Dictionary: WOP – WQ


• WOP
adj. 1961 US sl. – Italian
n. 1. L19 sl., orig. US, derogatory – an Italian; the Italian language 
n. 2. 1980 Amer. dial. – a homemade alcoholic drink consisting of any combination of hard liquors, with other beverages or fruit sometimes added; by extension, an occasion at which this is consumed
n. 3. 20C Aust. sl. – a prostitute
 
• WOPAJAWED
adj. crooked, askew, awry, lopsided, out of shape …1934 Amer. dial.
 
• WOPATULI
n. a homemade alcoholic drink consisting of any combination of hard liquors, with other beverages or fruit sometimes added; by extension, an occasion at which this is consumed …1980 Amer. dial.
 
• WOPCACKER
adj. astounding, notable, excellent …c1925 Aust. sl.
n. anything astounding, notable, or excellent …c1925 Aust. sl.
 
• WOPE!
int. whoa! stop!; also used to express surprise or incredulity …1942 Amer. dial.
 
• WOP-JAWED
adj. 1. 1965 Amer. dial. – crooked, askew, awry, lopsided, out of shape
adj. 2. 1981 US circus & carnival usage – amazed by an act or demonstration
 
• WOPPER
n. 1. anything or anyone unusually large of its kind …c1780
n. 2. a thumping lie …1791 colloq.
 
• WOPPERED
adj. fatigued, wearied, restless …1868 Eng. dial.
 
• WOPPER-JAWED
adj. 1. crooked, askew, awry, lopsided, out of shape …1905 Amer. dial.
n. 2. having a protruding or otherwise misshapen lower jaw …1930 Amer. dial.
 
• WOPPING
adj. unusually large or great …M19
 
• WOPPLE-JAWED
adj. having a protruding or misshapen lower jaw …1883 Amer. dial.
 
• WOPPY-JAWED
adj. crooked, askew, awry, lopsided, out of shape …1965 Amer. dial.
 
• WOPSE
vb. to maul, to handle …Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
 
• WOP SPECIAL
n. macaroni or spaghetti dishes …20C US sl., not always derogatory
 
• WORB
n. a disreputable or slovenly person …1933 Aust. sl.
 
• WORD
int. 1. an exclamation of agreement and appreciation, used when someone has said something important or profound …1987 African-American teen sl.
int. 2. an exhortation to listen, to pay attention …1980s African-American sl.
vb. 1. to speak …1905 Aust. sl.
vb. 2. to reprimand …1945 Aust. sl.
 
• THE WORD
n. 1. 1961 sl. – gossip, rumour; news or information
n. 2. 1962 US sl. – an order
 
 WORD-FLOWING
adj. fluent in speech …1681 obs.
 
• THE WORD FROM THE BIRD
n. the genuine truth …1950s Amer. sl.
 
• WORDS-AND-MUSIC BOY
n. a songwriter …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
 
• WORD UP!
int. an exhortation to listen, to pay attention …1986 African-American sl.
 
 WORD-WANTON
adj. obscene in speech …B1900
 
• WORK
n. 1. 1950 US sl. – cheating in gambling, especially in craps
n. 2. 1959 Amer. sl. – sex
n. 3. 1963 US sl. – dice or cards that have been altered for the purpose of cheating
n. 4. 1974 US sl. – the betting slips in an illegal lottery or gambling operation
n. 5. 1987 US sl. – killing
n. 6. 1989 US sl. – crack cocaine
n. 7. 1990 US sl. – in professional wrestling: a completed scripted and state event
n. 8. 2001 US sl. – cosmetic surgery
n. 9. 2002 US sl. – a prostitute with steady earnings
vb. 1. 1851 Amer. sl. – to exert one’s charm, power, persuasiveness, etc., esp. on an audience; to manipulate
vb. 2. 1851 Amer. sl. – to go about a place begging, selling, stealing, etc.; to ply one’s often-dishonest trade
vb. 3. 1957 US sl. – to have sex with someone
vb. 4. 1963 US sl. – to cheat at gambling
vb. 5. 1989 US sl. – to dilute a powdered drug
vb. 6. 1993 US sl. – to sell drugs
vb. 7. M20 US criminals’ sl. – to solicit and perform sexual acts, as ‘work an area’ in prostitution
 
• WORK A FLANKER
vb. to trick, to swindle …1923 sl.
 
