOTH-TONGUED
adj. 1593 – plausible in speech; using fair or flattering words

• SMOOTH UP
vb. 1. 1584 obs. – to flatter, to encourage
vb. 2. 1592 obs. – to cover or hush up; to conceal
vb. 3. 1762 – to polish up, to improve

• SMOOTHY
n. 1939 sl., orig. US – an ingratiating person

• SMOOTY-FACED
adj. B1900 Eng. dial. – shy, bashful, modest, shame-faced

• SMOPPLE
adj. 1731 Eng. dial. – brittle, crisp, crumbling, as ‘smopple’ wood, or a ‘smopple’ pie crust

• SMORE
n. 1393 Sc. – smoke, smother, etc.
vb. 1. c725 Sc. & Eng. dial. – to suffocate; to smother
vb. 2. c1480 – to suppress, to keep in obscurity or concealment
vb. 3. 1530 obs. rare – to smear, to bedaub
vb. 4. 1651 rare – to smoulder

• SMORGASBORD
n. 1948 – a medley, a miscellany; a rich variety or selection

• SMOT
n. 1. 1532 Sc. & Eng. dial. – a spot, a stain, a mark, a blot
n. 2. 1566 obs. rare – a stroke, a blow
vb. a1387 obs. – to besmirch, to defile, to befoul

• SMOTHER
n. 1. c1175 – dense, suffocating, or stiflin smoke, such as produced by combustion without flame
n. 2. 1597 – a smouldering or slow-burning fire
n. 3. 1697 – dense or suffocating dust, fog, etc. filling the air
n. 4. 1840 – a confused turmoil of foam or water
n. 5. 1888 – a wild profusion of flowers, etc.
n. 6. 1904 – a smothered or indistinct noise
vb. 1. a1200 – to suffocate with smoke
vb. 2. 1548 – to suffocate by preventing breathing
vb. 3. 1579 obs. – to conceal by keeping silent about; to suppress all mention of; to hush up
vb. 4. 1600 – to smoulder; to burn slowly
vb. 5. 1725 – of smoke: to escape slowly
vb. 6. 1837 Amer. dial. – to experience shortness of breath
vb. 7. 1845 – to stop a cricket ball by placing the bat more or less over it
vb. 8. 1877 – to oppress or overwhelm
vb. 9. 1954 boxing usage – to prevent, by clever positioning of the arms, the development of an opponent’s attack

• SMOTHERATE
vb. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to suffocate

• SMOTHERATION
n. 1826 – a smothering; suffocation

• SMOTHER-FIRE
n. 1635 – a smouldering or smoky fire

• SMOTHERING SPELL
n. 1878 Amer. dial. – difficult in breathing

• SMOTHERLY
adj. 1928 Amer. dial. – suffocating, oppressive

• THE SMOTHERS
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – a feeling that lasts for a short while, with difficult breathing and heart beating fast

• SMOTHERSOME
adj. 1864 Amer. dial. – oppressively hot or humid; suffocating

• SMOTHER UP
vb. 1589 – to conceal, to suppress, to hush up

• SMOTRY
adj. c1407 obs. rare – smutty, grimy

• SMOTTER
vb. 1513 Sc. rare – to bespatter; to soil or stain

• SMOUCH
n. 1. 1578 – a kiss 
n. 2. 1765 Brit. colloq., rare, derogatory – a nickname for a Jewish man 
n. 3. 1844 Amer. dial. – a smudge, a smear
n. 4. 1849 S. Afr. – an itinerant trader
vb. 1. 1588 – to kiss; to kiss and cuddle 
vb. 2. 1826 Amer. dial. – to steal, to pilfer; to appropriate to one’s own use or benefit
vb. 3. 1840 Amer. dial. – to cheat one; to engage in devious or underhanded activities; to finagle

• SMOUCHER
n. 19C colloq. – a kiss

• SMOUGE
n. 19C colloq. – a kiss
vb. 1. 1840 Amer. dial. – to cheat one; to engage in devious or underhanded activities; to finagle
vb. 2. 1851 Amer. dial. – to steal, to pilfer; to appropriate to one’s own use or benefit
vb. 3. 19C colloq. – to kiss; to kiss and

• SMOUL
vb. 1961 Amer. dial. – to slobber over something

• SMOULDER
vb. 1. 1481 obs. – to smother, to suffocate
vb. 2. 1578 obs. rare – to be feeble or languid
vb. 3. 1934 – to show suppressed anger, hatred, resentment, etc.

• SMOUS
n. E18 Brit. colloq., derogatory – a nickname for a Jewish man

• SMOUSE
n. 1. 1705 sl., obs. derogatory – a Jew
n. 2. 1850 S. Africa – an itinerant trader
vb. 1. 1775 – to feast
vb. 2. 1840 – to eat up, consume, as a delicacy
vb. 3. 1886 Eng. dial. – to fondle; to caress

• SMOUSER
n. 1903 S. Africa – an itinerant trader

• SMOUSH
n. 1963 Aust. sl. – a kiss

• SMOUTCH
n. E18 Brit. colloq.. derogatory – a nickname for a Jewish man 
n. 2. 1844 Amer dial. – a smudge, a smear
vb. 1. 1840 Amer. dial. – to cheat one; to engage in devious or underhanded activities; to finagle
vb. 2. 1851 Amer. dial. – to steal, to pilfer; to appropriate to one’s own use or benefit

