Dictionary: VEQ – VER


• VER
n. the season of spring; springtime – 1382 obs.
vb. to aver, to declare – c1400 obs.

• VERA
n. 1. a gin; hence, a drinker of gin – 1940s rhyming sl. (Vera Lynn)
n. 2. skin – 1940s rhyming sl. (Vera Lynn) 
n. 3. the chin – 1940s Aust. & Brit. rhyming sl. (Vera Lynn)
n. 4. a cigarette paper – 1940s UK rhyming sl. for ‘skin’ (Vera Lynn)

• VERABLES
n. veritable facts – 1887 Eng. dial.

• VERA LYNN
n. 1. a gin; hence, a drinker of gin – 1940s rhyming sl.
n. 2. skin – 1940s rhyming sl.
n. 3. the chin – 1940s Aust. & Brit. rhyming sl.

• VERA LYNNS
n. cigarette papers – 1940s Irish rhyming sl. for ‘skins’

• VERAMENT
adv. really, truly – 1303 obs.

• VERANDAH
n. 1. the gallery of the Old Vic Theatre, London – L19 sl.
n. 2. a pot belly – 20C Aust. & US sl.

• VERANDAH OVER THE TOY SHOP
n. a paunch or beer-belly – 1987 Aust. sl.

• VERAS
n. the police vice squad – 1996 UK sl.

• VERA VICE
n. the police vice squad – 1950s homosexual sl.

• VERB
n. a word – a1716 obs. rare

• VERBAGE
n. verbosity, excessive wordiness – 1787 rare

• VERBAL
adj. using many words; talkative, verbose – 1611 obs.
n. 1. a collection of words; a vocabulary or dictionary – 1599 obs. rare
n. 2. an incriminating statement attributed to an arrested or suspected person – 1963 sl., orig. & chiefly Brit.
n. 3. a conversation – 1960s sl.
n. 4. a statement, usually untrue, by a policeman, designed to ensure the conviction of a suspect – 1960s sl.
vb. 1. to attribute an incriminating statement to an arrested or suspected person – 1963 sl., orig. & chiefly Brit.
vb. 2. to confess under interrogation – 1960s criminals’ sl.
vb. 3. to talk – 1960s sl.
vb. 4. to talk aggressively, to abuse – 1960s sl.

• VERBAL DIARRHOEA
n. excessive talk, esp. when meaningless, pointless, and irritating to the hearer – 1823 sl.

• VERBALITY
n. the quality of being verbal; that which consists of mere words or verbiage – 1645

• VERBALLING
n. the act of faking a criminal confession – 1974 UK sl.

• VERBAL PROCESS
n. a detailed account or report – 1681 obs.

• VERBALS
n. 1. insults, abuse, backtalk – 1960s sl.
n. 2. a conversation, a talk – 1997 UK sl.

• VERBALUP
vb. to fake a confession of criminal guilt – 1973 UK sl.

• VERBARIAN
adj. having to do with words – 1830
n. an inventor or coiner of words – 1873

• VERBATE
vb. to reproduce word for word – 1512 obs.

• VERBATICAL
adj. verbal; pert. to words – 1612 obs.

• VERBATIMLY
adv. word for word – 1597 obs.

• VERBERABLE
adj. that may be, or is worthy to be beaten – 1656 obs.

• VERBERANT
adj. reverberant – 1890

• VERBERATE
vb. 1. to beat or strike so as to cause pain, esp. by way of punishment – 1625 rare
vb. 2. to vibrate, to tremble, to quiver – 1755 rare

• VERBERATION
n. 1. a smarting pain, as when beaten with rods, whips, or scourges – 1688 obs.
n. 2. the act of beating or striking so as to cause pain or hurt; esp. flogging or scourging; also, a blow or stroke – c1730
n. 3. reverberation of sound – 1855

• VERBERATIVE
adj. addicted to the practice of flogging – 1866

• VERBEROUS
 adj. smarting with pain – 1688 obs.

• VERB-GRINDER
n. a nit-picking schoolmaster – E19 sl.

