Reverse Dictionary: AGO – AIN


AGO – ADJECTIVES
– ago AGONE 1823 Amer. dial.
– of long ago, ancient ELDERN 1862 Sc.
– of long ago, of yore, ancient LANG SYNE 1798 Sc.

AGO – ADVERBS
– ago; before now SITH c1350 obs.
– ago; in the past SITHEN c1386 obs.
– ago; in the past SITHENCE 1548 obs.
– ago, past ABYE 1894 Sc.
– ago; since ABACK 1768 Sc.
– a little while ago, recently  BACK-ALONG 1880 Eng. & Amer. dial.
– long ago ALLUS-AGO;  ALWAYS-AGO 1914 Amer. dial.
– long ago; in ancient times OLD 1608 obs. rare
– long ago; in the past BACK-CAST 1874 Eng. dial.
– long ago; long since LANG SYNE 1500-20 Sc.
– long ere, long since LANGER 1303 Sc. & N. Eng. dial. obs.
– since long ago, for a long time LONG ALREADY 1935 Amer. dial.

AGO – NOUNS
– a long time ago ALLUS-AGO;  ALWAYS-AGO 1922 Amer. dial.

AGO – NOUNS, PERSON
– a person who lived long ago LANG-SYNER 1843 Eng. dial.

AGO – PHRASES
– a notional date that, within context, was a very long time ago THE YEAR DOT 1895 UK sl.
– a notional date that, within context, was a very long time ago THE YEAR BLOB 1997 UK sl.
– a very long time ago WHEN ADAM WAS AN OAKUM BOY IN BROOKLYN NAVY YARD M19 sl.
– a very long time ago WHEN ADAM WAS AN OAKUM BOY IN CHATHAM M19 sl.
– long ago DONKEY’S YEARS AGO Bk1942 Amer. colloq.
– long ago RIGHT SMART AGORIGHT SMART SPELL AGO Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– long ago WHEN FANNY WAS A WOMAN’S NAME Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– some time ago A SPACE BACK Bk1942 Amer. sl.


AGONIZING, AGONY – ADJECTIVES
– agonizing, extremely painful RAMPANT Bk1905 Eng. dial.

AGONIZING etc. – NOUNS
– acute agony, piercing pain agony LANCINATION 1649
– an agonizing or arduous task, experience, etc.; a bitter disappointment ASS-BREAKER 1961 Amer. sl.


AGREE, AGREEABLE, AGREEABLENESS, AGREEABLY, AGREED, AGREEING, AGREEINGLY, AGREEMENT – ADJECTIVES
– agreeable, acceptable KOSH 1994 US sl.
– agreeable, acceptable, pleasing LIKEWORTH c888 obs.
– agreeable, amiable, genial COUTHIE;  COUTHY 1938 Amer. dial.
– agreeable, complaisant, amiable, suave PLACENTIOUS a1661 obs. rare
– agreeable, convenient, suitable AVENANT c1300 obs.
– agreeable, delightful; said of sounds, odours, etc. FAIR a1000 obs.
– agreeable, enjoyable, exceedingly pleasant, delightful, charming JOLLY 1549
– agreeable, flexible JELLO Bk1971 US students’ sl.
– agreeable, friendly, admirable, excellent DAVE 1990s sl.
– agreeable, good-natured; pleasing LIKELY 1809 Amer. dial.
– agreeable in manner, courteous VELVETY 1861
– agreeable; neat, natty; with dainty habits TASTY 1870 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– agreeable; noble, valiant HENDY a1250 obs.
– agreeable, pleasant BRAW Bk1911 Sc.
– agreeable, pleasant I-WIL c1275 obs.
– agreeable, pleasant, affable SMOLT c1400 obs.
– agreeable, pleasant, fine, handsome DAINTY 1787 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– agreeable, pleasant, genial SANSHACH 1969 Sc.
– agreeable, pleasant; smug SMIRK 1534
– agreeable, pleasant; worthy, excellent; fine, handsome DENTY a1698 Sc.
– agreeable, pleasing SUAVIOUS 1669 obs. rare
– agreeable, pleasing, acceptable to a person QUEME c1200 obs.
– agreeable, pleasing, beautiful, comely FAVOURABLE 1398 obs.
– agreeable, pleasing, pleasant QUEMEFUL a1340 obs.
– agreeable, pleasing, pleasant, acceptable LIKEFUL c1305 obs.
– agreeable; satisfactory COPASETIC Bk2006 US sl.
– agreeable, to one’s taste, suitable SYMPATHIQUE 1869
– agreed, accordant SAMTALE c1200 obs.
– agreed or arranged IN THE CAN 20C colloq.
– agreeing, accordant; marked by agreement SYMPHONIOUS 1743
– agreeing, concordant SAMENTALE a1300 obs.
– agreeing, conforming CONGRUENT 1875
– agreeing, consonant, or conforming to or with QUADRANT 1536 obs.
– agreeing, harmonious, accordant; suitable, agreeable ACCORDABLE c1374 obs.
– agreeing, unanimous, of one mind UNANIMATE 1633 obs.
– agreeing well; friendly WELL TOGETHER 1741 obs.
– characterized by being agreed upon or stipulated; settled by covenant PACTITIOUS 1656 obs. rare
– disposed to quietly agree or assent ACQUIESCENT 1753
– exactly agreeing; exact, precise JUMP 1581 obs.
– in agreement IN TALE 1577
– in agreement IN THE SAME TALE c1375
– in agreement, free from strife, at peace, reconciled SAUGHT 956 obs.
– in agreement with ABOUT THAT 1990s US students’ sl.
– marked by agreement or harmony; harmonious, concordant HARMONICAL 1531 rare
– not agreed upon; not granted or bestowed UNACCORDED 1645
– not agreeing; having little in common ECCENTRIC 1607-11 obs.
– pert. to agreement or harmony; harmonious HARMONIAL 1569 rare
– pert. to an agreement or pact PACTORIAL 1884 Sc. rare
– ready to agree, inclined to assent, deferential ASSENTANEOUS 1834 rare
– refusing to agree NOT HAVING ANY (OF) 1902 UK sl.
– said of something that is agreeable or pleasant CAVASCACIOUS 1908 Amer. dial.
– very agreeable; very polite NICE AS PIE 1922 US sl.
 
