Reverse Dictionary: ABOM – ABUR


ABOMINABLE,  ABOMINABLY,  ABOMINATION – ADJECTIVES
– abominable AVERSABLE 1663 obs. rare
– abominable, execrable HUTIT c1500 Sc. obs.
– abominable, filthy PUTREDINOUS 1711 obs.
– abominable, inhuman, detestable ABHOMINAL 1477 obs.
– abominable, loathsome, detestable; disgusting, hateful WLATSOME a1300 obs.
– abominable, not to be spoken of; unmentionable; shocking, atrocious NEFAND 1490 obs.
– abominable, not to be spoken of; unmentionable, shocking; atrocious NEFANDOUS 1640
– abominable, revolting; deserving to be cursed; detestable ABHOMINAL 1477 obs.
– abominable, terrible ADJECTIVAL;  ADJECTIVE;  VERMILION L19 sl., chiefly Aust., euphemism for ‘bloody’
– abominable, terrible HAEMATOID 1920s euphemism for ‘bloody’
– abominable, to be abhorred, detestable ABHORRIBLE 1602
– abominable, wicked, detestable, vile NEFAST 1849 rare

ABOMINABLE etc. – ADVERBS
– 1592  ABOMINATIONLY – abominably, hatefully ​​(rare) 

  ABOMINABLE etc. – NOUNS
– 1483  ABHOMINALTY – an abominable or inhuman deed ​(obs. rare) 
– 1628 ABHORRATION – an abomination; extreme loathing or disgust; an object of disgust​


ABOMINATE,  ABOMINATED – ADJECTIVES
– abominated, detested DETESTATE a1600
 
ABOMINATE etc. – VERBS
– to abominate, to detest, to abhor DETESTATE 1548
– to abominate; to feel extreme disgust and hatred towards ABOMINE 1683 obs.


ABORIGINAL,  ABORIGINE – NOUNS, PERSON
– a Black, Aboriginal, or Maori woman, esp. as the focus of a White man’s sexual interest BLACK VELVET 1899 Aust. & NZ sl., offensive
– aboriginal servants in Australia BLACKBOYS Bk1892 Aust. sl.
– a dark-skinned man, esp. a man of sub-Saharan African or Australian Aboriginal origin or descent BLACK MAN a1398
– a generic name for the Australian Aboriginal JACKEY;  JACKIE;  JACKY;  JACKY-JACKY 1845 Aust. sl., derogatory
– a mixed-race, a half-white, half-Black or Aborigine woman YALLER GAL 1834 Aust. & US sl.
– a mixed-race, a half-white, half-Black or Aborigine woman YELLOW GIRL 1832 sl.
– a mixed-race, half-white, half-Aborigine man YELLER FELLA;  YELLER FELLER 1913 Aust. sl.
– a mixed-race, half-white, half-Aborigine man YELLOW FELLOW 1834 Aust. & US sl.
– an Aboriginal YELLOW AND BLACK 1885 Aust. sl.
– an Aboriginal, esp. an Aboriginal male YAMIDGEE; YAMMAGI;  YAMMIDGEE 1925 Aust. sl.
– an Aboriginal girl or woman BITUMEN BLONDE 1943 Aust. sl., derogatory
– an Aboriginal guide accompanying explorers BLACKBOY 1893 offensive
– an aboriginal inhabitant ABORIGINARY 1868
– an Aboriginal woman LUBRA 19C Aust.
– an Aboriginal woman or other non-white woman MARY 1830 Aust.
– an Aborigine AB c1870 Aust. sl.
– an Aborigine BLACKBIRD 1865 Aust. sl.
– an Aborigine DARKMAN 1970s Aust. sl., derogatory
– an Aborigine TARPOT 1894 Aust. sl., derogatory
– an Aborigine; a dark-skinned person BLACKFELLA;  BLACKFELLER;  BLACKFELLOW 1827 Aust. sl.
– an Aborigine child COOBOO Bk2001 Aust. colloq.
– an Aborigine who refuses to cooperate with the authorities BAD NIGGER 1910 Aust. sl.
– a Native Australian BLACKBUTT 1910 Aust. sl.
– a Native Australian; an Aboriginal UNBLEACHED AUSTRALIAN L19 sl.
– a Native or inhabitant of Australia who is Black; an Australian Aboriginal BLACK AUSTRALIAN 1863
– a Native woman; the wife of an Aborigine GIN 1830 Aust.
– an Australian Aboriginal ABO 1908 Aust. sl., now mainly derogatory
– an Australian Aboriginal BINGY 1933 Aust. sl.
– an Australian Aboriginal BOONG 1913 Aust. sl.
– an Australian aboriginal DARK CLOUD 1945 Aust. sl., derogatory
– an Australian Aboriginal employed by police to track down fugitives or persons lost in the bush BLACK TRACKER 1862 Aust. 
– an Australian Aboriginal man BLACKBOY 1810 rare, offensive
– an Australian aborigine; any person having very dark skin as a racial trait DARKEE;  DARKEY;  DARKIE;  DARKY 1775 sl., now derogatory or offensive
– an expert on Aborigine and bush customs and folktales ABO 1910 Aust. sl.
– an expert on Aborigine bush customs and folktales ABOLIAR 1904 Aust. sl.
– any Aboriginal singled out from the rest BILLY 1905 Aust. sl.
– a person of Australian Aboriginal origin or descent BLACK 1614
– a White term for an Aboriginal BINGHI 1893 Aust. sl., derogatory