• VERBICIDE
n. 1. the act of destroying the sense or value of a word; perversion of a word from its proper meaning, as in punning – 1858
n. 2. one who mutilates or destroys a word – 1867

• VERBIGERATE
vb. 1. to speak, to talk, to chat – 1656 obs.
vb. 2. to go on repeating the same word or phrase in a meaningless fashion, especially as a symptom of mental disease – 1892

• VERBOCINATION
n. expression of ideas by means of words – 1653 obs. rare

• VERBOMANIA
n. Bk1991 – an excessive use of or attraction to words

• VERBOSIOUS
adj. verbose, long-winded – 1676 obs.

• VERBOUS
 adj. verbose, long-winded – 1657 obs. rare

• VERD
n. 1. verdancy, freshness, newness, originality – 1603 obs.
n. 2. green parts of woods, forest verdure – 1641 obs.
n. 3. green; greenness – 1915 poetic usage

• VERDANCY
n. 1. the quality or condition of being verdant; greenness – 1631
n. 2. innocence, inexperience; rawness, simplicity – 1849

• VERDANT
adj. 1. of a green colour or hue; green – 1581
adj. 2. of persons: green, inexperienced, gullible – 1824

• VERD ANTIQUE
n. a green incrustation on brass or copper; verdigris – a1835

• VERDANTLY
adv. 1. in a verdant manner; freshly, flourishingly – 1828
adv. 2. in a raw or inexperienced manner; greenly – 1864

• VERDANTNESS
n. greenness – 1727 rare

• VERD-AZURE
adj. of a bluish-green colour; sea-green – 1876 rare

• VERDAZURINE
adj. bluish-green; sea-green – 1681 obs.

• VERDICT
n. an opinion – 1825 Eng. dial.

• VERDIE
n. a spoken formula or ritual action which is supposed to bring luck; a charm, a superstition – 1879 Sc.

• VERDOUR
n. fresh greenness of vegetation; fig. fresh or flourishing condition – 1447 obs.

• VERDOY
vb. to become green – 1480 obs.

• VERDUGO
n. a hangman or executioner; also, a term of abuse – a1616 obs. rare

• VERDUGOSHIP
n. the personality of an executioner – 1610 obs.

• VERDURANT
adj. green, verdant – 1583 obs.

• VERDURE
n. 1. the fresh green colour characteristic of flourishing vegetation; greenness, viridity – a1300
n. 2. sharpness, tartness, or unpleasantness of taste – 1508 obs.
n. 3. freshness or agreeable briskness of taste in fruits or liquors; also, taste, savour – 1513 obs.
n. 4. smell, odour – 1520 obs.
n. 5. fresh or flourishing condition – c1586
n. 6. signs of gullibility – 1861

• VERDUROUS
adj. of vegetation: rich or abounding in verdure; flourishing thick and green – 1604

• VERE
n. the season of spring; spring-time – c1325 obs.
vb. to raise up; to uplift – a1300 obs.

• VERECUND
adj. modest, bashful; shy, coy – c1550

• VERECUNDIOUS
adj. accompanied by modesty; modest, bashful, shy, coy – a1639 obs.

• VERECUNDITY
n. modesty, bashfulness .,..1721 rare

• VERECUNDNESS
n. modesty, bashfulness – 1727 rare

• VERECUNDOUS
adj. modest, shamefaced, demure – 1656

• VEREFIANCE
n. the act of proving; verification, confirmation – c1450 obs.

• VERENDA
n. the female genitals – 19C euphemism

• VERE-TIME
n. spring-time – 1382 obs.

• VERG
n. a mess – 1892 Sc.
vb. to soil, to defile – Bk1905 Sc.

• VERGE
n. 1. the male organ; the penis – a1400 obs.
n. 2. an accent-mark – 1555 obs.
n. 3. the end of life – 1750
n. 4. the horizon – 1822 poetic
n. 5. a strip or belt of trees – 1825 Sc. obs.
n. 6. a rod, wand, or stick – 1897 rare
n. 7. an idea, opinion, view – Bk1905 Eng. dial.
vb. of the sun: to descend toward the horizon; to sink, or being to do so – 1610

• VERGEN
n. a burrow of a fox, rabbit, etc. – Bk1905 Eng. dial.

