Reverse Dictionary: A – ABOL


A – NOUNS
– the letter “a” (a-by-itself-a) ABISELFA 1840  


AARDVARK – NOUNS
– an aardvark ANT BEAR 1545
– an aardvark EARTH-HOG 1731
– an aardvark EARTH-WOLF 1796


ABACK – ADJECTIVES
– taken aback, surprised, disconcerted QUEER-TAKEN 1858 Sc.

ABACK – ADVERBS
– taken aback, disagreeably surprised; dismayed BEGONE Bk1898 Eng. dial

ABACK – VERBS
– to be taken, or cause to be taken, aback BACK-WIND 1899
– to be taken aback REMAIN FOOLISH Bk1904 Sc.
– to take aback, to disconcert, to abash an over-confident person TAKE SOMEBODY TO THE FAIR 1870 Sc.


ABACUS – NOUNS, PERSON
​- a person who uses an abacus in casting accounts ABACIST 1387 


ABANDON – VERBS
– to abandon ABANDONATE 1654 obs. rare  
– to abandon SCARF 1970s US college sl.  
– to abandon TANG OUT 1970s US college sl.  
– to abandon a course of action; to stop SHITCAN 1950s Aust. & NZ sl.
– to abandon any good resolution FALL OFF THE SENSE WAGON 1905 sl.
– to abandon a plan, undertaking, etc. SCUTTLE 1888
– to abandon a project THROW UP ONE’S CARDS 1635  
– to abandon deliberately, to give up, possibly for illicit monetary gain, esp. in boxing TANK 1920s sl.  
– to abandon, esp. to leave off or throw up work JACK 1873 Eng. dial.  
– to abandon, esp. to leave off or throw up work JAG 1873 Eng. dial.  
– to abandon or cancel a plan or scheme ICE 1980s sl.  
– to abandon or reject EIGHTY-SIX 1958 US sl.
– to abandon or shrink from one’s purpose; to fail to fulfil a promise; to yield sneakingly CRINKLE 1612 rare 
– to abandon someone without support LEAVE IN THE AIR 1948 UK sl. 
– to abandon, to desert, or to betray any person or thing RAT 1974 sl.  
to abandon, to discard, to get rid of; to treat as junk or rubbish JUNK 1911
– to abandon, to engage anyone while taking the opportunity to slip way GIVE ONE THE BAG TO HOLD 1793 
– to abandon, to forsake LET c1175 obs. 
– to abandon, to forsake ABAND 1559 obs.   
– to abandon, to forsake BANDON 1587 obs. 
– to abandon, to forsake LINQUISH 1591 obs.  
– to abandon, to forsake a habit, practice, etc. LEAVE a1225 obs. rare 
– to abandon, to forsake, to give up a practice DECLINE 1672 obs.  
– to abandon, to forsake, to give up a practice FLING UP ONE’S CARDS 1688  
– to abandon, to forsake, to quit BELEAVE c1205 obs. 
– ​to abandon, to give up CHUCK IN Bk1999  
– to abandon, to give up SUCCUMB 1632 obs.  
– to abandon, to give up TEW UP 1877 Eng. dial.  
– to abandon; to give up; to cease doing something GIVE THE GAME AWAY 1953 Aust. sl. 
– to abandon, to give up, to resign LEAVE UP 1430-40 obs.  
– to abandon, to go away without taking with one BELEAVE c1175 obs. 
– to abandon, to leave in the lurch LEAVE IN THE LASH 1573 obs. 
– to abandon, to leave, to desert UNBEND a1400-50 obs. rare 
– to abandon, to leave, to desert WAIVE c1330 obs. 
– to abandon; to leave; to quit PUNCH OUT Bk1974 Amer. sl. 
– to abandon, to neglect, to ignore THROW OFF 1858 Amer. dial. 
– to abandon, to relinquish CAST UP 1530 obs. 
– to abandon, to relinquish TO-LEAVE 1432-50 obs. 
– to abandon, to stop, to cease BUNCH 1927 Amer. dial. 
– to abandon, to stop, to cease WALK OUT ON 1937 UK sl., orig. theatrical usage   
– to abandon, to terminate a relationship BAIL OUT 1980s US sl.  
– to abandon, to throw away, to dispense with DITCH 1899 sl. 
– to abandon, to throw away, to dispense with GIVE THE DITCH 1899 sl. 
– to abandon, to throw away, to dispense with HANG UP THE FIDDLE Bk1903 sl.  
– to abandon, to throw away, to dispense with JACK (IT) IN c1910 sl.  
– to abandon, to throw away, to dispense with WHITE-EYE 1911 Amer. dial. 
– to be abandoned, to be left in the lurch HOLD THE BAG 1760 Amer. sl.  


