Reverse Dictionary: ARO – ARZ

AROMA, AROMATIC- ADJECTIVES
– aromatic, containing aroma, or the principle of fragrance AROMATOUS 1483 obs. rare
– pert. to aroma AROMAL 1848

AROMA etc. – NOUNS
– aroma SCENTAGE 1911 Sc.
– aroma, a whiff, a slight odour; said of smells WAFF 1819 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– aroma, odour, smell, flavour VAAM 1866 Sc.
– a warm aroma, as that arising from cooking OAM 1866 Sc.


AROUSE, AROUSED – ADJECTIVES
– sexually aroused WET 1940s sl.
– sexually aroused; extremely lustful RANDY AS A MALLEE BULL Bk1999 Aust. sl.
– slightly sexually aroused; said of a male ALERT 2000 UK sl.

AROUSE etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– one who arouses emotionally; one who inspires excitement SENDER 1920s African-American usage
– one who arouses emotionally; one who inspires excitement SOLID SENDER 1920s African-American usage

AROUSE etc. – VERBS
– to arouse emotionally; to be deeply moved by music SEND 1900s African-American usage
– to arouse from sleep, a swoon, a faint, etc.; to wake someone up; to wake up, to regain consciousness AWECCHE a1000 obs.
– to arouse one sexually LIGHT UP 1960s US sl.
– to arouse one sexually; to cause one to feel loving or amorous MAKE ONE’S LOVE COME DOWN 1928 Amer. dial.
– to arouse, to awake from sleep; to recover from a swoon DAW c1314 obs. exc. Sc.
– to arouse, to awaken, to alarm, to make to get out of bed RAISE 1729 Sc.
– to arouse, to awaken, to recall to consciousness ADAW c1386 obs.
– to arouse; to disturb BEAT UP THE QUARTERS OF 1670
– to arouse, to enflame, to excite, to inspire TIND c1175 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– to arouse, to excite ACCITE 1597 obs.
– to arouse, to excite, to stir up; to render active, to stir into activity ACTUATE 1603 obs.
– to arouse; to make watchful INVIGILATE E17 obs. rare
– to arouse, to startle ABRAID 1596 obs.
– to arouse, to stir up HARROW UP 1791 Sc.


ARRAIGN, ARRAIGNMENT – NOUNS
– arraignment RAIGNMENT 1570 obs. rare

ARRAIGN etc. – VERBS
– to arraign RAIGN 1444 obs.


ARRANGE, ARRANGED, ARRANGEMENT, ARRANGING – ADJECTIVES
– arranged or agreed IN THE CAN 1929 colloq.
– arranged, ordered, disposed; destined, appointed ORDINATE 1398 obs.
– arranged satisfactorily; sorted out COCUM;  COKUM M19 sl.
– arranged, settled, constituted BESTEAD;  BESTED c1300 obs.
– arranged, sorted out, ‘fixed’ JACKED UP 1960s NZ sl.
– arranged successfully; in order, sorted out BUTTONED 1940s sl.
– carefully arranged; carefully prepared; entirely in order WRAPPED;  WRAPPED-UP c1935 services’ usage
– that arranges, or puts in order ORDONNANT 1820-30 rare

ARRANGE etc. – NOUNS
– an arrangement, a settlement; preparation BANDOBAST;  BUNDOBUST 1776
– an arranging, ordering, or disposing in ranks or order; the condition of being ordered or arranged ORDINATION 1658
– an arranging, setting right, putting in order TED B1900 Sc.
– arrangement RANGEMENT 1674 obs. rare
– arrangement, fixture TAILLIE;  TAILYE c1425 Sc. obs.

ARRANGE etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– a person who arranges something at a high price TIN MITTENS 1935 US criminals’ sl.

ARRANGE etc. – VERBS
– to arrange at short notice, to ‘fix up’ ORGANIZE 1930s sl., orig. military usage
– to arrange (fruit, vegetables, berries, or the like) so that the best appear at the top DEACON Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
– to arrange in a set, sequence, or series; to set in due order, to sort out SUIT 1552 obs.
– to arrange in rows or ranks, or other regular order; esp. to draw up in order of battle; to set in array ORDAIN c1290 obs.
– to arrange neatly; to pile up in orderly fashion layer after layer DESS 1641 Eng. dial.
– to arrange, to bring about, to manage BETEE c1205 obs.
– to arrange, to constitute, to organize ECONOMIZE 1691 obs.
– to arrange, to contrive LAY 1627 obs.
– to arrange, to contrive, shape, put together properly; to fit or adapt one thing to another VAND 1914 Sc.
– to arrange, to contrive, to manage SCHEME 1879 Eng. dial.
– to arrange, to determine, to settle, to appoint TAILYETAILZIE 1375 Sc. obs.
– to arrange, to devise, to contrive, to plan BETHINK a1225 obs.
– to arrange, to devise, to manage, or order something SKIFT a1300 obs.
– to arrange, to distribute, to divide TO-SET 1387 obs.
– to arrange, to fit; to arrange FAIT 1635-6 obs.
– to arrange, to intend, to plan LAY OUT 1828 Amer. dial.
– to arrange, to manage BEVIL Bk1911 Sc.
– to arrange, to organize BUNG ON 20C sl.
– to arrange, to organize MODEL 1721 Eng. dial. obs.
– to arrange, to organize, to contrive; to prepare anything JACK UP 1939 NZ sl.
– to arrange, to organize, to plan LAY IT ON THE LINE c1930 Brit. sl.
– to arrange, to plan, to originate THINK UP Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– to arrange, to put in order FACULATE 1889 Amer. dial.
– to arrange, to set in order or array; to regulate RAIL a1310 obs.
– to arrange, to put in order; to prepare, to make, to construct TIFF 1300s obs.
– to arrange, to set in order; to prepare; to tidy, to clean up REDD 1787 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– to arrange, to set in order; to put things ‘straight’ or ‘to rights’ ADDRESS 1375 obs.
– to arrange, to settle, to fix a matter; to decide or determine in a specified way TAIL c1315 obs.
– to arrange, to sort out SACK 1940s US criminals’ sl.
– to make an arrangement TEE UP Bk1999 Aust. sl.


