Reverse Dictionary: AIO – AK

AIR, AIRY – ADJECTIVES
– airy; breezy; exposed to the air AERY a1398 poetic usage, rare
– being in the open air, or under the open sky SUBDIAL 1647 obs. rare
– causing air to be put in motion AIR-STIRRING Bk1885
– existing in the air; unsubstantial AERICAL 1660 obs. rare
– moving through the air AIR-DRAWN adj. 1623 obs.
– of air: damp, moist ULIGINOUS 1661 obs. rare
– of air, mist, etc.: charged with moisture or odours FAT 1659 rare
– of air or light: sharp, piercing QUICK 1608 rare
of air or water: cool, fresh, refreshing CALLER 1725 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– of air, wind, weather: deliciously mild, fragrant, and soothing BALMY 1704
– of the air, atmosphere: close, oppressive, moist and warm BENAUT 1969 Amer. dial.
– of the air: pure, exhilarating RACY 1838
– of the nature of air; airy AEREOUSAERIOUS 1594 obs.
– placed high in the air, lofty; also, of the nature of air AIRSOME 1584 obs.

AIR etc. – NOUNS
– a blast of warm air; a warm aroma YOAM 1864 Sc.
– a breath of air; a slight wind WAG OF AIR Bk1905 Eng. dial.
a current of warm air OEL 1899 Sc.
– a current of warm air felt out of doors in the evening HANT’S BREATH 1954 Amer. dial.
– a disturbance of the air AIR ROCK 20C Amer. sl., World War II usage
– air OZONE 1907 Amer. sl.
– an ill-smelling current of air HANT’S BREATH 1988 Amer. dial.
– a pocket of dead, superheated air HEAT BLANKET Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
– a stir or motion of the air; a current of air; a breeze VENTILATION 1456 obs.
– a sudden blast of air or wind WAFF 1686 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– exposure to the open air; open air life AERATION 1578 obs. rare
– fear of swallowing air AEROPHAGIA Bk2008
– suction of air INDRAUGHT 1820 Sc.
– the air BLORE c1614 arch.
– the air, sky, atmosphere, heavens; weather ELEMENT 1785 Sc. & Eng. & Amer. dial.
– the dread of air AEROPHOBIA 1775
– the dread of air AEROPHOBY 1775
– the open air GUTTER-HOTEL c1870 tramps’ sl.
– the waving of the air upon a very hot day MIRR 1899 Sc.
– warm air; steam, vapour NIM 1911 Sc.

AIR etc. – VERBS
– to supply with fresh air; to ventilate VENT 1601 obs.


AIR-CONDITIONED, AIR CONDITIONER, AIR CONDITIONING – ADJECTIVES
– air-conditioned REFRIGERATED 1998 Amer. dial.

AIR-CONDITIONED etc. – NOUNS
– air conditioner using evaporating water as cooling agent DESERT COOLER 1976 Amer. dial.
– air conditioning REFRIGERATED AIR 1967 Amer. dial.
– air conditioning REFRIGERATION 1998 Amer. dial.