AGREE etc. – ADVERBS
– agreeably, beautifully, brightly, handsomely, nobly, in a comely manner FAIR a1000
– agreeably, handsomely, modestly MEETERLY 1790 Eng. dial.
– agreeably, pleasantly SUGARLY;  SUGGERLIE 1584 obs. rare
– agreeingly SAMLY c1350 obs.
– agreeingly; in the way of agreement or harmony; harmoniously HARMONICALLY 1604 obs.
– by means of an agreement or pact PACTIONALLY 1884 Sc.
– in an agreeable, pleasing, or becoming manner QUEMELY c1380 obs.
 
AGREE etc. – INTERJECTIONS
– an exclamation of agreement BLATANT! Bk2007 sl.
– an exclamation of agreement BLOODY OATH! Bk1999 Aust. sl.
– an exclamation of agreement DEAL! 1980s sl.
– an exclamation of agreement I HEARD THAT! 1980s US college sl.
– an exclamation of agreement I HOPE TO SPIT! 1910s US sl.
– an exclamation of agreement I’LL DRINK TO THAT! Bk1996 Aust. sl. 
– an exclamation of agreement MY BLOODY OATH! 1848 Aust. & NZ sl.
– an exclamation of agreement MY COLONIAL OATH! 1859 Aust. sl.
– an exclamation of agreement OKEY! E19 sl., orig. US
– an exclamation of agreement; absolutely, indeed QUITE SO! M19 sl.
– an exclamation of agreement; absolutely, indeed QUITE! M19 sl.
– an exclamation of agreement, acceptance FAIR DO(S)! M19 Aust. & NZ
– an exclamation of agreement, acceptance FAIR DUES! M19 Aust. & NZ
– an exclamation of agreement, acceptance FAIR ENOUGH! 1926 UK sl.
– an exclamation of agreement, acceptance FAIR SHAKES! M19 Aust. & NZ
– an exclamation of agreement and satisfaction YOU AIN’T WOOFING! 1943 Amer. college sl.
– an exclamation of agreement, assent, approval NOT HALF! 1920 UK sl.
– an exclamation of agreement or approval COOLNESS! 1988 US sl.
– an exclamation of agreement or assent; all right! I am satisfied! RYEBUCK 1859 chiefly Aust.
– an exclamation of agreement or compliance AYE-AYE POPEYE! 1990s UK sl.
– an exclamation of agreement or compliance AYE-AYE SHEPHERD’S PIE! 1990s UK sl.
– an exclamation of agreement or satisfaction ALRIGHTY! 1997 Aust. sl.
– an exclamation of agreement, pleasure, etc. YEAH MAN! 1934
– an exclamation of complete agreement ABSOLUTELY! 1937 UK sl.
– an exclamation of emphatic agreement BLOODY OATH! 20C Aust. sl.
– an exclamation of emphatic agreement COLONIAL OATH! Bk1999 Aust. sl., obs.
– an exclamation of emphatic agreement DAMNED TOOTING! 1963 US sl.
– an exclamation of ironic agreement TRUE TALE! 1952 Sc.
– an exclamation of strong agreement I RECKON! 1966 Amer. dial.
– an exclamation of strong agreement LAWS, YES! 1966 Amer. dial.
– an exclamation of strong agreement with what has just been said I’M SERIOUS! 1981 US sl.
– an exclamation of unqualified agreement BLEEDING OATH! Bk1999 Aust. sl.
– an exclamation of wholehearted agreement YOU’RE NOT WRONG! Bk1999 Aust. sl.
– I agree! AND HOW! 20C Amer. sl.
– I agree! I approve! I’M THERE! 1977 US sl. 
– I agree with what you just said! I MEAN THAT! 1977 US sl.
– I agree with your plan of action! I’M ABOUT IT! 1999 US sl.
– it’s an agreement, it’s a deal, IT’S A GO 1878
 