ARRAY, ARRAYED – ADJECTIVES
– arrayed DICKED 1894 Amer. dial.
– arrayed, bedecked BEDIGHTBEDIGHTED 1894 Eng. dial.
– arrayed, equipped, accoutred ADUBBED 1475 obs.

ARRAY etc. – NOUNS
– array, attire, dress, DUBBING a1300 obs.
– array, clothing, attire GARMENTURE 1832

ARRAY etc. – VERBS
– to array, to adorn; to dress GEAR c1250 obs.
– to array, to adorn; to dress, to clothe DUB a1300 obs.
– to array, to adorn with something RAIL c1350 obs.
– to array, to equip, to accoutre ADUB 1475 obs.
– to array, to equip, to furnish, to apparel, to bedeck BEDIGHT c1400 arch.
– to array, to fit out, to dress AFAITE 1483 obs.
– to array, to fit out, to equip DECK a1500 obs.
– to array, to put in order; to prepare, to make or get ready BUSK c1330
– to array, to put in order; to prepare, to make or get ready BUSS c1330 rare


ARREARS – ADJECTIVES
– in arrears BACK-LYIN’ 1932 Sc.

ARREARS – NOUNS
– arrears; a deficit; outstanding liabilities BEHINDMENTS 1758 Amer.
– arrears; failure of payment or rent DECAY 1546 obs.


ARREST, ARRESTED, ARRESTING – ADJECTIVES
– arrested BAGGED Bk2006 US sl.
– arrested BATTED OUT Bk2006 US criminals’ sl.
– arrested BUZZED IN Bk1970 US students’ sl.
– arrested CAFFLED L19 sl., orig. UK criminals’ usage
– arrested CLIPPED Bk2006 US sl.
– arrested CLOUTED Bk2006 US sl.
– arrested COLLARED Bk2006 US sl.
– arrested COPPED Bk2006 US sl.
– arrested COPPERED 1872 criminals’ sl.
– arrested DROPPED Bk2006 US sl.
– arrested FLAGGED Bk2006 US sl.
– arrested GAFFLED Bk2006 US sl.
– arrested GUZZLED 1936 Amer. criminals’ sl.
– arrested JABBED Bk1970 US students’ sl.
– arrested NAILED 1859 Amer. sl.
– arrested SMUGGED 19C Brit. sl.
– arrested STIFFED Bk1970 US students’ sl.
– arrested TAKEN UP E18 sl.
– arrested TAPPED 1950s Amer. sl.
– arrested TOOK UP E18 sl.
– arrested UNDER STARTER’S ORDERS 1959 UK police & criminals’ sl.
– arrested as a suspected person loitering SUSSED 1977 UK sl.
– arrested by the police POPPED Bk1970 US sl.
– arrested, captured DEAD 1950s sl.
– arrested, committed to trial HOBBLED E19 sl.
– arrested, imprisoned UNDER GLASS 1920s sl., orig. US
– arrested, in prison UP L19 sl., orig. UK criminals’ usage
– arrested, in trouble with the law JAMMED L19 US criminals’ sl.
– arrested; kidnapped  SNEEZED 1996 UK sl.
– arrested; sometimes applied to someone caught with illegal drugs in their possession POPPED 1960 US sl.
– arresting, capturing TAKEFUL 1901 Eng. dial.
– liable to arrest; wanted HOT 1931
– not arrested or seized UNATTACHED 1498 obs.
– safe from arrest MACE-PROOF 1879 obs. nonce word
– successful; said of an arrest OFF 1930s UK criminals’ sl.
– under arrest ON THE PEGS 20C Amer. sl., World War I usage

ARREST etc. – NOUNS
– a justifiable arrest FAIR COP L19 sl., orig. UK criminals’ usage
– a method of arrest whereby a policeman grasps the villain’s collar and holds their arm in such a way that the more they struggle, the more likely it is for the arm to be broken X M19 sl.
– an arrest ACCIDENT 20C Brit. sl.
– an arrest BUST c1953 sl., orig. & chiefly US
– an arrest COG-SHOULDER E17 sl.
– an arrest COLLAR 1871 sl., orig. US
– an arrest COP L19 sl., orig. US
– an arrest FALL 1894 UK & US criminals’ sl.
– an arrest NAP c1700 sl. obs.
– an arrest NICKING 1970s sl.
– an arrest RAP M19 chiefly US
– an arrest TUG 1960s sl.
– an arrest and charge from which one cannot escape, despite attempting to intimidate or bribe the plaintiff or a prosecution witness BAD FALL 1910s US criminals’ sl.
– an arrest and/or conviction FALL 1893 US sl.
– an arrest; a police raid NAB 1940s US sl.
– an arrest; a predicament; a muddle; a dilemma; trouble JACKPOT 1887 Amer. sl.
– an arrest; a prison sentence TRIP 1920s US criminals’ sl.
– an arrest; a successful search BINGO Bk2007 UK sl.
– an arrest, esp. one involving brutality RODNEY KING 1990s African-American usage sl.
– an arrest for something the person did not do; an arrest for a minor violation that leads to more serious charges HUMMER 1932 sl.
– an arrest made to fulfil a quota, usually in response to pressure for strong police action against crime ACCOMMODATION COLLAR 20C Amer. police sl.
– an arrest motivated by the subject’s lack of respect towards the arresting police officer ATTITUDE ARREST 1992 US sl.
– an arrest of someone found in the act of committing a crime DEAD TUMBLE 1930s US criminals’ sl.
– an unfounded arrest LAME RAP 1971 US sl.
– a police tactic in which a person who has been arrested is moved from one precinct to another in rapid succession, making it impossible for him to be located and bailed out by his friends and family STATIONS OF THE CROSS 1982 US sl.
– arrest RHEUMATISM IN THE SHOULDERS Bk1903 sl.
– a warrant for arrest READER 1920s US criminals’ sl.
– a warrant for arrest or re-arrest HOOKER 1934 Amer. criminals’ sl.
– a warrant of arrest FASTNER L17 sl.
– the ledger of arrests and arrested persons kept at a police station BLOTTER 1958 US sl.
– the thing a member of the underworld fears most, usually arrest or being caught in the act DEADWOOD L19 US criminals’ sl.