ABANDONED – ADJECTIVES
– abandoned, discarded JUNKED 1915 
– abandoned, dissolute ABRUPT 1583 obs. rare  
– abandoned, forsakenthrown off CAST 1597 
– abandoned, given up ABANDED 1941 Amer. dial.  
– abandoned, given up ICED 1980s US college sl.  
– abandoned, given up JACKED IN 1940s sl.  
– abandoned, given up JACKED UP 1874 colloq. 
– abandoned, ignored, misunderstood, confused BASKETED 1867 sl.  
– abandoned, lonely, alone ALL ALONE LIKE A COUNTRY DUNNY Bk1999 Aust. sl.
– abandoned, wasted, lost DOWN THE CRAPPER;  DOWN THE PAN;  DOWN THE SHITTER 1930s sl. 

ABANDONED – NOUNS, PERSON
– a dirty, abandoned, debased woman GIN-BOTTLE 1909 sl.
– an abandoned or illegitimate child FETCH 1944 Amer. dial.
– an abandoned, wicked wretch RAGGARD;  RAGGELT Bk1905  Eng. dial.

ABANDONED – VERBS
– to be abandoned; to be left in the lurch LIE IN THE LASH 1584 obs.


ABASE,  ABASED,  ABASEMENT,  ABASING – ADJECTIVES
– abased, humbled, cast down, debased, dejected ABESSED 1707 obs.
– abased, ignoble HENE c825 obs.

​​ABASE etc. – NOUNS
– abasement  DEBASEMENT 1593 obs.
– abasement, humiliation, degradation ABJECTION c1525 obs.
– abasement, humiliation, degradation BASING 1581 obs.
– abasement, lowering, degradation ABASURE 1653 obs.
– abasement, lowering, degradation ABJECTEDNESS 1660 obs.
– abasement, lowering, degradation DEBASEMENT 1593 obs.

​​ABASE etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– a person who abases or brings down; a humbler VAILER 1600 obs. rare

ABASE etc. – VERBS
– to abase ADBASS 1548 obs. rare
– to abase, to cast down, to humble LAY a1300 obs.
– to abase; to cause to be humble LAY FULL LOW c1225 obs.
– to abase, to humble, or lower one’s courage, the heart, etc. VAIL 1582 obs.
– to abase, to humble, to humiliate LET DOWN 1747
– to abase, to humble, to humiliate HUMILE 1491 obs.
– to abase; to humble; to reduce or bring down with respect to power, status, rank, etc. LOW c1175 obs.
– to abase, to lower in dignity; to render mean or base BEMEAN 1651
– to abase; to lower in position, rank, or dignity DEBASE 1568 obs.
– to abase, to lower, to degrade, to debase ABJECTATE 1731 obs.


