Dictionary: WR – WRN


• WRABBED
adj. 1540 obs. rare – perverse; difficult to manage

• WRABBLE
vb. 1513 obs. rare – to wriggle

• WRAC
n. 1956 sl. – a member of the Women’s Royal Army Corps, the women’s corps of the British Army

• WRACK
adj. 1. c1375 obs. rare – worthless, base, evil; said of persons
adj. 2. 1487 obs. rare – damaged, impaired,, injured
n. 1. c900 obs. – retributive punishment; vengeance, revenge
n. 2. c1386 – a wrecked ship or other vessel; a vessel ruined or crippled by wreck
n. 3. c1400 obs. – a disastrous change in a state or condition of affairs; wreck, ruin subversion
n. 4. c1407 – damage, disaster, or injury to a person, state, etc., by reason of force, outrage, or violence; devastation, destruction
n. 5. 1426 obs. – the ruin, downfall, or overthrow of a person; adversity, misfortune
n. 6. 1472 – rubbish; waste material; that which is of an inferior, poor, or worthless quality
n. 7. 1513 – marine vegetation, seaweed, or the like, cast ashore by the waves or growing on the tidal seashore
n. 8. a1586 – a thing or person in impaired, wrecked, or shattered condition
n. 9. a1586 obs. – fragments of wreckage
n. 10. 1610 obs. – a damaged or injured part; damage, impairment
n. 11. 1844 Eng. dial. – the brunt or consequences of some action
vb. 1. c1275 obs. – to avenge or revenge a person, deed, etc.; to punish
vb. 2. 1470 – to suffer or undergo shipwreck
vb. 3. 1564 – to cause the ruin, downfall, or subversion of a person, etc.; to ruin, to overthrow
vb. 4. 1587 – to injure or spoil severely; to destroy; to render useless, to break, to shatter

WRACKER
n. 1. 1719 Sc. obs. – an inspector of goods employed to reject unsound or faulty wares
n. 2. 1821 Amer. dial. – one who salvages or plunders a wrecked vessel
n. 3. 1825 Sc. – one who, as he had a right to inspect the barrels made for packing fish, was authorized to reject those that were insufficient

• WRACK-GOODS
n. 1671 obs. – remnants of a wrecked vessel, esp. as cast ashore; wreckage

• WRACKLING
n. 1781 Eng. dial. – the youngest or smallest of a brood or litter; the youngest or weakest of a family, a weakling

• WRACKSOME
adj. 1608 obs. rare – destructive  ​

• WRAF
n. 1921 sl. – a member of the Women’s Royal Air Force, the women’s corps of the Royal Air Force

WRAKER
n. 1825 Sc. – one who, as he had a right to inspect the barrels made for packing fish, was authorized to reject those that were insufficient

• WRAMP
n. 1783 Eng. dial. – a severe wrench; a sprain
vb. Bk1905 Eng. dial. – to sprain; to tear violently

WRANGATANG
n. 1926 Amer. dial. – a ranch hand who herds or trains saddle horses; broadly, a cowboy

WRANGLER
n. 1. 1518 – a perverse, peevish, disputative person; an angry or noisy disputer or arguer
n. 2. 1885 Amer. dial. –  a ranch hand who herds or trains saddle horses; broadly, a cowboy
n. 3. 1937 US sl. – a person on a film or television set responsible for handling the animals or children that appear in the scenes

• WRAP
n. 1. 1939 Aust. sl. – enthusiastic approval; praise; a compliment or commendation
n. 2. 1972 sl., orig. entertainment usage  – the end of a session
n. 3. 1977 US sl. – a wrapped roll of coins
n. 4. 1996 Brit. sl. – a very small quantity of a drug wrapped in paper or foil
vb. 1. 1970s Amer. movies & television usage – to complete, to finish
vb. 2. 1999 UK sl. – to roll a marijuana cigarette
vb. 3. 20C Brit. criminals’ sl. – to tie up

• WRAP AROUND
vb. 1950 UK sl. – to crash a vehicle into an immovable object

• WRAP-HEAD
n. 1987 Jamaica – a member of the Pocomania Afro-Christian religion

• WRAP IT UP
vb. 1961 US sl. – to kiss while parked

• WRAPPED
adj. 1. c1935 Services’ usage – carefully arranged; carefully prepared; entirely in order
adj. 2. c1955 Aust. sl. – enthralled; overjoyed; pleased; totally amazed by; enthusiastic about
adj. 3. 1980s Amer. sl. – under control, in hand