ABORT,  ABORTION,  ABORTIONIST – NOUNS
– abortion; premature expulsion of the foetus, miscarriage ABORCEMENT;  ABORSEMENT 1540 obs.
– abortion, miscarriage ABORTUS 1764 obs.
– a clinic in which abortions are performed ABORTUARY 1983 anti-abortion campaigners usage, derogatory
– a hospital, clinic, in which abortions are performed ABORTORIUM 1933
– an aborted foetus CASTLING 1580 obs.
– an aborting; premature expulsion of the foetus ABORTMENT 1607 obs.
– an abortion EFFLUXION 1643
– an abortion ABIGAIL 2000s S. Afr. homosexual sl.
– an inexpensive abortion SCRAPE JOB Bk1967 US students’ sl.
 
ABORT etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– a black market abortionist RABBIT-SCRAPER 1950s homosexual sl.
– an abortionist ANGEL-MAKER L19 sl.
– an abortionist BACK STREET BUTCHER Bk2002 criminals’ sl.
– an abortionist BACK-ALLEY BUTCHER Bk1988 sl.
– an abortionist LOCK PICKER;  PIN ARTIST Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– an abortionist RABBIT-SNATCHER 1950s US criminals’ sl.
 
ABORT etc. – VERBS
– to abort a foetus KEEP THE CENSUS DOWN 19C Brit. sl.
– to cause abortion KNOCK A LID 1913-17 Amer. dial.
– to give someone an abortion MAKE SOMEONE ONE 1960s US sl.
– to perform an abortion PULL A RABBIT M20 US criminals’ sl.
​- to suffer abortion; said of women SLIP THE CALF 1664 obs., humorous usage


ABORTIVE – ADJECTIVES
– abortive from the first; checked before even a beginning had been made ABORSIVE 1639 obs. rare

ABORTIVE – VERBS
– to render abortive; to render ineffectual or fruitless ABORTIVATE c1630 obs. rare


ABOUND,  ABOUNDING – ADJECTIVES
– abounding in, full of RANK a1300 obs.

ABOUND etc. – VERBS
– to abound EXSUPERATE 1625 obs.
– to abound; to be in great abundance; to be plentiful; to overflow EXUBERATE 1623
– to abound; to be in great abundance; to be plentiful; to overflow EXUPERATE;  UBERATE 1623 obs.
– to abound, to be plentiful WALM 1399 obs.


ABOUT – ADVERBS
– about, around UMBE 971 obs.
– about, concerning, of UMBE c900 obs.
– of manner or degree: about, nearly, approximately ANEWST 1691 Eng. dial.


ABOUT-FACE – NOUNS
– an about-face; a complete reversal or change of attitude or opinion VOLTE-FACE 1819


ABOVE – ADVERBS
– above​​ ABOON 1875 Eng. dial.
– above BOON Bk1911 Sc.
– above BEHEIGH Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– above UPSIDE Bk1905 Eng. dial.


ABOVEBOARD – ADJECTIVES
– aboveboard, honest; true DINKUM 1905 Aust. & NZ


ABRADE,  ABRASION – NOUNS
– an abrasion, a hurt or sore, a cut BOBO 1969 Amer. dial.
– an abrasion, a spot, blemish, crack, injury SCAM 1866 Sc.
– an abrasion or sore place on the skin GAW 1793 Sc. & Eng. dial.
 
ABRADE etc. – VERBS
– to abrade or cut the flesh slightly RASE 1899 Sc.
– to abrade the skin, to chafe, to peel SCAW 1929 Sc.
– to abrade, to break the skin BREAK Bk1911 Sc.
– to abrade, to scrape GRAIN 1845 Amer. dial.
– to abrade, to scrape or rub off the skin, esp. from the shins and joints; to graze BARK 1850
– to abrade; to scratch; to graze, to rub slightly SCRAZE Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– to suffer abrasion of skin LOSE LEATHER 1726


ABREAST – ADVERBS
– abreast, side by side; close together SIDE AND SIDE 1834 Amer. dial.


ABRIDGE,  ABRIDGED,  ABRIDGEMENT – ADJECTIVES
– abridged, brief, short, concise COMPENDIARIOUS 1730 obs.
– abridged, curtailed CURTAL 1579 obs.
– abridged, cut down, shortened, curtailed DECURTATE a1638 rare
– abridged, shortened CORREPT 1654 obs.
 
ABRIDGE etc. – NOUNS

– abridgement, abstract ​ ABBREVIATE 1716 Sc.
– abridgement, shortening ABRIDGE 1611 obs. rare
– abridgement that is brief but comprehensive COMPENDIUM 1589
– abridging; shortening; cutting down DECURTATION 1652 obs.
– an abridged or abbreviated copy ​ABBREVIATURE 1650
 
ABRIDGE etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– an abridger; a writer of a small compendious treatise of a science SUMMULIST 1652
– a person who abbreviates, abridges, or shortens ABBREVIATOR 1615
– a person who abridges or summarizes SUMMIST 1600 obs.
– a person who abridges or summarizes ​SUMMISTER 1586 obs.
– a person who abridges or summarizes SUMMULARY 1581 obs. rare
 
ABRIDGE etc. – VERBS
– to abridge, to abbreviate ABBREVY 1483 obs. rare
– to abridge, to abbreviate ABREVY a1325 obs.
– to abridge, to curtail, to shorten, to reduce CUT 1413
– to abridge, to cut down, to shorten, to dock, to curtail DECURT 1550 obs.
– to abridge, to cut down, to shorten, to dock, to curtail ​DECURTATE 1623 obs.