• WORKAHOLIC
n. a person whose primary and obsessive interest is work; a compulsive worker …1968 Amer. sl.
 
• WORK A READY
vb. to effect a swindle …1942 Aust. sl.
 
• WORKAROUND
n. 1991 US sl. – in computing: a temporary fix of a problem
 
• WORK AT ARM’S LENGTH
vb. to work at a disadvantage or clumsily …19C sl.
 
• WORK AT IDLE HALL
vb. to be unemployed …20C W. Indies sl.
 
• WORK AT MCDONALDS
vb. 1975 US sl. – to be a member of the Mexican Mafia, a Mexican-American prison gang
 
• WORK BLUE
vb. to use obscene language; to peddle smut …1990s Amer. sl.
 
• WORK BOTH SIDES OF THE STREET
vb. to take two contrary positions at once …1930s US political usage
 
• WORK BRICKLE
adj. ready to work …Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
 
• WORK-BRITTLE
adj. 1647 Eng. & Amer. dial. rare  – eager to work, earnest or intent on work, industrious, energetic
 
• WORK BY THE HAG
vb. to do piece-work in contradistinction to day-work …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
 
• WORK CAPITAL
vb. to commit an offense punishable with death …1878 sl.
 
• WORK DOUBLE TIDES
vb. to work as hard as possible …1788
 
• WORKED UP
adj. angry; excited; distraught …1883 Amer. sl.
 
• WORKER
n. 1. c1870 Aust. colloq. – a draught bullock
n. 2. 1962 US sl. – a gambling cheat
n. 3. 1980 US circus & carnival usage – a large blown-up balloon shown by the concession selling packages of balloons
n. 4. 1993 US sl. – a professional wrestler who puts on a good performance
n. 5. 1995 US sl. – a member of a drug-selling enterprise who sells drugs on the street
 
• WORK FOR A DEAD HORSE
vb. to work for wages already paid …M17 sl.
 
• WORK FOR THE QUEEN
vb. to work overtime without receiving extra pay …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
 
• WORKHOUSE
n. a hard, ill-found ship …20C nautical usage
 
• WORK IN FRISCO
vb. 1975 US sl. – to serve time at the San Quentin Prison, San Rafael, California
 
• WORKING
adj. 1981 US sl. – in craps: said of a bet that will be in effect on the next roll
 
• WORKING A WELT
adj. c1900 UK sl. – dishonestly contriving a break from work
 
• WORKING BOY
n. 1987 US sl. – a male prostitute
 
• WORKING BROAD
n. a prostitute …M20 US euphemism
 
• WORKING CLASS
n. a glass (drinking) …Brit. rhyming sl.
 
• WORKING CLASSES
n. spectacles …Brit. rhyming sl. for ‘glasses’
 
• WORKING END
n. 1992 US sl. – the dangerous end of a tool or weapon
 
• WORKING FIFTY
n. 1990 US sl. – a large piece of crack cocaine bought at a wholesale price
 
• WORKING FOR STREET, WALKER & CO.
phr. out of work, and walking the streets in search of it …c1920 Aust.
 
• WORKING GIRL
n. 1968 euphemism, orig. US – a prostitute
 
• WORKING-OVER
n. chastisement …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
 
• WORKING STIFF
n. a common working man; an ordinary worker …1930s Amer. sl.
 
• WORKING WOMAN
n. a prostitute …M20 US euphemism
 
• WORK IT
vb. to behave in a blatantly seductive way; to engage in high-pressure salesmanship …1980s Amer. sl.
 
• WORK LIKE A BEAVER
vb. to work hard …a1775 US
 
• WORK LIKE A CHARM
vb. to achieve the objective with perfect success …1880 Amer. sl.
 
• WORK LIKE DIGGORY
vb. to work hard …1892 Ireland
 
• WORKMAN
n. a professional gambler …c1800 gambling usage
 
• WORK OFF
vb. to masturbate …19C Brit. sl.
 
• WORK OFF THE DEAD HORSE
vb. to work to pay off a debt …19C Aust., NZ, & US sl.
 