• SMUCKLE
vb. 1690 obs. – to smuggle

• SMUDGE
adj. 1596 obs. rare – smart, trim
n. 1. a1871 – a slight sign or indication of laughter, etc.
n. 2. 1883 – very small coal; fine slack, coal dust
n. 3. 1968 sl. – a photographer, esp. a street or press photographer
n. 4. 20C US sl., derogatory – a nickname for a Black person
n. 5. 20C Brit. sl. – a photograph
vb. 1. 1589 obs. rare – to make smart or trim; to deck up
vb. 2. 1808 Sc. & Eng. dial. – to laugh quietly or to oneself
vb. 3. 1825 – to smoulder
vb. 4. 1844 rare – to smouch, to caress
vb. 5. 1864 – to bungle, to make a mess of something

• SMUDGER
n. 1961 – a photographer, esp. a street or press photographer

• SMUDGY
adj. 1. 1847 Eng. dial. – stifling, stuffy
adj. 2. 1870 Eng. dial. – foggy, thick
adj. 3. 1878 Eng. dial. – giving out much smoke; smoky

• SMUG
adj. 1. 1551 – of males: trim, neat, spruce, smart; later, having a self-satisfied, conceited or consciously respectable air
adj. 2. 1582 – of the face: smooth, sleek
adj. 3. 1598 – of things: smooth, clean, neat, trim, or tidy
adj. 4. 1607 obs. – of language: smooth, neat
n. 1. 1600-9 obs. – a blacksmith
n. 2. 1882 university sl. – a diligent student
n. 3. 1891 – a smug or self-satisfied person
vb. 1. 1588 rare – to smarten up one’s appearance, etc.; to make trim or gay
vb. 2. 1813 Eng. dial., rare – to caress, to fondle
vb. 3. 1825 sl. – to steal, to filch, to run away with
vb. 4. 1842 sl. – to copy surreptitiously
vb. 5. 1857 sl. – to hush up a matter
vb. 6. 1896 sl. – to arrest; to imprison

• SMUG-BOAT
n. 1867 nautical usage – an opium boat; a contraband trader on the coast of China

• SMUGGED
adj. 19C Brit. sl. – arrested

• SMUGGERY
n. 1928 – smugness

• SMUGGLE
vb. 1. 1679 obs. – to caress, to fondle, to cuddle
vb. 2. 1768 – to get possession of by stealth

• SMUGGLERY
n. 1895 – smuggling

• SMUGGLE THE COAL
vb. 1688 sl., obs. – to make people believe one has no money when the reckoning is to be paid

• SMUGGLING-KEN
n. 1725 cant obs. – a brothel

• SMUGGY
adj. 1518 obs. rare – grimy, smutty

• SMULKIN
n. c1571 obs. rare – a brass farthing

• SMUR; SMURR
n. 1. 1808 Sc. & Eng. & Amer. dial. – a drizzle or wet mist
n. 2. 1907 Sc. & Eng. dial. – mist, cloud
vb. 1825 Sc. & Eng. & Amer. dial. – to drizzle; to become foggy or cloudy

• SMURR UP
vb. 1914 Amer. dial. – to gradually become a bit hazy 

• SMURRY
adj. 1887 Amer. dial. – hazy, overcast, cloudy; drizzly

• SMUSH
n. 1930 US sl., rare – the mouth  
vb. 1825 Amer. dial. – to mash or crush

• SMUSS
vb. 1736 obs. – to grab, seize, snatch; to take by force

• SMUT
n. 1. 1664 – a black mark or stain; a smudge
n. 2. 1693 – soot or sooty matter
n. 3. 1698 – indecent or obscene language
n. 4. 17C – an obscene story; pornography in general 
n. 5. 1899 – a very minute insect
n. 6. 1981 Amer. dial. – matter that forms in the eyes when one is sleeping
vb. 1. 1587 – to make with some black or dirty substance; to blacken, to smudge
vb. 2. 1601 – to stain with some fault or imperfection
vb. 3. 1722 – to make something obscene

• SMUT BALL
n. 1900 Amer. dial. – a puffball

• SMUT-BUTT
n. 20C US college sl., derogatory – a nickname for a Black person

• SMUTCH
n. 1. 1530 – a black or dirty mark; a stain; a smudge
n. 2. 1648 – a moral stain
n. 3. 1791 – soot, smut, grime, dirt
vb. 1. a1616 – to blacken, to make dirty, to smudge
vb. 2. 1640 – to sully, to besmirch, etc., morally or otherwise

• SMUTCHIN
n. 1650 obs. rare – snuff

• SMUTCHLESS
adj. 1853 – unsmirched

• SMUTCHY
adj. 1579 – smudgy, smeary, dirty

• SMUTHOUND
n. 1. 1927 colloq. – a person who seeks to censor or suppress indecent or obscene language, esp. in literature; someone who is hunting for smut
n. 2. M20 US sl. – a man who revels in obscenity and pornography  

• SMUT-PEDDLER
n. M20 US sl. – one who sells pornography

• SMUTS
n. E20 US criminals’ sl. – obscene pictures  

• SMUT SESSION
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a retailing of risqué stories

• SMUT-SLUT
n. M20 US sl. – a low slut; a sexually loose woman

• SMUTTY
adj. 1. 1648 – of the colour of smut; dusky; dark
adj. 2. 1650 – soiled with or full of smut; dirty; blackened
adj. 3. 1668 – indecent, immodest, impure, obscene, bawdy 
vb. 1933 Amer. dial. – to soil, to dirty

• SMUTZ
vb. 1968 Amer. dial. – to kiss; to caress

• SMY
n. 1507 Sc. obs. – a knave, a rascal

• SMYTRIE
n. 1786 Sc. rare – a collection of small people, especially children, or of small objects


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