ABROAD – ADVERBS
– abroad; spread about, cast to the winds ABREED 1892 Sc. & Eng. dial.

ABROAD – PHRASES
– abroad, out of the country BEYOND SEAS 1644

ABROAD – VERBS
– to send abroad or to a distance ABLEGATE 1657 obs. rare


ABRUPT,  ABRUPTLY – ADJECTIVES
– abrupt, brief, hasty, hurried CURSORY 1601
– given to abrupt, impulsive expression EJACULATORY 1644 obs.
– rudely abrupt or forward, testy, snappish, sharp-tongued, spiteful KNAPPISH 1513 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
 
ABRUPT etc. – ADVERBS
– abruptly, concisely, curtly CUTTEDLY 1530 obs.
– abruptly, suddenly BANG 1847 Eng. dial.
– abruptly, suddenly BAZZ 1861 Eng. dial.
– abruptly, suddenly, at once ​A-POP;  POP 1966 Amer. dial.
– abruptly, with a sudden blow, sharply SMACK 1840 Amer. dial.
– abruptly, with a sudden blow, sharply SMACK-BANG;  SMACK-DAB-DASH;  SMACK-JAM 1965 Amer. dial.
– abruptly, with a sudden blow, sharply SMACK-DAB 1852 Amer. dial.

ABRUPT etc. – VERBS
– to do something abruptly or in a strange way FLASH Bk1970 US students’ sl.


ABSCESS,  ABSCESSED – ADJECTIVES
– abscessed; festered; infected BEALED 1790 Eng. & Amer. dial.
 
ABSCESS etc. – NOUNS
– an abscess ABSCESSION 1610 obs. rare
– an abscess IMPOSTUME 1710 US
– an abscess MAPSY Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– an abscess NABSY;  NAPSY Bk1903 Eng. dial.
– an abscess, a boil, or other swelling RAISING 1966 Amer. dial.
– an abscess, a carbuncle ANT HEAP 1943 Amer. dial.
– an abscess; a pustule or boil BEAL c1400 obs. exc. Eng. & Amer. dial.
– an abscess, a tumour APSE 1857 Eng. dial.
– an abscess containing pus; a swelling; a blister ADDLE 1825 Eng. dial.
– an abscess; suppuration; a boil BEALING a1605 obs. exc. Eng. & Amer. dial.
– an abscess, swelling, , boil, or other festering sore; a sharp attack of pain INCOME 1808 Sc.
– an abscess, tumour, or the like INGROWTH a1838 Sc.


ABSCOND,  ABSCONDER,  ABSCONDING – ADJECTIVES
– absconding secretly LEVANTING 1855
 
ABSCOND etc. – NOUNS
– a secretly absconding ABSQUATULATION 1847 Amer. sl.
– a sudden absconding or disappearance ABSQUATULATION 1847 Amer. sl.
 
ABSCOND etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– an absconder ABSQUATULATOR 1842 Amer. sl.
– an absconder SCALER 1901
– an absconder; a fugitive LAMASTER;  LAMISTER;  LAMMIE;  LAMMISTER;  LAMSTER 1904 US prison & criminals’ sl.
– a person who absconds ABSCONDENT 1685 obs. rare
– a person who absconds, esp. one who does so after losing bets LEVANTER 1781
 
ABSCOND etc. – VERBS
– to abscond TAKE A MICKEY FINN 1924 Amer. sl.
– to abscond, esp. from a hotel or lodging, without paying one’s bill JUMP ONE’S BILL;  JUMP ONE’S BOARD L19 sl.
– to abscond on the day of battle, to avoid fighting BOG-SCLENT Bk1911 Sc.
– to abscond or depart, esp. permanently; to leave the country BUY A TRUNK 1934 US West. usage
– to abscond or depart; to flee, to run away ABSQUATILATE 1830 Amer. sl.
– to abscond, to clear out, to decamp; to take flight AMPUTATE 1842 Amer. sl.
– to abscond, to depart ABSQUATIATE 1839 Amer. sl.
– to abscond, to depart ABSQUATULIZE 1829 Amer. sl.
– to abscond, to depart in haste, to run away, to escape MIZZIL;  MIZZLE 1781 Amer. dial.
– to abscond; to escape, to depart, to leave SHOOT THROUGH 1947 Aust. & NZ sl.
– to abscond; to flee from authorities LAMMISTER 1921 US sl.
– to abscond, to go away suddenly or secretly LEVANT 1797
– to abscond, to hasten, to hurry, to move lightly and rapidly; to make off SKIP 1338
– to abscond; to leave; to flee TAKE A RUN-OUT POWDER 1909 US colloq.
– to abscond, to leave, to run away ABSQUAT 1868 sl., orig. US
– to abscond, to leave; to run away ABSQUATTLE 1842 sl., orig. US
– to abscond, to leave, to run away ABSQUATULATE;  ABSQUOTULATE 1830 sl., orig. US
– to abscond; to make an escape from; to flee; hence, to run LAM (OUT) 1886 US sl., chiefly criminals’ & police usage
– to abscond, to make off, to slip away SKIN 1894 US sl.
– to abscond, to steal away without paying one’s bill; to depart hurriedly SHOOT THE CROW 1887 Sc. sl.
– to abscond with, to steal GO SOUTH 1982 Amer. dial.


