Dictionary: TV – TWN


• TV
n. 1965 sl., orig. & chiefly Amer. – a transvestite  

• TWAIL
n. 1608 obs. rare – a spider’s web

• TWANG
n. 1898 Aust. sl. – opium  

• TWANG ONE’S NOSE
vb. 1748 obs. – to blow the nose loudly  

• TWANG ONE’S WIRE
vb. 1950s sl. – to masturbate

• TWANG THE WIRE
vb. 1950s sl. – to masturbate  

• TWANGY
adj. 1980s US sl. – pert. to male prostitution

• TWANGY BOY
n. 1980s US sl. – a young male prostitute  

• TWANK
n. 1. 1960s homosexual sl. – an older man  
n. 2. 1960s sl. – in prostitute usage: an older man who enjoys watching young women at work but has no personal interest in sex  

• TWANKAY; TWANKEY
n. 1900s sl. – gin  

• TWANKY
n. 2000s African-American sl. – the number 20  

• TWARTLINS
adv. 1899 Sc. – crosswise  

• TWARTOUR
adv. Bk1905 Sc. – across, athwart  

• TWAT
n. 1. 1656 – female genitals  
n. 2. 1656 – a woman considered merely as a sex object
n. 3. 1929 sl. – an unpleasant or despicable person, usually male  

• TWATTLE-BASKET
n. 1715 – one who does nothing but twattle; an idle chatterer, a chatterbox, a babbler

• TWEAKED
adj. 1980s US sl. – odd; crazy

• TWEAKY
adj. 1980s US sl. – odd; crazy

• TWEE
adj. 1. 1905 US sl. – tiny; dainty; miniature; cute
adj. 2. 1956 sl. – excessively sentimental  

• TWEEDLE
n. 1. 1890 criminals’ sl. – a counterfeit ring used in a swindling racket  
n. 2. 1925 sl. – a swindle or confidence trick, esp. one involving counterfeit goods (originally a ring)  
vb. 1. 1684 – to produce a succession of shrill modulated sounds on a musical instrument; to play triflingly or careless upon an instrument
vb. 2. 1715 – to entice by or as by music; to wheedle, to cajole
vb. 3. 1925 sl. – to swindle people or play confidence tricks  

• TWEEDLE-DEE
vb. 1837 – to play or sing in a high-pitched tone; also, to play idly

• TWEEDLEDEE AND TWEEDLEDUM
n. 1853 – two things or parties the difference between which is held to be insignificant

• TWEEDLER
n. 1925 sl. – a swindler or confidence trickster  

• TWEEDLETOE
n. B1900 Eng. dial. – a person who places one foot over the other in walking

• TWEEDY
adj. 1923 – characteristic of those who wear tweeds; heartily informal; exclusively clannish, etc.

• TWEEN
n. 1946 colloq., chiefly US – a person who is nearly a teenager

• TWEEN-AGE
adj. 1951 colloq. – relating to or intended for tweenagers
n. 1938 colloq., chiefly US, rare – a person who is nearly a teenager; also, such people
as a class

• TWEENAGER
n. 1949 colloq., chiefly US – a child who is nearly a teenager

• TWEENER
n. 1. 1948 – a person who is nearly a teenager
n. 2. 1990s sl. – a person posed between two major categories

• TWEENEY
n. 1888 – a maidservant assisting both the cook and the housemaid  

• TWEENIE
n. 1. 1888 – a maidservant assisting both the cook and the housemaid  
n. 2. 1919 colloq., orig. US – a young teenager, or a pre-teenager

• TWEENY
n. 1888 – a maidservant assisting both the cook and the housemaid  

• ‘TWEESH
prep. 1768 Sc. – between  

• TWEET
n. 1917 Amer. dial. – a goldfinch  

• TWEETLE
vb. 1912 obs. – to play triflingly or carelessly upon an instrument; to produce a succession of shrill modulated sounds on a musical instrument

• TWEEZE
vb. 1932 – to pull out hair with tweezers; to pluck

• TWELVE-HOUR
adj. 1791 Sc. – pert. to twelve o’clock (noon)