ABASH,  ABASHED,  ABASHMENT – ADJECTIVES
– abashed; ashamed; discomfited; disconcerted ABAIST a1000
– abashed; astonished ABAWED a1450 obs.
– abashed, bashful, modest SHAMEFAST c897 obs.
– abashed, cast down, ashamed, bashful DASHED 1803 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– abashed, confounded ABASIT 1845 Sc.
– abashed, disconcerted, dismayed BASHED c1440 obs.
– abashed humbled, disheartened, dispirited, dejected CRESTFALLEN 1589
– abashed, humbled, disheartened, dispirited, dejected CREST-SUNK 1618 obs.
– abashed, showing shame SHAMEFACED L19
– abashed, shy, or self-deprecating AW-SHUCKS 1932 colloq. 
– abashed, timid, sheepish BAUCH 1871 Sc.
– feeling abashed or confused ALL-OVERISH 1899 Amer. dial.

​ABASH etc. – NOUNS
– abashment ABASHEDNESS 1530 obs. rare
– abashment, bashfulness BASHEDNESS c1440 obs.
– abashment, dismay ABASHANCE c1450 obs. rare

​ABASH etc. – VERBS
– to abash DEBASH 1610 obs.
– to abash an over-confident person, to disconcert TAKE SOMEBODY TO THE FAIR 1870 Sc.
– to abash or overcome especially by boldness or effrontery OVERFACE c1475 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– to abash, to confound, to put to shame DASH 1570
– to abash; to disconcert, to put out of countenance BASH c1375 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– to abash, to humiliate; to lower the pride of CUT THE COMB OF 1814
– to abash, to intimidate DARE 1805 Sc.
– to abash, to put out of countenance; to outface DEFACE 1537 obs.
– to abash, to put to silence in an argument COLLIE 1825 Sc.
– to be abashed or ashamed BASH c1460 obs.
– to be abashed; to be made to blush HAVE THE CHEEK-ACHE Bk1903 sl.
– to make abashed, humbled, disheartened, dispirited, or dejected CREST-FALL 1611 obs. rare


ABATE,  ABATED,  ABATEMENT,  ABATING – ADJECTIVES
 – abated; incomplete, defective​, imperfect​ DIMINUTE c1475 obs.

ABATE etc. – NOUNS
– abatement DEBATEMENT c1550 obs. rare
– abatement RABBATE 1589 obs.
– abatement, curtailment; diminution or reduction by taking away a part DEFALCATION 1476 obs.
– abatement, deduction, diminution, cessation BATE c1450 obs. exc. N. Eng. dial.
– abatement, impairment PAIR c1375 obs. rare
– abatement; lessening, diminution LESSING c1340 obs.

ABATE etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– a person who abates, lessens, or lowers ABATER 1732 

ABATE etc. – PREPOSITIONS
 – abating, leaving out of account, excepting ​​ BATING 1568

ABATE etc. – VERBS
– to abate NULL 1984 Amer. dial.
– to abate by a tiny amount; to make the slightest abatement BATE AN ACE a1566 obs.
– to abate or diminish RABBATE a1398 obs.
– to abate, to cease ​LEATH 1205 obs.
– to abate, to deduct, to subtract DEFALK 1536 obs.
– to abate; to deduct, to subtract DEFALCATE 1540-1 obs.
– to abate, to diminish, to fall off in quantity BATE a1541 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– to abate, to diminish, to lessen; to deduct FAIK;  FALK 1445 Sc.
– to abate, to fall off, to grow less DEBATE a1400-50 obs.
– to abate, to grow less, to decrease TAKE OFF 1776 obs.


ABBATOIR – NOUNS
– an abattoir; a slaughterhouse; originally: a place in which animals are slaughtered for food, and usually also cut up and prepared for sale ​BUTCHERY 1340


ABBESS – NOUNS, PERSON
– an abbess ABBADISSE;  ABBATESSE;  ABBATISSE;  ABBODESSE;  ABBODISSE;  ABBOTESS c855 obs.
– the female superior of a nunnery or convent of women, having the same authority over nuns that an abbot has over monks ABBAS (obs.);  ABBASE (obs.);  ABBESS;  ABBESSE 1297
– the female superior of a nunnery or convent of women, having the same authority over nuns that an abbot has over monks


ABBEY – NOUNS
– an abbey ​ABBACY 1896 Sc.