ABSENCE,  ABSENT – ADJECTIVES
– absent ABSTENT 1898 Sc.
– absent MINUS M19 sl.
– absent, away OFF THE RESERVATION L19 US sl.
– absent, away OUT OF SOMEONE’S FACE 1980s Black British sl.
– absent, lacking, deficient WANE c825 obs.
– absent without leave ACK WILLIE;  ACK WILLY 1942 Aust. sl.
– done in absence; pert. to absence ABSENTANEOUS Bk1721
– said of a person who is absent or gone MR. NASH IS CONCERNED 19C
– said of a person who is gone NASHED 19C sl.
 
ABSENCE etc. – NOUNS
– absence ABSENCY 1599 obs. rare
– absence ABSENTY 1520 obs.
– absence of; want, lack, shortage WANE c888 obs.
– absence; the fact that a person is not present WANT c1480 obs.
– an absenting oneself ABSENTATION 1800
– an absenting oneself; a withdrawal or staying away ABSENTMENT 1600 obs.
– unauthorized absence LAND SECURITY M18 sl.
 
ABSENCE etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– an absentee; one who is absent ABSENT c1425 obs.
– an absentee, someone who has opted out of normal social life GHOST 1976 US college sl.
 
ABSENCE etc. – VERBS
– to absent oneself from a class or an examination; to cut a class BLITZ c1900 US students’ sl.
– to absent oneself from without permission; to skip a class SNAP 1831 Amer. dial.
– to absent oneself from work or school; to quit a job TAKE OUT 1969 Amer. dial.
– to absent oneself or escape from some responsibility without adequate excuse PLAY OFF 1783 Amer. dial.
– to absent oneself, to make oneself scarce SCARCIFY Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– to absent oneself when there’s likely to be any trouble GET OUT OF THE RAIN 20C sl.
– to be absent, esp. from home; to loiter LACK 1746 Eng. dial.
– to be absent or missing; to be a defaulter WANT 1435 obs.
– to be absent or wanting FAULT c1375 obs.
– to be absent; to feign a fainting fit to get out of duty or get sympathy CHUCK A DUMMY World War I Amer. usage
– to be illicitly absent from work SAG L19 Brit. sl.


ABSENT-MINDED – ADJECTIVES
– absent-minded, dazed PEBBLE-BEACHED 1934 sl.
– absent-minded; dreamy MOONEY;  MOONY Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– absent-minded, dull, stupid LUNCHY 1960s US college sl.
– absentminded; having the attention distracted from what is present DISTRAIT 1748
– absent-minded, inattentive ASLEEP AT THE BAG Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– absent-minded, inattentive ASLEEP AT THE BASE Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– absent-minded, inattentive ASLEEP ON THE JOB Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– absent-minded, inattentive BLAH Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– absent-minded, inattentive BLANK Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– absent-minded, inattentive DEAD ABOVE THE EARS Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– absent-minded, inattentive DEAD BETWEEN THE EARS Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– absent-minded, inattentive DEAD FROM THE HOOFS UP Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– absent-minded, inattentive DEAD FROM THE NECK UP Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– absent-minded, inattentive DEAD-HEADED Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– absent-minded, inattentive GONE TO SLEEP ON THE BAG Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– absent-minded, inattentive GONE TO SLEEP ON THE BASE Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– absent-minded, inattentive GONE TO SLEEP ON THE JOB Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– absent-minded, inattentive HALF THERE Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– absent-minded, inattentive NO ONE AT HOME Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– absent-minded, inattentive NOT ALL THERE 1864 sl.
– absent-minded, inattentive NOT KEEPING ONE’S EYE ON THE BALL Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– absent-minded, inattentive NOT ON THE JOB Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– absent-minded, inattentive NOT THERE Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– absent-minded, inattentive OUT OF TOWN Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– absent-minded, inattentive WITH A VACANT ATTIC Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– absent-minded, inattentive WITH A VACANT HOUSE Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– absent-minded, inattentive, day-dreaming; unconscious of one’s surroundings DEAD TO THE WORLD 20C sl., orig. US
– absent-minded, vague YONDERLY 1828 Eng. dial.
 
ABSENT-MINDED – NOUNS
– absence of mind; a fit of abstraction or musing; a reverie; a dazed or puzzled state DUMP 1523
– absent-mindedness; distractedness ABSENTNESS 1790 rare
– an absent-minded, dreamy, or dazed state DWAAL 1957 S. Afr.
 
ABSENT-MINDED – NOUNS, PERSON
– a giddy, absent-minded person DITZ;  DITZO Bk2006 US sl.
– an absent-minded, distracted person, or one given to sentimentality MOONCALF a1627
– an absent-minded or inattentive person DIRK 1964 US sl.
– an absent-minded or inattentive person DIZ;  DIZZ 1963 US sl.
– an absent-minded or inattentive person MAGOO 1932 Amer. sl.
– an absent-minded or inattentive person MENTAL MIDGET 1966 US sl.
– an absent-minded or unworldly person; a dreamer HEAD-IN-AIR 1932
 
ABSENT-MINDED – PHRASES
– addressed to an absent-minded person YOU’D FORGET YOUR HEAD IF IT WASN’T JAMMED ON 1979 UK sl.
– addressed to an absent-minded person YOU’D FORGET YOUR HEAD IF IT WASN’T SCREWED ON 1979 UK sl.
– addressed to an absent-minded person YOU’D FORGET YOUR HEAD IF IT WASN’T STUCK ON 1979 UK sl.
– addressed to an absent-minded person YOU’D FORGET YOUR HEAD IF IT WASN’T TIED ON 1979 UK sl.
– applied to any person thought to be absent-minded, stupid, feeble-minded, inattentive, etc.​ NOBODY HOME c1915 Amer. sl.
– applied to any person thought to be absent-minded, stupid, feeble-minded, inattentive, etc. NOBODY HOME UPSTAIRS 1951 Amer. dial.
 
