Dictionary: SWI – SZ


• SWI
n. 1941 Aust. sl. – a two-shilling piece

• SWICKLE
n. 1621 obs. – a loop or noose in a trap
vb. 1621 obs. – to noose

• SWICKY
adj. 1. B1900 Sc. – deceitful, guileful
adj. 2. B1900 Sc. – sportive, tricky, roguish
n. 1914 Amer. dial. – whisky

• SWIDDLE
vb. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – to scatter, to dribble

• SWIE
vb. c900 obs. – to be silent

• SWIFT
n. 1. 1661 obs. rare – a rapid current; a rapid
n. 2. 1763 Eng. dial. – the sail of a windmill

• SWIFTEN
vb. 1. 1638 rare – to make swift, to hasten
vb. 2. 1839 rare – to move swiftly, to hasten, to hurry

• SWIFTERLY
adv. c1425 obs. – more swiftly

• SWIFTFOOT
n. 1825 – a fast runner; a swift-footed person or animal

• SWIFT HALF
n. 1973 Brit. colloq. – an alcoholic drink, (often a half-pint of beer, etc.) esp. one intended to be drunk quickly during a brief visit to a public house

• SWIFTHEAD
n. 1340 obs. rare – swiftness

• SWIFT HORSE RUNNING
n. a1513 obs. – horse racing

• SWIFTIE;  SWIFTY
n. 1. 1945 – a fast-moving person; a rapid runner; a quick thinker
n. 2. 1945 Aust. sl. – deception; a deceptive trick
n. 3. 1993 Brit. colloq. – an alcoholic drink, intended to be consumed quickly

• SWIFTSHIP
n. c1225 obs. rare – swiftness

• SWIFTY
adj. c1380 chiefly poetic usage, rare – swift

• SWIG
n. 1548 – drink, liquor
vb. 1. c1654 sl. – to drink deeply or eagerly
vb. 2. 1663 – to castrate a ram by tying the scrotum tightly with a string
vb. 3. 1833 – to sway about, to waver; to move with a swaying motion

• SWIGGER
n. 1941 colloq. – a habitual drinker, esp. of alcoholic liquor

• SWIGGLE
vb. 1. 1683 obs. rare – to sprinkle
vb. 2. 1837 rare – to wriggle
vb. 3. 1943 rare – to shake liquid about in a vessel; to shake something in a liquid

• SWIKE
adj. c1175 obs. – deceitful; treacherous; traitorous
n. 1. c893 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – deceit, deception, treachery; a trick
n. 2. c1000 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – a deceiver; a traitor
n. 3. a1100 obs. – a snare, a trap
vb. 1. c897 obs. – to cease, to leave off
vb. 2. c950 – to deceive, to cheat
vb. 3. c1000 obs. – to act deceitfully, to practice deceit
vb. 4. c1400 obs. rare – to surprise, to take unawares
vb. 5. 1889 Sc. – to get dishonestly, to ‘sneak’

• SWIKEBERT
n. c1300 obs. rare – a hare

• SWIKEDOM
n. c893 obs. – deceit, fraud; treachery, treason

• SWIKEFUL
adj. c1100 obs. exc. Sc. – deceitful, treacherous

• SWIKEHEAD
n. a1250 obs. – deceit, fraud; treachery, treason

• SWIKEL
adj. c1000 obs. – deceitful, treacherous, crafty

• SWIKELLY
adv. a1023 obs. – deceitfully, treacherously

• SWIKELNESS
n. a1023 obs. – deceitfulness, treachery

• SWIKINGLY
adv. c1175 obs. – treacherously

• SWILE
n. 1802 Newfoundland usage – a seal (animal)
vb. 1905 Newfoundland usage – to hunt for seals

• SWILK
vb. 1865 Eng. dial. – to splash or dash about, as liquid

• SWILKER
vb. 1674 Eng. dial. – to splash or dash about, as liquid

• SWILKIN
adj. a1400 obs. – of such a kind

• SWILL
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – excellent; first-rate
n. 1. 1602 – copious or heavy drinking; liquor, esp. when drunk to excess; a draught or swig of liquor
n. 2. 1624 obs. – a washing tub
n. 3. 1945 Aust. & NZ sl. – the rapid consumption of alcohol in a pub just before closing time
vb. 1563 – to drink greedily or to excess

• SWILL-BELLY
n. a1700 obs. – a great drinker; a drunkard

• SWILL-BOWL
n. 1542 obs. – a person who drinks to excess; a drunkard; one who habitually ‘swills the bowl’

• SWILL-DOWN
adj. 1693 obs. – addicted to excessive drinking; swilling down liquor

• SWILLED
adj. 1637 – drunk, filled with liquor

• SWILLER
n. 1. a1500 obs. – a scullion; a person who swills dishes
n. 2. 1598 – a person who drinks greedily or to excess

• SWILL-POT
n. 1653 – an excessive drinker; one who swills a bowl (flagon, pot)

• SWILLY
adj. 1824 rare – addicted to heavy drinking
n. 1890 Eng. dial. – a whirlpool, an eddy

• SWIM
n. 1860 colloq. – an enterprise, a scheme

• SWIM BETWEEN TWO WATERS
vb. 1553 – to steer between two extremes

• SWIMBLE
n. c1386 obs. rare – a swaying motion
vb. a1400-50 obs. rare – to feel dizzy

• SWIME
adj. c1540 obs. – giddy, dazed
n. a1000 obs. – dizziness, giddiness; swooning, a swoon

• SWIMMER
n. 1. 1699 sl. obs. – a counterfeit coin
n. 2. 1811 sl. obs. – ‘a guard-ship or tender’
n. 3. 1929 sl. – a swimming costume
n. 4. 1987 colloq., orig. Aust. – a sperm

• SWIMMERING
adj. 1650 obs. rare – giddy
n. 1650 obs. rare – a state of dizziness or giddiness

• SWIMMINESS
n. 1894 – dizziness or giddiness

• SWIMMING
adj. 1. 1596 obs. rare – wavering, unsteady
adj. 2. c1595 – overflowing
adj. 3. 1703 – of the eyes: suffused with tears; watery
adj. 4. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – in order; in good condition
n. 1530 – a state of dizziness or giddiness; vertigo

• SWIMMIST
n. 1881 – a habitual or professional swimmer

• SWIMMY
adj. 1. 1827 obs. – graceful, elegant
adj. 2. 1836 – inclined to dizziness or giddiness
adj. 3. 1936 – of the eyes: watery, tearful

• SWIND
vb. a1000 obs. – to waste away, to languish; to dwindle away, to decrease, to die; also, to vanish, to disappear

• SWINDLE
n. 1. 1559 obs. rare – dizziness, giddiness, vertigo
n. 2. 1835 US obs. – the price or cost of something
n. 3. 1858 colloq. – something which is not as good, impressive, valuable, etc., as it is clamed to be; something that does not live up to expectations
n. 4. 1868 – a betting or gambling; a game of chance on which money is staked; also, a ticket for a lottery, sweepstake, etc.