AGREE etc. – NOUNS
– a body of persons who have signed an agreement or document SIGNMENT a1660 obs.
– a drawing back from an agreement BACK-DRAW 1923 Sc.
– agreeableness AGREEMONY 1678 obs. nonce word
– agreement, accord, concord; oneness or unity of spirit, mind, or feeling ONEHEAD 1340 obs.
– agreement, accord, concord; union of mind or feeling ONEMENT a1450 obs.
– agreement, accord, congruity SYMPHONY 1598 obs.
– agreement, amity BON-ACCORD Bk1911 Sc.
– agreement, concord SAMENTALE a1225 obs.
– agreement, freedom from strife, peace SAUGHT c1100 obs.
– agreement, go-ahead, approval OK;  OKAY M19 sl.
– agreement, reconciliation; reconcilement ACCORDMENT c1330
– an agreeable proposition; a bit of luck or a trick that leads to large profits COP 20C Aust. & NZ sl.
– an agreement BLOCK Bk1911 Sc.
– an agreement, a bargain, pact, contract PACTION 1471 now chiefly Sc.
– an agreement; a deal; a bargain WHACK 1860 Amer. dial.
– an agreement; an appointment; a bargain, a compact MATCH 1569 obs.
– an agreement, compact, bargain; hence, a post, situation, a steady job TACK 1718 Sc.
– an agreement, covenant SAUGHT 1038-50 obs.
– an agreement or covenant TAILYIE 1808 Sc.
– an agreement or promise, binding on him who makes it; now ‘bond’ BAND a1440 arch.
– peaceful agreement or submission; rest, quiet satisfaction ACQUIESCEMENT 1721 obs.
– something agreeable or humorous PISSER Bk1971 US students’ sl.
– something very agreeable or pleasing, esp. when given as a sop or bribe SUGAR-PLUM 1608
– the agreeable or pleasant part, side, or aspect of anything SMOOTH 1612
 
AGREE etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– an agreeable and kind man; a well-dressed, affable man GLOVER 1854 US sl.
– an agreeable, attractive, or remarkable person BERRY c1900 Amer. students’ sl.
– an agreeable, even-tempered half-wit; a person who is peculiar or abnormal in a harmless, inoffensive way ODDLING 1941 Amer. dial.
– an agreeable or jolly companion BON ENFANT 1836
– an agreeable or lovely person HENDY a1350 obs.
– an agreeable, pleasant person HELYIES-AM 1866 Sc.
– an agreeable, pleasant, trustworthy person BEAUT 1866 sl.
– a person who always agrees with his superiors LITTLE SIR ECHO 1989 Aust. sl.
– a person who refuses to agree to something HOLDOUT 1940s US sl.
 
AGREE etc. – PHRASES
– all of the same way of thinking ALL OF A TALE 1901 Eng. dial.
– an agreement; a bargain IT’S A WHACK 1919 Amer. dial.
– an agreement; a bargain THAT’S A WHACK 1875 Amer. dial.
– an expression of agreement, affirmation I FEEL YOU 1990s African-American sl.
– an expression of agreement, affirmation I’M SAYING DOE 2000s African-American sl.
– an expression of agreement or assent RIBUCK;  RYEBUCK 1859 Aust. sl.
– an expression of agreement, usually when the first speaker is recounting some tale of problems TALK ABOUT IT 1920s US college sl.
– an expression of agreement, usually when the first speaker is recounting some tale of problems TELL ME ABOUT IT 1920s US college sl.
– I agree, you’re right’ an expression of acceptance WHATEVER FLOATS YOUR BOAT 1980s US college sl.
– I totally agree with youthat is absolutely right YOU CAN SAY THAT AGAIN 1941
– used to emphasize one’s absolute agreement CAN A DUCK SWIM? M19 sl.
– used to emphasize one’s absolute agreement WILL A FISH SWIM? M19 sl.
 