ABSENT-MINDED – VERBS
– to be absent-minded, to muse MEASE 1877 Eng. dial.


ABSENT WITHOUT LEAVE – PHRASES
– absence without leave A.W.O. LOOSE 1920 US sl.
– absent without leave AWOL 1920 sl., orig. US


ABSOLUTE – ADJECTIVES
– absolute ABSOTIVE 1924 Amer. sl.
– absolute; assured DEAD 1589
– absolute, certain DEAD-BANG 1985 Amer. sl.
– absolute, certain, definite COPPER-PLATED L19 US sl.
– absolute, complete UP-AND-DOWN;  UP-AND-DOWN-STAIRS M19 sl.
– absolute, complete, thoroughgoing RIGHT-DOWN 1586 rare
– absolute, complete, thorough, utter, arrant BODACIOUS 1887 Amer. dial.
– absolute, complete, unequivocal DEADWOOD M19 US sl.
– absolute, downright, complete DOWN 1625 obs.
– absolute, full, complete, perfect PLENARY a1425
– absolute, maximum, complete, very FULL-ON 1970 US
– absolute, not to be questioned, final PEREMPTORY 1532
– absolute, out-and-out COLD-BLOODED 1962 African-American sl.
– absolute, out-and-out, pure and simple BUST-OUT 1961 US sl.
– absolute, undivided, unbroken SINGLE 1590 rare
– absolute, undoubted, complete, thorough FAIR 1872
– absolute, unqualified, out-and-out POINT-BLANK 1845 Amer. dial.
– absolute, utter SKIRE 1825 Sc.


ABSOLUTELY – ADVERBS
– absolutely ABSOBLOODYLUTELY 1923 Amer. sl.
– absolutely ABSOFUCKINGLUTELY 1921 Amer. sl.
– absolutely ABSOGODDAMLUTELY 1962 Amer. sl.
– absolutely ABSOTOOTLY 1955 Amer. dial.
– absolutely FULL 1950s Amer. sl.
– absolutely and positively ABSOGODDAMNTIVELY 1986 Amer. sl.
– absolutely and positively ABSOTIVELY 1926 Amer. sl.
– absolutely, certainly, thoroughly, unquestionably, simply POINTEDLY a1883 Amer. dial.
– absolutely, completely, exactly, simply POINT-BLANK 1851 Amer. dial.
– absolutely, completely, intensely FULL OUT 1910s US sl.
– absolutely, completely, keenly for or against something DEAD-NUTS 1887 US sl.
– absolutely, completely, outright RIGHT-DOWN 1566 rare
– absolutely, completely, utterly OUT-AND-OUT L18
– absolutely, definitely BY THE CLOCK 1910s US sl.
– absolutely, definitely, very JUST L19 sl.
– absolutely, downright, thoroughly, completely, utterly EVEN-DOWN 1856 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– absolutely, entirely, completely, very PLUM 1858 Amer. dial.
– absolutely, extremely DANG 1840s
– absolutely; most definite ABSO-ONE-HUNDRED-PERCENT-LUTELY 20C sl.
– absolutely, positively; without qualification or reserve; wholly, completely BARELY c1340 obs.
– absolutely, properly, completely FAIRLINS 1891 Sc.
– absolutely, really EVERMORE 1933 Amer. dial.
– absolutely, surely; without a doubt SURE AS SHIT 1954 US sl.
– absolutely, thoroughly, totally FROM ASSHOLE TO APPETITE 1950s Amer. sl.
– absolutely; totally FLAT-ASS Bk2006 US sl.
– absolutely, totally FULL BORE 1936 US sl.
– absolutely, truly BACK-ACTUALLY;  BLACK-ACTUALLY 1928 Amer. dial.
– absolutely, utterly DEAD-ASS 1971 Amer. sl.
– absolutely, very much, greatly DOUBLE TIME 1994 UK sl.
– absolutely, very much indeed ABSOBALLYLUTELY;  ABSOBLOOMINGLUTELY 1910s sl.
– absolutely, very, really FAIR M19
– absolutely, very, thoroughly, extremely, completely; wholeheartedly DEAD 1589 
– absolutely; without doubt DEAD-BANG 1919 Amer. police usage
 
ABSOLUTELY – INTERJECTIONS/PHRASES
– absolutely! FUCKING A! Bk2006 US sl.
– absolutely! certainly!; completely accurate; not doubt at all DAMN TOOTIN’! 1910s US sl.
– absolutely, definitely, I couldn’t agree more I’LL SAY;  I’LL SAY SO 1910s sl., orig. US
– absolutely!, excellent! RIGHTEOUS 1967 sl., orig. African-American
– absolutely, indeed; an expression of agreement QUITE!;  QUITE SO! M19 sl.
– absolutely! undoubtedly!; an exclamation of enthusiastic affirmation DAMN SKIPPING!;  DAMN STRAIGHT! 1970s orig. African-American
– absolutely! without a doubt! DAMN SKIPPY! 1994 US sl.
– absolutely! yes indeed! I GUESS YES! L19 US sl.
– absolutely! yes! certainly! A! 1950s African-American sl.


