Dictionary: THE – THIM


• THEAK
n. thatch, thatching; grass, straw, etc., cut for thatching …1868 Sc. & Eng. dial.
vb. 1. to thatch …1785 Sc. & Eng. dial.
vb. 2. to cover; to clothe; to protect …1785 Sc. & Eng. dial.
vb. 3. to smart, to sting …Bk1905 Eng. dial.

• THEAKER
n. 1. a thatcher …1790 Sc. & Eng. dial.
n. 2. a smart, stinging blow …Bk1905 Eng. dial.

• THEAK-LEISHER
n. a comb for the hair …1879 Eng. dial.

• THEAL; THEALE
n. 1609 Eng. dial. obs. – a board, a plank, a joist  

• THEARCHY
n. Bk1991 – a system of government by God or a god

• THEAT
n. 1886 Sc. – a liking or inclination for  

• THEATROMANIA
n. Bk1991 – a mania for the theatre

• THEATROPHOBIA
n. Bk1991 – an abnormal fear of theatres

• THEAVE
n. 1. 1796 Eng. dial. – a young ewe sheep that has not yet borne a lamb  
n. 2. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – a young woman  

• THECKING
n. 1838 Sc. & Eng. dial. – clothing, covering to the body, etc.

• THEE
n. 1685 Sc. & Eng. dial. – a dialect form of ‘thigh’  
vb. 1794 Sc. & Eng. dial. obs. – to thrive, to prosper; to grow  

• THEEF
n. 1. a stench, a bad smell …Bk1905 Sc.
n. 2. an escape of wind, flatulence …Bk1905 Sc.

• THEEKING
n. clothing, covering to the body, etc. …1838 Sc. & Eng. dial.

• THEENE
vb. to close …Bk1905 Eng. dial. obs.

• THEETEN
vb. to tighten …Bk1905 Eng. dial.

• THEFTUOUS
adj. given to theft, thievish; dishonest; furtive, secret, sneaking …c1400 orig. Sc.

• THEFTUOUSLY
adv. by theft …1898 Sc.

• THEFTY
adj. thievish …Bk1905 Eng. dial.

• THEGITHER
adv. together …1818 Sc. & Eng. dial.

• THEIR NAME IS LEGION
phr. they are innumerable …1382

• THEIVIL-PAIN
n. a pain in the side …Bk1905 Sc.

• THEIVIL-SHOT
n. a pain in the side …Bk1905 Sc.

• THEN WANT MUST BE YOUR MASTER
phr. used in refusing a demand expressed by “I want ___ ____” …1828

• THEODORE THE MEDDLER
n. Theodore Roosevelt, twenty-sixth US President …Bk1942 Amer. sl.

• THEOMANCY
n. Bk1991 – divination involving inspired oracles or others inspired by God

• THEOMANIA
n. Bk1991 – a religious madness in which a person believes he is God or is inspired by God

• THEOPHOBIA
n. Bk1991 – an abnormal fear of God

• THEOTIOUS
adj. 1969 Amer. dial. – very good

• THERE
adj. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – excellent; first-rate  

• THERE-AGAIN!
int. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – an exclamation of surprise or assent  

• THERE AIN’T NO SUCH ANIMAL
phr. 1922 US sl. – no such person or thing exists

• THERE AND THEREAWAYS
adj. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – approximately

• THERE ARE MANY WAYS OF DRESSING CALVES’ HEADS
phr. Bk1891 sl. – many ways of saying or doing a foolish thing; a simpleton has many ways of showing his folly; or, generally, if one way won’t do, we must try another  

• THERE ARE NO FLIES ON HIM
phr. 1848 sl., orig. Aust. or US – he’s sly, artful  

• THERE ARE WORSE IN GAOL
phr. 20C UK – indicates that the person referred to might be worse  

• THERE GOES THE BALLGAME
phr. 1946 US sl. – that finishes it; that is the end, esp. of one’s chances  

• THE-RECKLIES
adv. corruption of directly …1878 Eng. dial.