• WORKOHOLIC
n. a workaholic …E1970s sl.
 
• WORK ONE OVER
vb. to hit repeatedly; to assault by hitting …1927 sl.
 
• WORK ONE’S ASS OFF
vb. to work hard …1924 Amer. sl.
 
• WORK ONE’S BUNS OFF
vb. to work very hard …1940s Amer. sl.
 
• WORK ONESELF UP
vb. to allow oneself to get very upset …20C Amer. sl.
 
• WORK ONE’S FINGERS TO THE BONE
vb. to work very hard
 
• WORK ONE’S GUTS OUT
vb. to work extremely hard …colloq.
 
• WORK ONE’S OWN ASH-HOPPER
vb. to do one’s own work …1843 Amer. dial.
 
• WORK ONE’S TAIL OFF
vb. to work very hard …1940s Amer. sl.
 
• WORK ONE’S TICKET
vb. to get out of a chore by feigning illness or injury …Brit. sl., orig. army usage
 
• WORKOUT
n. 1. 1909 Amer. sl. – a session of strenuous physical exercises, practice of athletic efforts, etc.
n. 2. 20C Amer. sl. – a hard job; an exhausting effort
vb. (usually as ‘work out’)
vb. 1. 1885 Amer. sl. – to end, to eventuate
vb. 2. 1909 Amer. sl. – to do strenuous exercises; to have a hard session of physical conditioning
vb. 3. 1975 US sl. – to masturbate
vb. 4. M20 US sl. – to coit
 
• WORK-OVER
n. chastisement …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
vb. (as ‘work over’) to beat up, to assault and batter …Brit. sl.
 
• WORKS
n. 1. 1934 Amer. drug culture sl. – the devices used for injecting narcotics; drug paraphernalia
n. 2. 20C sl. – either the male or female genitals
n. 3. 20C sl. – the ‘third’ degree,’ a prolonged and supposedly violent period of questioning by the police 
 
• THE WORKS
n. 1. c1870 prison sl. – a convict establishment
n. 2. 1899 US sl. – the complete treatment
n. 3. 20C sl. – copulation
n. 4. L20 drug culture sl., orig. US – all the equipment needed for injecting drugs: syringe, spoon, etc.
 
• WORKSHOP
n. the female genitals …18C obs. euphemism
 
• WORK SOMEONE OVER
vb. to beat someone, esp. cruelly and systematically …1927 Amer. sl.
 
• WORK THE BROADS
vb. 1. to ‘stack’ the cards; to work a three-card trick …c1840 criminals’ sl.
vb. 2. to issue counterfeit coin …1923 criminals’ sl.
 
• WORK THE CUTS
vb. 1986 US sl. – of a prostitute: to solicit customers on the streets
 
• WORK THE DUMB ORACLE
vb. 19C Brit. euphemism – to copulate 
 
• WORK THE GLORY ROAD
vb. 1959 US sl. – to affect religious conversion while in prison in the hope of receiving an early parole
 
• WORK THE HAIRY ORACLE
vb. 19C Brit. euphemism – to copulate
 
• WORK THE HOLE
vb. 1953 US sl. – to rob drunks sleeping on subway platform cars
 
• WORK THE MACE
vb. 1to swindle …M18 sl.
vb. 2. to obtain goods by persuading the shopkeeper to extend credit that one has no intention of paying …E19 sl.
 
• WORK THE MAIN STEM
vb. to be along a town’s main street …L19 sl.
 
• WORK THE NUTS
vb. 1980 US sl. – to operate a shell game in a circus midway or carnival
 
• WORK THE ORACLE
vb. 20C Brit. sl. – to successfully perform something through stealth and cunning or with the aid of an outright lie
 
• WORK THE OTHER SIDE OF THE STREET
vb. 1982 US sl. – to be on opposing sides of a bipolar situation; to make a living as a criminal
 
• WORK THE PANHANDLE
vb. to beg …M19 US sl.
 
• WORK THE RATTLE
vb. to operate, as a professional thief, on the trains …c1890 UK sl.
 
• WORK THE TICKET
vb. to obtain one’s discharge from the Army by having oneself adjudged physically unfit …L1890s sl.
 
• WORK THE TUBS
vb. to pick pockets on buses or at bus-stops …1929 sl.
 