• SWINDLEABLE
adj. a1876 rare – vulnerable to being defrauded or swindled; gullible

• SWINDLEDOM
n. 1847 rare – the world of swindlers or swindling

• SWINDLE FOOD
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a gullible person; a dupe

• SWINDLERDOM
n. 1865 rare – swindlers collectively

• SWINDLERSHIP
n. 1862 rare – a being a swindler

• SWINDLE SHEET
n. 1906 sl., chiefly US – a document making fraudulent claims, esp. on an expense account

• SWINDLING
n. 1527 obs. rare – dizziness, giddiness, vertigo

• SWINE
n. 1. c1175 derogatory – a greedy, lazy, or dirty person; a coarse, degraded, or lecherous person; a term of abuse
n. 2. 1842 sl. – an unpleasant or despicable person, usually male
n. 3. 1892 colloq. – a difficult, unpleasant, annoying, or troublesome thing or task

• SWINE BREAD; SWINE’S BREAD
n. 1677 obs. – a truffle

SWINE-CHOP
n. 1877 rare – of a hound: a jaw that is overshot (projecting upper jaw)

• SWINE-CHOPPED
adj. 1874 rare – of a hound: having a projecting upper jaw

• SWINE COTE
n. c1430 – a pigsty

• SWINE CREW; SWINE CRUE
n. 1673 Sc. & Eng. dial. – a pigsty

• SWINE CRUIVE; SWINE’S CRUIVE
n. 1501 Sc. & Eng. dial. – a pigsty

• SWINE-DOG
n. 1909 – an objectionable, troublesome, or unpleasant person; a term of abuse or contempt

• SWINE-DRUNK
adj. 1592 arch. – so drunk as to be drowsy, listless, or lethargic; excessively drunk

• SWINE DRUNKENNESS
n. 1531 obs. – the state of being so drunk as to appear ugly or deformed

• SWINE EYE; SWINE’S EYE
n. 1836 – an eye likened to that of a pig, esp. in being small and deep-set

• SWINE-EYED
adj. 1654 – having eyes likened to those of a pig, esp. in being small and deep-set

• SWINE FACE; SWINE’S FACE
n. 1567 – a person having a face likened to that of a pig; a term of abuse or contempt

• SWINE-FACED
adj. 1595 – having a face likened to that of a pig

• SWINE-FISH
n. 1598 rare – the common or harbour porpoise, Phocoena phocoena

• SWINE GARTH
n. 1459 obs. – a pigsty; an enclosure in which pigs are kept

• SWINE GROIN
n. a1400 obs. – the snout of a pig

• SWINE HEAD; SWINE’S HEAD
n. c1405 arch. – a foolish, unpleasant, self-indulgent, or objectionable person

• SWINEHERD
n. 1. a1000 – a person who keeps or tends pigs
n. 2. c1610 obs. rare – a boar

• SWINE HERDER
n. 1860 – a person who keeps or tends pigs

• SWINEHOOD
n. 1. 1797 – pigs collectively
n. 2. 1866 – coarse, degraded, or uncivilized people considered collectively

• SWINE-HOUND
n. 1899 – a despicable, troublesome, or unpleasant person

• SWINE HULK
n. a1500 obs. – a pigsty

• SWINE HULL
n. 1566 Eng. dial. – a pigsty

• SWINE-MOUTHED
adj. 1874 obs. – of a dog: having a projecting upper jaw

• SWINERY
n. 1. 1711 rare – pigs collectively
n. 2. 1740 – a place where pigs are kept or bred; a pigsty
n. 3. 1740 – a very unclean, untidy building or room likened to a pigsty
n. 4. 1833 rare – coarse, debased, or uncivilized people considered collectively
n. 5. 1846 – objectionable or deplorable actions or behaviour; esp. underhand, illicit, or scandalous activity

• SWINE SHOAT
n. 1581 Sc. & Eng. dial. & US obs. – a young pig

• SWINE SNOUT
n. 1. 1592 – a person having a nose likened to a pig’s snout; a term of abuse or contempt
n. 2. 1596 rare – a dandelion

• SWINE-SNOUTED
adj. 1600 – having a nose likened to a pig’s snout

• SWINE’S PUDDING
n. 1579 obs. – a sausage made with the flesh, offal, etc., of a pig, or having the stomach or entrails of a pig as the skin

• SWINE’S SNOUT
n. 1596 – a dandelion

• SWINE STY
n. 1414 – a pigsty

• SWING
n. 1. c1000 obs. – labour, toil
n. 2. a1400-50 obs. – a stroke with a weapon
n. 3. 1538 obs. – impulse; inclination; tendency
n. 4. 1696 obs. – a pendulum
n. 5. 1697 obs. – a noose for hanging, a halter
n. 6. 1860 – a swift tour or journey through a place involving a number of stops or visits
n. 7. 1905 – a political campaign tour
n. 8. 1910 sl. – a punch delivered with a sweep of the arm
n. 9. 1917 US sl. – a worker’s rest period or a shift system which incorporates such breaks; broadly, time off work
vb. 1. c725 obs. – to scourge, to whip, to flog, to beat; also, to strike with a weapon or the hand
vb. 2. a1000 obs. – to move or go impetuously; to rush
vb. 3. c1000 obs. – to labour, to toil
vb. 4. c1000 obs. – to beat up or whip milk, eggs, etc.
vb. 5. a1400 obs. – to throw with force, to fling, to hurl
vb. 6. 1542 sl. – to be killed by hanging
vb. 7. 1927 colloq. – to turn a starting handle in order to start a motor vehicle
vb. 8. 1957 sl., orig. US – to enjoy oneself; to have fun
vb. 9. 1964 sl. – to engage in group sex, partner-swapping, etc.

• SWING A CATGUT
vb. to use a rope …1933 Amer. dial.

• SWING A RIGHT
vb. 1894 – to strike or flail at with the fist

• SWING AROUND THE CIRCLE
n. 1905 – a campaigning tour of a constituency or larger area
vb. 1866 US – to make a political tour of a constituency or larger area

• SWING AT
vb. 1. to aim a blow at, to punch …1910s sl.
vb. 2. to criticize …1910s sl.

• SWING A WIDE LOOP
vb. to live a free life …Bk1942 Amer. sl.

• SWING BOTH WAYS
vb. 1964 sl. – to be bisexual

• SWING-CHAIR
n. 1833 – a rocking-chair

• SWING DADDY
n.1. an attractive, well-dressed man …1970s African-American sl.
n. 2. a male lover …1970s African-American sl.
n. 3. a pimp …1970s African-American sl.

• SWING DOUGLAS
vb. 1905 Aust. sl. – to swing an axe

• SWINGE
n. 1. 1531 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – sway, power, rule, authority, influence
n. 2. 1542 obs. – freedom of action, license; liberty to follow one’s inclinations
n. 3. 1548 obs. – impetus, impulse, driving power; inclination; tendency
n. 4. 1627 obs. rare – the lashing of a tail
n. 5. a1661 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – a leash for hounds
n. 6. 1823 Eng. dial. – a stroke, a blow
vb. 1. a1529 sl. obs. – to drink up or off
vb. 2. 1548 obs. – to whirl round, as a wheel
vb. 3. a1556 – to beat, to flog, to whip, to thrash
vb. 4. 1560 obs. – to chastise, to castigate
vb. 5. 1590 Eng. dial. & US – to singe, to scorch
vb. 6. 1605 obs. – to lash the tail; to brandish, to flourish
vb. 7. 1613 obs. – to have free scope or course; to indulge one’s inclination
vb. 8. a1640 sl. obs. – to possess carnally

• SWINGEBREECH
n. 1581 obs. – a person who struts or flaunts about

• SWINGE-BUCKLER
n. 1577 obs. – a swashbuckler; a swaggering bravo or ruffian; a noisy braggadocio

• SWINGED
adj. singed …Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.