ABSOLUTION,  ABSOLVE,  ABSOLVING – ADJECTIVES
– pert. to absolution; absolving ABSOLVITORY 1609 Sc.

ABSOLUTION etc. – NOUNS
– absolution, redemption, forgiveness of sins LESNESS c950 obs.
– absolution; the act of absolving ABSOLVITURE 1586 Sc. obs.

ABSOLUTION etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– a person who absolves ABSOLVANT 1506 obs.  

ABSOLUTION etc. – VERBS
– to absolve ​​​ABSOIL;  ABSOYLE c1450 obs.
– to absolve; to free from sin or its consequences UNBIND c950 obs.


ABSORB,  ABSORBED,  ABSORBENT,  ABSORBING,  ABSORPTION – ADJECTIVES
– absorbed ABSORPTED a1631
– absorbed; swallowed up; fig. engrossed ABSORPT 1528 arch.
– absorbent, imbibing OBSORBENT 1902 rare
– having the quality of absorbing, swallowing, or imbibing ABSORPTIVE 1664

ABSORB etc. – NOUNS
– absorption; swallowing up ​​ OBSORPTION c1600 obs. rare
– absorption ABSORBITION c1680 obs.
– an absorbing substance OBSORBENT 1747 rare

ABSORB etc. – VERBS
– to absorb OBSORB 1684 obs. rare
– to absorb, to swallow up ABSORBEATE Bk1626 obs.


ABSTAIN,  ABSTAINER,  ABSTAINING – ADJECTIVES (also see TEETOTALLER) 
– abstaining from alcoholic beverages; on the wagon UP THE POLE 1906 Amer. dial.
– abstaining from alcohol OFF 1910s sl.
– abstaining totally from alcohol ON THE WAGON 20C US
– refraining from drink ON THE COT;  ON THE TACK World War I Amer. sl.
 
ABSTAIN etc. – NOUNS
– an abstaining, keeping from or refraining ABSTAINMENT 1859 rare
– an abstaining, keeping oneself back, or refraining ABSTENTION 1624-47
– a vow to abstain from liquor for a certain period CAGG M18 military sl.
 
ABSTAIN etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– a person who abstains from intoxicating liquors; a teetotaller NEPHALIST 1861
– a person who practices or approves abstention ABSTENTIONIST 1880
– a total abstainer; a teetotaller COLD-WATER MAN 1894 Sc.
– a total abstainer; a teetotaller TEETEE 1900 Sc.
– a total abstainer; a teetotaller TEETOTAL 1857 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– a total abstainer; a teetotaller WATER-BOTTLE L19 sl.
– a total abstainer (balloon juice = soda-water) BALLOON-JUICE LOWERER Bk1909 sl.
– an abstainer from alcohol; a prohibitionist DRY Bk2006 US sl.
– an abstainer from alcoholic drinks; a teetotallera water drinker HYDROPOTIST 1678 obs. rare
– an abstainer from alcoholic drinks; a water drinker HYDROPOT;  HYDROPOTE 1727
​​- an abstainer from alcoholic drinks; a water drinker HYDROPOTIC 1623 obs.
 
ABSTAIN etc. – VERBS
– to abstain from BETHINK 1842 Eng. dial.
– to abstain from drinking alcohol KEG L18 US sl.
– to abstain from liquor for a certain period CAGG M18 military sl.


ABSTINENCE,  ABSTINENT – ADJECTIVES
– abstinent, refraining, sparing (with regard to other things than food) ABSTEMIOUS 1610 rare
– characterized by abstinence; self-restraining or refraining ABSTENTIOUS 1879
– committed to or advocating total abstinence; teetotal PUSSYFOOT 1919 rare
– pert. to abstinence ABSTINENTIAL 1681 obs. rare

ABSTINENCE etc. – NOUNS
– abstinence from food, fasting JEJUNATION 1623 obs.
– an abstaining or refraining from something; abstinence ABSISTENCE 1881
– total abstinence from intoxicating liquors; teetotalism NEPHALISM 1861 rare

ABSTINENCE etc. – PHRASES
– suffering from abstinence symptoms CHINAMAN ON ONE’S BACK 1962 Amer. sl.


ABSTRACTED – ADJECTIVES
– abstracted, distant; dreamy; said of the eyes, look FAR BEN 1918 Sc.
– abstracted, dreamy STANDING THERE LIKE A TIT IN A TRANCE 20C UK sl.
– abstracted, dreamy STANDING THERE LIKE A TOM TIT ON A BLATHER O’ LARD 20C UK sl.
– abstracted, dreamy STANDING THERE LIKE A TOM TIT ON A SIDE OF BEEF 20C UK sl.
– abstracted, insensible to outward things; dull, uninteresting DUMPISH 1545 obs.

ABSTRACTED – VERBS
– to be in a dreamy, stupid, abstracted state NAZZLE Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– to be in an abstracted or absent state of mind; to muse DUMP 1530 obs.