AGREE etc. – VERBS
– to agree PARK IN THE SAME LOT 1990s sl., orig. US
– to agree QUADRATE 1732 US
– to agree, correspond, or conform with QUADRATE 1610
– to agree, esp. tacitly; to concur in; to raise no objections to ACQUIESCE E17
– to agree fully to terms or conditions SIGN ON THE DOTTED LINE 20C
– to agree or side with, to give support to SUFFRAGE 1613 obs.
– to agree tacitly to; to concur in; to accept the conclusions or arrangements of others ACQUIESCATE a1586 obs. rare
– to agree; to be content or willing; to make up one’s mind to do something FADGE 1592 obs.
– to agree, to be harmonious, to get along QUADER 1847 Sc.
– to agree, to be of one accord; to have a close relationship PISS THROUGH THE SAME QUILL a1641 sl.
– to agree, to be in accordance SYMPHONIZE 1661 obs.
– to agree, to concur CONDOG 1492 obs.
– to agree, to correspond, to fit, to tally PAN 1571 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– to agree, to fit, to fit in; to fill in (a gap) FAY 1847 Amer. dial.
– to agree, to get on well SET HORSES 1899 Amer. dial.
– to agree, to get on well SIT HORSES 1965 Amer. dial.
– to agree, to get on well, to come to an agreement PIECE 1931 Amer. dial.
– to agree, to get on well together GEE 1719 sl.
– to agree, to go down with a person; to fit, to suit, to be suitable FADGE 1578 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– to agree; to grant; to consent BAITHE c1300 obs. rare
– to agree; to live in harmony JIBE 1871 sl.
– to agree; to match; to adjust, to assort SAMMER 1825 Sc.
– to agree to or covenant something PACTION 1640 Sc.
– to agree to, to make an arrangement or agreement  CONFABULATE 19C Eng. dial.
– to agree, to unite; to come to terms ONE 1340 obs.
– to agree with a person FADGE WITH 17C
– to agree with other information TRACK 1970s US Army sl.
– to agree with, to match; to befit BESORT 1605 obs.
– to agree with; to match with PAIR WITH 1892 Sc.
– to be agreeable or acceptable to a person; to please QUEME a1000 obs.
– to be agreeable to; to fall in with his plans or answer his requirement’s SUIT A PERSON’S BOOK 1851 orig. bookmakers’ usage
– to be in agreement; to follow with confidence STRING ALONG 20C colloq.
– to come to a binding agreement or understanding FASTEN ON Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– to come to agreement, to become reconciled SAUGHTEL 1154 obs.
– to come to an agreement MIDS Bk1905 Sc.
– to come very near an agreement COME TO NEARPOINTS Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– to draw back from agreement BACK-HAP 1824 Sc.
– to express agreement CHIME IN Bk1999
– to make agreeable or palatable SUGAR 1412-20
– to make agreeable or pleasant, to reduce the asperity of severity of SAUCE 1514
– to make an agreement with MATCH a1300 obs.
– to make an agreement; to come to terms TALK ALIKE 1901 Eng. dial.
– to reach an agreement LICK THUMBS 1958 Amer. dial.


AGRICULTURAL, AGRICULTURE – ADJECTIVES
​- agricultural, countrified AGGIE Bk1942 Amer. sl.
​- engaged or interested in agriculture; rural AGRICOLOUS 1825 rare

AGRICULTURAL etc. – NOUNS
​- Agricultural School (of the University of Minnesota) COW COLLEGE Bk1913 Amer. dial.
​- agricultural work, husbandry; labour or work in the cultivation of the soil TILTH c1000
​- agriculture AG 1910s US sl.
​- agriculture AGGIE 1910s US sl.
​- agriculture; cultivation of the earth TERRACULTURE 1847 rare
​- agriculture; cultivation of the soil EARTH-TILTH c1000 obs.
​- agriculture, farming; the business of cultivating land, raising stock, etc. FARMERY 1801
​- agriculture; ​husbandry GAINAGE 1625 obs.
​- agriculture; tilth, tillage TILTURE 1573 obs. rare
​- an agricultural college AG 1910s US sl.
​- an agricultural college AG COLL 1910s US sl.
​- an agricultural college AGGIE 1910s US sl.
​- the profit derived from the tillage of land GAINERY 1670 obs.
​- the profit or produce derived from the tillage of land GAINAGE 1390 obs.