AIRCRAFT – NOUNS
– a Beech C-47 Expeditor, a military transport plane used from World War II until early in the Vietnam war BUGSMASHER 1991 US sl.
– a bomber BIG FRIEND 20C Amer. sl., World War II usage
– a ‘bush pilot’ aeroplane BAG OF BONES 1984 Can. sl.
– a C-123 aircraft equipped with tanks filled with defoliants used on the Vietnam jungle RANCH HAND 1969 US sl.
– a CF-100 Canuck jet fighter aircraft ALUMINIUM COW 1950 Can. sl.
– a completely wrecked aircraft WRITE-OFF 1914 Royal Flying Corps usage
– a damaged aircraft RUPTURED DUCK 1930 US sl., orig. & chiefly military usage
– a dangerous plane to fly, esp. one that is in a dilapidated, run-down condition COFFIN 1945 Amer. dial.
a Defiant fighter aircraft DAFFY 1941 sl. obs.
– a DH-4 bomber aircraft FLAMING COFFIN 1919 US sl.
– a Douglas DC-3 Dakota transport aircraft DAK 1943 services’ sl.
– a F-111 combat aircraft or any aircraft that is awkward-looking or difficult to fly AARDVARK 1963 US sl., Vietnam war usage
– a fast aeroplane, officially a ‘fleet-fighter’ FLY-CATCHER 1915 military esp. airmen’s usage
– a fast airplane HOT CRATE 1943 Amer. sl.
– a fighter plane LITTLE FRIEND 1944 US sl.
– a fighter plane PEA-SHOOTER World War II Army & Air Force usage
– a flying-machine AVIATOR 1891 obs.
– a flying-machine, esp. a French aeroplane AVION 1898
– a glider or airplane FLYING COFFIN World War II Air Force & paratrooper usage
– a gun-carrying aeroplane GUN BUS 1919 Air Force sl.
– a Harrier aircraft LEAPING HEAP 2002 UK Air Force usage
– a high-speed attack jet aircraft FAST BIRD 1991 US sl., Vietnam war usage
– a jet aircraft AIR-SUCKER 1964 US aviation sl.
– a jet aircraft FAST MOVER 1972 US sl., Vietnam war usage
– a jet airplane whose fuel is burned by being mixed with air taken into the engine during flight AIR-BREATHER Bk1975 US Air Force  usage
– a jet fighter airplane FLYING BLOWTORCH Bk1974 Amer. sl.
– a jet fighter plane BLOWTORCH c1950 US Air Force usage
– a jet fighter plane LIGHTNING ROD 1954 US sl.
– a jet plane BLASTER 1955 Amer. sl.
– a jet plane that uses kerosene-based fuel OIL BURNER 1955 Amer. military sl.
– a jet-propelled airplane BLOW JOB c1950 US Air Force usage
– a large airplane BIG BUS 20C Amer. sl., World War II usage
– a large airplane; a bomber BIG JEEP 20C Amer. sl., World War II usage
– a large airplane; a bomber BIG SHIP 20C Amer. sl., World War II usage
– a light plane, esp. one travelling only short distances or making many stops PUDDLE-JUMPER 1930s sl.
– a McDonnell-Douglas A-4 Skyhawk strike fighter, as modified for advanced combat training MONGOOSE 
1987 Amer. military aviation usage
– a military aircraft CRATE 20C Amer. sl., World War I usage
– a military aircraft that marks targets for bomber aircraft with smoke bombs SMOKY JOE 1946 US sl.
– amphibian airplane AIR GOOSE 20C Amer. sl., World War II usage
– an aeroplane CRATE Bk1934 sl.
– an aeroplane SPAD Bk1934 sl.
– an aeroplane, esp. a heavy one BUS 1913 colloq.
– an aircraft KITE 20C Royal Air Force usage
– an aircraft coming down in flames FLAMER 1916 Royal Air Force usage
– an aircraft equipped to destroy tanks and other armoured vehicles CAN OPENER 20C Amer. sl., World War II usage
– an aircraft, esp. if old or dilapidated CAN 1923 Amer. sl.
– an aircraft propeller FAN c1916 Royal Air Force usage
– an aircraft used for dropping magnesium-based flares to illuminate the ground at night MOONSHINE 1990 US sl.
– an aircraft used to transport cargo AIR TRUCK 1927
– an air force fighter or intercepter plane BIRD DOG World War II US Air Force usage
– an airplane BIRD 1950s Amer. sl.
– an airplane CLOUD WAGON 20C Amer. sl., World War II usage
– an airplane FLYING FISH 20C Amer. sl., World War I usage
– an airplane falling in flames FLAMING COFFIN 20C Amer. sl., World War I usage
– an airplane manufactured by the Ford Motor Company AIR LIZZIE 20C Amer. sl., World War II usage
– an airplane that is clumsy in the air MECHANICAL COW 20C Amer. sl., World War I usage
– an amphibian airplane capable of landing on water or ground DUCK 1938 US sl.
– an AT-28 aircraft, used as a ground-attack aircraft and then a fighter bomber in the Vietnam war TROJAN 1985 US sl.
– an Atlas ICBM BIG A 1955 Amer. military sl.
– an attack plane that operates close to the ground GROUND-POUNDER 1990 Amer. sl.
– an early, lumbering, but comparatively stable and steady airplane FLYING BEDSTEAD Bk1974 Amer. sl.
– an enemy aircraft BANDIT 20C Amer. sl., World War II usage
– an enemy aircraft YAK 1991 US sl., Korean war usage
– an enemy airplane BUZZARD 1925 Amer. army usage
– an enemy airplane; an attacking fighter plane BOGEY;  BOGIE;  BOGY World War US Air Force usage
– an enemy raider plane using the uncertain light at dawn to slip away and get home DAWN HOPPER 1940-5 Royal Air Force usage
– an engineless aeroplane or glider AVIETTE 1912
– an exceptionally large aircraft, esp. a Boeing 737, a Lockheed C-5A Galaxy, or a Lockheed C-130 Hercules FAT ALBERT 1994 US sl.
– an old aeroplane EGG CRATE 1920s US sl.
– an old, slow, or dilapidated aircraft HACK 1916 Amer. sl.
– an unidentified aircraft BOGEY Bk1969 US Air Force Academy cadets’ sl.
– any of various lightweight aeroplanes BUTTERFLY AEROPLANE 1908 obs.
– any very large multi-engined aircraft  ALUMINUM OVERCAST 1961 US Air Force usage
– a plane that runs badly GALLOPING GOOSE 1910s US sl.
– a rotary-wing aircraft GYROPTER 1908
– a severely damaged or defenseless aircraft LAME DUCK 1876 US
– a short flight in an aircraft FLIP 1914 colloq.
– a small communications aircraft PUDDLE-JUMPER 1942 Royal Air Force usage
– a torpedo-carrying aircraft SARDINE-TIN 1939 Royal Air Force usage
– a type of slow, steady aeroplane used to train pilots QUIRK 1917 Royal Air Force usage
– a usually multi-engine airplane having very large tail surfaces; the Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress BIG-ASS BIRD 1961 US aviation usage
– a usually multi-engine airplane having very large tail surfaces; the Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress BIG-ASSED BIRD 1965 US aviation usage
– a WF-2 propeller-driven naval radar aircraft WILLIE FUDD Vietnam War US Navy usage
– the B-17 Flying Fortress HOLLYWOOD GLIDER 1946 US sl.
– the CV-7, a military transport aircraft built by DeHavilland Aircraft of Canada BUFFALO 1991 US sl.
– the position directly to the rear of a flying aircraft; hence, another aircraft occupying this position BACK-DOOR 1975 US sl.
the Republic F-84 Thunderjet fighter aircraft GROUNDHOG 1991 US Air Force usage
– the trailing aircraft in a formation BUTT-END CHARLIE 1942 US military usage
– the US Air Force F-111 aircraft EDSEL;  FLYING EDSEL 1972 US sl.