ARREST etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– a person for whose arrest a warrant has been issued WARRANTEE 1921
– one of two or more people who are arrested or sentenced to prison at the same time for the same crime; also, one of a pair of thieves working together FALL PARTNER 1950s US criminals’ sl.

ARREST etc. – PHRASES
– under arrest IN PULL c1810 cant

ARREST etc. – VERBS
– to arrest ATCH 1920s UK tramps’ usage
– to arrest ATCHKER 1910s UK tramps’ usage
– to arrest BAIL UP M19 sl.
– to arrest BAKE 1899 US sl.
– to arrest BUST 1940 sl., orig. & chiefly US
– to arrest COLLAR 1853 sl.
– to arrest COP 1844 sl.
– to arrest COPPER 1872 criminals’ sl.
– to arrest DRAG 1924 Brit. sl.
– to arrest DROP THE HOOK 1953 US sl.
– to arrest ERREST 1926 Amer. dial.
– to arrest FEEL SOMEONE’S COLLAR 1950 Brit. sl.
– to arrest GATHER 1975 Aust. sl.
– to arrest GLUE 1920s sl., orig. US  
– to arrest HOBBLE 18C criminals’ sl.
– to arrest KNOCK OFF 1926 sl.
– to arrest LUMBER 1931 Brit. sl.
– to arrest PICK UP 1871 sl., orig. US
– to arrest PULL UP 1812 sl.
– to arrest PUT THE COLLAR ON SOMEONE 1865 US sl.
– to arrest PUT THE SLEEVE ON 1930 US sl.
– to arrest RIDE 1930s US criminals’ sl.
– to arrest ROUST 1950s Amer. sl.
– to arrest RUN IN 1859 sl.
– to arrest SIDETRACK 1920s US criminals’ sl.
– to arrest SMUG 19C Brit. sl.
– to arrest SNITCH 1990s Aust. sl.
– to arrest TAG 1930s sl.
– to arrest TAKE CARE OF L19 sl.
– to arrest TAKE DOWN 1940s US criminals’ & police sl.
– to arrest TAKE FOR A RIDE 1930s US criminals’ sl.
– to arrest TAKE FOR A WALK 1930s US criminals’ sl.
– to arrest TAKE IN L19 sl.
– to arrest TAKE UP E18 sl.
– to arrest TUCK UP E18 sl.
– to arrest VAMP 1970s African-American sl.
– to arrest YAFFLE 1910s US criminals’ sl.
– to arrest YANK L19 sl., orig. US
– to arrest and apprehend CALL THE KNOCK 2000s sl.
– to arrest and apprehend someone OFF 1970s US police sl.
– to arrest and apprehend; to catch, in the sense of to hit NAB 1686 UK criminals’ sl.
– to arrest and/or charge on the basis of concocted evidence; to ‘frame up’ PUT ON 1910s Aust. criminals’ sl.  
– to arrest a person PULL IN 1893 colloq.
– to arrest for debt CAP 1589 obs.
– to arrest on a warrant ROMBOYLE;  RUMBOYLE 1823 UK criminals’ sl.
– to arrest or charge someone DO 1784 Brit. sl.
– to arrest or charge someone HAUL UP 1865 sl.
– to arrest or convict FALL 1873 sl.
– to arrest or detain someone RAIL 1995 US sl.
– to arrest or imprison JUG 1841 US sl.
– to arrest or summon someone BLISTER 1909 Brit. sl.
– to arrest someone CARRY DOWN 1971 Trinidad and Tobago
– to arrest someone CHORE 2000 UK sl.
– to arrest someone CLAIM 1970 UK sl.
– to arrest someone FLAG Bk2006 US sl.
– to arrest someone GAFFLE Bk2006 US sl.
– to arrest someone PULL 1811 sl.
– to arrest someone SNEEZE 1950 US sl.
– to arrest someone WHIP 1971 US sl.
– to arrest, to apprehend NAIL 1732 Brit.
– to arrest, to apprehend by legal authority TACHE c1400 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– to arrest, to attack NYAM 1970 Black British sl.
– to arrest; to bring someone before a court to answer a charge HAVE UP 1749 sl.
– to arrest; to call to time WALK ONE UP ON THE CARPET Bk1913 Amer. dial.
– to arrest, to capture TAKE TO Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– to arrest, to catch NIB 1819 sl.
– to arrest, to catch or apprehend by law HOOK 1928 Amer. sl.
– to arrest, to catch, to apprehend LAG 1847
– to arrest; to imprison SMUG 1896 sl.
– to arrest, to imprison; to put away privily LUMBER 1819 sl.
– to arrest, to interrogate GUZZLE 1936 UK & Amer. criminals’ sl.
– to arrest, to make an unjust attack VAMP ON 1970s African-American sl.
– to arrest, to put in jail BAG 1824 Amer. sl.
– to arrest, to seize, to grab at, to steal GLOM 1907 Amer. dial.
– to arrest, to seize, to lay hold of NATCH Bk1905 Sc.
– to arrest, to set the law on LAW 1900s US sl.
– to arrest, to stop; to distrain for debt REST 1821 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– to arrest; to take into custody PINCH 1837 Amer. sl.
– to arrest, to take into custody; to apprehend NICK a1640 sl.
– to arrest with a view to prosecution; to charge RAP 20C US sl.
– to be arrested BE TOOK Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
– to be arrested FALL OUT 1962 Amer. criminals’ sl.
– to be arrested GET POPPED Bk1970 US sl.
– to be arrested HAVE AN ACCIDENT 1936 Amer. criminals’ sl.
– to be arrested by the police BAG UP 1980s UK & African-American sl.
– to be arrested for a felony CATCH AN F 1990s African-American sl.
– to be arrested or convicted; to be imprisoned FALL 1873 Amer. criminals’ sl.
– to be arrested or convicted; to be imprisoned TAKE A FALL 1928 sl.
– to be arrested or stopped by the police HAVE YOUR COLLAR FELT 1949 UK sl.
– to be arrested or stopped by the police HAVE YOUR COLLAR TOUCHED 1949 UK sl.
– to be arrested, to be imprisoned GET A FALL 1920s US criminals’ sl.
– to be arrested, to be imprisoned TAKE A DROP 1920s US criminals’ sl.
– to be released from arrest or prison WALK 1950s US prison & criminals’ sl.
– to elude arrest, to hide out SCOUT 1913 Amer. dial.
– to escape from impending arrest or prison HAVE IT AWAY 1950s sl.
– to escape from impending arrest or prison HAVE IT AWAY ON ONE’S TOES 1950s sl.
– to escape from impending arrest or prison TAKE IT ON ONE’S TOES 1950s sl.
– to get arrested DROP Bk2006 US criminals’ sl.
– to lead to an arrest; to cause trouble for LAG M19 UK criminals’ sl.
– to make an arrest FINGER A COLLAR 1999 UK police sl.
– to place drugs or traces of drugs on a person during an arrest; said of the police FLAKE Bk2006 US criminals’ sl.
– to place under arrest, to apprehend, to take into custody DROP THE ARM ON 1953 US sl.
– to place under arrest; to apprehend, to take into custody PUT THE ARM ON 1929 US sl.
– to release from arrest DE-ARREST 1791 obs. rare
– to seize or place under arrest CRACK (OUT) 1952 Amer. criminals’ sl.
– to submit to arrest without resisting CHILL20C Amer. sl.