• WRAPPED UP
adj. 1. c1935 Services’ usage – carefully arranged; carefully prepared; entirely in order
adj. 2. 1963 Aust. sl. – pleased; overjoyed; enamoured
adj. 3. 20C Amer. sl. – busy with something or someone

• WRAPPED UP IN
adj. 20C Aust. sl. – involved with

• WRAPPER
n. 1. c1810 sl. – an overcoat; a top coat
n. 2. 1976 US citizens’ band radio sl. – a motor vehicle
n. 3. 1976 US sl., orig. citizens’ band radio sl. – an unmarked police vehicle

• WRAP-RASCAL
n. 1. E18 – a red cloak
n. 2. Bk1891 sl. – a coat

• WRAP ROUND
vb. 1950 UK sl. – to crash a vehicle into an immovable object

• WRAPS
n. 1. 1994 US sl. – cigarette rolling papers
n. 2. 2000s Black British sl. – dark glasses

• WRAP-UP
int. 1. c1935 army usage – a cry of despair at the imbecility of one’s superior or at one’s own state of boredom
int. 2. 1940s Brit. sl. – be quiet!
n. 1. 1930s US criminals’ sl. – a gullible person who has been successfully tricked
n. 2. 1939 Aust. sl. – enthusiastic approval; praise; a compliment or commendation
n. 3. 1940s Aust. sl. – a flattering account
n. 4. 1940s sl. – a girl who is willing, ready, and available; a sexually available young woman 
n. 5. 1950s Amer. sl. – a completion; a final treatment, a summary; the end, the conclusion
n. 6. 1960s Irish sl. – a parcel of scraps from the butcher 
n. 7. L20 drug culture sl. – a brown paper packet containing cannabis
(verbs usually as ‘wrap up’)
vb. 1. 1926 Amer. sl. – to complete, to finish
vb. 2. c1930 Services’ sl. – to cease talking; to stop making a row or a noisy fuss
vb. 3. c1938 Royal Air Force usage – to crash-land an aircraft
vb. 4. World War II Aust. Air Force usage – to thoroughly understand 
vb. 5. 1950s Aust. sl. – to praise, to flatter
vb. 6. 1976 US sl. – to complete the final days of a prison sentence
vb. 7. 1999 UK sl. – to roll a marijuana cigarette

• WRAP UP IN CLEAN LINEN
vb. 18C colloq. – to couch smutty or sordid matter in decent language

• WRAPT UP IN THE TAIL OF HIS MOTHER’S SMOCK
phr. c1780 sl. – applied to anyone who is remarkable for his success with the ladies’

• WRAPT UP IN WARM FLANNEL
adj. c1780 sl. – drunk with spirituous liquors

• WRAP YOUR LAUGHING GEAR AROUND
vb. 1962 Aust. sl. – to eat

• WRAP YOURSELF AROUND
vb. 1965 Aust. sl. – to eat or consume something

WRATACK
n. 1768 Sc. – a dwarf; an undersized person

WRAUL
n. 1825 Sc. – a dwarf; an ill-grown person; a puny child

• WRAW
adj. 1. c1205 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – angry, wrathful, vexed, fierce; characterized by anger or ire
adj. 2. c1386 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – peevish, crabbed, perverse
vb. 1481 obs. rare – to mew as a cat

• WRAWFUL
adj. c1386 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – peevish, crabbed, ill-tempered; perverse, contrarious

• WRAXLE
vb. c1000 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – to wrestle; to contend, to strive

• WRAY
n. 1891 Eng. dial. – a corner

• WREAKFUL
adj. 1531 rare or obs. – given or addicted to revenge; vengeful, malicious, angry