• TWELVEMONTH
n. a1131 – a period of twelve months; a year

• TWELVEMONTHLY
adv. 1847 – every twelve months; yearly, annually

• TWELVE MOONS
n. 1609 obs. – a twelvemonth, a year

• TWELVE O’ NIGHT
n. 1873 Sc. – midnight

• TWELVE-PENNY
adj. 1604 – of small value, paltry, insignificant

• TWELVEPENNY PIECE
n. 1594 obs. – a shilling

• TWELVER
n. 1699 sl., obs.- 1 shilling; a coin worth twelve pence

• TWELVE SCORE
n. a1400 – twelve twenties, two hundred and forty

• TWEME
vb. c1023 obs. – to divide into two parts, to separate

• TWENNIE
n. 1989 US sl. – a twenty-dollar dose of crack cocaine  

• TWENTIES
n. 1952 US sl. – a swindle featuring a twenty-dollar note  

• TWENTY
n. 1. 1975 US Citizens’ band radio sl. – a location  
n. 2. 1999 UK sl. – a ₤20 note  

• TWENTY-CENT BAG
n. 1972 US sl. – twenty dollars’ worth of a drug  

• TWENTY-CENT ROCK
n. 1991 US sl. – crack cocaine worth $20  

• TWENTY-FIVE
n. 1966 sl. – LSD  

• TWENTY-FOOT WORM
n. 19C – a centipede

• TWENTY-FOUR CARAT
adj. 1. 1900 colloq. – thoroughgoing, unalloyed out-and-out
adj. 2. 1965 colloq. – genuine, flawless, trustworthy

• TWENTY-FOUR-HOUR BUG
n. 1960 Amer. dial. – a mayfly  

• TWENTY-FOUR MAN
n. 1925 – an overworked person

• TWENTY-FOUR SEVEN
adv. 1989 US sl. – at all times, always, twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week  

• TWENTY HUNDRED
adj. c1275 obs. – two thousand

• TWENTY IN THE HUNDRED
phr. 1602 obs. – a 20% rate of interest on loans

• TWENTY-ONE DAYS IN THE COUNTY JAIL
n. 1988 US sl. – in poker: a hand consisting of three sevens  

• TWENTY ROCK
n. 2003 UK sl. – crack cocaine  

• TWENTY-TWO CARAT
adj. 1. 1962 colloq. – thoroughgoing, unalloyed out-and-out
adj. 2. 1962 colloq. – genuine, flawless, trustworthy

• TWEON
vb. c897 obs. – to be doubtful; to doubt; to debate

• TWERK
n. 1. 1820 colloq., chiefly US – a twisting or jerking movement; a twitch
n. 2. 1928 colloq., orig. & chiefly US – an ineffectual or worthless person; a fool; a ‘jerk’
n. 3. 1940 colloq., chiefly US – a change, usually minor, or variation, esp. of an odd or negative type; a twist
n. 4. 1996 colloq. – a sexually provocative dance involving thrusting movements of the bottom and hips while in a low, squatting stance
vb. 1. 1848 colloq., chiefly US – to move with a twitching, twisting, or jerking motion
vb. 2. 1993 colloq., orig. US – to dance to popular music in a sexually provocative manner, using thrusting movements of the bottom and hips while in a low, squatting stance
vb. 3. 1999 colloq., orig. & chiefly US – to improve or perfect something by making a fine adjustment to it; to alter; to tweak; also, to distort facts, etc., typically to make something appear more appealing or acceptable

• TWERKING
n. 1. 1862 colloq. – the cry of a parakeet
n. 2. 1921 – a dancing in a sexually provocative manner, characterized by thrusting movements of the bottom and hips

• TWERP
n. 1. 1874 sl. – a foolish person  
n. 2. 1925 sl. – an unpleasant person; a despicable or objectionable person; an insignificant person; a nobody

• TWICE
vb. 1637 sl. – to make twice as much, to double; to do twice as much as

• TWICE-CHILDISH
adj. 1605 obs. – in one’s second childhood

• TWICE OUT OF SIGHT
adj. 1960 Amer. dial. – somewhat remote; beyond visibility

• TWICER
n. 1. 1678 sl. – a person who goes to both matins and evensong services at church  
n. 2. 1924 sl. – a cheat or a deceitful or cunning person  

• TWICE YEARED
adj. 1583 obs. – that has lasted two years

• TWICHILD
n. c1580 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – one who is ‘twice a child’; an old man in his second childhood; also, one’s second childhood

• TWICK
vb. a1000 chiefly Eng. dial., rare – to pull something sharply or suddenly; to tug; to pluck

• TWICKERED OUT
adj. 1886 Eng. dial. – tired, exhausted, very weary

• TWIDDLE
n. 1774 – a twirl or twist; also, a curl, a twirled mark or sign
vb. 1. a1547 – to be busy about trifles; to trifle
vb. 2. 1863 – to play triflingly on an instrument; to talk in a trifling or inept manner
vb. 3. 1980s US computing sl. – to change something in a small way