• SWINGEING
adj. 1. 1567 obs. – powerful, authoritative
adj. 2. a1592 colloq. – very great or large; huge, immense
adj. 3. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – excellent; first-rate

• SWINGEINGLY
adv. 1668 colloq. – very greatly or forcibly; hugely; immensely

• SWINGE ONE’S JACKET
vb. to give one a beating …1740

• SWINGER
n. 1. 1513 Sc. obs. – a rogue, a rascal, a scoundrel
n. 2. 1583 obs. – a person who acts vigorously or forcibly; a vigorous performer; a powerful fellow
n. 3. 1599 colloq., rare – something very big or excellent; something forcible or effective
n. 4. 1662 obs. – a swing for recreation
n. 5. 1671 obs. – a great or bold lie
n. 6. 1836 – a forcible blow or stroke
n. 7. 1964 sl. – a person who engages in group sex, partner-swapping, etc.; a sexually promiscuous person; also, a homosexual
n. 8. 1965 – a lively person who keeps up with what is considered fashionable; one who is ‘with it’

• SWINGING
adj. 1. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – excellent; first-rate
adj. 2. 1958 colloq. – energetic, vigorous, lively
adj. 3. 1958 colloq. – uninhibited, ignoring conventions
adj. 4. 1964 sl. – promiscuous
n. 1. c1200 obs. – a beating, a scourging
n. 2. 1591 sl. – a hanging
n. 3. 1964 sl. – indulgence in sexual promiscuity; engaging in group sex or the exchanging of sexual partners

• SWINGING DICK
n. 1957 sl. – a man; a successful, arrogant, ambitious, or aggressively bold man

• SWINGINGLY
adv. 1668 colloq. – very greatly or forcibly; hugely; immensely

• SWING KELLY
vb. 1945 Aust. sl. – to wield an axe, to do axework

• SWINGLE
n. 1. a1400 obs. rare – the clapper of a bell
n. 2. 1967 N. Amer. sl. – a promiscuous single person, esp. one in search of a sexual partner
vb. 1. c1450 obs. – to swing or flourish about
vb. 2. 1755 Eng. dial. – to swing; to hang; to be suspended

• SWINGLING
n. c1000 obs. – giddiness, dizziness, vertigo

• SWING MAN
n. 1972 sl. – a supplier of drugs

• SWING RIDER
n. 1903 – a cowboy who keeps a moving herd of cattle in order

• SWINGSTER
n. 1937 sl. – a musician who plays jazz with swing

• SWING-SWANG
n. a1703 – a swinging to and fro; oscillation

• SWING THE GATE
vb. 1933 Aust. & NZ sl. – to be the fastest shearer in the shed

• SWING THE LEAD
vb. 1. World War I Amer. sl. – to boast; to exaggerate
vb. 2. 1917 Brit. sl. – to malinger or shirk one’s duty

• SWING THE MALLET
vb. 1888 Eng. dial. – to strike while the iron is hot

• SWING WITH
vb. 1950s Amer. sl. – to be friends

• SWINISH
adj. 1. a1200 – greedy, dirty, lazy; coarse, degraded, uncivilized
adj. 2. a1475 – coarse, debased; said of an action, trait, etc.
adj. 3. c1548 – fit only for pigs; of low quality, unpleasant; dirty, messy; said of food, shelter, etc.

• SWINISHLY
adv. 1542 – lazily, greedily, dirtily

• SWINK
n. 1. a1000 arch. – labour, toil
n. 2. c1000 obs. rare – trouble, affliction
n. 3. a1225 obs. – the product of a person’s labour; produce
n. 4. 1611 obs. rare – heavy drinking
vb. 1. c1000 arch. – to labour, toil, work hard; to exert oneself, to take trouble
vb. 2. a1000 obs. – to suffer physical or mental pain
vb. 3. c1175 obs. – to journey toilsomely, to travel
vb. 4. c1550 obs. – to drink deeply, to tipple
vb. 5. 1883 Amer. dial. – to shrink

• SWINKED
adj. 1637 rare – wearied with toil; overworked

• SWINKER
n. 1340 rare – a person who toils or works hard; a labourer

• SWINKFUL
adj. 1. a1000 obs. – full of toil or trouble; disastrous; troublesome, irksome; painful, distressing
adj. 2. a1000 obs. – hard-working, industrious, diligent

• SWINKFULNESS
n. 1. a1000 obs. – hardship, tribulation
n. 2. a1000 obs. – diligence

• SWINKHEAD
n. c1350 obs. rare – a state of labour or toil

• SWINKING
adj. 1. c1225 rare – hard-working; toiling, labouring
adj. 2. 1693 obs. – heavy, ponderous
n. 1. a1225 rare – a toiling; labour; hard work
n. 2. 1590 obs. – heavy drinking

• SWINKLESS
adj. a1000 obs. – free from toil or trouble; painless

• SWINKUM-SWANKUM
adj. 1867 Eng. dial. – careless; ‘swaggering’

• SWINWARD
n. 1614 obs. rare – a person who keeps or tends pigs

• SWIP
n. 1. c1275 obs. – a stroke, a blow
n. 2. c1275 obs. – forcible movement, a rush
vb. 1. a1225 obs. – to strike, to hit
vb. 2. c1225 obs. – to move with haste or violence; to make a dash; to escape, to slip away

• SWIPE
n. 1. 1788 colloq. – a heavy swinging blow; a driving stroke made with the full swing of the arms in cricket or golf
n. 2. 1866 Sc. – knowledge, skill
n. 3. 1892 sl. – an instance of adverse criticism
n. 4. 1929 US sl. – a groom or stable boy
n. 5. 1929 sl. – an unpleasant or despicable person, usually male
n. 6. 1967 African-American sl. – the penis
vb. 1. 1829 colloq. – to drink hastily and copiously; to drink at one gulp
vb. 2. 1851 sl. – to hit, to deal a swinging blow
vb. 3. 1889 sl. – to steal or take roughly or without permission

• SWIPER
n. 1. 1836 colloq. – a copious drinker
n. 2. 1853 – a person who deals a driving stroke

• SWIPES
n. 1796 colloq. – orig. weak inferior beer; later, beer in general

• SWIPEY
adj. 1821 sl. rare – drunk; tipsy

• SWIPPER
adj. a1387 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – quick, nimble, active

• SWIPPERLY
adv. a1400 obs. – quickly, nimbly

• SWIPPLE
n. a1400 obs. – a mop, a besom

• SWIRE
n. c888 obs. – the neck

• SWIRK
vb. a1513 Sc. obs. – to spring forth

• SWIRL
n. 1. c1425 – a whirlpool, an eddy; a whirling body of water
n. 2. 1786 – a curl of hair; a knot in the grain of wood
n. 3. 1962 sl. – a fairground roundabout with freely-pivoted cards drawn by a spider frame
vb. 1818 – of the head: to swim, to be giddy or dizzy

• SWIRLIE
n. 1970 US colloq. – a forcibly immersing a person’s head in the bowl of a toilet as it is flushed, typically as a practical joke

• SWIRLY
adj. 1. 1786 – twisted; knotty, gnarled
adj. 2. 1912 – moving in whirlpools or with a circular motion or course; whirling