ABSTRUSE – ADJECTIVES
– abstruse, hidden RECONDITE 1619
– abstruse, profound, obscure ORACULOUS 1625 rare or obs.
– abstruse, secret, unknown except by a few ESOTERIC 1876


ABSURD,  ABSURDITY,  ABSURDLY – ADJECTIVES
– absurd MAD 1940s sl.
– absurd, bizarre BIZZURD 2003 UK sl.
– absurd, crazy MADMEN 1960s sl.
– absurd, dull, stupid​ DEAF c1440 obs.
– absurd, foolish FURIOUS 1526 obs.
– absurd, foolish, dull-witted, mad DAFT-LIKE 1790 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– absurd, foolish, silly; said of an idea or situation RADGE 1961 sl.
– absurd, foolish, silly; said of an idea or situation RADGY 1990s sl.
– absurd, incongruous, unreasonable ABSONOUS 1622 obs.
– absurd, nonsensical JUNKY 1960s US sl.
– absurd, not according to right reason; not based on reason ADOXAL 1652 obs. rare  
– absurd, preposterous, ludicrous, wrong ARSE-WISE 20C colloq.
– absurd, ridiculous BALLSY 1930s sl.
– absurd, ridiculous OBSOCKY 20C W. Indies sl.
– absurd; ridiculous OKEY-DOKE 1988 Amer. sl.
– absurd; ridiculous OKEY-DOKEY 1993 Amer. sl.
– absurd, ridiculous; topsy-turvy COCK-EYED 1896 UK sl.
– absurd, silly IMPERTINENT 1639 obs.
– absurd, visionary, fanciful, preposterous, ridiculous, impossible LAPUTAN 1866
– apt to commit absurd mistakes FOND AS A BESOM Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– quite absurd or incredible OUT OF ALL REASON 1887 Sc.
 
ABSURD etc. – ADVERBS
– absurdly, foolishly OAFLY Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– absurdly, in an eccentric manner; crazily DOTTILY 1937
 
ABSURD etc. – NOUNS
– absurdity, folly MAGGOTRY 1706 obs.
absurd or worthless ideas, talk, writing, etc.; nonsense JUNK 1906 orig. & chiefly US
– an absurdity ADOX;  ADOXE 1606 obs. rare
– an absurdity; an unreasonable thing, act, or statement ABSURD 1610 obs.
– an absurdity, trifle, piece of folly something unsuitable, out of place, or irrational IMPERTINENCES 1603
– an absurd notion or fancy; a whim, fancy, caprice; generally in plural MEGRIM 1831 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– an absurd or grotesque thing PUNCHINELLO 1669
– an absurd or illogical conclusion; also, an absurd state or condition ABSURDUM 1606
– an absurd or queer thing QUOZ 1790
– an absurd or silly device or practice; an absurdity; a piece of folly or nonsense TRIM-TRAM 1533 obs.
– an absurd story; a false report or rumour FURPHY 1916 Aust. sl.
– a piece of absurdity; an idle tale A TALE OF WALTROT 1377 obs. rare
– grotesque absurdity; grotesque ornamentation in architecture and books BABERY c1384 obs.
 
​ABSURD etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– an absurd and irrational person FANTASTICO 1597 obs.
– an absurd or foolish person BABELAVANTE a1400 obs.
– an absurd or grotesque person PUNCHINELLO 1669
– an absurd or queer person QUOZ 1790
– a person who behaves in an absurd or illogical manner ABSURDIST 1894 rare
 
ABSURD etc. – PHRASES
– a comment on any marked absurdity THE MIND BOGGLES 1950s sl.
– a way of stating to a person that his scheme is absurd or ridiculous WHEN THE SKY FALLS WE SHALL CATCH LARKS 1822

ABSURD etc. – VERBS
– to act absurdly, to play the fool TAKE THE PISS OUT OF 1990 sl.
– to attempt the absurd or impossible PUT A ROPE TO THE EYE OF A NEEDLE B1900
– to attempt the absurd or impossible TEACH A PIG TO PLAY ON THE FLUTE 1884
– to attempt the absurd or unnecessary; to act foolishly and to no purpose ROAST SNOW IN A FURNACE 1883 sl.
– to believe firmly something absurd, astounding, or impossible BELIEVE THE MOON IS MADE OF CHEESE 18C colloq.
– to cause a person to appear absurd or foolish ASS 1605 obs.
– to cause someone to appear absurd or foolish MAKE AN ASS OF SOMEONE 1548
– to do an absurd or ridiculous thing MAKE WIMWAMS FOR WATER-WHEELS 1865 Eng. dial.
– to reduce to absurdity or foolishness; to cause to be or appear foolish or ridiculous STULTIFY