• THERECKLY
adv. corruption of directly …1878 Eng. dial.

• THERE HAVE BEEN SLANGING-DUES CONCERNED
phr. uttered by one who suspects that he has been curtailed of his just share, portion, or right …c1810 sl.

• THERE IS A VIXTER UPON ONE
phr. one has grown stout …Bk1905 Sc.

• THERE NOW FOR YOU!
int. an exclamation …1898 Ireland

• THERE OR THEREABOUTS
adj. approximately …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
adv. in the neighbourhood …Bk1905 Eng. dial.

• THERE’S A BLOW IN THE BELL
phr. 1936 criminals’ sl. – there’s something wrong, something suspicious, somewhere  

• THERE’S A BLUE SHIRT AT THE MASTHEAD
phr. L19 nautical usage – there is a call for assistance in an emergency

• THERE’S A DEAD CAT UP THE BRANCH
phr. 1965 Amer. dial. – used to suggest that something is suspicious, someone is attempting to deceive the speaker, something’s fishy  

• THERE’S A DEAD DUCK UP THE STREAM
phr. 1965 Amer. dial. – used to suggest that something is suspicious, someone is attempting to deceive the speaker, something’s fishy  

• THERE’S A DEAD NIGGER IN THE WOODPILE
phr. 1965 Amer. dial. – used to suggest that something is suspicious, someone is attempting to deceive the speaker, something’s fishy  

• THERE’S A DEAL OF GLASS ABOUT
phr. 1880s – applied to a flashy person or a showy thing

• THERE’S A DEAL OF WEATHER ABOUT
phr. M19 nautical usage – there’s a storm approaching

• THERE’S A HAIR IN THE BUTTER
phr. 1980 Amer. dial. – an expression of suspicion of some statement or event  

• THERE’S A LETTER IN THE POST OFFICE
phr. 1855 Amer. dial. – used to indicate that there is a hole in one’s trousers or that one’s underwear is showing  

• THERE’S A MULE IN THE GARDEN
phr. 1877 Eng. dial. – something unpleasant is going on

• THERE’S AN ASS FOR EVERY SEAT
phr. 1982 Amer. sl. – in car sales: any car can ultimately be sold  

• THERE’S BLOOD ON THE MOON
phr. 1933 Amer. dial. – there’s a menacing or suspicious situation or set of events  

• THERE’S CORN IN EGYPT
phr. 1838 – there is abundance; there is a plentiful supply

• THERE’S DIRTY WORK AT THE CROSSROADS
phr. 1965 Amer. dial. – said when something is going on behind your back, suspicious or concealed activity  

• THERE’S LIFE IN THE OLD DOG YET
phr. 1857 UK – he is still very much alive, and, especially, capable of sexual activity  

• THERE’S LIFE IN THE OLD GIRL YET
phr. 1857 UK – she is still very much alive, and, especially, capable of sexual activity

• THERE’S MORE IN HER BELLY THAN EVER WENT THROUGH HER MOUTH
phr. 19C colloq. – said of a pregnant woman  

• THERE’S MY THUMB ON IT
phr. 1885 Eng. dial. – words used in ratifying a bargain  

• THERE’S NO SUCH THING AS A FREE LUNCH
phr. 1980s US sl. – the world is a hard place and one must work for what one gets

• THERE’S SOMETHING DEAD UP THE BRANCH
phr. 1903 Amer. dial. – used to suggest that something is suspicious, someone is attempting to deceive the speaker, something’s fishy  

• THERE’S SOMETHING DEAD UP THE CREEK
phr. 1899 Amer. dial. – used to suggest that something is suspicious, someone is attempting to deceive the speaker, something’s fishy  

• THERE’S SOMETHING FISHY ABOUT THAT
phr. 1965 Amer. dial. – used to suggest that something is suspicious, someone is attempting to deceive the speaker, something’s fishy  