• SWISH
adj. 1879 colloq. – smart, elegant, fashionable
n. 1. 1860 – a caner for flogging; a stroke with this
n. 2. 1941 US sl., derogatory – a male homosexual; an effeminate man
n. 3. 1963 – in cricket: a rapid or careless attacking stroke
vb. 1. 1856 Brit. school sl. – to beat someone with a cane, etc.
vb. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – to go fast

• SWISH ALPS
n. 1983 US sl. – the Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles, California, a homosexual enclave

• SWISHER
n. 1. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a fast throw
n. 2. 1999 US drug culture sl. – a hollowed-out cigar refilled with marijuana

• SWISH FAGGOT
n. 1980 US sl. – an effeminate, melodramatic homosexual man

• SWISHING
n. 1860 sl., chiefly Eton College usage – a beating with a cane

• SWISH-SWASH
adj. 1865 – shaking from side to side, as liquid in a state of agitation
n. 1. 1547 – an inferior or wishy-washy drink
n. 2. 1582 obs. – a violent or swaggering person

• SWISH-TAIL
n. 1796 sl. obs. – a pheasant

• SWISH TANK
n. 1992 US sl. – a holding cell in a jail where homosexual suspects and prisoners are kept

• SWISHY
adj. 1941 US sl. – homosexual; effeminate

• SWISS ARMY (KNIFE)
n. 1998 UK rhyming sl. – a wife

• SWISS BANKER
n. 2003 UK rhyming sl. for ‘wanker’ – a despicable person; an all-purpose form of abuse

• SWISS-CHEEZE UP
vb. 2002 US sl. – to shoot a person or place full of holes

• SWISS COTTAGE
n. 1820 – a chalet

• SWISSENER
n. 1542 obs. rare – a Swiss

• SWISSER
n. 1530 obs. – a Swiss

• SWISSESS
n. 1793 rare – a female Swiss

• SWISS ITCH
n. 1967 US sl. – a placing a pinch of salt on the back of the hand, then licking it off, and immediately taking a jigger of tequila, followed by immediately biting into a slice of lime

• SWITCH
n. 1. 1630 obs. rare – stimulus, incentive
n. 2. 1870 – a long bunch or coil of hair, esp. of false hair worn by women to supplement the natural growth of hair
n. 3. 1938 sl. – a fraudulent substitution
n. 4. 1949 US sl. – the buttocks
n. 5. 1949 US sl. – a switchblade knife that opens with a button-operated spring
n. 6. 1982 US sl. – in a sexually oriented massage parlour: a massage given to the masseuse by the customer
vb. 1. 1648 obs. – to urge on, to impel, to incite
vb. 2. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – to tell or tattle; to give information
vb. 3. 1970 US sl. – to act upon bisexual impulses

• SWITCHABLE
n. 1979 US sl. – a person who is willing to play either the sadist or masochist role in a sado-masochism encounter

• SWITCH-AROUND
n. 1981 – an alternation or exchange; a reversal of position, opinion, etc.

• SWITCHBOARD JOCKEY
n. 1957 US sl. – a telephone operator

• SWITCHBOARD MUGGER
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a telephone operator

• SWITCH-CLERK
n. 1889 – a telephone operator

• SWITCHED
adj. 1909 rare – of cream or an egg: whipped

• SWITCHED ON
adj. 1. 1964 UK sl. – in fashion: up-to-date and well-informed
adj. 2. 1972 US sl. – drug-intoxicated
adj. 3. 1977 UK sl. – excited by music; aroused by a sexual opportunity

• SWITCHER
n. 1966 US sl. – a bisexual

• SWITCHEROO
n. 1933 US colloq. – a swapping; an exchange

• SWITCHFOOT
n. 1964 US sl. – a surfer who can surf with either foot forward, depending on the conditions

• SWITCH-HITTER
n. 1. 1948 US baseball – an ambidextrous batter
n. 2. 1960 US euphemism – a bisexual
n. 3. 2002 US sl. – a person who masturbates with first one hand and then the other

• SWITCH LANES
vb. 2003 UK sl. – to change allegiance; used by teenage gang members

• SWITCH OFF
vb. 1921 sl. – to become less interested

• SWITCH-TAIL
n. 1. 1623 obs. – a long flowing tail which can be swished about; later called ‘swish-tail’
n. 2. 1909 Amer. dial. – an immodest or forward girl or woman

• SWITH
adv. 1. 971 obs. – strongly, forcibly; very greatly, very much, extremely, excessively
adv. 2. c1175 obs. – instantly, immediately, without delay
adv. 3. c1275 obs. – rapidly, quickly, swiftly
int. c1175 obs. – quick!

• SWITHE
vb. 1. c1220 obs. – to burn, to scorch, to singe
vb. 2. 1876 Eng. dial. – to hurt, to smart

• SWITHEN
vb. 1600 obs. – to burn, to scorch, to singe

• SWITHER
n. 1. a1768 Sc. & Eng. dial. – agitation, excitement; a flurry, a fluster
n. 2. 1719 Sc. & Eng. dial. – perplexity, indecision, hesitation; doubt, uncertainty
vb. 1. 1535 Sc. & Eng. dial. – to be uncertain; to falter; to be perplexed or undecided; to hesitate
vb. 2. 1865 Eng. dial. – to burn, to scorch, to singe
vb. 3. 1876 Eng. dial. – to hurt, to smart

• SWITHERING
adj. 1895 Eng. dial. – scorching, parching

• SWITHLY
adv. 1. c888 obs. – strongly, forcibly; very greatly, extremely, excessively
adv. 2. 1370 obs. – rapidly, quickly, swiftly

• SWITHNESS
n. c1540 Sc. obs. rare – swiftness, rapidity

• SWITTER
vb. a1800 Eng. dial. – to flutter and splash in water like ducks or geese; to splash water about or to splash about in water

• SWITZER
adj. 1598 – Swiss
n. 1577 arch. – a Swiss

• SWITZERESS
n. 1719 – a female Swiss

• SWITZERLAND OF AMERICA
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – Maine

• SWIVE
n. c1560 obs. – an act of swiving; copulation
vb. 1. c1386 obs. or arch. – to have sexual connection with a female; to copulate
vb. 2. 1893 Eng. dial. obs. – to cut grain with a broad hook

• SWIVEL
vb. 1898 Amer. dial. – to shrivel

• SWIVEL EYE
n. 1765 colloq. – an eye which points in a different direction from the other; a squinting eye

• SWIVEL-EYED
adj. 1758 colloq. – having eyes pointing in different direction; hence, having a crazed or frenzied appearance; mad, crazy; holding views regarded as extreme or fanatical

• SWIVEL-HIPS
n. 1932 Amer. sl. – a person whose hips move smoothly and effectively, such as a clever runner in football, a hula dancer, etc.