• WORK THINGS
vb. to achieve something, not necessarily though usually dishonest, or, at best, dubious …L19 colloq.
 
• WORK UP
vb. 1. of men: to copulate …19C colloq.
vb. 2. to devise …M19 Amer. sl.
 
• WORKUS
n. a Methodist chapel …c1840 Anglicans’ usage
 
• THE WORKUS
n. the workhouse …19C
 
• WORK WITH THE LEFT HAND
vb. to work inefficiently …1650 obs.
 
• WORLD
n. 16C literary euphemism – a breast
 
• THE WORLD
n. 1970 US sl. – during the war in Vietnam, the US, life outside the military
 
• WORLD-BEATER
n. a very effective person; a winner; a champion …1893 Amer. sl.
 
• WORLD-CLASS
adj. very superior; outstanding; super-excellent …1950 Amer. sl.
 
• WORLD OF SHIT
n. 1984 US sl. – a very dangerous situation
 
• WORLDS
n. 1990 US sl. – commercially manufactured cigarettes
 
• WORM
n. 1. c800 – a despicable person 
n. 2. 1864 sl. obs. – a policeman
n. 3. 19C sl., derogatory – the penis 
n. 4. Bk1902 sl. – a police spy; an informer
n. 5. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – a cheat 
n. 6. 1980s Amer. computing usage – in computing: a program that copies itself from one computer to another in a network, does not destroy data, but can clutter up a system 
n. 7. 1981 US sl. – phencyclidine
n. 7. 20C US sl. – a low creep or jerk
n. 8. M20 sl. – a bookworm, an ardent student or reader 
vb. 1859 UK sl. – to remove the beard of an oyster or mussel 
 
• WORM-BURNER
n. a fast-moving ground ball in baseball, golf, etc. …20C Amer. sl.
 
• WORM CASTLE
n. a hardtack biscuit …US Civil War usage
 
• WORM-CRUSHER
n. a foot-soldier …L19 UK army sl.
 
• WORM DIRT
n. 2001 US sl. – chewing tobacco
 
• WORM-EATER
n. 1. a skilful workman drilling minute holes in bogus antique furniture to simulate wormholes …1880s cabinet-makers’ usage
n. 2. a fellator …20C sl.
 
• WORM FOOD
n. a dead body; a corpse …20C sl.
 
• WORMHOLE
n. an unauthorized way into a computer system …1980s Amer. computing usage
 
• WORM ONE’S WAY (INTO)
vb. to enter or penetrate stealthily .,..1845 Amer. sl.
 
• WORM OUT OF SOMETHING
vb. to evade or avoid an unpleasant situation …1893 Amer. sl.
 
• WORMS
n. 1. a line cut in the turf as a goal-line at football …c1880 UK sl.
n. 2. macaroni …L19 sl.
n. 3. spaghetti …E20 sl.
 
• WORMS AND SNAILS
n. nails …Brit. rhyming sl.
 
• WORMS IN BLOOD
n. spaghetti in tomato sauce …20C US jocular usage
 
• WORN DOWN TO THE NAIL
adj. worn out; almost at an end …1873 Eng. dial.
 
• WORRAB
n. a barrow …1860s UK back-slang
 
• WORRIED AS A PREGNANT FOX IN A FOREST FIRE
adj. extremely anxious …c1920 UK
 
• WORRIMENT
n. worry …L19 colloq.
 
• WORRIT
n. 1. anxiety, mental distress …1838 colloq.
n. 2. a person worrying himself or others …1848 UK colloq.
vb. to worry; to distress; to pester …1818 colloq.
 
• WORRY
vb. 1951 US – of a jockey in horseracing: to ride a horse
 
• WORRY AND STRIFE
n. a wife …20C UK rhyming sl.
 
• WORRY-BOX
n. someone who fusses …1965 Amer. dial.
 
• WORRY-CAT
n. one who fusses a lot …1965 Amer. dial.
 
• WORRY-GUTS
n. a person who worries …1932 sl.
 
• WORRYWART
n. a person who worries excessively; a constantly apprehensive person …1956 Amer. sl.
 
• WORSE END OF THE STAFF
n. the disadvantage …c1530 colloq.
 