• VERGER
n. 1. a garden or orchard; a pleasure-garden – a1300 obs.
n. 2. an official who carries a rod or similar symbol of office before the dignitaries of a cathedral, church, or university – 1472-3
n. 3. one whose duty it is to take care of the interior of a church, and to act as attendant – 1707

• VERGERER
n. an official who carries a rod or similar symbol of office before the dignitaries of a cathedral, church, or university – 1485 obs.

• VERGERESS
n. a female verger or caretaker of a church – 1889

• VERGERISM
n. action, etc., characteristic of a verger – 1857 rare

• VERGERY
n. a sacristy, a vestry – 1882 rare

• VERGLA
n. freezing rain – 2002 Can. sl.

• VERGOYNE
n. shame – 1484 obs.

• VERGOYNOUS
adj. ashamed – 1483 obs.

• VERICAL VEIN
n. a varicose vein – 1966 Amer. dial.

• VERIDICAL
adj. 1. speaking, telling, or relating the truth; truthful, veracious – 1653
adj. 2. of hallucinations, phantasms, etc.: coincident with, corresponding to, or representing real events or persons – 1884

• VERIDICALITY
n. truthfulness – a1901

• VERIDICALLY
adv. truthfully – 1836

• VERIDICALNESS
n. truth-speaking or the quality of speaking the truth – 1727 obs.

• VERIDICOUS
adj. truthful, veracious – 1817

• VERIFICAL
adj. speaking the truth, truthful, veracious – a1660 obs.

• VERIFICATE
vb. to prove a thing true – 1721 obs.

• VERIFICATION SHOT
n. the drawing of blood back into the syringe to make sure that one has hit a vein – 1930s US drug culture sl.

• VERIFICATIVE
adj. that verifies, affording proof – 1860 rare

• VERIFICATORY
adj. that verifies, affording proof – 1834

• VERIFYMENT
n. verification – a1325 obs.

• VERIGREEN
n. a very simple or gullible person – 1854 US sl.

• VERILIES
adv. verily, truly, really – 1902 Sc.

• VERILOQUOUS
adj. speaking the truth; truthful, veracious – 1672 obs.

• VERILY
adj. true, very – a1340 obs. rare
adv. in truth or verity; as a matter of truth or fact; really, truly – a1300 now arch.

• VERIMENT
adj. veritable, true, correct – c1590 obs.
adv. in truth or verity; truly, really – a1300 obs.
n. truth; verity – 1518 obs.

• VERINESS
n. actuality, reality, truth – 1574 obs.

• VERISIMILAR
adj. having the appearance or semblance of truth or reality; appearing true or real; probable, likely – 1681

• VERISIMILARY
 adj. having the appearance or semblance of truth or reality; appearing true or real; probable, likely – 1653 obs.

• VERISIMILE
n. a plausible semblance or appearance of something – 1652 obs.

• VERISIMILITUDE
n. 1. the appearance of being true or real; likeness or resemblance to truth, reality, or fact; probability, likelihood – 1603
n. 2. an apparent truth – 1783

• VERISIMILITUDINARY
adj. of persons: having a show of being correct in opinion or judgement – 1675 obs.

• VERISIMILITY
n. probability, likelihood – 1646 obs.

• VERISIMILOUS
adj. having the appearance or semblance of truth or reality; appearing true or real; probable, likely – 1635 obs.

• VERITABILITY
n. a truth or verity; a true statement, correct account – 1864 rare

• VERITABLE
adj. 1. of a statement, etc.: that is in accordance or conformity with the truth; true – 1474
adj. 2. genuine, real, true; not counterfeit, false, or spurious; correctly or properly so called – 1483
adj. 3. of persons: speaking the truth; truthful, veracious – 1489 obs.
adv. truly, veritably – 1490 obs.