ABUNDANCE,  ABUNDANT – ADJECTIVES
– abundant MANYFULL c1440 obs.
– abundant WALLING a1400 obs.
– abundant, ample in quantity; copious LARGE a1225 obs.
– abundant, bounteous CROWNED 1603 rare
– abundant, copious RANK 1303 obs.
– abundant, copious UBERANT 1622 obs. rare
– abundant, copious, full UBEROUS 1633
– abundant, fully sufficient ABOUNDABLE c1400 obs.
– abundant, generous, plentiful, well-supplied RAFFIE;  RAFFY 1871 Sc.
– abundant, much in quantity MICKLE;  MUCKLE 1737 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– abundant, numerous, crowded THICK ON THE GROUND 1893 UK sl.
– abundant, overflowing; plentiful ABOUND c1400 obs.
– abundant, plentiful FAT 1563
– abundant, plentiful DEGORE;  DELORE 1965 Amer. dial.
– abundant, plentiful WAGGA-WAGGA 1990s W. Indies sl.
– abundant, plentiful, plenteous PLENTEVOUS 1738 obs.
– abundant, rich, plentiful, sumptuous, splendid OPIMOUS 1656 obs.
– abundant, rich, sumptuous, splendid OPIME 1533 obs.
– abundant, very plentiful PLENTIFUL AS PIG-TRACKS;  THICK AS PIG-TRACKS 1870 Amer. dial.
– characterized by abundance; very generous; bountiful MUNIFICENT 1565
– exceptionally abundant  or large BUMPER 1836
– in abundance UTA 1986 US sl.
– in abundance, galore BALORE 1968 Amer. dial.
– in abundance, galore RESTING 1970 Amer. dial.
– superabundant; excessive, superfluous TRABOCCANT 1651 obs. rare
– superabundant, overflowing EXUBERATE 1638 obs.

ABUNDANCE etc. – ADVERBS
– abundantly, amply, fully, quite, by a great deal LARGE a1300 obs., chiefly Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– abundantly, aplenty, in abundance AGLORE 1967 Amer. dial.
– abundantly, aplenty, in abundance AGLORY 1969 Amer. dial.
– abundantly, in abundance GALLORUM;  GALOREM 1813 Sc. obs.
– abundantly, in excess ALL ENDS AND SIDES 1866 Eng. dial.
– abundantly, in great supply LIKE STUPIDNESS 1950s W. Indies & Black British sl.
– abundantly, plentifully FATLY 1515 obs.
 
ABUNDANCE etc. – NOUNS
– a being abundant; abundantness, plentifulness ABUNDANCY 1620 obs.
– abundance OMBERTY;  UMBERTY 1575 obs. rare
– abundance LUSHINGS 1852
– abundance, ample means, wealth SUFFISANCE 1390 obs.
– abundance, ever so much MAIN’S MORE 1822 Sc. obs.
– abundance, fullness; plenty FULTH a1400 rare
– abundance, lots WHIPS 1888
– abundance, plentifulness; satiety FULSOMEHEAD a1325 obs.
– abundance, plenty DIGGLES 1892 Eng. dial.
– abundance, plenty MURTH 1674 Eng. & Amer. dial.
– abundance, plenty RAFF c1320 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– abundance, plenty SCOUTH;  SCOWTH 1804 Sc.
– abundance, plenty SCOUTH AND ROUTH 1900 Sc.
– abundance, plenty TALLOW c1380 obs.
– abundance, plenty, a great deal MERTH 1677 Eng. dial.
– abundance, plenty, a large quantity ABUNDATION 19C Eng. dial.
– abundance, plenty; a store LABIES Bk1902 Eng. dial.
– abundance, plenty, esp. of food SCAFF AND RAFF 1806 Sc.
– abundance, profusion AFFLUENTNESS 1727 obs. rare
– abundance, profusion, esp. of good living LASHANGALLAIVIE a1838 Sc.
– abundance, rich growth; fruitfulness; fertility;
– abundance, profusion, esp. of good living
copiousness UBERTY a1412 rare  
– abundance, treasure, riches, wealth TALENT a1400-50 obs.
– abundant supply; large quantity TEEM 1876 Eng. dial.
– an abundance BUNDANCE 1908 Amer. dial.
– an abundance GOD’S PLENTY 1949 Amer. dial.
– an abundance, a great plenty LASHINGS 1894 Amer. dial.
– an abundance, a large amount or quantity; multitude, more than enough OCEANS L16
– an abundance; a large quantity GUSH 1849 Amer. dial.
– an abundance; a large quantity or number MORT 1899 Amer. dial.
– an abundance of anything BOKOO World War I Amer. sl. (French ‘beaucoup’)
– an abundance; plenty; a large amount or number REMPTION;  RIMPTION 1913 Amer. dial.
– an abundance; plenty; a large amount or number RIMPSHIONS 1917 Amer. dial.
– an abundant or full supply TRUNKFUL 20C colloq.
– anything unusually abundant or large BUMPER 1859 sl.
– excessive abundance, profusion, extravagant outpouring or expenditure LAVISH 1483 obs.
– superabundance, plenty FAT 1570-6 obs.
 
ABUNDANCE etc. – PHRASES
– in abundance, aplenty, galore TILL HELL WOULDN’T HAVE IT 1939 Amer. dial.
– in abundance, aplenty, galore TILL HECK WOULDN’T HAVE IT 1967 Amer. dial.
– ​in abundance, aplenty, galore TILL HELL WOULDN’T SNEEZE AT IT 1935 Amer. dial.
– in superabundant supply COMING OUT OF ONE’S EARS 1965 Amer. sl.
– in the midst of abundance or plenty, wanting for nothing AT RACK AND MANGER c1380
– there is abundance; there is a plentiful supply THERE’S CORN IN EGYPT 1838
 
ABUNDANCE etc. – VERBS
– to be in great abundance COME LIKE SALT 2003 Trinidad and Tobago
– to be in great abundance; to be plentiful; to abound; to overflow EXUBERATE 1623