• WORSE HALF
n. one’s wife …1965 Amer. sl.
 
• WORSERER
adj. worse …1752 sl.
 
• WORSE THAN THE SEVEN-YEAR ITCH
adj. very bad …1929 Amer. dial.
 
• WORSE THINGS HAPPEN AT SEA
phr. a phrase of vague consolation …c1910
 
• WORSHIP AT THE ALTAR
vb. to fellate …20C homosexual sl.
 
• WORSHIP THE PORCELAIN GOD(DESS)
vb. to vomit, esp. in the toilet …20C Amer. sl.
 
• WORST HALF
n. 1. one’s husband …1965 Amer. sl.
n. 2. one’s wife …1965 Amer. sl.
 
• WORTH A BOB OR TWO
adj. of persons: (fairly) wealthy; of things: (fairly) valuable ..20C colloq.
 
• WORTH A GUINEA A BOX
phr. applied to any small, cheap, yet good or useful article …c1920
 
• WORTH A GUINEA A MINUTE!
int. applied to a pair (usually) of persons with a good line in humorous cross-talk …c1950 Services’ usage
 
• WORTH A JEW’S EYE
adj. extremely valuable …1598 colloq.
 
• WORTH A PLUM
adj. rich …c1710 colloq.
 
• WORTH A PULL
adj. worth investigating …19C sl.
 
• WORTHLESS AS A PINCH OF SOUR OWL MANURE
adj. very worthless …1985 Amer. dial.
 
• WORTH ONE’S SALT
adj. efficient; worthy of one’s pay
 
• WORTH ONE’S WEIGHT IN BURNT COPPER
adj. of little worth …1887 colloq.
 
• WORY
n. any military reminiscence …c1950 army usage
 
• WOSSIE
n. a weak, timid, passive person …1982 US sl.
 
• WOSSNAME
n. a thing or person whose name is not known, forgotten, etc. …20C sl.
 
 WOTCHA
int. hello, ‘what cheer?’ …1894 Brit.
 
• WOTCHER
int. hello, ‘what cheer?’ …1894 Brit.
 
• WOULD KILL A BROWN DOG
adj. of food: dreadful, disgusting, inedible …1966 Aust. sl.
 
• WOULDN’T FEED IT TO A JAP ON ANZAC DAY
adj. of food: absolutely disgusting …Aust. sl., racist
 
• WOULDN’T IT!
int. a exclamation indicating dismay, disapproval, disgust, etc. …Aust. sl.
 
• WOULDN’T IT GIVE YOU THE PIP
phr. expression of disgust or exasperation …20C
 
• WOULDN’T IT GIVE YOU THE SHITS
phr. expression of disgust or exasperation …20C
 
• WOULDN’T IT GIVE YOU THE TOM-TITS
phr. expression of disgust or exasperation …20C
 
• WOULDN’T IT MAKE YOU SPIT BLOOD
phr. a phrase of disgust …c1910 Eng.
 
• WOULDN’T IT MAKE YOU SPIT CHIPS
phr. a phrase of disgust …c1920 Aust.
 
• WOULDN’T IT RIP THE HARNESS OFF A NIGHTMARE
phr. expression of disgust or exasperation …20C
 
• WOULDN’T IT RIP YOU?
int. used to express disgust or exasperation …1941 Aust. sl.
 
• WOULDN’T IT ROCK YOU!
int. an exclamation of annoyance …1940 Aust. & NZ
 
• WOULDN’T IT ROOT YOU!
int. an exclamation of disgust, exasperation, or annoyance …1940 Aust. & NZ
 
• WOULDN’T IT ROT YOUR SOCKS
phr. a phrase of disgust …c1930 Aust.
 
• WOULDN’T KNOW IF A TRAM WAS UP YOU
phr. to be docilely unaware …1972 Aust. sl.
 
• WOULDN’T SAY NO
phr. used for registering acceptance of something, sometimes as a suggestion that something would be accepted if it were offered …1939 UK sl.
 
• WOULDN’T THAT JAR YOU!
int. an exclamation of surprise …1965 Amer. dial.
 
• WOULDN’T WORK IN AN IRON LUNG
phr. to be extremely lazy …1971 Aust. sl.
 