• VERITABLENESS
n. truth, veracity – 1664 rare

• VERITABLY
adv. with truth or verity; truly, truthfully; genuinely, really – 1481

• VERITY
n. 1. truth, either in general or with reference to a particular fart; conformity to fact or reality – c1375
n. 2. true facts or circumstances – 1422
n. 3. a true statement, a correct account, truth – 1533
n. 4. truthfulness, veracity, sincerity – c1555
n. 5. reality, real existence, actuality – a1633

• VERJUICE
vb. to embitter, to make sour – 1836

• VERMEIL
adj. of a bright scarlet or red colour; vermilion – c1400 chiefly poetic usage
n. 1. blood – 1590 obs. rare
n. 2. a vermilion hue or colour – 1590
vb. to colour or suffuse, to stain over, with or as with vermilion or bright red – 1596 chiefly poetic usage

• VERMELET
n. vermilion, bright red, scarlet – c1530 obs.

• VERMENT
n. averment; the act of proving, verification – 1472 obs.

• VERMICULATE
vb. to become worm-eaten – c1631 obs.

• VERMICULOSE
adj. infested with worms – 1727 rare

• VERMICULOUS
adj. full of worms – 1690 rare

• VERMIL
adj. of a bright scarlet or red colour; vermilion – c1400 chiefly poetic usage
n. blood – 1590 obs. rare
vb. to colour or suffuse, to stain over, with or as with vermilion or bright red – 1596 chiefly poetic usage

• VERMILION
adj. abominable, terrible – L19 Aust. euphemism for ‘bloody’
n. a blush – 1787 obs.
vb. 1. to blush – 1719 rare
vb. 2. to cover or smear someone with blood – E19 Aust. sl.

• VERMIN
n. 1. a vile, objectionable, or offensive person – 1581
n. 2. a large quantity or number; a swarm, a crowd, multitude – 1745 Sc.
n. 3. a term of abuse; also, applied playfully to a mischievous child – 1777 Sc. & Eng. dial.

• VERMINAILLE
n. vile, objectionable, or offensive people – 1600 obs.

• VERMINIAN
adj. consisting or composed of vermin – 1640 obs.

• VERMINOUS
adj. noxious, objectionable, offensive – 1621-3

• A VERMINT O’ RATS
n. a great quantity or plague of rats – Bk1905 N. Ireland

• VERMINULOUS
adj. made by vermin – 1665-6 obs.

• VERMINY
adj. infested with vermin; verminous – 1859 rare

• VERMIPHOBIA
n. Bk1991 – an abnormal fear of worms

• VERMONT CHARITY
n. sympathy – 1910s US tramps’ sl.

• VERMONT GREEN
n. a local variety of marijuana – M20 US drug culture sl.

• VERMONT THAW
n. ‘six feet of snow and a hurricane’ – 1891 Amer. dial.

• VERNACLY
adv. vernacularly, in the native or mother tongue – 1673 obs.

• VERNACULAR
adj. 1. of diseases: characteristic of or occurring in a particular country or district; endemic – 1666 obs.
adj. 2. of a slave: that is born on his master’s estate; home-born – 1804 rare
adj. 3. personal, private – 1840

• VERNACULARY
adj. of a language or dialect: that is naturally spoken by the people of a particular country or district; native, indigenous – 1652 obs.

• VERNACULATE
vb. 1. to call in the vernacular – 1887 US obs.
vb. 2. to use native language – 1895 US obs.

• VERNACULE
adj. of a language or dialect: that is naturally spoken by the people of a particular country or district; native, indigenous – 1669 obs. rare

• VERNACULIZE
vb. to translate into the native speech of a people; to make vernacular – a1802 obs.

• VERNACULOUS
adj. 1. low-bred, scurrilous – 1605 obs.
adj. 2. of products: indigenous, native – 1606 obs.
adj. 3. that writes, uses, or speaks the native or indigenous language of a country or district – 1658 obs.