ABBOT – NOUNS, PERSON
– abbots ABBATE 1750
– an abbot ABBOD c880 obs.
– an abbot or abbé ABATE Bk1883
– an Italian abbot ABBATE 1750
– the chief ruler of an abbey ABBAT c1130 obs.
– the head or superior of an abbey; after the dissolution of the monasteries, sometimes applied to the layman to whom the revenues of an abbacy were impropriated ABBOT c1123 


ABBREVIATE,  ABBREVIATED,  ABBREVIATION – ADJECTIVES
– abbreviated, concise CUTTED 1565-73 obs.
– tending to abbreviate or shorten ABBREVIATORY 1765 rare

ABBREVIATE etc. – ADVERBS
– by way of abbreviation; in short, in brief ABRUPTLY 1579 obs.

ABBREVIATE etc. – NOUNS
– abbreviation, shortening, curtailment ACCURTATION 1583 obs.
– an abbreviated or abridged copy ABBREVIATURE 1650
– an abbreviated or contracted form of a word or phrase; a contraction, an abbreviation ABBREVIATURE c1630
– an abbreviated or shortened state, condition, or form; shortness ​ABBREVIATURE 1614 obs.
– an abbreviation of a word, phrase, or name ABBREVIATE 1607
– the process of abbreviating; abbreviation, shortening ABBREVIATURE 1659 obs.

ABBREVIATE etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– a person who abbreviates, abridges, or shortens; one who summarizes ABBREVIATOR 1615  

ABBREVIATE etc. – VERBS
– to abbreviate, to abridge ABBREVY 1483 obs. rare 
– to abbreviate, to abridge ABREVY a1325 obs.  


ABDICATION,  ABDICATOR – NOUNS
– abdication; the act of putting away or letting go from oneself, giving up, or laying down, especially a dignity or office; resignation, relinquishment DEMISSION 1577-87 

ABDICATION etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– one who abdicates ABDICANT 1654 ​
– one who abdicates ABDICATOR 1864 


ABDUCT,  ABDUCTED,  ABDUCTION,  ABDUCTOR – ADJECTIVES
– of a woman: carried away by force; raped RAPT 1432-50  

ABDUCT etc. – NOUNS
– rape (abduction or ravishing) RAPT 1535 Sc. obs.  
– the act of carrying away a person by force, esp. a woman RAPE c1400 
– the act of carrying off a woman RAPTURE 1600 obs.  

ABDUCT etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– an abducted woman RAPT 1632 obs. rare  
– a person supposedly abducted by aliens ABDUCTEE 1974  
– a person who abducts a very young child BABY-SNATCHER 1857  
– a person who abducts or illegally leads away ABDUCTOR 1847  

ABDUCT etc. – VERBS
​- to abduct MORGANIZE M19 US sl.  
​- to abduct; to compel, to coerce a person into doing something SHANGHAI 1919 sl., orig. US military usage  
​- to abduct; to lead or draw away by act or persuasion ABDUCE 1537 arch. 
​- to carry off a person by force, esp. a woman RAPE 1590  


ABET,  ABETTOR – NOUNS, PERSON
– an abettor SUCCENTOR 1609 obs. rare an abettor 
– an abettor, a person who encourages or assists an offender BETTOR 1671 obs.  
– an abettor; a person who heartens or encourages HEARTER c1550 obs. rare 
– an abettor, a supporter, an encourager ​FAUTOR c1330  
– an abettor, a supporter, an encourager FAUTERER a1662 
– an abettor, a supporter, an encourager FAUTRESS 1596 obs. 
– a person who abets; an instigator, supporter, or promoter, usually of an offense, or of the offender ABETTER 1611  
– a person who abets, instigates, or encourages to the committing of any offense ABETTOR 1514  
– a person who aids and abets in wrongdoing or error MAINTAINER c1330 obs.  