• WREASE
vb. Bk1904 Eng. dial. – to rope onions

• WREATH OF ROSES
n. 1900s sl. – a venereal ulcer

• WREATHE ROUND
vb. 20C Brit. sl. – to caress or fondle someone sexually

• WRECK
n. 1. 1795 sl. – a sick person
n. 2. 1795 – an exhausted or dissipated person; a human ruin
n. 3. c1925 UK public schools’ usage – a weakling; one without spirit
n. 4. 1930s Amer. sl. – an old car or other vehicle
n. 5. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – an unattractive person
n. 6. Bk1980 Amer. sl. – one in a state of anxiety
n. 7. Bk1988 Aust. sl. – a person suffering from over-indulgence in drink or drugs, or other excesses
n. 8. 20C Cockneys’ usage – a recreation ground
vb. 1. 1960s homosexual sl. – to degrade a fellow homosexual when he is not expecting it
vb. 2. 1960s homosexual sl. – to exaggerate one’s effeminacy deliberately as a shock tactic

• WRECK A RECTUM
vb. 20C sl. – to perform anal intercourse

• WRECKED
adj. 1. 1968 sl. – very drunk
adj. 2. 1968 Amer. drug culture sl. – intoxicated with or addicted to narcotics
adj. 3. 1980s US college sl. – very upset
adj. 4. 2000s sl. – exhausted 

• WRECKER
n. 1. 1932 rare – a person employed to assist hunters who get into difficulties
n. 2. Bk1992 criminals’ sl., obs. – a criminal whose activities include pilfering and looting ocean-going vessels in distress, as well as using false distress signals to lure unsuspecting ships to shore where the passengers and crew are murdered in order to freely steal the valuables aboard

• WRECKING CREW
n. 1. 1946 US sl. – on the railway: a relief crew
n. 2. 1973 US sl. – theatre insiders who watch a show’s early performances and spread negative comments about the show
n. 3. 1998 UK sl. – crack cocaine

• WRECKLIN;  WRECKLING
n. 1. 1781 Eng. dial. – the youngest or smallest of a brood or litter; the youngest or weakest of a family, a weakling
n. 2. 1869 Eng. dial. – an unhealthy, feeble child

• WRECK MY HEAD
vb. 2003 Ireland – to agitate me to an extreme degree

• WRECK OF THE HESPERUS
n. E20 Brit. sl. – an untidy, dishevelled person or place

• WRECK SOMEONE’S BEADS
vb. 1970s US homosexual sl. – to beat someone up; to shock or startle

• WRECK THE HEAD
n. 2000s Irish sl. – one who is highly infuriating

• WREEDEN
adj. 1781 Eng. dial. – peevish, irritable, angry

• WREGLING
n. 1781 Sc. – the youngest or smallest of a brood or litter; the youngest or weakest of a family, a weakling

• WREN
n. 1. 1821 Sc. – a term of endearment, esp. to a child; also, a peevish person
n. 2. 1869 sl. – a prostitute who specialized in army camps
n. 3. 1910s US sl. – an attractive woman
n. 4. 1918 sl. – a member of the Women’s Royal Naval Service, the women’s service of the  Royal Navy
n. 5. 1920 US sl. – a young woman or girl

• WRENCH
n. 1980 US sl. – in drag and motor racing: a mechanic
vb. 1. 1781 Eng. dial. – to rinse
vb. 2. 1976 US sl. – to disrupt or upset someone
vb. 3. 2002 US sl. – to go
vb. 4. 2004 US sl. – in motor racing, and hot rodding: to perform mechanical work on a car, whether it literally involves the use of a wrench or not

• WRENCH ARTIST
vb. 1977 US sl. – a railway mechanic

• WRENCHER
n. 2003 US sl. – a car enthusiast with considerable mechanical ability

• WRENCHFUL
adj. a1225 obs. rare – artful, crafty, deceitful

• WRENCH OFF
vb. 20C sl. – to masturbate

• WRENNERY
n. 1943 Brit. jocular usage – a building used to accommodate Wrens

• WREST
n. L16 cant – a picklock (the thieves’ tool)

• WRESTER
n. L16 cant – a picklock (the thieves’ tool)

• WRESTLE
vb. 1971 US sl. – to play a game of bar dice

• WRESTLE THE CHUCK
vb. M19 US sl. – to dine

• WRESTLE THE HASH
vb. M19 US sl. – to dine

WRETCH
n. 1. c888 obs. – a person driven out of or away from his native country; a banished person; an exile
n. 2. a1000 – a vile, sorry, or despicable person; a mean or contemptible person
n. 3. c1000 – a person in deep distress, sorrow, misfortune, or poverty; a miserable, unhappy or unfortunate person; a poor person
n. 4. 1303 obs. exc. Sc. – a niggard; a miser; a covetous or parsimonious person
n. 5. 1893 Eng. dial. – a term of endearment or sympathy
n. 6. Bk1989 US college sl. – a person who can’t find someone to have sex with
vb. 1966 US sl. – to vomit