ARRIVAL, ARRIVE, ARRIVED – ADJECTIVES
– newly arrived NEW-COME 1787 Sc. & Eng. dial.

ARRIVAL etc. – NOUNS
– a furtive arrival or departure CREEP 1946 US sl.
– arrival, advent, coming TOCOME c897 obs.
– arrival, arrival of company ARRIVANCE Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– arrival; the act of coming VENUE a1400 obs.
– failure to arrive UNCOMING 1593 obs.

ARRIVAL etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
a young woman newly arrived in a town or city, or with no fixed address MYSTERY 1937 Brit. sl.

ARRIVAL etc. – VERBS
– to arrive BUTT IN 1898 Amer. sl.
– to arrive BUZZ IN 1930s Amer. sl.
– to arrive PULL IN 1905 Amer. sl.
– to arrive SIFT IN 20C US & Black British sl.
– to arrive at a destination sooner than another person BEAT SOMEONE TO THE PUNCH 1960s sl., orig. African-American
– to arrive at a place FALL BY 1970 Amer. dial.
– to arrive at a place, event, etc. ADVENE 1684 obs. rare
– to arrive, come forward, or approach a place or state ACCEDE 1677
– to arrive, come to a place UNTO-COME c1440 obs.
– to arrive late or unannounced ROCK UP 1982 colloq.
– to arrive on the scene; to appear; said of someone or something unpleasant COME OUT OF THE WOODWORK 1973 UK
– to arrive on the scene; to appear; said of someone or something unpleasant CRAWL OUT OF THE WOODWORK 1973 UK
– to arrive on the scene; to appear; said of someone or something unpleasant CREEP OUT OF THE WOODWORK  1973 UK
– to arrive or leave quickly; to appear BLITZ 1940s sl.
– to arrive suddenly; usually used of the police FALL 1940s Aust. sl.
– to arrive, to appear POLE 1900s Aust. sl.
– to arrive, to approach, to come to TO-COME 1393 obs.
– to arrive, to come LEND a1100 obs.
– to arrive; to come to a place BECOME c885 obs.
– to arrive, to enter, esp. in a slow and measured manner SAIL INSAIL INTO M19 sl.
– to arrive, to go to, to visit FALL IN;  FALL ON IN;  FALL OUT;  FALL OVER;  FALL UP M19 sl., orig. African-American usage
– to arrive; to make a personal appearance SHOW UP 1898 Amer. sl.
– to arrive, to turn up FALL UP 1958 African-American sl.
– to arrive unexpectedly LOB (IN) 1916 Aust. sl.
– to arrive, usually at speed TOOL IN 1960s US college sl.
– to have arrived at your destination CALL FOR THE BUTTER 1975 US sl.