• TWIDDLEPOOP
n. 1834 sl. – an effeminate-looking fellow  

• TWIDDLER
n. 1904 – a twirling delivery of the ball at cricket

• TWIDDLE-TWADDLE
adj. 1798 – idle, trifling
n. 1886 – foolish chatter, idle talk; nonsense

• TWIDDLING
adj. 1844 – trifling, paltry

• TWIDDLY BIT
n. 1912 – a fancy or intricate embellishment; a detail

• TWIE
adv. a900 obs. – twice

• TWIFOLD
adj. 1. c890 arch. – twofold, double
adj. 2. c897 obs. – double-dealing, deceitful, insincere
adj. 3. c1200 obs. – double-minded, irresolute
vb. 1875 rare – to fold in two; to bend double

• TWIFOLDLY
adv. c1000 obs. – twofold, doubly, to twice the amount

• TWIG
n. 1. a1800 Eng. dial. – a pull; a twitch; a tug; a draught
n. 2. 1842 Eng. dial. – a stout stick
n. 3. 1883 Eng. dial. – a divining-rod
n. 4. 1811 sl., obs. – style, fashion; also, condition, state fettle
vb. 1. 1550 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to give such correction as may be inflicted with a twig; to give a somewhat sharp, but not angry and severe reproof
vb. 2. 1570 obs. rare – to trim or prune a tree
vb. 3. 1573 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to do anything vigorously or strenuously
vb. 4. 1725 sl., obs. – to snap, to break off
vb. 5. 1755 Eng. dial. – to pull, to pluck, to twitch
vb. 6. 1764 colloq. – to watch; to look at; to inspect
vb. 7. 1796 colloq.. – to perceive, to catch sight of, to spot ; to recognize
vb. 8. 1815 colloq.. – to understand or realize the meaning of something  

• TWIGGAGE
n. 1923 literary usage, rare – twigs collectively

• TWIGGEN
adj. 1549 arch. – made of twigs or wickerwork

• TWIGGER
n. 1. 1573 – a vigorous, prolific breeder: originally said of a ewe; hence, an unchaste or lascivious person; a wanton person of either sex; a strumpet, a harlot, a fornicator, a wencher
n. 2. 1814 Eng. dial. – a man who cuts twigs off the birch tree and makes them into bundles  

• TWIGGERY
n. 1909 – twigs collectively

• TWIGGY
adj. 1562 – slender, as a shoot or branch

• TWIGHT
adv. a1500 obs. – quite
vb. 1558 obs. – to touch; also, to twitch

• TWIGLET
n. 1849 – a little twig

• TWIGLING
n. 1907 – a little twig

• TWIGSOME
adj. 1860 – slender, as a shoot or branch

• TWIG THE DARBIES
vb. 1725 sl., obs. – to knock off the irons (handcuffs)

• TWI-LIFE
n. 1889 nonce word – a life marked by indistinct perception or consciousness

• TWILIGHT
adj. 1. 1645 – lighted as by twilight; dim, obscure, shadowy
adj. 2. 1863 – of early times
n. 1. 1609 – an intermediate condition or period; a condition before or after full development
n. 2. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – jocose for toilet  
n. 3. 1967 Amer. dial. – a three-cornered scarf tied under the chin  

• TWILIGHTED
adj. 1865 – partly illuminated

• TWILIGHT HOME
n. 1934 – a residential institution for old people or animals

• TWILIGHTING
n. 1387 obs. rare – the evening twilight, from sunset to dark night

• TWILIGHT WORLD
n. 1954 – a world characterized by uncertainty, obscurity, or decline

• TWILIGHT ZONE
n. 1909 – an urban area in which housing is becoming decrepit

• TWILIT
adj. 1869 – lit by or as by twilight

• TWILL-DO BIRD
n. 1968 Amer. dial. – an imaginary bird, that flies backwards, ‘he don’t care where he’s goin’, he just wants to see where he’s been’  

• TWILLY
n. Bk1942 Amer. college sl. – an attractive girl  

• TWILT
vb. 1836 Eng. dial. – to beat, to thrash, to flog  

• TWIMPS
20C sl. – n. in dominoes: twenty points  

• TWIN
adj. c1000 adj. – consisting of two; twofold, double
vb. 1. c1230 obs. exc. Sc. – to separate, to disjoin, to disunite, to sever, to part, to divide
vb. 2. c1330 obs. rare – to divide or share; to part with
vb. 3. c1386 obs. – to depart, to go away; to escape, to get free
vb. 4. 1722 obs. – to deprive of

• TWIND
vb. 1. 1548 obs. – to twist, to wind, to turn
vb. 2. 1575 obs. – to become entangled or knotted