• THERE’S SOMETHING ROTTEN UP THE BRANCH
phr. 1965 Amer. dial. – an expression of suspicion

• THERE THEN HAPS!
int. 1887 Eng. dial. – an exclamation of dismay  

• THERIOMANCY
n. Bk1991 – divination involving wild beasts; also, divination based upon observation of the movements of animals

• THERMOPHOBIA
n. Bk1991 – an abnormal fear or dislike of heat

• THERSITICAL
adj. 1650 rare – foul-mouthed, scurrilous, grossly abusive

• THERY
adv. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – very  

• THESMOPHILIST
n. 1644 nonce word – a lover of law

•THESTER
adj. a900 obs. – dark, obscure
n. c897 obs. – darkness
vb. a900 obs. – to become dark, to grow dim; to make dark

• THESTREEN
adv. 1788 Sc. – last night, yesterday evening  

• THEW
vb. 1. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – to threaten  
vb. 2. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – to tire

• THEWED
adv. Bk1905 Eng. dial. obs. – hopefully

• THEWLESS
adj. 1895 Sc. & Eng. dial. – feeble, inactive  

• THEY CHARGE LIKE A WOUNDED BULL
phr. 1950sAust. – their prices are very high

• THEY CHARGE LIKE THE LIGHT BRIGADE
phr. 1950s – their prices are very high

• THEY CHEATED THE STARTER
phr. 20C – applied to a married couple whose first child arrives before it is conventionally expectable

• THEY’RE BETTER FUCKERS THAN FIGHTERS
phr. World War I usage – applied to those soldiers who frequented French or Belgian brothels whenever they had the money

• THIBLE
n. 1790 Eng. dial. – a smooth stick or spatula, used for stirring broth, porridge, etc.  

• THICCY!
int. 1891 Eng. dial. – an exclamation used to call attention to anything  

• THICK
adj. 1. having a friendly relationship, friendly …c1756
adj. 2. numerous, plentiful; frequent, in quick succession …1790 Sc. & Eng. dial.
adj. 3. foolish, slow-witted, unintelligent, stupid …a1800 sl.
adj. 4. partially deaf …1892 Eng. dial.
adj. 5. of the weather: cloudy, misty, foggy …1895 Sc. & Eng. dial.
adj. 6. thorough, complete, downright …1900 Eng. dial.
n. 1. a crowd, a mass of people …1828 Sc. obs.
n. 2. a thicket …1853 Amer. dial.
n. 3. a foolish person …1857 sl., orig. schoolchildren’s usage

• THICK AND THREEFOLD
adv. 1. in great numbers or quantity …1902 Sc. & Eng. dial.
adv. 2. strongly …Bk1905 Eng. dial.

• THICK AS A DOZEN IN A BED
adj. of people: very close, intimate; crowded, in crowded conditions …1868 Amer. dial.

• THICK AS BEES
adj. very friendly and intimate; on exceedingly good terms …1902 Eng. dial.

• THICK AS BLACKBERRIES
adj. very friendly and intimate; on exceedingly good terms …1894 Ireland

• THICK AS CROWDY
adj. very friendly and intimate; on exceedingly good terms …Bk1905 Sc.

• THICK AS DARBY AND JOAN
adj. very friendly and intimate; on exceedingly good terms …1882 Eng. dial.

• THICK AS DICK AND LEDDY
adj. very friendly and intimate; on exceedingly good terms …Bk1905 Eng. dial.

• THICK AS DICK AND LIDDY
adj. very intimate …Bk1900 Eng. dial.

• THICK AS FIDDLERS IN HELL
adj. very plentiful …Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.

• THICK AS FIVE IN A BED
adj. of people: very close, intimate; crowded, in crowded conditions …1855 Amer. dial.

• THICK AS FLIES
adj. crowded, packed …Bk1942 Amer. sl.