ARROGANCE, ARROGANT, ARROGANTLY – ADJECTIVES
– arrogant HIGH-HEELED M19 Aust. & US sl.
– arrogant, and snobbish HIGH-HAT 1924 colloq., orig. & chiefly US
– arrogant, boastful HIGH IN TOOTH L19 sl.
– arrogant, boastful, showing off SEDDITTY;  SEDITTYSIDIDYSIDITTY;  SIDITY 1968 US sl.
– arrogant, cheeky, impudent, rude FACETY 1943 W. Indies & Black British usage
– arrogant; conceited CHESTY 1899 US sl.
– arrogant, conceited; exhibiting a superior air; assertive TOPPING 1790 Amer. dial.
– arrogant, conceited; exhibiting a superior air; assertive TOPPY 1908 Amer. dial.
– arrogant, conceited; high and mighty; self-important MAGNIFICENT 19C Brit. sl.
– arrogant, conceited; impressed with one’s own importance FINE-HAIRED 1901 Amer. dial.
– arrogant, conceited, pretentious; having an exaggerated opinion of one’s own importance ARSEY;  ARSY 1993 UK sl.
– arrogant, conceited, self-important, presumptuous; overly ambitious ABOVE ONESELF 1823
– arrogant, conceited, self-important; smugly over-confident COCKY-SURE 1968 Amer. dial.
– arrogant, conceited, vulgar SWANKEY;  SWANKY 1900s sl.
– arrogant, domineering, masterful BOUNCEFUL Bk1893 Eng. dial.
– arrogant, haughty ASTORPERIOUS 1935 Amer. dial.
– arrogant, haughty ON THE HIGH ROPES a1700
– arrogant, haughty; conceited; self-confident UPHEADED 1826 Amer. dial.
– arrogant, haughty, condescending HOSTILISH 1960s African-American sl.
– arrogant, haughty, imperious HIGH-MINDED 1503
– arrogant, haughty; improperly or unjustifiably vain or proud MISPROUD 1303 obs. exc. arch.
– arrogant, haughty, pompous PONTIFICIAL 1835 depreciative usage
– arrogant, haughty; pompous; dogmatic PONTIFICAL a1640 depreciative usage
– arrogant, haughty, pretentious, ostentatious FASTUOSE 1727 obs.
– arrogant, haughty, proud, conceited HIGH IN THE INSTEP 1562 obs. exc. Eng. dial. obs.
– arrogant, haughty, proud; holding or behaving oneself loftily HAUTAIN 1297 obs.
– arrogant, haughty; rigorous, hard, severe; the opposite of affable DANGEROUS a1225 obs.
– arrogant, haughty, self-important HIGH-HEADED 20C US sl.
– arrogant, haughty, snobbish, conceited SADDITY 1960s African-American sl.
– arrogant, headstrong, obstinate, proud COBBY 1785 Eng. dial.
– arrogant, hectoring, blustering HUFF-SNUFF a1693 obs.
– arrogant, ill-natured, bullying IGNORANT 1940s W. Indies & Black British usage
– arrogant, impudent, proud; forward, wayward, stubborn; peevish, petulant PROTERVE 1382 obs. rare
– arrogant, inclined to put on airs; showing off AIRISH 1943 Amer. dial.
– arrogant, insolent, presumptuous SURCUIDANT a1529 obs. rare
– arrogant, insolent, self-confident LUSTY a1568 obs.
– arrogant, insolent, uppity; restless, aggressive; headstrong, stubborn, forward BRICKETY;  BRIGATY;  BRIGETTY;  BRIGGITY; BRIGGOTY; BRIGITY 1868 Amer. dial.
arrogant, presumptuous PUSH-UP 1990s W. Indies
– arrogant, presumptuous SUCCUDROUS c1475 Sc. obs.
– arrogant, proud, haughty, disdainful; pretentious, ostentatious FASTUOUS a1638 rare
– arrogant, self-important BOOPETY 1948 Amer. dial.
– arrogant, self-satisfied, full of oneself UP ONESELF 1940s Aust. sl.
– arrogant, showy LAANIELAHNEE;  LANI;  LANIE;  LARNEY 1970s S. Afr. sl.
– arrogant, showy, vulgar SWANK 1910s sl.
– arrogant, snobbish, haughty and disdainful; supercilious; unpleasant SNOOTY 1919 Amer. sl.
– arrogant, snobbish, reserved STUCK-UP M19
– arrogant, snobbish, reserved STUCKUPPY M19
– arrogant, stand-offish AKIMBO 1940s UK society sl.
– arrogant, stuck up, pretentious UPSTUCK 1904 Amer. dial.
– arrogant, stuck-up, snobbish LAA-DEE-LAA;  LA-DEE-DA;  LA-DI-DA(H);  LAH-DI-DAH 1895 colloq.
– arrogant, supercilious, ambitious HIGH-SIGHTED 1610
– arrogant, supercilious; intellectual, pretentious HIGH-NOSED L18 sl.
– pert. to someone who is arrogant, self-important, or overbearing BIGASS Bk2006 US sl.
– securely entrenched, and therefore arrogant FAT AND SASSY 1968 Amer.
– showing off, acting in an arrogant or vulgar manner SWANKING 20C sl.
– very arrogant, snobbish MORE SIDE THAN A BILLIARD BALL 1910s Aust. sl.

ARROGANCE etc. – ADVERBS
– arrogantly HIGH-HAT 1960s sl.
– arrogantly, conceitedly CHESTILY 1908 US
– arrogantly, ostentatiously, haughtily, pretentiously FASTUOUSLY a1677
– arrogantly, presumptuously SUCCUDROUSLY c1375 Sc. obs.
– in an arrogant or self-important manner CHESTY 1899 Amer. dial.

ARROGANCE etc. – NOUNS
– an arrogant, boastful assertion or bearing VANCE 1830 Sc.
– an extravagantly arrogant or boastful remark of speech RODOMONTADE 1591
– an extravagantly arrogant or boastful remark of speech RODOMONTADO 1598
– arrogance, conceit BIG-HEAD 1853 US
– arrogance, dogmatism; pomposity PONTIFICALITY 1600 depreciative usage
– arrogance, effrontery POLISH 1900s sl.
– arrogance, haughtiness, ostentation FASTUOUSNESS 1649
– arrogance, haughtiness, pride HAUTAINESSE 1297 obs.
– arrogance, imperiousness IMPERIOSITY 1654 obs. rare
– arrogance, impudence, self-possession, brazen assurance GALL 1882 orig. US sl.
– arrogance, insolence of triumph or prosperity WANTONNESS c1480 rare
– arrogance, pompousness FAST 1673 obs.
– arrogance, presumption OGART c1375 Sc. obs.
– arrogance, presumption SUCCUDRY 1375 Sc. obs.
– arrogance, presumptuous boasting, pride, pomp, vanity BOBANCE c1325 obs.
– arrogance, self-conceit, dogmatism OPINION c1425 obs.
– arrogance, self-confidence, conceit, haughtiness UPHEADEDNESS 1832 Amer. dial.
– arrogance, self-confidence, conceit, haughtiness UPHEADINESS 1963 Amer. dial.
– arrogance, snobbery HIGH NOSE 1930s colloq.
– arrogance, superciliousness SNOOT 1970s sl.
– arrogant or boisterous language; boastful assertion, brag; ostentation FANFARONADE 1652
– arrogant, showing-off behaviour SWANK 1854 sl.
– a showing off, acting in an arrogant, superior manner HIGH FLY L19 sl.