AIRCRAFT CARRIER – NOUNS
– an aircraft carrier BIRDBOAT 20C Amer. sl., World War II usage
– an aircraft carrier BIRDFARM Bk1971 US students’ sl.
– an aircraft carrier COVERED WAGON 20C Amer. sl., World War II usage
– an aircraft carrier FLATTOP 20C US colloq.
– an asbestos-suited firefighter aboard an aircraft carrier ASBESTOS JOE 1943 US Navy sl.

AIRCRAFT CARRIER – NOUNS, PERSON
– an airplane handler on an aircraft carrier AIREDALE 20C Amer. sl., World War II usage


AIRCRAFT PARTS – NOUNS
– a cockpit SPEELKEN;  SPELLKEN E19 UK criminals’ sl.
– a cylinder in an aeroplane engine JUG 1963 US sl.
– an aircraft cockpit simulator SIM L20 Royal Air Force usage
– an aircraft’s control column POLE 1981 UK sl.
– a radio transmitter used to establish an aircraft’s position PIPSQUEAK 1943 Brit. sl.
– a window built in the area immediately below and slightly behind the nose of a bomber GLASS CHIN 1988 US sl.
– the astrodome of an aircraft OBSERVATORY c1938 Royal Air Force usage
– the back seat of a two-seat airplane MOTHER-IN-LAW SEAT 1961 Amer. aviation usage, jocular
– the cockpit of an aeroplane CAB Bk1974 Amer. sl.
– the cockpit of an aeroplane NACELLE 1914 rare
– the cockpit of an airplane OFFICE 1917 aviators’ sl.
– the control lever of an airplane BROOMSTICK World War I usage
– the ejection seat of military aircraft BOOM BUCKET Bk1970 US Air Force sl.
– the gun-turret of an aircraft, esp. one beneath the fuselage DUSTBIN 1934 Brit. sl.
– the throttle of a car, airplane, etc. GUN 1900s Amer. sl.
– the weapon panel in the cockpit of an F-4 Phantom aircraft DOGBONE 1984 US sl.