• WRETCH-CLAAT; WRETCH-CLAHT
n. 1980s Black British sl. – a term of abuse

WRETCHCOCK
n. 1641 obs. – a puny, insignificant person; a poor wretch

• WRIDDEN
adj. 1781 Eng. dial. – peevish, irritable, angry

• WRIG
n. 1. 1564 obs. – the willow tree
n. 2. 1805 Sc. – the smallest or weakest of a litter, brood, or family; the youngest or feeblest of a family; a weak, puny child
vb. Bk1854 Eng. dial. – to wriggle, to writhe

• WRIGGLE
vb. 19C Brit. euphemism – to masturbate

• WRIGGLE-DIGGLE
n. 1960s sl. – petting, mutual fondling; hence, sexual intercourse

• WRIGGLE LIKE A CUT SNAKE
vb. 1940s Aust. sl. – to be evasive or shifty; to toady

• WRIGGLE LIKE A SNIG IN A BOTTLE
vb. B1900 Eng. dial. – of a child: to be restless (snig = an eel)

• WRIGGLE NAVELS
vb. 18C sl. – to copulate

• WRIGGLE OFF
vb. c1860 UK sl. – to depart; to leave

• WRIGGLE OUT (OF)
vb. 1848 sl. – to avoid or evade a responsibility or duty

• WRIGGLER
n. a snake …1927 Aust. sl.

• WRIGGLESOME
adj. wriggling …1891 rare

• WRIGGLETY-WRY
adj. crooked, awry, all on one side …B1900 Eng. dial.

• WRIGGLING POLE
n. the penis …L17 sl.

• WRIGGLING STICK
n. the penis …E18 sl.

• WRIGGLY
adj. 1995 UK sl. – out of the ordinary; suspiciously different

• WRIGHT
n. 1. a695 arch. – an artificer or handicraftsman; a constructive workman
n. 2. 971 obs. – a person who does or performs something; a doer or worker
n. 3. c1275 – a carpenter; a joiner; one who works in wood

• WRIGLEY’S GUM
n. 20C Brit. rhyming sl. – the bum

• WRIMPLE
n. 1499 obs. – a crease or fold; a wrinkle
vb. 1. 1611 obs. rare – to wrinkle, to crumple
vb. 2. 1657 obs. rare – to pucker the face

• WRINCH
vb. 1990s W. Indies – to scowl

• WRING
vb. L19 US sl. – to pick someone’s pocket

• WRINGER
n. 1954 US sl. – a bankruptcy petition

• WRING IN
vb. M19 US criminals’ sl. – to include, to pay for

• WRINGING AND TWISTING
n. 1940s African-American sl. – suffering racial discrimination and dealing with it either by rebellion or acquiescence

• WRING-JAW
n. L18 sl. – rough cider

• WRINGLE-GUT
n. 1777 Eng. dial. – a restless, fretful person; a nervous, fidgety man

• WRINGLE-WRANGLE
n. 1882 rare – controversial argument; wordy disputation

• WRING ONESELF
vb. L19 cant – to change one’s clothes

• WRING ONE’S SOCK OUT
vb. 20C Brit. jocular usage – to urinate; there is an implication that one has waited too long to urinate

• WRING OUT ONE’S SOCK
vb. 1988 sl. – of a man: to urinate

• WRING OUT YOUR MULE
vb. 1974 US sl. – to urinate

• WRING THE DEW OFF THE BRANCH
vb. 20C US sl. – to urinate

• WRING THE RATTLESNAKE
vb. 1960s sl. – to urinate

• WRINKLE
n. 1. L16 UK – a clever device, a cunning trick, or method, esp. a new one
n. 2. 1643 – a defect or problem, esp. a minor one
n. 3. 1812 sl. – a lie, a fib
n. 4. 1818 sl., orig. sporting usage – a helpful or valuable hint or piece of information
n. 5. M19 US sl. – a bit, a small amount
n. 6. c1920 Amer. sl. – the mother of one’s sweetheart
n. 7. 1920s sl. – an old person
n. 8. 1980s Aust. prison sl. – an old prisoner
n. 9. 1990s US college sl. – an unpleasant, unsophisticated male
n. 10. 20C sl. obs. – the female genitals
vb. 1812 sl. obs. – to tell a lie