ARROGANCE etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
an arrogant and belligerent person, usually a male BADASS 1956 sl., orig. & chiefly US
an arrogant, cocky person CRACKERJACK 1910s US sl.
an arrogant, conceited, or stupid person; a fool, a simpleton BALLOON HEAD 1931 colloq., chiefly US
an arrogant, domineering man BASHAW 1593
an arrogant, foolish, vulgar young man, esp. when his image is boosted by flashy clothes ZOOT-SUITER 1960 US sl., derogatory
an arrogant, haughty person MRS. ASTOR’S BILLY GOAT 1920s US sl.
an arrogant, haughty person MRS. ASTOR’S COW 1920s US sl.
an arrogant, haughty person MRS. ASTOR’S PET COW 1920s US sl.
an arrogant, haughty person MRS. ASTOR’S PET HORSE 1920s US sl.
an arrogant, haughty person MRS. ASTOR’S PLUSH HORSE 1920s US sl.
an arrogant, oppressive person, jealous of rivalry and vindictive BUZZARD 1889 US sl.
an arrogant or conceited person BIG-HEAD 1846 colloq.
an arrogant or conceited person; a self-important, stuck-up, or citified person; a snob HIGH-HAT 1923 US colloq.
an arrogant or conceited person; a self-important, stuck-up, or citified person; a snob HIGH-HATTER 1925 US colloq.
an arrogant or haughty person; a person who acts important BIG FEELER 1967 Amer. dial.
an arrogant or haughty person; a self-important person ASTOR’S PET COW 1967 Amer. dial.
an arrogant or haughty person; a self-important person ASTOR’S PET POODLE 1967 Amer. dial.
an arrogant or haughty person in office GRIMSIR c1450 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
an arrogant or wanton blusterer WALLOCH-GOUL Bk1825 Sc.
an arrogant person; a person who shows of their material wealth HIGHSIDER 1997 US college sl.
an arrogant person who ‘sticks their nose in the air’; a snob SNOOT 1941 colloq.
an arrogant, pretentious woman of any class; a woman who is unjustifiably self-important or esteemed LADY MUCK 1957 UK sl.
an arrogant, proud person BIG HOUSE NIGGER 1950s African-American sl.
an arrogant, self-opinionated person KING SHIT 1940s sl., orig. US
an arrogant, self-opinionated person KING SPIT 1940s sl., orig. US
an arrogant, showy, vulgar person SWANKEY;  SWANKY M19 sl.
an arrogant, snobbish, or reserved person STUCK-UP L19 sl.
– an arrogant, successful, ambitious, or aggressively bold man (BIG) SWINGING DICK 1957 sl.
– an arrogant, unpleasant woman MISS THANG;  MISS THING 1990s African-American sl.
a person likened to a builder of the Tower of Babel, esp. in being arrogant or unrealistic BABEL BUILDER 1610
a person who is obnoxiously arrogant and self-assertive WISECRACKER 1923 Amer. sl.
– a person with an arrogant, swaggering manner; a boaster; a braggart SPRAG a1838 Sc., rare

ARROGANCE etc. – VERBS
– to act arrogant or self-important MOW THE MUSTARD 1967 Amer. dial.
– to act in an arrogant manner; to be self-satisfied GET ABOVE ONESELF 1823
– to act in an arrogant or proud manner SET UP A KAIM 1882 Sc.
– to act in an arrogant or supercilious manner FANCY PANTS 1936 Amer. sl.
– to assume an arrogant air of authority; to speak dogmatically or pompously PONTIFY 1883 rare, usually depreciative usage
– to be arrogant; to walk proudly SCORT Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– to become arrogant or insolent; to become angry COP AN ATTITUDE 1962 Amer. sl.
– to behave arrogantly or pretentiously; to be overbearing or oppressive MOUNT THE HIGH HORSE 1871
– to behave in an arrogant and affected manner ACT LIKE ONE’S SHIT DOESN’T STINK 1952 sl., orig. US
– to behave in an arrogant and affected manner ACT LIKE ONE’S SHIT DON’T SMELL 1960s sl., orig. US
– to behave in an arrogant and affected manner ACT LIKE SHIT WOULDN’T MELT IN ONE’S MOUTH 1960s sl., orig. US
– to behave in an arrogant and affected manner THINK ONE’S SHIT DOESN’T STINK c1947 sl., orig. US
– to behave in an arrogant manner; to ‘put on side’ PUT ON DAWG 20C sl.
– to behave in an arrogant or high-handed way PONTIFICATE 1898
– to speak arrogantly or pompously; to be verbose; to wander from the subject  BLOVIATE 1847 Amer.


ARROW – ADVERBS
– of an arrow’s flight: in the wrong direction; erringly FALSE 1815 obs. or arch.

ARROW – NOUNS
– an arrow NARROW Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– an arrow, or similar missile, esp. a crossbow-bolt GANYIE c1425 Sc. obs.
– an arrow shot from a crossbow CROSS-ARROW 1619 obs.
– a square-headed arrow QUARRY 1600 obs.
– implements of war, esp. arrows; also, an arrow, a weapon TACKLE c1375 obs.


ARSON, ARSONIST – NOUNS
– an act of arson TORCH JOB 1930s US sl.
– incendiary fire RED-COCK 1815 Sc.

ARSON etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– an arsonist ​ACCELERATOR 20C US criminals’ sl.
– an arsonist TORCH 1938 US sl.
– an arsonist on the payroll of a criminal gang SPARK Bk1992 US criminals’ sl.
– an incendiary FIRE-BUG 1869 colloq., orig. US
– an incendiary MAKE-FIRE 1560 obs.
– an incendiary; one who ‘adds fuel to fire’ BOUTEFEU Bk1911 Sc.
– a person suspected of being an incendiary BLUE CAT Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– a pyromaniac PYRO 1977 sl.