• VERNAL
adj. 1. coming, appearing, or happening in spring – 1534
adj. 2. suggestive of spring; having the mildness or freshness of spring; early, youthful – 1790
n. the vernal season; the spring – 1654 obs.

• VERNALITY
n. the ‘spring-time’ of something; the first part, the beginning – 1639 obs.

• VERNALIZE
vb. to render spring-like – 1830 rare

• VERNALLY
adv. in or like spring – 1727 rare

• VERNANCY
n. a flourishing state; greenness – 1669 obs.

• VERNANT
adj. 1. flourishing or growing in, or as in, spring – c1440 now rare or obs.
adj. 2. freshly green; verdant – 1594 now rare or obs.
adj. 3. pert. to the spring; vernal – 1654 now rare or obs.

• VERNAL SEASON
n. the season of spring – 1644

• VERNATE
vb. to become young again – 1623 obs.

• VERNEUK
vb. to cheat, to humbug, to swindle – 1871 S. Afr. sl.

• VERNEUKER
n. a defrauder, a swindler – 1905 S. Afr. sl.

• VERNEUKERY
n. defrauding, swindling – 1896 S. Afr. sl.

• VERNILE
adj. servile, slavish – 1623 obs. rare

• VERNILITY
n. servility, slavishness, flattering behaviour – 1623 obs.

• VERNIX
n. varnish – 1573 obs. rare

• VEROL
n. French pox; syphilis – 1596 obs. rare

• VEROLA
n. syphilis – 1600 obs.

• VERONICA LAKE
n. a steak – 1950s rhyming sl.

• VERQUERE
n. an old form of backgammon – a1700 obs.

• VERRE
n. 1. glass – c1374 obs.
n. 2. a vessel made of glass, esp. a drinking vessel; a glass – 1382 obs.

• VERREMENT
adv. really, truly – 1303 obs.

• VERRER
n. a worker in glass; a glazier – 1415 obs.

• VERRID
adj. feared – 1876 Eng. dial. obs.

• VERSABILITY
n. 1. versatility – 1673 obs.
n. 2. changeableness – 1721 obs.

• VERSABLE
adj. that turns, or may be turned – 1623 obs.

• VERSABLENESS
n. aptness to be turned – 1727 obs.

• VERSAL
adj. 1. universal – 1592 obs.
adj. 2. single; individual – 1709 obs.

• VERSANT
adj. 1. concerned, anxious, or busy about, occupied or engaged in or with, something – 1645
adj. 2. versed in or conversant with a subject, etc.; familiar with; knowing the ways of – 1711 Sc.
adj. 3. of persons: skilled, versed, or experienced in a subject, practice, etc., as the result of having been occupied with it – 1766 rare
n. 1. the slope, side, or descent of a mountain or mountain chain; the area or region covered by this – 1851
n. 2. tendency to slope or descend; declination – 1859

• VERSATE
vb. to turn about – 1887 rare

• VERSATILE
adj. 1. of persons: fickle, inconstant – 1682 rare
adj. 2. bisexual – 1959 euphemism
adj. 3. able to enjoy both active and passive sexual roles – 1950s US homosexual sl.

• VERSATILOUS
adj. marked by versatility or variableness; versatile – 1629 obs. rare

• VERSATILOUSNESS
n. versatility – 1640 obs.

• VERSATION
n. a turning over or backwards and forwards – 1656 obs.

• VERSATIVE
adj. marked by adaptability or variety – 1846 rare

• VERSE
n. a clause, sentence, or the like – c1000 obs.
vb. 1. to overthrow, to overturn, to upset – 1556 obs.
vb. 2. to impose upon; to cozen, to cheat, to defraud – 1591 cant obs.
vb. 3. to practise fraud or imposition – 1591 cant obs.
vb. 4. to turn over a book in study or investigation – 1606 obs.

• VERSE-FELLOW
n. a fellow or companion verse-maker – 1592 obs.

• VERSEFY
n. a father-in-law – 1814 Sc. obs.