AIRCRAFT OTHER – ADJECTIVES (also see PILOT)
– of a combat aircraft: ready for takeoff; on fifteen-minute alert COCKED 1955 US Air Force usage
– of aircraft:  damaged, esp. crashed, beyond repair; of a person: killed, esp. through carelessness WRITTEN OFF c1930 Royal Air Force usage
– of an airplane: designed so as to land at high speed HOT 1944 Amer. sl.
– of landing an aircraft: without engine function DEAD-STICK 1999 US sl.
– pert. to flying-machines AERODROMIC 1896

AIRCRAFT OTHER – ADVERBS
– of a cab, aeroplane, etc.: being driven without its usual load or passengers DEADHEAD 1999 US sl.

AIRCRAFT OTHER – NOUNS
– a downward spiral of an aeroplane from which recovery is nearly impossible and as a result of which
impact with the ground is inevitable DEATH SPIRAL 1990 US sl.
– a formation of several military aircraft flying in the same mission GAGGLE 1942 US sl.
– aggressive or violent behaviour by a passenger on board on aircraft AIR RAGE 1996
– an after-flight hotel party attended by a flight crew and flight attendants DEBRIEFING 2002 US sl.
– an airplane crash, esp. an airplane crash caused by a pilot’s error while attempting a landing CHINESE THREE-POINT LANDING 20C US World War II Air Force usage
– an identification signal, enabling an aircraft’s position to be located by radar SQUAWK 1956 sl., orig. US
– a number of aircraft raiding in line, one after the other CAB-RANK TECHNIQUE 1940 Royal Air Force usage
– a plane landing with one wing low CHINESE LANDING 20C US sl.
– a squadron of aeroplanes; an aerial display AIR CIRCUS 1907
– a successful ejection of pilot and crew from a downed US aircraft GOOD CHUTE 1990 US sl.
– fear of airplanes AERONAUSIPHOBIA Bk2008
– revolutions performed with an aeroplane, esp. for display AEROBATICS 1917
– the art of constructing and using flying-machines AERODROMICS 1891
– the landing field, aircraft carrier, etc. where an aircraft is based HOME PLATE 1950s US Air Force sl.
– the refuelling and reloading of an F-18 fighter jet in less than five minutes QUICK-TURN BURN 1991 US sl.
– touching the clouds in an airplane CLOUD KISSING 20C Amer. sl. World War II usage

AIRCRAFT OTHER – PHRASES
said of an airplane standing on its nose after a crash KISSING THE EARTH World War I usage

AIRCRAFT OTHER – NOUNS, PERSON
– a deck-landing officer on an aircraft carrier BATS 1962 UK sl.
– a female flight attendant STEW 1970 US sl.
– a flight attendant who shirks her duties by staying in the galley out of sight GALLEY QUEEN Bk1997 airline usage
– a flight clerk BAGGAGE-SMASHER 1945 Amer. sl.
– a man who signals an aircraft with a pair of bats BATSMAN 1943
– an air hostess HOSTIE 1960 Aust. sl.
– an airplane enthusiast BIRD-WATCHER 1983 US sl.
– an airplane mechanic or other person who frequents an airplane hangar HANGAR RAT 1954 US sl.
– a nonaviator or a poor aviator who talks knowingly about flying HANGAR PILOT 1941 US sl.
– a passenger who causes trouble HAWK Bk2006 Amer. commercial airline usage
– a passenger who seeks to take control of an airliner in flight HAVANA RIDER 1983 Amer. airline usage
– a person who flies an aircraft without consideration for others’ convenience AIR HOG 1907
– a pilot, flight attendant, etc., travelling on a plane as a passenger DEADHEAD 20C Aust. sl.
– a stewardess, a flight attendant COW PILOT Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– a woman who is engaged in the flying or operation of aircraft, esp. as a pilot or member of air crew; also, a female member of the Royal Air Force below NCO rank AIRWOMAN 1910
– passengers GEESE Bk2006 Amer. commercial airline usage