• TWINDLE
n. 1526 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – a twin
vb. 1845 Eng. dial. – to bring forth twins

• TWINE
n. 1. 1602 obs. or rare – an embrace, a clasping
n. 2. 1606 obs.  – division, separation, disunion
n. 3. 1768 – a turn of fortune, a vicissitude
n. 4. 1865 – a tangle, a knot, a snarl
n. 5. 1876 Eng. dial. – a whine, a moan; also, a fretful or agitated state; a fit of ill temper; a bad mood
vb. 1. c1535 Sc. – to separate, to part
vb. 2. 1666 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to contort the body; to writhe, to wriggle, to squirm
vb. 3. 1805 Eng. dial. – to cry, to fret; to whine; to complain, to moan

 • TWINEY
adj. 1824 Eng. dial. – given to whining or moaning; fretful, agitated, complaining

• TWINGE
n. 1. 1548 obs. – a tweak or pinch
n. 2. 1622 – a pang of shame, remorse, sorrow, or the like; a prick of conscience
n. 3. 1790 Eng. dial. – an earwig
n. 4. 1860 rare – a twist, a turn
n. 5. 1888 – a ‘nip’ of cold
vb. a1300 obs. rare – to oppress, to afflict, to persecute

• TWINGLE
vb. 1647 rare – to twist, to twine, to wriggle, to writhe

• TWINGLE-TWANGLE
n. 1634 – a representation of the continuous sounds of a harp or the like

• TWING TWANG
n. 1761 rare – a representation of the sound of the harp, or other such instrument

• TWINGY
adj. 1865 rare – experiencing twinges of pain

• TWINITY
n. 1879 – a group of two in intimate union, two in one

• TWINK
n. 1. a1400 – a winking of the eye; the time taken by this; a twinkling; the shortest possible space of time; a moment
n. 2. 1816 – the chaffinch, Fringilla coelebs
n. 3. 1830 obs. – a twinkle or sparkle  
n. 4. 1887 Eng. dial. – a sharp, shrewish, grasping woman  
n. 5. 1953 US sl., derogatory – a male homosexual; an effeminate man  
n. 6. 1963 US sl. – a weird or deviant person; a social outcast
n. 7. 1963 US sl. – a young, sexually attractive person
n. 8. 20C US sl. – a jerk; an incompetent fool  
vb. 1. c1400 obs. – to wink, to blink  
vb. 2. a1529 – to make a light clear abrupt ringing sound, to clink, to chink
vb. 3. 1615 – of a bird: to utter with a shrill metallic note
vb. 4. 1637 – to twinkle, to sparkle
vb. 5. 1747 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to chastise; to blame; to find fault with  

• TWINKIE
n. 1. 1963 US sl., derogatory – a male homosexual; an effeminate man  
n. 2. 1963 US sl. – a weird or deviant person; a social outcast
n. 3. 1963 US sl. – a young, sexually attractive person

• TWIN-KIN
adj. a1400 obs. – of two kinds, twofold, double

• TWINKLE
n. 1548 obs. – a wink; a blink; also, a momentary glance
vb. 1. a1300 rare – of a bell, musical instrument, etc.: to make a series of sharp light ringing sounds on being struck
vb. 2. a1300 obs. or arch. – to wink, to blink; to close and open the eye(s) quickly
vb. 3. 1616 – to move to and fro, or in and out, with rapid alternation; to appear and disappear in quick succession; to flicker, to flutter

• TWINKLE-DRESS
n. 1960 poetic usage – a sparkling party dress

• TWINKLEDUM
n. 1681 – an imitation of the sound of the guitar

• TWINKLER
n. a1382 obs. rare – one who winks

• TWINKLES
n. 1913 Amer. dial. – pine needles  

• TWINKLE-TOED
adj. 1960 – light-footed, nimble; of a dance: quick, requiring agility

• TWINKLING
adj. 1740 obs. – winking, blinking
n. 1. a1300 obs. – a winking
n. 2. 1303 – the time taken in winking the eye; a very brief period; a moment, an instant

• TWINKLING OF A BEDPOST
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a short time; a moment  

• TWINKUM TWANKUM
n. 1729 obs. rare – a refrain of a song, expressing careless jollity

• TWINKY
n. 1. 1963 US sl., derogatory – a male homosexual; an effeminate man  
n. 2. 1963 US sl. – a weird or deviant person; a social outcast
n. 3. 1963 US sl. – a young, sexually attractive person

• TWINLEPI
adj. a1400-50 – twofold, double

• TWINLIGHT
n. c1532 obs. – twilight

• TWINLING
n. a1382 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – a twin