AGRICULTURAL etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– an agriculture student K-BOY Bk1970 US sl.
​- a ruling member of an agricultural class TILLOCRAT 1858 nonce word
​- a student of an agricultural (college) training program; spec., Texas A&M AGGIE 1910s US sl.
​- a student of geoponics, the science of agriculture or husbandry; a writer on agriculture GEOPONIST 1716 rare
​- a writer on agriculture GEOPONIC 1612 rare


AGROUND – VERBS
– to run aground FALL ON SHORE 1590 obs.


AGUE – ADJECTIVES
– stricken with ague ARRESTED BY THE BAILIFF OF MARSHLAND 1590 obs.

AGUE – NOUNS
– ague fit; ague, intermitting fever ACCESS c1374
– an ague, an intermittent fever TYPE-FEVER 1819 obs.
– an imperfect fit of the ague MEENING Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– the ague INTERMITTING 1790 Eng. dial. obs.
– the ague MARSHLAND BAILIFF Bk1905 Eng. dial.


AHEAD – ADVERBS
– ahead, in advance, before; said of motion TOFORE c1330 obs.
– directly ahead; in the direction of the length AN-END 1601 chiefly nautical usage


AID, AIDE, AIDING – ADJECTIVES
– aiding, assisting, helpful ADJUVANT a1614
– aiding, helping FURTHERING 1418 obs.
– bringing aid, help, or assistance OPIFEROUS 1656 obs. rare
– giving aid, helpful ADJUVABLE 1599 obs. rare
– giving aid, helpful ADMINICULAR 1676
– giving aid, helpful ADMINICULARY 1818 obs.
– giving aid, helpful, assisting ADJUTORIOUS 1657 obs. rare
– giving aid, helpful, helping, assisting AIDANT 1483
– giving aid, helping ADJUTORY 1612 obs.

AID etc. – NOUNS
– a calling to one’s aid; an appeal for aid or defense ADVOCATION 1598 obs.
– a giving aid or help, assistance OPITULATION 1597 obs.
– aid, assistance, means of help, support AIDANCE 1593
– aid, assistance; a helping forward; advancement FURTHERANCE c1440
– aid, help SISTENCE a1513 obs. rare
– aid, help, assistance SUBSIDY 1387 obs. or arch.
– aid, help, support, assistance SUFFRAGE c1460 obs.
– aid, succour, help, assistance SUCCURRANCE c1450 obs.
– aid, support, furtherance FAVOUR c1400 obs.
– an aid, help, subsidy SUBSIDIUM 1640
– an aid, help; said of things SUFFRAGAN 1644 obs.
– an aid; something helpful MYSTERY 1581 obs. rare
– anything that aids, helps, or supports ADMINICLE a1556
– the corrupt giving of mutual aid, esp. in professional contexts, as a critic consistently pushing a novelist friend LOGGING E19 sl., orig. US

AID etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– an aide, helper, assistant AIDANT 1475 rare
– an aider, a helper OPITULATOR 1624 obs.-
– an aider, a helper, ADJOINT 1597 obs.
– a person who aids or assists SUCCOURER 1440 obs.
– a person who gives aid, countenance, or support to another; a defender and helper MAINTAINER c1330 obs.
– a person who helps or aids SUFFRAGE c1480 obs.
– a politician who engages in the corrupt giving of mutual aid LOG-ROLLER E19 sl.

AID etc. – PREPOSITIONS
– in aid of, in contribution to ATOWARDS Bk1898 Eng. dial.

AID etc. – VERBS
– to aid, assist, or help VAIL a1300 obs.
– to aid or assist GIVE A HEAD 1945 Amer. dial.
– to aid, to assist ADJUVATE 1599 obs.
– to aid, to assist BEAR A BOB 1890 Eng. dial.
– to aid, to assist, to help OPITULATE 1597 obs.
– to aid, to help JUVATE 1708 obs. rare
– to aid, to help, to assist AUXILIATE 1656 obs.
– to aid, to help, to assist a person in need or trouble; to supply the wants of BEET a1300 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– to aid, to help, to further FILSTEN a1200 obs.
– to come to the aid of someone in need HELP A (LAME) DOG OVER A STILE 1546
– to engage in the corrupt giving of mutual aid LOG-ROLL M19 sl.
– to give secret aid to SUBAID 1597 obs. rareto summon aid; to over-react, to panic HIT THE PANIC BUTTON 1950s