AIRCRAFT OTHER – VERBS
– to apply maximum power or acceleration to a vehicle or plane NEEDLE 1950s US sl.
– to bail out, to eject from an aircraft PUNCH OUT 1964 aeronautics sl.
– to be killed in an airplane crash BUST ONE’S ASS 1945 Amer. sl.
– to cease to function; said of an aircraft PACK UP c1937 Royal Air Force usage
– to crash-land an aircraft WRAP UP c1938 Royal Air Force usage
– to crash; said of a pilot or airplane BUY A FARM 1956 Amer. sl., esp. US Air Force usage
– to crash; said of a pilot or airplane BUY A PLOT 1954 Amer. sl., esp. US Air Force usage
– to crash; said of a pilot or airplane BUY THE FARM 1955 Amer. sl., esp. US Air Force usage
– to crash; said of a pilot or airplane BUY THE SHOP 1954 Amer. sl., esp. US Air Force usage
– to crash; said of combat aircraft AUGER Bk1970 US Air Force sl.
– to dive and crash in a tailspin; to crash-land; said of an aircraft AUGER IN 1944 US military usage
– to drive a cab, aeroplane, etc. without its usual load or passengers DEADHEAD 1920s sl.
– to eject from an aircraft PUNCH OUT Bk1970 US Air Force sl.
– to execute a turn in a fighter plane YANK AND BANK 1986 US sl.
– to fly a plane very low over a building, field, etc. BUZZ 1944 Amer. sl.
– to fly awkwardly; to be difficult to pilot; said of an aircraft FLY LIKE A BRICK-BUILT SHITHOUSE 1950s airmen’s usage
– to fly close to the ground or water; to drift or manoeuvre sideways; said of an aircraft CRAB 1943 UK sl.
– to land an aircraft without engine function DEAD-STICK 1962 US sl.
– to land one’s aircraft in the sea DITCH 1940s sl., orig. Royal Air Force usage
– to land safely and accurately on an aircraft carrier TRAP 1991 US sl.
– to lose airspeed or altitude, esp. with the engine stalling repeatedly MUSH 1941 sl., orig. US
– to operate the controls of an aircraft; to do a pilot’s work PULL A PINT c1930 Royal Air Force usage
– to run out of airspeed; said of an airplane MUSH 1935 US sl.
– to separate from formation while under attack, while on a combat air mission PUKE 1986 US sl.
– to stop working suddenly; said of an aircraft engine during flight CONK OUT 20C Amer. sl., World War II
usage
– to turn off the motor of an aircraft CUT THE GUN 20C Amer. sl., World War II usage
– to wreck an airplane CRACK 20C Amer. sl., World War II usage


AIRFIELD – NOUNS
– an airfield EAGLES’ NEST 20C Amer. sl., World War II usage


AIR FORCE – see SERVICES


AIRLINE  – NOUNS
– a nickname for Pan Am airline company PAINFUL, NAUSEATING AND MISERABLE 2002 US sl.
– a nickname for Pan Am airline company PANDEMONIUM WORLD SCAREWAYS 2002 US sl.
– a nickname for Pan Am airline company PASSENGERS ALWAYS NEGLECTED AT MEALTIMES 2002 US sl.


AIRMAIL – NOUNS
– the collecting of airmail stamps AEROPHILATELY Bk1991


AIRPORT – NOUNS
– an air-traffic control tower MADHOUSE 1944 Amer. aviation usage
– London ‘Gatwick’ airport GATNICK 1999 UK sl.
– London Heathrow airport THIEF ROW 1999 UK sl.
– the point on a runway where a pilot taking off must decide whether to abort or take-off or to take off GO-NO-GO 1963 US sl.
– the tarmac surround of a hangar APRON c1930 Royal Air Force usage

AIRPORT – NOUNS, PERSON
– a flight clerk BAGGAGE-SMASHER 1945 Amer. sl.
– a non-flying member of an airfield staff KIWI 20C colloq.
– any security enforcer who waves metal-detecting wands over others; commonly applied to airport security personnel WANDER Bk2004 US armed forces usage
– a porter at an airport station REDCAP 20C US & Can.