​ABET etc. – VERBS
– to aid and abet in a shady affair ​PAL IN 1906 US sl.  


ABHOR,  ABHORRED,  ABHORRENCE,  ABHORRENT – ADJECTIVES
– finding abhorrent or being opposed to DEATH ON  20C US sl. 
– most abhorred or execrable INEXECRABLE L16 obs. rare 
– to be abhorred, detestable ABHORRIBLE 1633 obs. rare  

ABHOR etc. – INTERJECTIONS
– an exclamation of abhorrence, disbelief, or contempt KAE!;  KAIGH!;  KAY! 1828 Sc.  
– an exclamation of abhorrence or disgust ACH-A-VIE! Bk1905 Eng. dial. 
– an exclamation of abhorrence or disgust FAH!;  FAUGH!;  FOH!;  ​​FOUGH! 1542 

ABHOR etc. – NOUNS
– abhorrence ABHORFULNESS 1556 obs. rare  
– abhorrence, hatred, aversion; a great dislike for or turning away from anything AVERSATION 1613 arch.  
– an abhorring ABHORMENT 1576 rare 

ABHOR etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– a person considered disgusting, worthless, or abhorrent MUCK L19 sl.  
– a person who abhors ABHORRANT Bk1880  
– a person who abhors or hates ABHORRER 1611  

ABHOR etc. – PHRASES
– that fills me with abhorrence, horror, or disgust THAT GIVES ME THE SCREAMING ABDABS 1966 sl.

ABHOR etc. – VERBS
– to abhor, to despise, to spurn ASPERNATE 1656 obs. 
– to abhor, to detest, to abominate DETESTATE 1548 obs. rare  
– to abhor, to loathe, to abominate; to feel extreme disgust and hatred towards ABOMINE 1683 obs.  
– to abhor, to loathe, to detest; to cause disgust or nausea UG;  UGG a1340 obs. exc. Sc. & Eng. dial.  
– to abhor, to feel horror, to dread HIDOUS 1382 obs. rare 
– to be abhorrent; to be offensive ​STINK c1225 
– to be extremely abhorrent or offensive to a person STINK IN THE NOSTRILS a1600  


ABIDE,  ABIDING – ADJECTIVES
– abiding, sojourn, temporary residence or continuance in a place TARRIANCE 1530 arch. 

ABIDE etc. – NOUNS
– an abiding-place, a place where one stays or dwells MANSION c1386 arch. 
– an abiding, remaining, dwelling, or staying in a place MANSION a1340 obs.  
– a permanently abiding, resident, staying or dwelling in a place MANSIONARY 1447 obs.  

ABIDE etc. – VERBS
– to abide, to dwell LEND a1300 obs. 
– to abide, to dwell LENG a1300 obs. 
– to abide, to dwell, to remain in a place SIT c900  
– to abide, to dwell, to remain in a place; to remain for the time being in a place BELEAVE c1175 obs. 
– to abide, to dwell, to reside, to sojourn HABIT a1366 obs.  
– to abide, to endure, to suffer, to bear, to undergo BIDE c1200 obs. exc. Eng. dial. 
– to abide, to remain, to stay on ONBIDE c1440 obs.  
– to abide, to remain, to stay, to continue in some state or condition TARRY c1450 obs.  
– to abide; to suffer ABEDGE c1225  
– to abide; to tolerate ABEAR 1885  