• TWIN LOVELIES
n. 20C euphemism – the human breasts  

• TWINLY
adv. 1913 rare – to an equal extent; doubly; in an identical degree

• TWINNER
n. 1573 rare – an animal that brings forth twins

• TWINNING
n. c1225 obs. exc. Sc. – parting, separation

• TWIN POTS
n. 1950s hot rodding usage – dual carburetors

• TWINS
n. 1. 20C US – the human breasts  
n. 2. 20C US – the testicles

• TWIN SOUL
n. 1868 – a kindred spirit

• TWIRE
n. 1676 sl., obs. – a glance, a leer
vb. 1. 1601 obs. rare – to wink
vb. 2. 1602 arch. – to look narrowly or covertly; to peer, to peep

• TWIREDE
adj. c888 obs. – of two minds or counsels; undecided, irresolute; divided in mind

•  TWIRE-PIPE
n. a1625 obs. rare – a contemptuous name for a musical pipe

• TWIRK
vb. 1599 obs. rare – to twist spirally

• TWIRL
n. 1. 1879 criminals’ sl. – a skeleton key used by a burglar  
n. 2. 1891 sl. – a prison warder  
n. 3. Bk1896 sl. – a short crowbar, used by housebreakers  
n. 4. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – a mental twist, an eccentric line of conduct  
n. 5. 20C US rhyming sl. – a woman; a girl  

• TWIRLBLAST
n. 1865 – a whirlwind

• TWIRLER
n. 1. 1883 baseball usage – a pitcher
n. 2. 1921 criminals’ sl. – a skeleton key used by a burglar  

• TWIRLIFICATION
n. 1834 – a twirling, gyrating

• TWIRLIGIG
n. 1902 – a twirly pattern; a whirligig

• TWIRLPOOL
n. 1966 Amer. dial. – a place in a stream where water flows round and round and draws things in toward the centre  

• TWIRLWIND
n. 1770 – a whirlwind

• TWIRP
n. 1874 sl. – a foolish person  

• TWIRTY
adj. 1850 Amer. dial. – cross, easily put out; pert  

•TWISH
int. 1577 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – an exclamation of contempt or vexation  

• TWISPECHE
n. a950 obs. – double or deceitful speech

• TWISS
n. L18 Irish – a chamber-pot  

• TWIST
n. 1. c1374 obs. – a twig, a branch
n. 2. 1785 sl. – a hearty appetite
n. 3. 1798 – a change of circumstances
n. 4. 1811 – a peculiar mental turn or bent; an intellectual or moral bias or obliquity; a craze, a whim
n. 5. a1849 Ireland rare – a spell or turn; a bout; a contest
n. 6. 1862 – a wresting, perversion, distortion of meaning
n. 7. 1894 – a dance in which the body is twisted from side to side; a dance of this kind popular in the early 1960s
n. 8. Bk1896 sl. – a short crowbar, used by housebreakers  
n. 9. 1906 rhyming sl. for ‘twist-and-twirl = girl’, chiefly US, often derogatory – a young woman  
vb. 1. c1440 obs. – to detach, to separate, to take away
vb. 2. c1450 obs. – to torment. to harass
vb. 3. 1483 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to prune, to clip
vb. 4. 1694 sl. – to eat heartily
vb. 5. 1816 – in cricket: when bowling, to give a lateral spin to the ball so that it ‘breaks’ or turns aside on rebounding
vb. 6. 1821 – to pervert; to distort; to force a meaning from
vb. 7. 1864 – to get into a tangled or confused state; to confuse, to confound
vb. 8. 1906 – in insurance: to induce someone to change a policy from one company to another
vb. 9. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – to roll a cigarette  
vb. 10. 1914 sl. – to cheat, to defraud
vb. 11. 1961 – to dance the twist

• THE TWIST
n. 1933 criminals’ sl. – cheating, dishonesty; treachery

• TWIST-AND-TWIRL
n. 1905 rhyming sl. for ‘girl’, chiefly US, often derogatory – a young woman  

• TWISTED
adj. 1. 1574 obs. – intimately associated or connected; united; combined
adj. 2. 1725 sl. – hanged, executed
adj. 3. 1900 – of a person: neurotic, emotionally unbalanced; perverted
adj. 4. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – bewildered; perplexed; baffled  
adj. 5. 1960s drug culture sl. – very much intoxicated with narcotics