AIRPORT – VERBS
– of weather conditions at an airport: to deteriorate beneath operational limits FALL ON ONE’S ASS 1970s Amer. airline usage


AIR RAID – NOUNS
an air-raid shelter HELTER-SKELTER 1940s rhyming sl.

AIR RAID – NOUNS, PERSON
– persons who do not take shelter during air raids, but remain outdoors to watch GOOFERS Bk1947 US army sl.


AIRS – ADJECTIVES
– affecting the airs of a fashionable lady LADYFIED E17 sl.
– assuming airs, dignity, or importance; conceited STUCK-UP 1829 colloq.
– assuming airs; making lofty pretensions AIRY 1606 rare
– assuming airs of importance unsuitable to years or action; presuming, forward HOIT-A-POIT B1900 Eng. dial.
– assuming an air of superiority; overdressed FANDANGEE 2003 Trinidad and Tobago
– assuming artificial airs AFFECTATE 1578 obs.
– assuming artificial airs AFFECTATED 1580 obs.
– given to assuming airs; pretentious, affectedly superior AIRIFIED 1837
– given to putting on airs; conceited AIRYFIED 1933 Amer. dial.
– giving oneself airs; proud and conceited; above one’s station; affected in manner PENSY 1715 obs. exc. Sc. & Eng. dial.
– giving oneself airs; proud, conceited PENSIFUL 1788 Sc.
– having the appearance of assuming conceited airs GAINTERING Bk1900 Sc.
– inclined to put on airs AIRISH 1943 Amer. dial.
– putting on airs FALUTIN 1966 Amer. dial.
– putting on airs GUSSY 1970 Amer. dial.
– putting on airs; acting so as to show off or drawn attention to oneself FEISTY;  FICETY 1906 Amer. dial.
– putting on airs; haughty, proud, conceited BIG-FEELING 1887 Amer. dial.
– putting on airs; highfalutin, pretentious FANCY 1954 Amer. dial.
– putting on airs; said of a woman HANKY 1967 Amer. dial.
– taking airs upon oneself, assuming ONTAKING Bk1905 Sc.

AIRS – NOUNS
– affected airs, palavers TANTRUM 1808 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– airs, affectations, love-making LOLLYGAGS Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
– airs and affectations, assumption ONTACK 1900 Sc.
– airs and graces; affectations FLAMIGIGS Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
– airs, whims, caprices, with an implication of temper; tantrums ANTRIMS 1884 Eng. dial.
– assumed airs or fine or showy manners, as shown by the movement of the head; used contemptuously NIDDY-NODDIES B1900 Sc.

AIRS – NOUNS, PERSON
– a boy who puts on the airs of a man GADDERMAN 1890 Ireland
– a conceited fellow who gives himself airs and is quick to take offense; a braggart, a hector, a blustering
person HUFF-SNUFF 1583 obs.
– a man who is giving himself airs; one inclined to be independent, consequential, or assuming BIGGITY 
Bk1892 African-American usage
– an affected girl putting on airs TIP-TOE NANCY 1900 Amer. dial.
– a person who affects airs PUT-ON E18 sl.
– a person who affects airs of superiority; one who is finicky and conceited in dress and carriage; a dandy PRICK-ME-DAINTY a1529 chiefly Sc.
– a person who puts on airs ARNCHY 1926 Amer. dial., African-American usage
– a person who puts on airs FANCY PANTS 1935 sl., orig. US
– a person who puts on airs a boaster, a bumptious person, a show-off BIGNADUO 1943 W. Indies
– a person who puts on airs; a frivolous, giddy person; one who loves display; a show-off PAVIEPEEVEE 
a1850 Sc.
– a person who puts on airs and graces; an affected person; a social climber SILVERTAIL 1942 sl.
– a person who puts on airs, and tries to associate with his superiors; a social climber; one who tries to live above one’s true station HALF-STRAINER 1887 Amer. dial.
– a person who puts on airs, and tries to associate with his superiors; a social climber; one who tries to live above one’s true station HALF-WAY STRAINER 1896 Amer. dial.
– a person who puts on conceited airs ​GAINTERER 1825 Sc. obs.
– a pert, impertinent, or conceited fellow who assumes ridiculous airs; a coxcomb, a fop JACKANAPES 
c1555
– a vulgar man who puts on airs; a parvenu GUTTER-BLOOD c1855 chiefly Sc. colloq.
– a woman who gives herself airs; a giddy, ostentatious person; a flighty girl FLISKMAHOY 1816 Sc.
– a woman who puts on airs; one who behaves in a finicking manner FINNICKS 1839 Eng. dial.
– a woman who puts on a lot of airs; an elite ‘social leader’ of a community; usually mocking MISS ASTOR;  MRS. ASTOR 1966 Amer. dial.