ARSON etc. – VERBS
– to commit arson; to deliberately set fire to something, esp. in order to claim insurance money TORCH 1931 sl., orig. US


ART – NOUNS
– a being well studied in any art PROVEXITY 1674 obs. rare
– an art or science SKILL 1570 obs.
– an art or science, a craft; a branch of knowledge or of skilled work; in early times: occult art, magic CUNNING 1340-70 obs.
– an art or science; a department of skill or knowledge MASTERY a1300 obs.
– an art, trade, occupation, profession; that in which anyone is skilled FACULTY c1386 obs. exc. arch.
– a proposed name for ‘the fine or ornamental arts’ CALLOTECHNICS 1860 rare
– a room devoted to the display of works of art; a museum, picture-gallery, etc. CABINET 1676 obs. or arch.
– art, craft; a trade, profession, calling MYSTERY a1400 arch.
– bad art; a mischievous or hurtful art CACOTECHNY 1775 rare
– string art; the art of making decorative pictures by winding yarn round nails driving into a flat surface SYMMOGRAPHY 1971
– the act or process of making a work of art FABREFACTION 1652 obs. rare

ART – NOUNS, PERSON
– a generous patron of art or literature MAECENAS c1561
– an art dealer or antique dealer commissioned to find a specific object; BIRD DOG c1930 US sl.
– a person skilled in or devoted to aesthetics; a professor of taste AESTHETICIAN 1845
– a person who studies the arts or humanities (German) GEISTESWISSENSCHAFTLER 1938

ART – VERBS
– to instruct in an art ART 1628 obs.


ARTERY – NOUNS
– an artery ARTIRE 1603 obs.

ARTFUL, ARTFULLY, ARTFULNESS – ADJECTIVES
– artful VARTFUL Bk1905 Eng. dial. obs.
– artful, crafty, cunning, dexterous SLEIGHTFUL 1380 obs. rare
– artful, crafty, deceitful WRENCHFUL a1225 obs. rare
– artful, crafty, sly, cunning SUBTILE c1385
– artful, crafty, wily, cunning, sly VULPINARY 1721 obs.
– artful, cunning AIRTY Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– artful, cunning DEEP AS GARLICK B1900 Eng. dial.
– artful, cunning DEEP AS GARRATT 1856 Eng. dial.
– artful, cunning DEEP AS GARRICK 1882 Eng. dial.
– artful, cunning DEEP AS GARRY B1900 Eng. dial.
– artful, cunning DEEP AS THE NORTH B1900 Eng. dial.
– artful, cunning DEEP AS THE NORTH STAR B1900 Eng. dial.
– artful, cunning DEEP AS WILKES B1900 Eng. dial.
– artful, cunning, astute, knowing; wide-awake; alert; cautious, wary LEARY;  LEERY 1718 sl.
– artful, cunning, crafty, deceitful, knavish SLIVERLY 1674 Eng. dial. rare
– artful, cunning, sly HIGH-WITTED 1588
– artful, cunning, wily CANNY a1662 Sc. obs. or arch.
– artful, deceitful, crafty, sly, cunning, wily CAUTELOUS 1574 obs. or arch.
– artful, knowing, shrewd DOWNY AS A HAMMER 1821 Amer. sl. rare
– artful, knowing, shrewd, aware, cunning, crafty DOWNY 1803 sl., chiefly Brit., rare
– artful, knowing, shrewd, cunning, sly; insinuating PAUKY;  PAWKY 1726 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– artful, knowing, shrewdly aware FLY c1810 sl.
– artful, profoundly cunning or sly DEEP 1513
– artful, sly CARNEY;  CARNY 1881 sl.
– artful, sly CRAZY LIKE A FOX 1908 sl., orig. US
– artful, sly, crafty, knowing IKEY 1887 sl., derogatory & offensive
– artful, sly, crafty, knowing IKEY-MO 1887 sl., derogatory & offensive
– somewhat artful, crafty, sly, cunning, deceitful SUBDOLOUS 1588 rare

ARTFUL etc. – ADVERBS
– artfully, cleverly, dexterously, skilfully; ingeniously, cunningly SUBTLY c1350 arch.
– artfully, deceitfully GAMELY c1000 obs.

ARTFUL etc. – NOUNS
– artfulness AIRTINESS Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– artfulness; affectation of speech or behaviour; flattery GUIVER;  GUYVER;  GYVER 1889 Aust. & NZ sl.
– artfulness, craftiness, greed, financial chicanery, etc. IKEYNESS 1911

ARTFUL etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– an artful, knowing fellow CHICKLE-A-LEARY CHAP E19 sl.

ARTFUL etc. – PHRASES
– he’s artful, sly THERE ARE NO FLIES ON HIM 1848 sl., orig. Aust. or US


ARTHRITIS – NOUNS
– arthritis RIDER BOYS 1970 Amer. dial., jocular usage
– arthritis ARTHUR 1974 UK sl.
– arthritis, rheumatism ARTHURITIS 1954 Amer. dial.
– arthritis, rheumatism ARTHURATICS 1967 Amer. dial.
– arthritis personified OLD ARTHUR 1968 Amer. dial.
– arthritis personified UNCLE ARTHUR 1992 Amer. dial.


ARTICHOKE – NOUNS
– an artichoke ARCHYCHOCK 1531 obs.
an artichoke HARTICHOKEHARTICHOUGH 1688 obs.


ARTIFICE, ARTIFICER – NOUNS
– an artifice; a crafty or cunning device; something craftily invented SUBTLETY 1375 obs.
– an artifice, a dodge; a cunning of crafty scheme SUBTILITY 1390 obs.
– an artifice, a trick SPRING 1753 obs. rare
– an artifice, a trick; a crooked device CREEK c1405 obs.
– an artifice, a trick, a prank; a stratagem REAK 1629 Sc. & Eng. dial. obs.
– an artifice, a trick, a ruse DAP Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– an artifice, a trick, a wile; deceit, guile, trickery CROOK c1175 obs.
– an artifice, device, or trick SKIFT c1460 obs.
– artifice, a contrivance, device, trick CAST c1340 obs.
– artifice, stratagem; a cunning or clever device SUBTILTY c1386 obs.
– artifice, wile, a trick; a crooked piece of conduct; deceit, guile, trickery CROOK c1175 obs.