• TWISTER
n. 1. 1483 obs. – one who prunes or clips trees
n. 2. 1694 sl. obs. – a voracious feeder
n. 3. 1832 – in cricket: a delivery in which the ball twists or ‘breaks’
n. 4. 1834 sl. – one who shuffles or prevaricates; a dishonest person; a crook; a swindler or deceitful person  
n. 5. 1834 nautical usage, obs. – a grossly exaggerated tale; a lie
n. 6. 1835 sl. – something that confounds, or non-plusses
n. 7. 1888 Eng. dial. – a blow which makes the victim twist or writhe
n. 8. 1897 US – a whirling wind-storm; a cyclone, a tornado
n. 9. 1904 Amer. dial. – a one who breaks wild horses to the saddle  
n. 10. Bk1913 Amer. dial. – a tree with a twisted grain
n. 11. 1924 orig. US – an insurance salesman or agent who unscrupulously induces a holder to switch his policy from one company to another
n. 12. 1936 US sl. – a spasm experienced by a drug taker as a withdrawal symptom  
n. 13. 1938 US sl. – an intravenous injection of a mixture of drugs  
n. 14. 1940 US sl. – a key  
n. 15. 1940s US sl. – a spree; a bender
n. 16. 1966 – one who dances the twist
vb. 1. c1605 obs. – to twist, to spin thread
vb. 2. 1872 Eng. dial. – to wind, to meander

• TWISTERER
n. 1725 obs. – a twister or spinner

• TWISTERING
adj. 1872 – winding, twisting

• TWISTEROO
n. 1963 colloq. – an unexpected twist; a narrative with an  unexpected twist

• TWISTER TO THE SLAMMER
n. 1939 US sl. – the key to the door

• TWISTICAL
adj. 1. 1805 colloq. – somewhat twisted or crooked
adj. 2. 1815 colloq. – not straight or plain in character; morally or mentally tortuous

• TWISTIFICATION
n. 1835 – a twisting; a twisted object or part

• TWISTIFY
vb. 1835 Amer. dial. – to twist

• TWISTING
n. 1. 1535 obs. rare – a pruning, a clipping
n. 2. 1834 sl. – a scolding; a trouncing
n. 3. 1856 – evasion, prevarication

• TWISTKEY
n. 1617 obs. rare – a turnkey

• TWISTLE
n. a1796 Sc. – a twist, a wrench
vb. 1788 Eng. dial. – to twist, to twirl; to screw

• TWIST SLOWLY IN THE WIND
vb. 1973 US sl. – to suffer protracted humiliation, obloquy, regret, etc.

• TWIST THE LION’S TAIL
vb. 1895 US – to provoke the resentment of British people

• TWIST THE TAIL
vb. 1909 – to annoy, to coerce

• TWISTY
adj. 1. 1894 – dishonest, not straightforward
adj. 2. 1970s US sl. – attractively feminine

• TWISTY-WISTY
adj. 1892 nonce word – in a twisting or winding manner

• TWIT
n. 1. 1528 – a criticism or reproach, esp. one made in a good-humoured or teasing way; a taunt, a jibe
n. 2. 1720 rare – a person who spreads rumour or gossip, or who reports others’ wrongdoings; a telltale
n. 3. a1825 Eng. dial. obs. – a fit of temper or irritability
n. 4. 1891 chiefly US – a state of nervous excitement or agitation
n. 5. 1934 colloq., orig. & chiefly UK – a stupid, silly, or annoying person; a fool, an idiot
vb. 1. 1530 – to censure, reproach, or upbraid a person, esp. in a good-humoured or teasing way; to find fault with; to blame; to taunt
vb. 2. 1543 rare – to express disapproval of an action, conduct, etc., esp. in a good-humoured or teasing way; to criticize, to censure; to ridicule
vb. 3. a1643 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to reveal something by indiscreet talk; to spread gossip or rumour

• TWITCH
n. 1. 1510 – a sudden sharp feeling of physical or mental pain or discomfort; a twinge, a pang
n. 2. 1523 – a sudden sharp pull or tug; a jerk, a pluck, a snatch
n. 3. 1790 Eng. dial., obs. rare – an earwig
n. 4. 1977 colloq., orig. UK – an expedition to make a sighting of a rare bird; a gathering of birdwatchers in response to a reported sighting
vb. 1. c1300 – to pull or jerk something sharply or forcibly; to give a sudden sharp pull or tug at something
vb. 2. c1410 obs. – to pinch or pull at a person, part of the body, etc. with pincers or a similar instrument; to tear at, to rend; to nip
vb. 3. a1413 – to cause mental pain of discomfort to a person; to prick the conscience
vb. 4. c1450 obs. – to put a person to death by hanging
vb. 5. 1542 obs. rare – to move, to stir
vb. 6. 1607 rare – to steal something by snatching
vb. 7. 1669 obs. – to pluck the string of a musical instrument
vb. 8. 1773 chiefly US – to haul a log along the ground by means of ropes or chains
vb. 9. 1798 obs. – to castrate an animal by means of a cord looped over the testicles and drawn tight
vb. 10. 1827 obs. rare – to suffer a sudden, sharp pain; to twinge
vb. 11. 1894 chiefly UK – to open a curtain slightly or briefly in order to watch the activities of others furtively from one’s window
vb. 12. 1958 colloq. – of a motor vehicle, trailer, etc.: to judder slightly or veer momentarily sideways, esp. when travelling at high speed
vb. 13. 1977 colloq., orig. UK – to attempt to make sightings of rare birds, esp. obsessively or by travelling great distances