ABILITY,  ABLE – ADJECTIVES
– able EEBLE 1880 Sc.  
– able YABLE;  YIBBLE 1825 Sc. 
– able, competent, capable SUFFICIENT;  SUFFISANT c1385 obs.  
– able, competent, capable, skilful TIGHT 1598 obs. exc. Eng. dial.  
– able, having the capacity or power to do a thing HABILE 1558 obs.  
– able or ready to do anything PANURGIC 1873 rare  
– able, ready, clever ASPERT 1423 obs. rare  
– able, strong, energetic FARRACHIE Bk1900 Sc.  
– able, sufficient, capable BASTANT 1637 obs.  
– endowed with many abilities or faculties; versatile FACULIZED 1816 Amer. dial. 
– endowed with many abilities or faculties; versatile FACULTISED 1871 Amer. dial. 
– hardly able BADLY ABLE Bk1898 Eng. dial.  
– hardly able HARD-MATCHED Bk1905 Eng. dial.  hardly able 
– most able, ablest ABLEMOST 1614 obs.  
– most able, best, chief HEAD 1895 Amer. dial. 
– of good ability or character; worthy, brave; able, skilful TIDY c1350 obs.  
– rendered able; endowed with ability; capacitated, qualified HABILITATE 1622 obs.  
– unusually able or skilled; highly competent DARB 1930 US sl. 

ABILITY etc. – NOUNS
– abilities, faculties, powers of mind HABILIMENTS 1585 obs. 
– ability ABILTY 1768 Sc. obs. 
– ability HABILITY 1430-1678 obs.  
– ability, activity, agility FEEROCHRIE Bk1900 Sc.  
– ability; acumen; judgement; knowledge; cunning; cleverness, shrewdness COCUM;  COKUM;  KOCUM;  KOKUM 1848 sl. rare
– ability and determination; the actual ability and determination to carry out a promise, threat, etc., as opposed to an empty boast ASS 1961 Amer. sl.  
– ability; being able CANNING a1555 obs. 
– ability; being able; adequate qualification SUFFICIENCY 1567 obs.  
– ability; capacity; competence SUFFICIENCE 1382 obs.  
– ability, capacity, power BIND 1824 Sc.  
– ability, cleverness, knowledge CAN:  CANN:  KANN 1768 Sc.  
– ability, cleverness, smartness CLEVERALITY 1828 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– ability, competence SUFFISANCE c1392 obs.  
– ability; competence SUFFICIENTY 1461 obs. 
– ability, courage, impudence MOXIE 1930s sl. 
– ability, facility OIL 1910s sl. 
– ability; grasp of intellect ABILITATION c1656 obs.  
– ability; grasp of intellect FATHOM 1604 obs. 
– ability, gumption; spirit, energy ODOCITY Bk1905 Eng. dial.  
– ability; knowledge, invention; ingenuity, quickness of intellect INGINE 1660 Sc. obs. 
– ability; means of effecting a purpose SCRAN 1806 Sc.  
– ability, mental equipment, brains, good sense HEAD-GEAR Bk1902 Eng. dial. 
– ability, might, strength MAUGHT 1773 Sc. 
– ability, power, strength DOUGHT 1731 Sc. rare 
– ability, power, strength, substance; force FARRACH:  FEEROCH:  FEIROCH 1742 Sc.  
– ability, quick comprehension IDOCITY Bk1905 Eng. dial. 
– ability, ‘smarts’, knowledge MOVES 1960s sl., orig. US 
– ability; the quality of being able ABLENESS c1390 obs. 
– ability to work, energy, speed REDD 1892 Sc. 
– ability, understanding SCOLLE Bk1904 Sc. 
– ableness ABLESSE 1598 obs. rare  
– a personal ability or quality; a natural gift; usually used in plural DOTE 1546 obs.
– range of ability LATITUDE Bk1902 Eng. dial.
– the ability to enforce one’s wishes completely THE MOJO AND THE SAY-SO c1975 Amer. sl.  