• VERSELET
n. a little verse; a small poem – 1836

• VERSEMAKER
n. one who makes or writes verses; a poet – 1647

• VERSEMAN
n. a man who writes verse; a poet; later, a minor poet or versifier – 1652

• VERSEMANSHIP
n. verse-making – 1762 rare

• VERSEMONGER
n. a versifier, esp. one who writes poor or indifferent verse; a poetaster – 1634

• VERSEMONGERY
n. the writing of bad verse – 1836

• VERSER
n. 1. the member of a confidence trickster team (practising the “Barnard’s Law) who actually plays the game of chance through which a victim is defrauded and who would often claim to be a friend of one of the victim’s friends – c1550 UK criminals’ sl.
n. 2. a writer of verse; a poet – c1611

• VERSICAL
adj. composed or written in verse – 1854 rare

• VERSICLE
n. a short or single metrical line; a little verse – 1573

• VERSING LAW
n. confidence tricks that focus on the use of counterfeit gold to entrap the victim – 16C UK criminals’ sl.

• VERSIONING
n. a technique in hip-hop music of blending different periods and styles of recorded music – 2000 US sl.

• VERSIPELLOUS
adj. having the faculty of changing the skin – 1650 obs.

• VERSMOIA
n. a mother-in-law – 1814 Sc. obs.

• VERSUTILOQUENT
adj. talking cunningly or craftily – 1727
n. a crafty talker; one using words craftily – 1656

• VERSUTIOUS
adj. cunning, crafty, wily – 1660 obs.

• VERT
adj. green – Bk1905 Eng. dial.
n. 1. a sexual pervert – 19C
n. 2. in skateboarding: an almost vertical ramp – 2003 UK sl.
vb. to practice sexual perversion – 19C US sl.

• VERTICAL BACON SANDWICH
n. the labia majora – 1990s US sl.

• VERTICAL BATHTUB
n. a wall-mounted men’s urinal – M20 US jocular usage

• VERTICAL CARE-GRINDER
n. the treadmill – 1883 thieves’ sl.
(a device formerly used for driving machinery, consisting of a large wheel with steps fitted into its inner surface; it was turned by the weight of people or animals treading the steps)

• VERTICAL DRINKING
n. drinking while standing at the bar, esp. in a crowd – 1950s NZ sl.

• VERTICAL JOCKEY
n. an elevator operator – 1953 US sl.

• VERTICAL SMILE
n. the vagina – 20C sl.

• VERTICAL VEIN
n. a varicose vein – 1966 Amer. dial.

• VERTIE
adj. careful, cautious, prudent; industrious, wide-awake, eager; attentive to business – 1781 Sc. obs.

• VERTIES
vb. 1. to warn – 1825 Sc.
vb. 2. to advertise – Bk1905 Sc.

• VERTISE
vb. to warn – 1825 Sc.

• VERTY
adj. energetic, active, esp. at an early hour of the day, early rising – 1804 Sc.

• VERY
adj. excellent – 1989
adv. very much, absolutely – 2002 UK sl.

• VERY À LA
adj. absolutely in fashion; generally contemptuous, disparaging, or ironic in tone – 1984 UK sl.

• THE VERY ARTICLE
n. the precise thing; the thing or person most needed – c1850 colloq.

• VERY CLOSE VEIN
n. a varicose vein – 1926 Amer. dial.

• VERY COARSE VEIN
n. a varicose vein – 1854 Amer. dial.

• A VERY DEAL
n. a considerable quantity – 1865 Eng. dial.

• VERY FAMILLIONAIRE
adj. typical of a nouveau riche – M19 UK society usage

• VERY FRONCEY
adj. vulgar – L19 UK society usage

• THE VERY IDEA!
int. implies one’s (supposed) shock or disgust on hearing a proposition – 20C sl.

• VERY MOST
adv. generally – Bk1905 Eng. dial.

• VERY UNCOMFORTABLE PLACE
n. hell – 20C Brit. euphemism

• VERY WELL
adj. acceptable – M19 sl.


Back to INDEX V

Back to DICTIONARY