• SWIVELLED; SWIVELLED UP
adj. 1898 Amer. dial. – shrivelled (up)

• SWIVER
n. c1440 obs. – a person given to sexual indulgence

• SWIVET
n. 1892 – Eng. & Amer. dial. – agitation; a fluster or panic; a hurry

• SWIVETTY
adj. 1883 Eng. dial. – giddy, dizzy

• SWIZ; SWIZZ
n. 1915 Brit. sl., chiefly schoolchildren’s usage – something disappointingly unfair; a disappointment
vb. 1961 Brit. sl. – to trick by swindling, to subject to disappointment

• SWIZZLE
n. 1. 1813 sl. – intoxicating drink
n. 2. Bk1892 Aust. sl. – ale and beer mixed
n. 3. 1913 Brit. sl., chiefly schoolchildren’s usage – something disappointingly unfair; a disappointment
vb. 1847 sl. – to drink to excess

• SWIZZLED
adj. 1843 sl. – drunk; induced by heavy drinking

• SWIZZLER
n. 1. 1876 Eng. dial. rare – a drunkard
n. 2. 1936 sl. rare – a swindler

• SWOBBLE
vb. 1. B1900 Eng. dial. – to talk in a bullying or blustering fashion; to quarrel, to dispute noisily
vb. 2. B1900 Eng. dial. – to walk in a swaggering way
vb. 3. 1914 Amer. dial. – to swallow hastily

• SWOG
vb. 1637 obs. rare – to make one’s way heavily

• SWOLDER
vb. c1200 obs. rare – to wallow, to welter

• SWOLED
adj. 1712 Eng. dial. – of a sheep: roasted whole in the skin

• SWOLE-HOT
adj. 1721 obs. – oppressively hot, sultry

• SWOLLEN HEAD
n. 1. 1898 colloq. – a hangover
n. 2. 1899 colloq. – excessive pride, conceit
n. 3. 1928 colloq. – a person suffering from excessive pride

• SWOLLEN-HEADED
adj. 1928 colloq. – conceited

• SWOLTEN
adj. 1876 rare – oppressed with head, sultry

• SWOLTERY
adj. 1603 obs. rare – sultry, sweltering

• SWOLY
adj. 1496 obs. – oppressively hot, sultry

• SWON
n. a700 obs. – a swineherd; a person who tends to pigs

• SWONG
adj. a1300 obs. – thin, lean, as from hunger

• SWOOF
n. 1825 Sc. – a rushing or murmuring sound, as of wind, water, or the like, esp. one of a gentle or soothing nature
vb. 1590 Sc. obs. – to make a rushing, rustling, or murmuring sound

• SWOOK!; SWOOK-CALF!; SWOOK-CALFY!; SWOOKY!
int. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – a call to cattle at feeding time

• SWOON
n. 1590 obs. rare – a deep or sound sleep

• SWOONER-CROONER
n. 1944 US – singer Frank Sinatra (1915-1998)

• SWOONING-RIPE
adj. 1652 obs. – ready to swoon

• SWOONY
adj. 1. a1919 – inclined to swoon
adj. 2. 1934 colloq. – distractingly attractive, delightful

• SWOOP
n. 1. 1544 obs. – a blow, a stroke
n. 2. 1607 obs. rare – a sweeping or clearing away; a clearance
vb. 1. 1566 obs. – to move or walk in a stately manner, as with trailing garments; to sweep along
vb. 2. 1648 obs. – to drink off or swallow down quickly the contents of

• SWOOSE
n. 1920 – a bird that is the offspring of a swan and a goose

• SWOPE
n. 1639 Eng. dial. obs. – a small quantity of liquid, such as can be taken into the mouth at one time; a mouthful, a sip
vb. 1. c1000 obs. – to sweep
vb. 2. 1617 Eng. dial. obs. – to take liquid into the mouth in small quantities; to sip

• SWOPEN
adj. a1300 obs. – swept

• SWOP EVEN-HANDED
vb. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – to exchange without profit

• SWORD-AND-BUCKLER
adj. 1598 obs. – bragging, blustering

• SWORD-BROTHER
n. c1275 obs. – a comrade in arms

• SWORD-CUTLER
n. 1678 – a cutler who makes swords or sword-blades

• SWORDER
n. 1. 1594 – a person who kills another with a sword; an assassin, a cut-throat; a person who habitually fights with a sword; a gladiator
n. 2. 1815 – a person skilled in the use of a sword

• SWORD-FENCER
n. 1600 obs. – a gladiator

• SWORD-LAW
n. 1667 – government by the power of the sword, or by military force; martial law

• SWORDLET
n. 1884 – a small sword

• SWORDMAN
n. 1. a1387 – a man who uses or fights with a sword; a gladiator; one skilled in using a sword
n. 2. a1616 – a warrior, a military man, a fighter, a soldier

• SWORD-MINDED
adj. 1603 obs. – of cruel disposition; bloody-minded

• SWORD OF DAMOCLES
n. 1747 – used of an imminent danger which may at any moment descend upon one

• SWORD-PLAY
n. 1. a1000 obs. – fight, battle
n. 2. a1000 – a wielding a sword briskly, as in fencing; fencing
n. 3. 1847 – spirited or skilful controversy or debate

• SWORD-PLAYER
n. 1. a1400 obs. – a gladiator
n. 2. 1671 rare – a fencer

• SWORD-RATTLING
adj. 1914 – threatening military action; aggressive, pugnacious

• SWORD-SIDE
n. 1854 – the male line in descent

• SWORD-SLIPER
n. 1478 Sc. & N. Eng. dial., obs. – a sword-sharpener

• SWORDSMAN
n. 1. a1680 – a man skilled in fencing
n. 2. 1701 – a warrior, a military man, a fighter, a soldier
n. 3. 1859 – a soldier who fights with a sword

• SWORDSMANSHIP
n. 1886 – skill in controversy or debate

• SWORD-SLIPER
n. 1478 Sc. & N. Eng. dial. obs. – a sword-sharpener

• SWORD-SMITH
n. 1872 – a smith who makes swords

• SWORDSTER
n. 1881 – a person addicted to the use of the sword

• SWORD-TAKER
n. 1660 – a lawless killer; one who ‘takes the sword’ without authority or right

• SWORD-WRACK
n. 1646 obs.- destruction by the sword

• SWOT
n. 1. 1850 Brit. sl., derogatory – a hard-working pupil; one who studies hard
n. 2. 1850 Brit. – intensive study at school or college, orig. specifically mathematics
vb. 1860 Brit. sl. – to study intensively, esp. in preparation for an exam

• SWOTHER
vb. c1000 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to sleep, to slumber; also, to swoon

• SWOTTER
n. 1919 sl. – a person who studies hard

• SWOTTER-UP
n. 1931 sl. – a person who studies hard

• SWOTTY
n. 1929 colloq. nickname – a studious person, a swot

• SWOTY
adj. c893 obs. – covered with sweat; moist or stained with sweat

• SWOUGH
n. 1338 obs. – a forcible movement; impetus

• SWOUND
n. c1440 arch. – a fainting fit; a swoon
vb. 1530 arch. – to swoon, to faint

• SWOUNDS!
int. 1589 obs. – an exclamation contracted from ‘God’s wounds’, used as an oath

• SWOW
n. 1. a1325 obs. – a swoon
n. 2. c1403 obs. – a state of sleep or trance
vb. c1250 obs. – to swoon, to faint

• SWOWN
adj. c1000 obs. – fainting, in a swoon

• SWUFF
n. 1825 Sc. – a rushing or murmuring sound, as of wind, water, or the like, esp. one of a gentle or soothing nature
vb. 1590 Sc. obs. – to make a rushing, rustling, or murmuring sound

• SWUGGLE
vb. 1. 1880 Eng. dial. – to shake liquid in a vessel or tub, especially when rinsing it
vb. 2. B1900 Eng. dial. – to drink eagerly