ABILITY etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– a man of extraordinary ability power or ability BEYOND-MAN 1896 
– an able, competent person CRACK HAND 19C sl.  
– an able, energetic person who gets things done COME-UPPER 1968 Amer. dial.
– an exceptionally able or hard-working person OIL-BURNER 1960s US sl.  
– an unusually able person in any field of activity, as a dancing fool, etc. FOOL Bk1974 Amer. sl. 
– a person exhibiting unusual ability, etc.; a person who can do something very well BALL OF FIRE 1900 Amer. sl. 
– a person expressing a natural ability to excel at an endeavour; a virtuoso EAR MAN 1970s African-American sl.  
– a person of ability; an ingenious person, a genius INGINE 1824 Sc. obs.  
– a person of good ability PIPPIN Bk1913-17 Amer. dial. 
– a person of marked ability CRACKERJACK 1895 sl., orig. US 
– a person of marked ability or excellence CRACKAJACK Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.  
– a person possessing great ability, strength, etc.; an extraordinary person MOOSE CAT 1926 Amer. logging usage  
– a person who exhibits extraordinary ability at something HORSE 1955 Amer. sl.  
– a person who exhibits extraordinary ability at something HOSS 1858 Amer. sl. 
– a sophisticated, competent, unruffled, able person COOL CAT 1940s sl., chiefly African-American usage 

ABILITY etc. – PHRASES
– beyond one’s abilities ABOVE ONE’S BEND 1835 Amer. dial. 
– beyond one’s abilities ABOVE ONE’S HUCKLEBERRY 1859 Amer. dial. 
– beyond one’s abilities ABOVE ONE’S MATCH 1748 obs.  
– it is within a person’s innate ability or capacity to attain or achieve something IT IS IN A PERSON’S BUTTONS a1616 obs. rare  

ABILITY etc. – VERBS
– to be able or competent to do something SUFFICE a1325 obs.  
– to be able to do something requiring youth or vigour CUT THE MUSTARD Bk2006 US sl. 
– to be able to do something; to have the strength or ability DOW a1400 obs.
– to be exceptionally able or talented HANG THE MOON 1953 Amer. dial. 
– to display one’s ability SHOW ONE’S PACES c1870 colloq.  
– to endow a person with abilities or qualities DOTE 1519 Sc. obs.
– to endow with ability or capacity; to capacitate, to qualify HABILITATE 1604 obs.  
– to give ability or fitness; to enable ABILITATE 1627 obs.  
– to have the ability for something HAVE THE GUNS FOR 1961  
– to lose one’s ability and energy LOSE ONE’S DASH c1880 sl. 
– to lose one’s ability and energy LOSE ONE’S PUNCH c1900 sl. 
– to make a false show of ability BLUFF Bk1904 Amer. dial. 
– to pretend ability or knowledge PUNT Bk1971 US students’ sl.


ABJECT – ADJECTIVES
– abject, inferior, low, downtrodden, suppressed, subject to authority UNDERFOOT 1594 obs.  
– abject, mean, poor; humble, lowly; abased; miserable, wretched HEAN;  HENE c825 obs. 

 ABJECT – NOUNS, PERSON
– a base, abject, or humble person HEANLING a1225 obs.  
​- a base or abject person; a slave VASSAL 1589  


ABLE  see ABILITY


ABLE-BODIED – ADJECTIVES
– able-bodied, competent, capable LIKELY 1899 Amer. dial.  
– able-bodied, stout BRAW Bk1911 Sc. 
– able-bodied, strong, in good condition, hale, hearty FEERDY; FEIRDY; FERDY 1742 Sc.
– able-bodied; strong, powerful YALD;  YAULD;  YAWL 1786 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.  
– able-bodied; strong, powerful YELD 1816 Eng. dial. 