• THICK AS FOUR IN A BED
adj. of people: very close, intimate; crowded, in crowded conditions …1942 Amer. dial.

• THICK AS GLUE
adj. close, intimate …19C

• THICK AS HARRY AND MARY
adj. very friendly and intimate; on exceedingly good terms …Bk1905 Eng. dial.

• THICK AS HERRINGS IN A BARREL
adj. very friendly and intimate; on exceedingly good terms …Bk1905 Eng. dial.

• THICK AS HOPS
adj. crowded, packed …Bk1942 Amer. sl.

• THICK AS INKLE-MAKERS
adj. very friendly or intimate together …1857 Eng. dial.

• THICK AS INKLE-WEAVERS
adj. very friendly and intimate; on exceedingly good terms …1866 Eng. dial.

• THICK AS PIG-TRACKS
adj. very plentiful, abundant …1870 Amer. dial.

• THICK AS SIX IN A BED
adj. of people: very close, intimate; crowded, in crowded conditions …1965 Amer. dial.

• THICK AS THACK
adj. very friendly and intimate; on exceedingly good terms …1889 Eng. dial.

• THICK AS THEY CAN DICKER
adj. very intimate …Bk1900 Eng. dial.

• THICK AS THICK
adj. very friendly and intimate; on exceedingly good terms …1887 Eng. dial.

• THICK AS THIEVES
adj. crowded, packed …Bk1942 Amer. sl.

• THICK AS THREE IN A BED
adj. of people: very friendly, intimate; crowded, in crowded conditions …1844 Eng. & Amer. dial.

• THICK AS TWO DOGS’ HEADS
adj. very friendly and intimate; on exceedingly good terms …1896 Eng. dial.

• THICK AS TWO IN A BED
adj. very friendly and intimate; on exceedingly good terms …Bk1905 Sc.

• THICK DICKS
n. thick porridge …Bk1905 Eng. dial.

• THICKEDNESS
n. thickness …Bk1905 Eng. dial.

• THICK END
n. the greater part, the majority or most part …1867 Eng. dial.

• THICKENING-STUFF
n. food of any kind …Bk1905 Eng. dial.

• THICKENS
n. oatmeal porridge …1843 Eng. dial.

• THICKER AND FASTER
adv. in great numbers or quantity …1902 Sc. & Eng. dial.

• THICKETY!
int. an exclamation used by a child when another has been in mischief and got into trouble; you’ll catch it! …Bk1905 Eng. dial.

• THICKHEAD
n. 1. a fool; a soft-head …Bk1891 sl.
n. 2. (as ‘thick head’) a headache; often applied to a headache caused by alcohol …1991 sl.

• THICK-HOTS
n. porridge made of water and oatmeal …Bk1905 Eng. dial.

• THICKIE
n. a foolish person …1968 sl.

• THICK IN THE HEAD
adj. stupid, dull, slow of comprehension …1871 Sc.

• THICK-LIFTED
adj. short-winded, wheezy, breathing with difficulty …1746 Eng. dial.

• THICK-LISTED
adj. 1. dull, stupid …1777 Eng. dial.
adj. 2. short-winded, wheezy, breathing with difficulty …1790 Eng. dial.

• THICKNESS
n. 1. familiarity, intimacy, friendliness …1895 Eng. dial.
n. 2. fog, mist …1898 Sc.

• THICKO
n. a foolish person …1976 sl.

• THICK OF HEARING
adj. hard of hearing …1692

• THICK OF SPEECH
adj. indistinct …Bk1905 Eng. dial.

• THE THICK OF THE THRANG
n. the midst of the bustle or crowd; the busiest part or time …Bk1905 Eng. dial.

• THICK ONE
n. a gold sovereign; also, a crown or five-shilling piece …1848 Brit. sl.

• THICK-PELTED
adj. thick-skinned …Bk1905 Eng. dial.

• THICK-SET
adj. cloudy or set in for rain …Bk1905 Eng. dial.