AIDS – ADJECTIVES
– infected with HIV or suffering from AIDS SICK 1990 US

AIDS – NOUNS
– AIDS ACE OF SPADES 20C Brit. rhyming sl.
– AIDS MUSTARD 1996 US sl.
– AIDS THE BIG A 1986 US sl.
– AIDS or HIV HIGH FIVE 2000s US teen sl.
– AIDS or HIV PACKAGE 2002 US sl.
– AIDS or HIV SLIM-FAST DIET 2002 US sl.

AIDS – NOUNS, PERSON
– a person with AIDS HIVER 1980s sl., derogatory


AIL, AILED, AILING – ADJECTIVES
– ailed AILDED 1845 Amer. dial.
– ailing, delicate ILL-HEARTY 1746 Eng. dial.
– ailing, ill; in a state of ill health BADLY 1787 Sc.
– ailing, ill, out-of-sorts OOLIE 1929 Sc.
– ailing, ill, out-of-sorts OOLIE-LIKE 1929 Sc.
– ailing, ill, out of sorts; injured, disabled CROOK 1916 Aust. & NZ
– ailing, ill, unwell COMPLAINY 1887 Amer. dial.
– ailing, indisposed; diseased, sickly, weakly; frail, infirm CRAZY 1576 obs.
– ailing, infirm, ill, sickly CREACHY 1842 Eng. & Amer. dial.
– ailing, lacking energy, drooping MEEKING Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– ailing, out of health, poorly BADLINS 1932 Sc.
– ailing, physically weak KIDLING B1900 Eng. dial.
– ailing, poorly AILDY 1697 Eng. dial. obs.
– ailing, poorly HILDING B1900 Eng. dial.
– ailing, puny, sickly, delicate, weak, frail PINDLING 1862 Amer. dial.
– ailing, puny, sickly, delicate, weak, frail PINDLY 1959 Amer. dial.
– ailing, shabby, worn out OFF (OF) THE HOOKS Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– ailing, sick, ill, or exhausted; too weak to stand unaided DOWN ON THE LIFT 1952 Amer. dial.
– ailing, sick, ill, or exhausted; too weak to stand unaided ON THE LIFT 1888 Amer. dial.
– ailing, sickly, in weak health, infirm in body CRANKY 1787 Eng. dial.
– ailing, sickly, queasy, feeble QUEECHY 1859 Eng. dial.
– ailing somewhat, esp. used of the sensation of cold UNHEARTY Bk1905 Sc.
– ailing, unwell ADDLE Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– ailing, weak, in bad health PACHETTY Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– ailing, weakly CAILING 1888 Eng. dial.
– ailing, weakly, feeble, sickly SILLY a1585 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– ailing, weak; pale, sickly in appearance HALISH 1895 Eng. dial.
– ailing-looking or tired-looking, weak, puny, wearied, in poor spirits, miserable, dejected OORIT 1869 Sc.
– always ailing, very frail and delicate in constitution, broken down in health PALCHED 1891 Eng. dial.
– always ailing, very frail and delicate in constitution, broken down in health PALCHY 1897 Eng. dial.
– in an ailing and weak state; poorly, sickly; indifferently well CRAWLY-MAWLY 1677 Eng. dial.
– slightly ailing, esp. used of the sensation of cold UNHEARTSOME Bk1905 Sc.

AIL etc. – VERBS
– to ail ELD 1560 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– to ail YEELDE c1489 obs.
– to ail, to be amiss TEIL 1821 Eng. dial. obs.
– to ail, to feel poorly FEEL LIKE THE WALKING DEAD Bk1942 US sl.
– to ail, to have a continuing illness LINGER ON 1917 Amer. dial.
– to ail, to have a continuing illness LINGER 1859 Amer. dial.
– to be ailing or ill, to be unwell GRUNT 1893 Amer. dial.
– to be constantly ailing and sickly, not to thrive, to complain from ill health, to shrink, to shrivel ORP 1820 Sc.


AILMENT – ADJECTIVES
– of an ailment: grievous, oppressive SAIR 1808 Sc.
– subject to frequent ailments; disposed; susceptible to illness; sickly, in poor health RASHY 1895 Sc. & Amer. dial.