ABNORMAL,  ABNORMALLY – ADJECTIVES
– abnormal ABB 1991 US sl.  
– abnormal PUSHED OUT OF SHAME Bk1964 US students’ sl.
– abnormal, exceptional, unusual PRETERNATURAL 1580 obs.
– abnormal, extraordinary; said of natural occurrences WANTON a1754 obs. rare  
– abnormal, irregular, deviating from rule ANOMALOUS 1655
– abnormal, irregular, deviating widely from the ordinary or natural type ABERRANT 1830 
– abnormalities, esp. freakish births ABORTIVES 1623 obs.
– abnormal; monstrous TERATOID 1866
– abnormal, strange UNCO-LIKE 1842 Sc. 
– abnormal, unusual, strange; varying widely from what is usual or proper EXTRAVAGANT 1650 obs. 
– abnormal; weird; crazy; eccentric OFF 1866 US sl. 

ABNORMAL etc. – ADVERBS
– abnormally, unusually UNACCUSTOMARILY 1634 obs.  

ABNORMAL etc. – NOUNS
– abnormal or unusual character; eccentricity EXTRAVAGANCY 1651 obs. 
– a thing abnormal or peculiar in a harmless, inoffensive way ODDLING 1941 Amer. dial. 

ABNORMAL etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– an abnormal person; a weirdo ABB Bk1994 surfing sl.  
– a person abnormal or peculiar in a harmless, inoffensive way ODDLING 1941 Amer. dial. 
– a person who is markedly different from normal DEVIATE 19C euphemism  
– a person who is mentally abnormal or crazy DING-A-LING 1944 Amer. dial. 
– a person whose looks or behaviour mark them as abnormal TULIP 1991 Irish sl.  

ABNORMAL etc. – VERBS
 – to make abnormal ABNORMALIZE 1849  


ABODE – NOUNS
– abode, abiding ABODEMENT 1591 obs.  
– abode, habitation HABIT 1603 obs. rare 
– abode, remaining, tarrying, abiding BELEAVING c1330 obs. 
– abode, sojourn; shelter, lodging HARBOUR c1150 
– a fixed or established place of abode HAFT 1785 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.  
– an abode, a residence; an habitual haunt HEAF 1872 Eng. dial.  
– an abode, dwelling, habitation BIDING a1600 obs.  
– an abode, dwelling, home PALYIR 1879 Sc.  
– an abode, lodging HEAFING Bk1902 Eng. dial. 
– an abode or resting-place MANOR 1362 obs.  
– a place of abode, a dwelling TABERNACLE 1382 
– a place of abode; a dwelling-place MANSION-SEAT 1618 obs.  
– a place of abode, an abiding-place MANSION c1386 arch. 
– a place of abode, dwelling BIDING-PLACE 1520 obs.  
– a place of abode, dwelling-place MANSION-PLACE 1473 obs. 
– a place of abode, quarters QUARTERAGE 1577 rare 
– the abode of a community living together as one family FAMILISTERY 1865 rare  
– the earliest abode; the place where anything is nurtured in its beginnings • CUNABULA 1774

ABODE – VERBS
– to place or establish in a magnificent abode BABYLON 1633 obs. rare  
– to take up one’s abode, to settle or squat, in a place NESTLE 1406 obs.  


ABOLISH,  ABOLISHED – ADJECTIVES
– abolished by authority, repealed, annulled, cancelled ​• ABROGATE 1460 arch.  

ABOLISH etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– a person who abolishes, one who abrogates or repeals by authority ​• ABROGATOR 1599 

ABOLISH etc. – VERBS
– to abolish authoritatively or formally; to repeal a law; to annul ​• ABROGE c1450 obs. rare 
– to abolish authoritatively or formally; to repeal a law; to annul; to cancel ABROGATE 1526 
– to abolish, to destroy completely, to exterminate EXTERMISH 1903 Amer. dial.  
– to abolish, to destroy, to do away with, to remove DISANNUL 1892 Eng. dial.  
– to abolish; to destroy utterly; to put an end to EXTERMINE 1539 obs.  
– to abolish; to do away with; to make away with IMBOLISH 1592 obs. 


ABOLITION,  ABOLITIONIST – NOUNS
 – abolition or repeal by authority • ABROGATION 1535  

ABOLITION etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– an abolitionist • AB 1862 US sl.