• WRINKLE-BELLIED
adj. L18 colloq. – having had a number of children; usually used of a prostitute

• WRINKLE CITY
n. 1. 20C Amer. sl. – old age, the golden years
n. 2. 1980s Amer. sl. – a place inhabited or frequented by old people

• WRINKLE IN ONE’S HORN
n. Bk1942 Amer. sl. – an ingenious device

• WRINKLENECK
n. 1951 US sl. – in horse racing: a seasoned and experienced horse handler

• A WRINKLE ON ONE’S HORN
n. 1837 – a valuable hint

• WRINKLER
n. 1812 sl. – a person prone to telling lies

• WRINKLE ROOM
n. 1970s homosexual sl. – a bar, a club or that area of a club where older gay men gather

• WRINKLES
n. 1970s African-American sl. – chitterlings (intestines)

• WRINKLE VILLAGE
n. 1980s Amer. sl. – a place inhabited or frequented by old people

• WRINKLIE
n. 1972 sl. – an old person

• WRINKLIES
n. 1920s sl. – the old

• WRINKLY
n. 1. 1972 sl., chiefly teen usage – an old person
n. 2. 1980s Aust. prison sl. – an old prisoner

• WRIST
n. 1. 1991 UK sl. – in betting: odds of 5-4
n. 2. 1998 UK sl. – a contemptible person; an unpleasant person

• WRIST AEROBICS
n. 1990s sl. – masturbation

• WRISTERS
n. 1978 US sl. – in lobstering: knitted gloves with no fingers

WRIST HITTER
n. Bk1999 baseball usage – a hitter who obtains added power from a quick, timely turn of the wrists, rather than relying on pure body strength

• WRIST JOB
n. 1. 1969 UK sl. – an act of masturbation
n. 2. 1990s sl. – an unpleasant person
n. 3. 2000 UK sl. – a term of abuse; a ‘wanker’

• WRIST MARATHON
n. 1990s sl. – masturbation

• WRIST OF THE FOOT
n. 1649 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – the ankle

WRIST-SLAPPER
n. 1913 Amer. sl. – an effeminate or affected youth or man; a goody-goody

• WRIST-WATCH
adj. 1. c1900 Royal Navy usage – contemptible
adj. 2. c1905 military usage – high class; aristocratic

• WRISTY
adj. 1. 1950s sl.,  orig. US – weak; effeminate; homosexual
adj. 2. 2000 UK sl. – having the characteristics of a masturbator; hence, inferior or unpleasant

• WRITATIVE
adj. 1736 rare – disposed to write; fond of or addicted to writing; marked by inclination to writing

• WRIT BUG
n. 1940s US prison sl. – a prison inmate who becomes a self-taught lawyer, either to pursue their own case, to combat prison corruption, or to help fellow inmates

• WRITE
n. 1865 Sc. – a lawyer; a scrivener …1865 Sc.
vb. 1. 1930s drug culture sl. – of a doctor: to write prescriptions for narcotics
vb. 2. 1960s sl. – to pass dud cheques
vb. 3. 1997 US sl. – to create graffiti art

WRITEE
n. Bk1881 – the person written to, and so, the reader

WRITE-IN
n. Bk1980 Amer. political sl. – a candidate whose name does not appear on the ballot but is written in by the voter

• WRITE IT IN THE CHIMNEY CORNER
vb. 1992 Amer. dial. – to make note of an unusual event

• WRITE NUMBERS
vb. 1975 US sl. – to take bets on illegal policy game (numbers lottery)

• WRITE OFF
n. 1. 1914 Royal Flying Corps usage – a completely wrecked aircraft
n. 2. 1918 sl., orig. chiefly Services’ usage – any machine, vehicle, etc., smashed beyond economic repair
n. 3. Bk1919 Aust. services sl. – a man who is killed
n. 4. M20 sl., chiefly Services’ usage – a useless or worthless person; an incompetent person; a no-hoper
n. 5. 1970s sl., orig. military usage – a farewell, a termination
vb. 1910s sl., orig. Royal Air Force – to completely destroy or damage something so that it is beyond all hope of repair