AIRS – VERBS
– of a person affecting airs of superiority: to be overbearing or oppressive; to be proud; to take offense MOUNT THE HIGH HORSE 1871
– to affect airs PUT ONPUT UP E18 sl.
– to assume airs of superiority MISKEN 1794 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– to assume airs; to behave proudly or haughtily; to presume; to take liberties TAKE ON 1668
– to assume airs; to take too much upon one; to behave presumptuously or haughtily TAKE c1470 obs.
– to give oneself airs BIGGEN Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– to give oneself airs LAY ON JAM 1882 Aust. sl.
– to give oneself airs MAKE IT GOODLY 1611 obs.
– to give oneself airs PUT ON JAM 1882 Aust. sl.
– to give oneself airs PUT ON PARTS 1893 Eng. dial.
– to give oneself airs PUT ON SIDE 1878 sl.
– to give oneself airs SWAY ALL TOP ROPES L19 sl.
– to give oneself airs; to be affected FRIMICATE 19C Eng. dial.
– to give oneself airs; to boast, to walk arrogantly SCAWT Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– to put on airs PILE ON LUGS 1889 US sl.
– to put on airs PUT ON LUGS 1889 US sl.
– to put on airs and graces CUT DIDOES Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
– to put on airs and graces CUT DINGDOES Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
– to put on airs; to act in a pretentious manner SIDE 1910s sl.
– to put on airs; to assume artificial or pretended manners AFFECT 1631 obs. rare
– to put on airs; to be proud KICK UP SHINES 1884 Amer. dial.
– to put on airs; to behave or dress in an ostentatious or showy manner; to show off PUT ON THE DOG 1865 sl., orig. US
– to put on airs; to have an unjustifiably high opinion of oneself; to be conceited THINK ONE’S SHIT DOESN’T STINK c1947 US sl.
– to put on airs; to show off SWAMP World War I usage
– to put on airs; to show off; to something energetically or noisily PILE ON DOG M19 sl, orig. US.
– to put on consequential airs; to be proud BE ALL MAN AND SHIRT Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– to use conceited airs and gestures GAINTER 1825 Sc. obs.
– to use conceited airs and gestures; to stretch the neck like a gander GANDER 1822 Sc.


AIRSHIP – NOUNS
– an airship, a dirigible AERONAT 1903 rare
– an airship; a lighter-than-air flying machine, a balloon, esp. a dirigible balloon AERONEF 1861 rare
– the basket or gondola of an airship or balloon NACELLE 1853

AIRSHIP – NOUNS, PERSON
– a person who attends to the motor of an airship MOTOR-MATE 1928 rare


AIRSICK – NOUNS
– fear of vomiting due to airsickness AERONAUSIPHOBIA Bk2008


AISLE – NOUNS
– an aisle ALURE c1325 obs.
– an aisle AILE 1398 obs.
– an aisle ILING 1456-7 obs.
– an aisle YELE 1498 obs.
– an aisle YELL 1503-4 obs.
– an aisle YELDE 1527 obs.
– an aisle; the passage between the pews in a church ASS 1871 Sc.


AJAR – ADVERBS
– ajar; half-open; said of a door ASHARDASHORE Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– ajar, half open; said of a door SAM-OPE 1777 Eng. dial.
– ajar, half-open; said of a door or gate AGEE;  AJEE 1828 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– ajar; said of a door A-SAM Bk1898 Eng. dial. obs.
– ajar, slightly open ON THE CRACK 1892 Amer. dial.


AKIMBO – VERBS
to set the arms akimbo MAKE THE POT WITH THE TWO EARS 1675 obs.


AKIN – ADJECTIVES
– nearly akin, related AIM Bk1898 Eng. dial.