• WOULD YOU ADAM AND EVE IT?
phr. would you believe it? …1910s rhyming sl.
 
• WOULD YOU BUY A USED CAR FROM THIS MAN?
phr. can this person really be trusted? is this an honest face? …1960s Amer. sl.
 
• WOUND
adj. tense, anxious, on edge …1788 sl.
n. the female genitals …16C literary euphemism
 
• A WOUNDED DEAL
n. a considerable quantity …1740 Eng. dial.
 
• WOUNDED DUCK
n. 1in baseball: a short looping fly that falls for a hit …1980s Amer. sports usage
n. 2. in football: a wobbling forward pass, which might be intercepted …1980s Amer. sports usage
 
• WOUNDED IN THE THIGH
adj. deflowered …16C literary euphemism
 
• WOUNDED SOLDIER
n. a bottle or can of beer that has been partly consumed …1991 US sl.
 
• WOUND UP
adj. 1. tense, anxious, on edge …1788 sl.
adj. 2. angry, annoyed …2001 UK sl.
 
• WOW
adj. 1. exciting …1921 Amer. sl.
adj. 2. excellent; first-rate …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
int. an exclamation of pleasure, wonder, admiration, surprise, etc. …1513
n. 1. something beautiful or attractive …Bk1892 Amer. sl.
n. 2. a thing of wonder; something very exciting; a sensational success …1920 US sl.
n. 3. a theatrical success …1920s Amer. show business usage
n. 4. an intrusive wavering sound from a record player, usually caused by uneven running of the turntable …1930s Amer. sl.
n. 5. an attractive girl …Bk1942 Amer. college sl.
n. 6. something excellent …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
n. 7. an exclamation mark (!) …1983 US sl.
n. 8. the psychiatric hospital in Auckland, NZ …1998 NZ sl.
vb. 1. to impress someone powerfully and favourably …1920s Amer. sl.
vb. 2. to excite; to cause to lose composure; to overwhelm emotionally …1924 sl., chiefly US
vb. 3. to amaze, to astonish, to greatly impress …Aust. sl.
 
• WOWEE!
int. an exclamation of surprise, astonishment, wonder, pleasure, dismay, etc. …1921
 
• WOWEE-KAZOWEE!;  WOWIE-KAZOWIE!
int. an exclamation of pleasure, wonder, admiration, surprise, etc. …1990s Amer. sl.
 
• WOWSER
n. 1. a person very puritanical in morals; a spoilsport; one who neither swears, drinks, nor smokes …c1895 Aust colloq.
n. 2. an unpleasant or despicable person …1899 Aust. & NZ sl.
n. 3. a prude who publicly complains about the supposed deleterious effects of other people’s behaviour on society; a moral crusader …1900 Aust. sl.
n. 4. something very successful and impressive; a sensation …1928 Amer. sl.
n. 5. a teetotaller …1957 sl.
n. 6. a ‘blue-stocking’; an intellectual or literary woman…B1959 Aust. sl.
 
• WOWSERISH
adj. like a ‘wowser’; prudish, very puritanical  …1906 Aust. sl.
 
• WOWSERISM
n. prudishness; the characteristic behaviour of a ‘wowser’ …1904 Aust. sl.
 
• WOWSERISTIC
adj. prudish, puritanical …1907 Aust. sl.
 
• WOWSERY
adj. like a ‘wowser’; prudish; very puritanical …c1925 Aust. sl.
 
• WOW-WEE!
int. an expression of surprise, wonder, pleasure, dismay, etc. …Aust. sl.
 
• WOW-WOW
n. a dog …1887 colloq., chiefly child usage
 
• WOZA
n. a person who used to be successful or well known …2001 UK sl.
 
• WOZZ
n. a fool; an idiot …Brit. sl.
 
• WOZZED
adj. exhausted …1998 NZ sl.
 
• WOZZEN
n. the throat, the windpipe, the gullet …1858 Amer. dial.
 
• WOZZLE
n. a fool; an idiot …Brit. sl.
 
• W.P.B.
vb. to put into the Waste-Paper Basket …1884 colloq.
 
• W.P.B. FILE
n. the wastepaper basket, viewed as a place for filing useless or unwanted material …Aust. sl.


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