AILMENT – NOUNS
– a human ailment or illness EPIZOOTIC c1883 Amer. dial.
– ailment, habitual indisposition ACHAQUE 1646 obs.
– ailment, sickness, a long-standing illness AILING Bk1898 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– an ailment, illness, or complaint AIL 1750 Eng. dial.
– an imaginary ailment HIGULCION FLIPS Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– a slight ailment; an indefinable illness, not easily cured SNICK-UP 1830 Eng. dial.


AIM, AIMED, AIMING – ADJECTIVES
– aimed or levelled as a weapon; braced or wound up for action; crouched for a spring BENT c1330 obs.
– having but one aim or purpose SINGLE-MINDED 1860

AIM etc. – ADVERBS
– with aim or desire; with true intent; intentionally, sincerely, earnestly AFFECTEDLY 1596 obs.

AIM etc. – NOUNS
– a bad aim or shot BOSS-SHOT 1890 sl.
– aim, purpose, design CAST c1325 obs.
– aim, purpose, design LEVEL a1592 obs.
– aim, purpose, intention; that towards which an action, etc. is directed BENT 1579 obs.
– an aim ARCH Bk1898 Sc.
– an aim, an intent; an attempt, an effort, an endeavour ETTLE 1839 Sc.
– an aim, an object UMTION Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– an aim, attempt at, effort, endeavour MINT 1660 Sc. & Eng. dial. 
– an aim, a plan, a scheme, an idea DART 1887 Aust. sl.
– an aiming at something, an aim OFFER 1581 now rare or obs.
– an aiming at, striving after; a desire to obtain, earnest pursuit AFFECTATION 1549 obs.
– an aim with a weapon VIZZY 1720 Sc.
– singleness of aim or purpose SINGULARITY a1340 obs. rare

AIM etc. – PHRASES
– cannot aim something accurately CAN’T HIT THE BROAD SIDE OF A BARN Bk2006 US sl.
– said of someone with poor aim COULDN’T HIT THE SIDE OF A BARN Bk1999 Aust. sl.

AIM etc. – VERBS
– to aim a blow, weapon, etc. BEND 1530 obs.
– to aim (a missile); to make straight the course or aim of anything; to direct ADDRESS c1374 obs.
– to aim at, to aspire to, to make for; to seek to obtain or attain AFFECT 1483 obs.
– to aim at; to make an attempt at OFFER AT 1847 Sc.
– to aim at; to seek to obtain SUIT 1559-60 Sc. obs.
– to aim at, to strive after HEAVE AT 1535 obs.
– to aim at, to strive for HACK AFTER 1393 obs.
– to aim at; to tend towards ART Bk1898 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– to aim or impel an object POP 1827 Sc.
– to aim or intend ECCLE;  ECKLE 1721 Eng. dial.
– to aim, to intend to do something MARK a1400 Sc. obs.
– to aim; to manage, handle, manipulate a weapon WALD 1790 Sc.
– to aim, to take aim at ETTLE 1737 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– to aim with a weapon TAKE A VIZZY 1801 Sc.
– to take aim LELL 1825 Sc. obs.
– to take aim at DRAW A BEAD UPON 1841
– to take aim with a gun, bow, or other weapon VIZZY 1817 Sc.


AIMLESS, AIMLESSLY, AIMLESSNESS – ADJECTIVES
– aimless, feckless PAIDLING 1792 Sc.
– aimless, idle, vagrant, wandering PAUPING 1813 Sc. obs.
– aimless, ineffectual; listless, spiritless, wanting in energy or force THAVELESS 1835 Ireland
– aimless, ineffectual; listless, spiritless, wanting in energy or force THIEVELESS 1835 Sc.
– aimless, trifling PANDERING a1850 Sc.
– aimless, vagrant, idle PALMERING 1816 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– walking or working aimlessly, trifling, pottering PATTERIN’ 1828 Sc.

AIMLESS etc. – ADVERBS
– aimlessly, feebly, weakly, without force or energy THIEVELESSLY 1890 Sc.

AIMLESS etc. – NOUNS
– aimlessness, idling PANDERING 1884 Sc.

AIMLESS etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– an aimless, idle person;  an idler, a loiterer GADLING Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– an aimless person, a loiterer HANGER-AROUND 1889 sl.
– an aimless person, an idler, a loafer, a loiterer HANG-AROUND 1929 sl.