ARTIFICE etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– an artificer, an operative in a factory or workshop MANUFACTURER 1719 obs.
– an artificer or manufacturer MANUFACTOR a1649 obs.
– a skilful artificer or fabricator; a skilled worker or craftsman DÆDAL c1630 obs.

ARTIFICE etc. – VERBS
– to practice artifice or deceit with; to play tricks so as to cheat or deceive JUGGLE 1528
– to resort to artifice or trick GO ON THE ABRAHAM SUIT 19C sl.


ARTIFICIAL – ADJECTIVES
– artificial FACIT Bk1985 US
– artificial, made by or resulting from art FACTITIOUS 1646 obs.
– artificial; made in imitation without fraudulent intent FAKE 1909
– sentimentally or melodramatically artificial; pretentious HOKEY;  HOKIE;  HOKY 1945 sl., orig. US

ARTIFICIAL – NOUNS
– anything artificial or false; a prosthesis FALSIE;  FALSY 1940s Amer. sl.

ARTIFICIAL – VERBS
– to make artificial ART 1628 obs. rare
– to render something artificial or insincere HOKE UP 1935 sl., orig. US


ARTILLERY – see SERVICES


ARTISAN – NOUNS, PERSON
– a Black artisan SPOORIE 20C S. Afr.
– a handicraftsman, an artisan, a workman HANDICRAFT 1586 obs.
– a person, esp. a man working in a skilled manual occupation; an artisan, a craftsman HANDICRAFTSMANHANDY-CRAFTS-MAN 1530-1 now chiefly Sth. Asian
– a person, esp. a man working in a skilled manual occupation; an artisan, a craftsman HANDICRAFTMAN a1544 now chiefly Sth. Asian
– a person, esp. a man, working in a skilled manual occupation; an artisan, a craftsman HANDCRAFTMAN;  HANDCRAFTSMAN c1480
– an artisan or tradesman who sets up for himself ​MASTER-MAN 1794 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– an artisan who makes the action of an instrument, as of a gun, piano, etc. ACTIONER 1881
– a skilled artisan, craftsman, etc. CRAFTIMAN; CRAFTYMAN a1000 obs.


ARTIST – NOUNS, PERSON
– a cityscape artist (Italian) VEDUTISTA Bk1982
– a female artist; a woman who paints pictures PAINTRESS 1741
– a female artist; a woman who paints pictures PAINTRIX 1547 obs. rare
– an artist DAUB M19 colloq.
– an artist PAINTER STAINER Bk1909 UK society usage
– an artist; a painter GENTLEMAN OF THE BRUSH 1821 UK sl.
– an artist, architect, etc., whose work is characterized by regard for or preoccupation with the styles and values of the past HISTORICIST 1905
– an artist likened in some way to the Greek painter Zeuxis; used esp. with reference to his skill in producing extremely lifelike pictures, or his method of selecting attributes from different models and combining them to produce a composite idealized figure ZEUXIS 1577
– an artist, musician, writer, actor, etc., as the performer or originator of a work HAND 1587
– an artist of distinguished skill, one who those who are regarded as models of excellent in their art MASTER 1533
– an artist of distinguished skill who lived before the period accounted ‘modern’; chiefly applied to painters from the 13th to the 16th or 17th century OLD MASTER 1840
– an artist or painter who specializes in depictions of animals or living creatures ZOOGRAPHER Bk1656 rare
– an artist who changes some natural object or scenery to fit his concept EARTH ARTIST 1972
– an artist whose work is marked by indistinctness of outline NEBULIST 1836 rare
– an ennobled artist PAINT-BRUSH BARONET L19 UK society usage


ARTISTIC, ARTISTICALLY – ADJECTIVES
– artistic but not notably useful or comfortable ARTY-AND-CRAFTY 1902 colloq.
– artistic but not notably useful or comfortable ARTY-CRAFTY c1920 colloq.
– artistic, characteristic of painter PAINTERLY a1586 rare
– artistic, esp. in a self-conscious or pretentious manner ARTSY 1947 colloq.
– artistic; having the appearance of being produced by art ARTIFICIAL 1679
– artistic in taste, dress, etc., or wishing to be regarded as such ARTY 1915 colloq.
– artistic, neat FOXY L19 US college sl.
– artistic, skilful CRAFTIOUS c1449 obs. rare
– foolishly or pretentiously artistic ARTSY-FARTSY 1962 colloq.
– overly artistic or intellectual, pretentious; exhibiting superficial form and little positive content, etc. ARTY-FARTY 1946 colloq.
– overly artistic or intellectual, pretentious; exhibiting superficial form and little positive content, etc. ARTY-TARTY 1946 colloq.
– pretentiously artistic ART-AND-CRAFTY 1909 colloq.

ARTISTIC etc. – ADVERBS
– artistically. in a way proper to a painter PAINTERLY 1822 rare

ARTISTIC etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– an artistic person, esp. one who affects a pretentious or eccentric style ARTSY a1982 US colloq.
– a person attached to artistic properties; an aesthete DECORIST 1839 nonce word


ARTLESS – ADJECTIVES
– artless, guileless; free from duplicity; simple in character ONEFOLD 1882
– artless, guileless; innocent; lacking cunning or craftiness CRAFTLESS 1650 rare
– artless, natural, naive NAIF 1598
– artless, rude, inelegant; said of speech and the like LEWD c1425 obs.


ARTS  – NOUNS
– fine arts FARTS Bk2006 US sl.
– the liberal arts; polite literature, belles-lettres THE MUSES 1582

ARTS  – NOUNS, PERSON
– an avid supporter of the arts CULTURE-VULTURE Bk2006 US sl.
– a person skilled in the arts; a master of arts who has passed on to the study of philosophy ARCETER;  ARCISTER 1440 obs.