• WRITE ONESELF OFF
vb. 1. 1939 Royal Air Force – to get killed, esp. through carelessness or impetuousness
vb. 2. 20C Aust. sl. – to have a motor accident
vb. 3. 20C Aust. sl. – to get very drunk

• WRITE ONE’S NAME ACROSS ANOTHER’S
vb. L19 sl., orig. sporting usage – to hit in the face

• WRITE ONE’S NAME ON
vb. M19 sl. – to reserve for oneself; to have the first go at

• WRITE ONE’S (OWN) TICKET
vb. L19 sl. – to be able to stipulate one’s own conditions; to be in an advantageous position

• WRITE ON THE SURFACE OF THE SEA
vb. B1900 – to act foolishly and to no purpose

• WRITE OUT
vb. 1930s US criminals’ sl. – to order to be killed

• WRITER
n. 1. 1707 Sc. – a lawyer, a notary, a solicitor, an attorney, a law-agent
n. 2. 1930 US con artist’s sl., obs. – the member of a confidence team whose responsibility is to address the wrappers on packages of fraudulent newspapers or circulars, to accept 50 percent of the take and to distribute the funds to the other members of the team
n. 3. 1930s drug culture sl. – a doctor who will write prescriptions for narcotics and ask no questions about the user
n. 4. 1972 US sl. – in a casino: an employee who accepts and records bets on Keno 
n. 5. 1982 US sl. – a graffiti artist
n. 6. Bk19845 US Navy usage – the yeoman who serves as secretary to the captain of a ship

WRITER OF SAD, SHORT STORIES
n. 1934 US convicts’ sl. – forgers or other individuals arrested for circulating counterfeit currency who are serving a prison sentence for their actions

• WRITE SCRIP
vb. 1930s drug culture sl. – to give out prescriptions for narcotics

• WRITE SCRIPT
vb. 1930s drug culture sl. – to give out prescriptions for narcotics

• WRITE THE BOOK
vb. 1980s Amer. sl. – to be very authoritative or seasoned; to be an expert

• WRITE TO JOHN BULL ABOUT IT
phr. c1910 – if your wish to complain, write to the newspapers

• WRITE-UP
n. 1. 1920s US prison sl. – a disciplinary report
n. 2. c1945 journalists’ usage – a eulogistic paragraph or ‘feature’ or article
(verbs usually as ‘write up’)
vb. 1. 1920s US prison sl. – to report a convict for misconduct
vb. 2. 1920s US sl. – to report a worker for inadequate work or a misdemeanor

• WRITE WITH A FORK
vb. c1925 Aust. sl. – to charge three times as much

• WRITING
n. 1. 1930s US drug culture sl. – a narcotics prescription
n. 2. 1930s US drug culture & prison sl. – a means of smuggling drugs into prison; a letter is soaked in some form of narcotized solution and the text of the letter makes it clear, with simple codes, that this has been done
n. 3. 1990s sl. – graffiti

• WRITING CROAKER
n. 1930s drug culture sl. – a doctor who will write prescriptions for narcotics and ask no questions about the user

• WRITING DOCTOR
n. 1930s drug culture sl. – a doctor who will write prescriptions for narcotics and ask no questions about the user

• WRITINGER
n. 1868 nonce word – an expert in handwriting

• WRITING MASTER
n. 1582 – one who teaches to write

• WRITIN’S
n. Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. – legal papers, will, etc.

• WRIT-PUSHER
n. 1909 legal usage – a lawyer’s clerk

• WRITRIX
n. 1772 nonce word obs. – a female writer, an authoress

• WRITTEN OFF
adj. c1930 Royal Air Force – of aircraft:  damaged, esp. crashed, beyond repair; of a person: killed, esp. through carelessness

• WRIT WRITER
n. 1940s US prison sl. – a prison inmate who becomes a self-taught lawyer, either to pursue their own case, to combat prison corruption, or to help fellow inmates

• WRIXLE
vb. 1. c1400 obs. – to alter, to change; to confound
vb. 2. c1400 obs. – to exchange

• WRIZZLED
adj. 1590 obs. exc. Eng. dial. – marked with creases, wrinkles, or corrugations; wrinkled, shrivelled


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