• TWITCH-BALLOCK
n. 1634 Eng. dial. obs. – an earwig

• TWITCH-BELL
n. 1722 Eng. dial. – an earwig

• TWITCH-CLOCK
n. 1843 obs. – a cockroach

• TWITCH-CLOG
n. a1876 obs. – a cockroach

• TWITCHED
adj. 1959 UK sl., orig. military usage – agitated, restless, nervous, irritable  

• TWITCHEL
n. c1196 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – a narrow lane or alley; a narrow passage between walls or hedges; also, a place where a road forks
vb. 1. 1826 Eng. dial. obs. – to castrate animal by means of a cleft stick placed over the testicles
vb. 2. 1826 Eng. dial. obs. – to hobble or restrict an animals by means of a noose or cord, or by fastening a tin can or other object to the tail

• TWITCHELLED
adj. 1852 chiefly Eng. dial., obs. – of an animal: restrained by being held in a noose or tied up with a cord; also, hobbled or restricted by having a tin can or other object fastened to the tail

• TWITCHEN
n. a1000 now rare – a narrow lane or alley; a narrow passage; in early use also, a place where two or more roads meet or where a road forks

• TWITCHER
n. 1. 1771 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – a heavy blow; a sharp or sudden pain
n. 2. 1793 rare – a fidgety or twitchy person; one who makes short, sudden, spasmodic movements
n. 3. 1974 colloq., orig. Brit. – a birdwatcher whose main aim is to make sightings of rare birds; esp. one who travels great distances to do so, or who ticks off observations on a list; an enthusiastic or obsessive birdwatcher

• TWITCHERS
n. a1549 obs. – tweezers or small pincers used to pluck out hairs

• TWITCHET
n. 1899 Amer. dial. – the female genitals  

• TWITCHETY
adj. 1859 – twitchy, nervous, fidgety; also, of a thing, moving back and forth rapidly; jerky, jumpy

• TWITCHINESS
n. 1834 – a being twitchy; nervousness, fidgetiness, irritability

• TWITCHING
n. 1977 colloq., orig. Brit. – a collecting sightings of rare birds, esp. when practised obsessively, or by travelling great distances

• TWITCHMILL
n. 1652 obs. rare – a position of strength that is dependent on one’s relations with two other parties

• TWITCHY
adj. 1. 1787 – nervous, fidgety, irritable, agitated, restless  
adj. 2. 1968 colloq. – of a motor vehicle, etc.: tending to judder slightly or veer momentarily sideways, esp. at high speed; that handles unstably or unpredictably

• TWI-THOUGHT
n. 1885 – an indistinct or vague thought

• TWIT IN THE TEETH
vb. 1530 obs. – to censure, reproach, or upbraid a person; to tease, to taunt

• TWITTEN
n. a1798 Eng. dial. – a narrow lane or alley; a narrow passage between walls or hedges

• TWITTER
n. 1. 1598 obs. rare – a person who censures, reproaches, or upbraids someone
n. 2. 1653 – a state of nervous excitement or agitation; a fluster
n. 3. 1700 chiefly Eng. dial. & US – a fit of laughter; a titter, a giggle
n. 4. 1709 – a light, tremulous sound or call made by a bird; a chirrup, a warble
n. 5. 1715 chiefly Eng. dial., obs. – a shred, a fragment
n. 6. 1854 Eng. dial. – a telltale
n. 7. 1876 Eng. dial., obs. rare – a complication, a difficulty
vb. 1. a1387 – of a bird: to give a call consisting of repeated light tremulous sounds; to chirrup, to warble
vb. 2. 1616 obs. – to have a yearning desire or strong wish to do something; to yearn for something
vb. 3. 1629 – to tremble or move to and fro with a light rapid motion; to shake, to quiver, to flutter; esp. to tremble with excitement, eagerness, fear, etc.
vb. 4. 1630 – to talk in a rapid, tremulous voice; to chatter, to battle; also, to sing in a manner likened to that of a bird
vb. 5. 1654 rare – to laugh in a somewhat suppressed or restrained way; to titter, to giggle, to snigger
vb. 6. 1749 rare – to reproach or upbraid a person; to tease, to taunt
vb. 7. 1853 rare – to twiddle or move about the fingers or thumbs
vb. 8. 2006 – to post on the social networking service Twitter