• SWUNDEN
adj. c1275 obs. – lacking courage or strength

• SWUNK
adj. 1858 – wearied with toil

• SWUZZY
adj. 1. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – fine, attractive, admirable
adj. 2. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – excellent; first-rate

• SWY
n. 1. 1924 Aust. sl. – two
n. 2. 1941 Aust. sl. – a two-year prison sentence
n. 3. 1941 Aust. sl. – a two-shilling piece

• SWYPES
n. 1796 sl. – orig. weak inferior beer; later, beer in general

• SYBARISM
n. 1889 – sybaritic habits or practices; effeminate voluptuousness

• SYBARIST
n. a1651 – a person devoted to luxury or pleasure; an effeminate voluptuary or sensualist

• SYBARITAL
adj. 1839 – devoted to excessive luxury; effeminately luxurious

• SYBARITE
adj. 1599 – devoted to excessive luxury; effeminately luxurious
n. 1623 – a person devoted to luxury or pleasure; an effeminate voluptuary or sensualist

• SYBARITIC
adj. 1619 – devoted to excessive luxury; effeminately luxurious

• SYBARITICAL
adj. a1617 rare – devoted to excessive luxury; effeminately luxurious

• SYBARITISH
adj. 1631 – devoted to excessive luxury; effeminately luxurious

• SYBARITISM
n. 1840 – sybaritic habits or practices; effeminate voluptuousness

• SYBOTIC
adj. 1876 rare – pert. to a swineherd or his occupation

• SYBOTISM
n. 1876 rare – the tending of swine

• SYCOMANCY
n. 1652 obs. – divination by inspection of figs or fig leaves

• SYCOPHANT
adj. a1684 – meanly flattering, basely obsequious; sycophantic
n. 1. 1548 obs. – an informer, a talebearer, a malicious accuser; a calumniator, a slanderer
n. 2. 1589 obs. – an impostor, a deceiver
vb. 1. 1637 obs. – to flatter meanly
vb. 2. 1642 obs. – to slander, to calumniate

• SYCOPHANTICAL
adj. 1. a1566 obs. – calumnious, slanderous
adj. 2. 1632 obs. – meanly flattering; basely obsequious

• SYCOPHANTISH
adj. 1821 – basely obsequious; meanly flattering

• SYCOPHANTISM
n. 1821 – mean or servile flattery

• SYCOPHANTIZE
vb. 1. 1605 rare – to deal in mean or servile flattery
vb. 2. 1636 obs. – to utter malicious accusations; to slander, to calumniate

• SYCOPHANTLY
adj. 1680 obs. rare – meanly flattering; basely obsequious

• SYCOPHANTRY
n. a1677 obs. – calumnious accusation; talebearing; the trade or occupation of an informer

• SYDNEY OR THE BUSH
phr. 1924 Aust. colloq. – all or nothing

• SYDNEY-SIDER
n. 1. 1865 Aust. – a resident or native of Sydney
n. 2. Bk1892 Aust. sl. – a convict

• SYE
vb. 1. c888 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to sink, to fall, to descend; to collapse
vb. 2. c893 obs. – to drop as a liquid, to drip, to ooze
vb. 3. a1000 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to go, to proceed

• SYEBUCK
n. Bk1903 sl. – sixpence

• SYE OF LIFE
vb. a1400-50 obs. – to die, to depart this life

• SYKE
n. 1. a1214 Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – a small stream of water, esp. one flowing through flat or marshy ground, and often dry in summer
n. 2. 1479 obs. rare – a stretch of meadow; a field
n. 31859 Sc. & N. Eng. dial. – a gully; a dip or hollow

• SYLLAB
n. c1440 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – a syllable

• SYLLABARIUM
n. 1850 – a collection, set, list, or table of syllables

• SYLLABARY
n. 1586 – a collection, set, list, or table of syllables

• SYLLABATIM
adv. 1628 rare – syllable by syllable

• SYLLABATION
n. 1856 rare – formation or construction of syllables; a dividing words into syllables

• SYLLABIC
adj. 1. 1755 – pert. to a syllable
adj. 2. 1728 – forming or constituting a syllable
n. 1893 – a word or phrase pronounced syllable by syllable

• SYLLABICAL
adj. 1. 1530 rare – forming or constituting a syllable
adj. 2. 1620 rare – pert. to a syllable
adj. 3. a1732 rare – pronounced syllable by syllable

• SYLLABICATE
vb. 1654 rare – to form into syllables, to divide a word into syllables

• SYLLABICATION
n. 1631 – formation or construction of syllables; a dividing words into syllables

• SYLLABICITY
n. 1933 – a being syllabic

• SYLLABICNESS
n. 1888 – a being syllabic

• SYLLABIFICATION
n. 1838 – formation or construction of syllables; a dividing words into syllables

• SYLLABIFY
vb. 1864 – to divide into syllables

• SYLLABISM
n. 1892 – division into syllables

• SYLLABIST
n. 1846 rare – a person versed in the division of words into syllables

• SYLLABIZATION
n. 1926 – formation or construction of syllables; a dividing words into syllables

• SYLLABIZE
vb. 1656 – to divide into syllables

• SYLLABLIZE
vb. 1877 rare – to divide into syllables

• SYLLABUB
n. 1. 1706 – something unsubstantial and frothy; esp., floridly vapid discourse or writing
n. 2. 1859 – a mixture, combination

• SYLLOGE
n. 1686 rare – a collection; a summary

• SYLLOGISM
n. 1387 – an argument or something ironically or humorously regarded as such, esp. a specious or subtle argument or piece of reasoning

• SYLLOGISTRY
n. 1592 obs. – sophistical syllogistic reasoning

• SYLLOGIZATION
n. 1660 rare – syllogistic reasoning

• SYLLOGIZE
vb. c1420 – to argue by syllogisms; to reason syllogistically

• SYLLY-JESTICAL
adj. 1601 obs. – syllogistical; addicted to reasoning by syllogisms

• SYLO
n. 20C Brit. sl. – an asylum seeker

• SYLPH
n. 1839 – a graceful woman or girl

• SYLVA
n. 1. 1636 obs. – a collection of poems; a thesaurus of words or phrases
n. 2. 1846 – the trees of a particular region or period collectively

• SYLVAGE
n. a1774 rare – woody growth, boscage, a mass of growing trees

• SYLVAN
adj. 1594 – consisting of or formed by woods or trees
n. 1. 1589 – a person who inhabits a wood or forest; a forester, a rustic
n. 2. 1612 – an animal living in or frequenting the woods

• SYLVATIC
adj. 1. 1661 obs. – rustic, boorish
adj. 2. 1668 rare – found in woods; of the nature of a wood or woodland

• SYLVATICAL
adj. 1656 obs. rare – found in woods; of the nature of a wood or woodland

• SYLVESTER
adj. 1578 obs. rare – (also ‘silvester’) found in woods; rustic, sylvan

• SYLVESTER
n. 1866 – in Germany: St. Sylvester’s day, December 31, New Year’s Eve

• SYLVESTER-EVE
n. 1838 – the evening of December 31, New Year’s Eve

• SYLVESTER-NIGHT
n. 1852 – the evening of December 31, New Year’s Eve

• SYLVESTRIAL
adj. 1607 – found in woods, rustic, sylvan

• SYLVESTRIAN
adj. 1657 – found in woods, rustic, sylvan

• SYLVESTRIC
adj. 1623 obs. – found in woods, rustic, sylvan

• SYLVESTRIOUS
adj. 1656 obs. – found in woods, rustic, sylvan

• SYLVESTROUS
adj. 1653 obs. – found in woods, rustic, sylvan

• SYLVICULTURALIST
n. 1971 rare – a person engaged in or skilled in sylviculture

• SYLVICULTURE
n. 1880 – the cultivation of woods or forests; the growing and tending of trees as a department of forestry