• THICK-SPINNING
n. bad conduct …Bk1905 Eng. dial.

• THICK-THRANG
adj. thickly crowded …1892 Sc.

• THICK-THUMBED
adj. sluttish, untidy; clumsy …Bk1905 Eng. dial.

• THICK-TOLLOLS
n. oatmeal porridge …1881 Eng. dial., jocular usage

• THICK ‘UN
n. a gold sovereign, a pound; also, a crown or five-shilling piece …1848 Brit. sl.

• THICK-WET
adj. of clothes: saturated with water …Bk1905 Eng. dial.

• THICK-WINDED
adj. bad at breathing, husky …Bk1905 Eng. dial.

• THICKY
adj. thick, viscous …1986 Amer. dial.

• THICKY-DUDDLE
n. flour and water …1863 Eng. dial.

• THIEF
n. 1. a term of contempt or vituperation used with no implication of dishonesty; a rascal, a scamp …1827 Sc.
n. 2. an imperfection in the wick of a candle which causes it to gutter and waste …1889 Eng. dial.
vb. to steal, to rob; to commit theft …1838 Amer. dial.

• THIEF-ANIMAL
n. a term of opprobrium for a thievish person …1897 Sc.

• THIEF-LIKE
adj. 1. having the appearance of a blackguard …Bk1905 Sc.
adj. 2. plain, ugly; hard-looking …Bk1905 Sc.
adj. 3. of dress: unbecoming, not handsome …Bk1905 Sc.

• THIEF-LOON
n. a thief, a thievish rascal …1898 Sc.

• THE THIEF OF THE WORLD
n. the devil …1898 Ireland

• THIEF-RIEVER
n. a thief, a thievish rascal …Bk1905 Sc.

• THIEF’S BARGAIN
n. a very cheap bargain, such a bargain as a thief makes with a receiver of stolen goods …1900 Sc.

• THIEF TAKE YOU!
int. an imprecation or oath …1883 Eng. dial.

• THIEFY
adj. 1. stealthy, furtive …1897 Sc.
adj. 2. thievish, thieving …1898 Sc.

• THIEVE
vb. to steal, to rob …a901

• THIEVELESS
adj. 1. shy, reserved; cold, frigid in manner, forbidding …1787 Sc.
adj. 2. listless, spiritless, wanting in energy or force; aimless, ineffectual, bootless …1835 Sc.
adj. 3. cold, bleak …Bk1905 Sc.

• THIEVELESSLY
adv. feebly, weakly, aimlessly, without force or energy …1890 Sc.

• THIEVELY
adj. thievish, dishonest …Bk1905 Eng. dial.

• THIEVES’-HOLE
n. a jail, prison, esp. a particularly bad dungeon reserved for thieves …1631 Sc.

• THIEVES’ LATIN
n. the secret language or ‘cant’ of thieves …1821

• THIEVING
adj. inclined to steal …1598 sl.

• THIF
vb. to blow with wind or rain …Bk1905 Eng. dial. obs.

• THIG
n. begging, borrowing …1898 Sc.
vb. 1. to beg, to borrow; to solicit alms on certain occasions, such as on setting up housekeeping, etc. …1817 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
vb. 2. to entice; to entreat; to tease …Bk1905 Sc.

• THIGAMY
n. a thing whose name one cannot recall or does not know …1890 Amer. dial.

• THIGGER
n. a beggar, a mendicant …1885 Sc.

• THIGSTER
n. a beggar, a mendicant …Bk1905 Sc.

• THIKKI!
int. an exclamation used to call attention to anything …1891 Eng. dial.

• THILSE
adv. else, otherwise …Bk1905 Sc. obs.

• THIMBER
adj. gross, heavy, cumbrous …1861 Sc. obs.

• THIMBLE
n. the foxglove …Bk1905 Eng. dial.

• THIMBLE-PIE
n. a rap on the head with a thimbled finger …1847 Eng. dial.


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