• (THE) TWITTERATI
n. 2006 – users of the social networking service Twitter, esp. those who post frequently or have high numbers of followers

• TWITTERATION
n. 1. 1775 colloq., rare – tremulous excitement, as from desire, fear, etc.; a state of agitation; a shaking, a quiver, a tremble 
n. 2. 1805 colloq., rare – the chirruping and warbling of birds

• TWITTER BIRD
n. 1956 Amer. dial. – a goldfinch  

• TWITTERER
n. 1. 1815 – a bird, esp. one with a call characterized by repeated light tremulous sounds
n. 2. 1895 – a person who talks at length or in an idle or trivial manner; a chatterer, a prattler

• TWITTERING
adj. 1. 1648 – trembling or quivering, as with fear, excitement, etc.; tremulous, shaking
adj. 2. 1827 – talking rapidly or volubly; chattering, gossiping
n. 1. 1654 rare – a laughing, esp. in a somewhat suppressed or restrained manner, the sound of such laughter; tittering, giggling, sniggering
n. 2. 1668 obs. – an eager desire or longing; a hankering, a yearning
n. 3. 1682 rare – a trembling, shaking, or quivering
n. 4. 1773 – the light, tremulous chirruping or warbling of birds

• TWITTERLIGHT
n. 1608 obs. – twilight

• TWITTERLY
adj. 1896 obs. rare – shaking, trembling, jittery; in a state of nervous agitation

• TWITTERPATED
adj. 1. 1942 colloq., orig. & chiefly US – love-struck, besotted; infatuated, obsessed; also, excited, thrilled
adj. 2. 1943 colloq., orig. & chiefly US – foolish, silly; flighty, scatterbrained

• THE TWITTERSPHERE
n. 2006 colloq. – the notional environment in which people use the social networking service Twitter; such people collectively

• TWITTERY
adj. 1840 rare – shaking, trembling, jittery; in a state of nervous agitation; also, of a nervous or sensitive disposition

• TWITTING
n. 1. 1565 – a censuring, reproaching, or upbraiding a person, activity, etc., esp. in a good-humoured or teasing way; also, a taunt, a jibe
n. 2. a1643 obs. – a revealing something by indiscreet talk; a blabbing

• TWITTINGLY
adv. 1638 – by way of censure or reproach, esp. of a light or good-humoured kind; tauntingly, teasingly

• TWITTISH
adj. 1. 1939 chiefly UK, rare – critical, censorious
adj. 2. 1969 chiefly UK – stupid, silly, foolish

• TWITTLE
vb. 1. 1551 obs. – to spread gossip or rumour; to tattle
vb. 2. 1577 obs. – to utter idly, to chatter, to babble
vb. 3. 1581 chiefly poetic usage – of a bird: to chirrup; to warble; to sing

• TWITTLE-TWAT
n. 1662 obs. rare – a chatterer, one who talks nonsense; a tattler, a babbler

• TWITTLE-TWATTLE
adj. 1556 obs. – full of or given to idle or frivolous talk or chatter; gossipy, chatty; also, nonsensical, ridiculous
int. 1917 – nonsense!
n. 1565 obs. – idle talk, chatter, gossip, tittle-tattle; nonsense, rubbish

• TWIT-TWAT
adj. 1665 obs. – addicted to chatter, gossiping; characterized by frivolous or nonsensical talk
n. 1. 1677 obs. – idle talk, chatter, tittle-tattle
n. 2. 1891 – the house-sparrow

• TWITTY
adj. 1. a1825 orig. Eng. dial., now rare – touchy, irritable, short-tempered; censorious, carping
adj. 2. 1967 – resembling a twit; stupid, silly, foolish

• TWIVE
vb. 1576 nautical usage, obs. rare – of a ship at anchor: to swing up or down with the tide

• TWI-WIFING
n. c1250 obs. – bigamy by a husband

• TWIZZLE
n. 1. 1848 chiefly Eng. dial. – a twist or turn; a change of direction
n. 2. 1915 Amer. dial. – a tangle  
vb. 1. 1788 Eng. dial. – to twirl, to twist; to turn round; to form by twisting
vb. 2. a1825 Eng. dial. – to rotate rapidly, to spin, to twirl


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