• SYLVICULTURIST
n. 1887 – a person engaged in or skilled in sylviculture

• SYMBIOSIS
n. 1622 – living together, social life

• SYMBOL
n. 1. 1594 obs. – a brief or sententious statement; a motto,
maxim
n. 2. 1627 obs. – a contribution to a feast or picnic; a share, portion

• SYMBOLAEOGRAPHY
n. 1590 rare – the art of writing out or drawing up legal instruments

• SYMBOLATRY
n. 1869 – worship of or excessive veneration for symbols

• SYMBOLICS
n. 1. 1657 obs. – the use of written symbols, as in mathematics
n. 2. 1847 – the study of creeds and confessions of faith, as a branch of theology
n. 3. 1850 – the study of symbols, or of symbolic rites and ceremonies, as a branch of anthropology

• SYMBOLIZANT
adj. 1685 obs. rare – agreeing in nature or qualities; similar, congruous, concordant

• SYMBOLOLATRY
n. 1828 – worship of or excessive veneration for symbols

• SYMBOLOMANIA
n. 1970 – excessive use of symbols

• SYMBOLOPHOBIA
n. 1911 – a morbid dread of having one’s actions interpreted symbolically

• SYMMACHY
n. 1623 rare – a joining in war against a common enemy; aid in war; an alliance to fight together against something

• SYMMETRIATED
adj. 1592 obs. rare – symmetrical

• SYMMETRIOUS
adj. 1667 obs. rare – symmetrical; corresponding

• SYMMETRIOUSLY
adv. 1656 obs. – symmetrically

• SYMMETRIZE
vb. 1749 rare – to be symmetrical; to correspond symmetrically

• SYMMETROMANIA
n. Bk1991 – a mania for symmetry

• SYMMETROPHOBIA
n. 1809 – an abnormal fear of dislike of symmetry

• SYMMETRY
n. 1655 obs. – agreement, consistency, congruity, keeping with something

• SYMMOGRAPHY
n. 1971 – string art; the art of making decorative pictures by winding yarn round nails driving into a flat surface

• SYMMORPHISM
n. 1851 – likeness of form, condition of being conformed

• SYMPATHEAL
 adj. 1600 obs. rare – sympathetic

• SYMPATHETIC
adj. 1673 obs. – agreeing, harmonious, befitting, accordant

• SYMPATHETICAL
adj. 1. 1639 obs. – acting or effected by sympathy
adj. 2. 1650 obs. – feeling sympathy; affected by the feelings of another; sympathizing, compassionate
adj. 3. 1848 obs. – agreeing, harmonious, befitting, accordant

• SYMPATHIC
adj. 1659 obs. – acting or effected by sympathy

• SYMPATHICAL
adj. 1570 obs. – acting or effected by sympathy

• SYMPATHIQUE
adj. 1. 1859 – of a person: likeable; congenial
adj. 2. 1869 – of a thing, place, etc.: agreeable, to one’s taste, suitable

• SYMPATHISCH
adj. 1911 – likeable, pleasant, nice

• SYMPATHIST
n. a1834 rare – a person who sympathizes

• SYMPATHIZANT
n. 1620 obs. rare – a thing that has affinity with another

• SYMPATHY STICKS
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a beggar’s crutches

• SYMPHONETTE
n. 1947 rare – a short symphony

• SYMPHONIA
n. 1. 1579 – harmony of sound, esp. of musical sounds
n. 2. 1724 – a symphony

• SYMPHONIAC
adj. 1776 obs. rare – characterized by harmony

• SYMPHONIACAL
adj. 1650 obs. – harmonious

• SYMPHONIAL
 adj. 1773 obs. – said of sounds agreeing in quality of tone; harmonious

• SYMPHONIC
adj. 1. 1864 rare – harmonious
adj. 2. 1880 – having the same sound; pronounced alike

• SYMPHONICAL
adj. 1589 obs. rare – harmonious

• SYMPHONIOUS
adj. 1. 1652 – harmonious; full of harmony of sounds
adj. 2. 1743 – marked by agreement; agreeing, accordant
adj. 3. 1786 rare – having the same sound

• SYMPHONISM
n. 1965 – music of a symphonic kind; symphonies collectively

• SYMPHONIST
n. 1. 1656 obs. rare – one who sings in harmony, with ‘true tune and time’
n. 2. 1767 obs. – an orchestral performer who plays in a symphony
n. 3. 1789 – a composer of symphonies

• SYMPHONIZE
vb. 1. a1492 obs. – to sing together, in concert, or in harmony
vb. 2. 1661 obs. – to agree, to be in accordance
vb. 3. 1801 rare – to accompany musically
vb. 4. 1833 rare – to play a symphony
vb. 5. 1856 rare – to have the same or a similar sound, to sound alike

• SYMPHONOUS
adj. 1814 rare – harmonious; full of harmony of sounds; sounding pleasantly together or with something else

• SYMPHONY
n. 1. c1440 rare – harmony of musical sounds
n. 2. 1598 obs. – agreement, accord, congruity

• SYMPOLITY
n. 1873 – mutual relation of fellow citizens

• SYMPOSIAC
n. 1. 1581 obs. rare – a member of a drinking party; a banqueter
n. 2. 1603 rare – a meeting or conference for discussion of some subject

• SYMPOSIAL
adj. 1775 – suitable for a symposium; occurring at a symposium

• SYMPOSIARCH
n. 1. 1603 – the master of a feast
n. 2. 1787 – the director or president of a symposium

• SYMPOSIAST
n. 1. 1656 – a member of a drinking party; a banqueter
n. 2. 1878 – a person who contributes on some topic at a meeting or conference

• SYMPOSIUM
n. 1. 1711 – a drinking party; a convivial meeting for drinking, conversation, and intellectual entertainment
n. 2. 1784 – a meeting or conference for discussion of some subject

• SYMPTOMATES
n. 1583 obs. rare – symptoms

• SYMPTOMATIZE
vb. 1794 – to be a symptom of; to characterize or indicate as a symptom

• SYMPTOMICAL
adj. 1656 obs. rare – of the nature of a symptom of a disease

• SYMPTOMIZE
vb. 1884 – to be a symptom of; to characterize or indicate as a symptom

• SYNAGOGAL
adj. 1683 – pert. to a synagogue

• SYNAGOGIAN
adj. 1632 obs. rare – pert. to a synagogue

• SYNAGOGICAL
adj. 1621 – pert. to a synagogue

• SYNAGOGIST
n. c1662 – an adherent of the Jewish synagogue

• SYNAGOGUISH
adj. 1690 – showing excessive zeal for the synagogue

• SYNALLACTIC
adj. 1853 rare – reconciliatory

• SYNANTHROPIC
adj. 1936 – living in habitats made or altered by man

• SYNARCHY
n. 1716 rare – participation in government; joint rule or sovereignty

• SYNATHLETIC
adj. 1671 obs. rare – pert. to comrades or allies in a contest

• SYNCHRONAL
adj. 1660 rare – existing or happening at the same time; coincident in time; occurring at the same moment
n. 1660 obs. – a simultaneous or contemporary event