AIMLESS etc. – VERBS
– to act aimlessly or feebly, to busy oneself to no purpose; to fuss about; later, to behave frivolously, to trifle FRIBBLE 1640
– to act aimlessly; to be indecisive or fussy; to waste time FANNY ABOUT 1969 sl.
– to act aimlessly; to waste time FANNY AROUND 1969 sl.
– to be aimless and lazy; to idle about restlessly ARSLE;  ASSLE c1960 Amer. dial.
– to be aimless or restless; to wander around JUNE 1869 Amer. dial.
– to behave aimlessly or foolishly CRAP AROUND 1935 US sl.
– to behave aimlessly or foolishly FART ABOUT 1910s sl.
– to behave aimlessly or foolishly FART AROUND 1931 sl.
– to behave aimlessly or foolishly MUCK ABOUT 1856
– to behave aimlessly or foolishly MUCK AROUND 1856
– to behave aimlessly or foolishly PISS ABOUT 1961 sl.
– to behave aimlessly or foolishly PLAY SILLY BLEEDERS 1961 sl.
– to behave aimlessly or foolishly PLAY SILLY Bs 1961 sl.
– to behave aimlessly or foolishly PLAY SILLY BUGGERS 1961 sl.
– to behave aimlessly or mischievously MONKEY ABOUT 1889
– to behave aimlessly or mischievously MONKEY AROUND 1884 Amer. colloq.
– to go about aimlessly AUGER (AROUND) 1966 Amer. dial.
– to go about aimlessly MELL ALONG 1966 Amer. dial.
– to go about aimlessly looking for distraction EYEBALL 1966 Amer. dial.
– to go about aimlessly looking for distraction GOGGLE 1968 Amer. dial.
– to go about aimlessly looking for distraction MEDDLE AROUND 1968 Amer. dial.
– to go about aimlessly looking for distraction; to gad or fool about; to waste time HACK OFF 1888 US sl.
– to go about aimlessly, with nothing to do JELLY (AROUND) 1966 Amer. dial.
– to live aimlessly; to loaf or idle BAT AROUND 1928 US sl.
– to loiter or hang about aimlessly MUZZ 1758 sl., obs.
– to move about aimlessly, slowly, or sluggishly; to saunter; to hang around LEPP 1908 Sc.
– to move about aimlessly, to loiter, to lounge AWMHAWM 1878 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– to move about in an aimless way BUGALUG 1912 Amer. dial.
– to move aimlessly TAFFLE B1900 Eng. dial.
– to move aimlessly about, to potter MADDLE ALONG 19C Eng. dial.
– to move aimlessly or slowly MOG ALONG 1890 Amer. dial.
– to move aimlessly or slowly MOGLE 1892 Amer. dial.
– to move aimlessly or slowly; to loll; to idle LOP ABOUT 1882 Amer. dial.
– to move aimlessly or slowly; to loll; to idle LOP AROUND 1965 Amer. dial.
– to move aimlessly or slowly; to loll; to idle LOP ROUND 1851 Amer. dial.
– to move aimlessly or slowly; to trudge; to go MOG 1890 Amer. sl.
– to move aimlessly, slowly, or in a leisurely manner; to saunter, to amble POLE IT a1975 Amer. dial. 
– to move aimlessly, slowly, or leisurely; to saunter, to amble POLE 1892 Amer. dial.
– to move or travel in an aimless, leisurely, or indirect POODLE 1938 colloq.
– to pass time aimlessly or idly; to fool about, to mess around DOSS1937 Brit. colloq.
– to proceed in an aimless or lazy; to dawdle, to loaf; to move sluggishly MULL 1879 Amer. dial.
– to roam aimlessly or idly; to dally, to trifle, to waste time TAVER 1808 Sc.
– to roam aimlessly; to wander about idly; to gad about VAGE 1701 Sc.
– to stroll around in an aimless way, to drift about, to saunter, to prowl PALLALL 1933 Sc.
– to walk about aimlessly; to potter GAMMOCK 1863 Eng. dial.
– to walk aimlessly or slowly SAIG Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– to walk in an aimless, disorderly fashion REEL-RALL Bk1904 Sc.
– to walk or move aimlessly or slowly; to potter DOTTER c1475 now chiefly Sc.
– to wander about aimlessly or in the foolish-looking manner of a gander GANNER 822 Sc.
– to wander about in an aimless, confused, or melancholy fashion MAUNDER 1819 Eng. dial.
– to wander aimlessly ROAM AROUND LIKE A LOST SHEEP Bk1999 Aust. sl.
– to wander aimlessly about; to trifle; to do anything unskilfully MAZLE 1747 Eng. dial.
– to wander aimlessly; to go about in a feeble, languid way; to hang about, to loiter HAINGLE 1804 Sc.
– to wander or go about aimlessly BROGUE 1883 Amer. dial.