• SYNCHRONEITY
n. 1909 – concurrence of two or more events in time; coincidence or agreement in point of time

• SYNCHRONIC
adj. 1833 rare – existing or happening at the same time; coincident in time; occurring at the same moment

• SYNCHRONICAL
adj. 1652 rare – existing or happening at the same time; coincident in time; occurring at the same moment

SYNCHRONISM
n. 1588 – coincidence or agreement in point of time; concurrence of two or more events in time

SYNCHRONISMICAL
adj. 1793 – belonging to a synchronism or account of synchronous events

SYNCHRONIST
n. 1716 rare – a person who lives at the same time with another; a contemporary

SYNCHRONISTIC
adj. 1685 – relating to the concurrence of events in time

SYNCHRONISTICAL
adj. c1624 obs. rare – relating to the concurrence of events in time

SYNCHRONOLOGICAL
adj. 1836 – constructed according to synchronology

SYNCHRONOLOGY
n. 1736 – arrangement of events according to dates, those of the same date being placed or treated together

SYNCHRONOUS
adj. 1669 – existing or happening at the same time; belonging to the same period, or occurring at the same moment of time; contemporary; simultaneous

SYNCHRONY
n. 1848 – coincidence or agreement in point of time; concurrence of two or more events in time

SYNCOPATE
vb. 1605 – to cut short or contract a word by omitting one or more syllables or letters in the middle

SYNCOPE
vb. c1412 obs. rare – to cut short, to cut down, to reduce

SYNCOPIZE
vb. 1643 obs. – to cut short, to contract

SYNDICABLE
adj. 1656 obs. rare – ‘subject unto examination, censure, or controlment’

SYNDICATEER
n. 1906 – a member of a syndicate; a member of a financial syndicate

SYNDICATION
n. 1. 1650 obs. rare – a judging
n. 2. 1887 – a forming a syndicate
n. 3. 1925 – ownership by a syndicate

SYNDICATOR
n. 1. 1610 obs. rare – a judge; one who judges
n. 2. 1891 US – a person who forms a syndicate

SYNETHNIC
adj. 1879 – belonging to the same nation

SYNGAMICAL
adj. 1669 obs. rare – pert. to sexual union or copulation

SYNGRAPH
n. 1633 – a written contract or bond signed by both or all the parties

SYNKQUATENER
n. 1523 obs. rare – a captain of fifty (from French cinquantenier)

SYNOD
n. 1578 – an assembly, convention, or council of any kind

SYNODITE
n. 1655 obs. – a fellow-traveller; a travelling companion

SYNONYMAL
adj. 1613 obs. – synonymous
n. 1662 obs. – a synonym

SYNONYMALLY
adv. 1641 obs. – synonymously

SYNONYMIC
adj. 1816 – consisting of synonyms

SYNONYMICAL
adj. 1. 1645 obs. – having the character of a synonym
adj. 2. 1806 – consisting of synonyms

SYNONYMICALLY
adv. 1599 – as a synonym

SYNONYMICON
n. 1813 – a list or dictionary of synonyms 

SYNONYMICS
n. 1857 – the study of synonyms

SYNONYMIST
n. 1753 – a person who studies or makes a list of synonyms

SYNONYMITY
n. 1880 – a being synonymous or having the same meaning

SYNONYMIZE
vb. 1. 1614 rare – to give the synonyms of
vb. 2. 1700 – to use synonyms; to express the same meaning by different words
vb. 3. 1805 – to furnish with lists of synonyms

SYNONYMY
n. 1. 1592 – the use of synonyms or of words as synonyms
n. 2. 1609 obs. – a synonym
n. 3. 1612 obs. – a thing of the same name

SYNORTHOGRAPHIC
adj. 1786 – spelled alike; having the same orthography

SYNTHESPIAN
n. 1989 orig. US – a computer-generated character in a film

SYNTOMY
n. 1656 obs. – brevity, conciseness

SYPH
n. 1914 sl. – syphilis

SYPHILIDOLOGIST
n. 1857 – an expert in the study or treatment of syphilis

SYPHILIDOLOGY
n. 1849 rare – the study and treatment of syphilis

SYPHILIPHOBIASYPHILOPHOBIA
n. 1842 – an abnormal fear of becoming infected with syphilis

SYPHILIPHOBICSYPHILOPHOBIC
adj. 1856 – having a fear of being infected with syphilis
n. 1894 – a person having a fear of being infected with syphilis

SYPHILIS
n. 1821 – something that causes pervasive corruption or destruction

SYPHILITIC
adj. 1. 1764 – relating to syphilis
adj. 2. 1787 – affected with syphilis
n. 1810 – a person affected with syphilis

SYPHILIZE
vb. 1873 – to infect with syphilis

SYPHILOLOGIST
n. 1851 – an expert in the study or treatment of syphilis

SYPHILOLOGY
n. 1854 – the study and treatment of syphilis

SYPHILOMANIA
n. 1838 – the delusional belief or irrational fear that one is infected with syphilis

SYPHON THE PYTHON
vb. 1968 jocular usage, orig. Aust. – to urinate; used of males

SYRE
n. 1513 Sc. & Eng. dial. – a gutter, a drain, a sewer

SYRIATIC
adj. 1786 rare – Syrian

SYRINGA STATE
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – Idaho

SYRIOLOGIST
n. 1884 rare – a person versed in the study of Syrian antiquities

SYRTIC
adj. 1846 – of the nature of a quicksand

SYRTIS
n. 1667 – a quicksand

SYRUPICAL
adj. 1659 obs. rare – syrupy

SYRUP (OF FIGS)
n. 1981 rhyming sl. – wigs, a wig

SYRUP OF SOOT
n. 1663 obs. – a humorous term for coffee

SYRY
adj. c1384 obs. – Syrian

SYSOP
n. 1983 sl., orig. US – someone responsible for (assisting in) the day-do-day running of a computer system

SYSSITIA
n. 1835 Ancient Greece – meals eaten together in public

SYSSITION
n. 1874 Ancient Greece – a common meal

SYSTEM
n. 1. 1778 obs. – a pad formerly worn by women and used to raise up the hair, a roll
n. 2. 1851 Aust. – the transportation of convicts from the United Kingdom to Australia

SYSTEMATICIAN
n. 1802 – a person who constructs, or adheres to, a rational and coherent system, esp. a philosopher or theologian

S.Y.T.
n. c1950 sl. – an attractive girl (Sweet Young Thing)

SYTE
n. 1. c1175 obs. – anguish, grief; suffering; a feeling of anguish or grief
n. 2. c1400 obs. – anger, hostility
n. 3. 1930 rare – care, solicitude
vb. 1. a1400 obs. – (with ‘for’) to be anxious or troubled about something
vb. 2. 1930 rare – (with ‘for’) to care for, to look after

SYTEFUL
adj. a1400 obs. – sorrowful, mournful

SYTEFULLY
adv. 1488 obs. – sorrowfully, mournfully

SYTH
n. 1567 Sc. obs. – satisfaction, compensation
vb. 1513 Sc. obs. – to satisfy, to give satisfaction to

SYTHE
vb. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – to sigh

SYTHMENT
n. c1540 Sc. obs. – satisfaction, compensation, indemnification

SYVER
n. 1606 Sc. – a gutter, a drain, a sewer


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Updated September 16, 2022