Reverse Dictionary: CAS – CASZ


CASE – NOUNS
a case, box, chest; a receptacle of any kind CAP-CASE 1597 obs.
a case or box CASSOLE 1590 obs. rare
a little case or receptacle CAPSULE 1652 obs.
a small case, a casket FARSET 1639 obs. rare


CASH – ADJECTIVES (also see money) 
– in cash (rather than paper) money RED L19 sl.
 
CASH – NOUNS
– a cash-box; a till; a cash drawer without belling device CHIP Bk1914 criminals’ sl.
– a cash-box; a till; a cash drawer without belling device COMBINATION CHIP Bk1914 criminals’ sl.
– a cash-box; a till; a cash drawer without belling device DAMPER Bk1914 criminals’ sl.
– a cash-box; a till; a cash drawer without belling device DINGER Bk1914 criminals’ sl.
– any kind of cash or money OOFTISH 1877 sl. arch.
– a replenishment of cash PUGGY 1985 Sc. sl.
– a reserve of cash for use in day-to-day life rather than the proceeds of a robbery INDOOR MONEY 1960s UK criminals’ sl.
– a stock of cash; a cash-box PACK c1394 obs.
– available cash, means; an amount paid in advance, a down payment ANTE 1843 colloq.
– cash AMMO 2003 US sl.
– cash ARTHUR (ASHE) 1992 UK rhyming sl.
– cash CASTINGS M19 US sl.
– cash CHICKEN’S HASH 2000s rhyming sl.
– cash HARD MONEY 1972 US sl.
– cash NUGGETS c1890 colloq.
– cash OAK AND ASH 1960 UK rhyming sl.
– cash REDDY 1688 sl.
– cash THE ACTUAL 19C Eng. sl.
– cash, banknotes HAPPY CABBAGE 20C sl., orig. US
– cash, change ARMOR PLATE 1918 US navy sl.
– cash, coin, money QUINIE 1832 Sc.
– cash, coin, money QUINZIE 1832 Sc.
– cash, coin, money; loot in the form of cash; usually plural IRON MAN 1924 US criminals’ sl.
– cash in hand, usually as ‘the ready’ READY L17 sl.
– cash; money BEATER 1940s African-American sl.
– cash, money BITE 1532 thieves’ sl. obs.
– cash, money CHECK 1889 Amer. dial.
– cash, money CHEDDA;  CHEDDAR Bk2006 US sl.
– cash, money CHINK 1698 sl.
– cash, money DUST 1607 sl.
– cash, money HORSE NAILS 1859 sl.
– cash, money KELTER 1807 N. Eng. dial.
– cash, money NELSON EDDIES 1930s rhyming sl. for ‘readies’
– cash, money OCHRE 1835 sl.
– cash; money OSCAR ASCHE;  OSCAR ASH 1905 Aust. rhyming sl.
– cash, money QUID a1700 sl. obs. rare
– cash, money SAUSAGE AND MASH 1976 UK rhyming sl.
– cash, money SHEKELS 1883 sl.
– cash, money TIN 1836 sl.
– cash, money, banknotes, paper money CABBAGE 1903 sl., orig. US
– cash, money; cash BONES Bk2006 US sl.
– cash, money; formerly applied specifically to bronze or copper coins BRASS 1597 sl.
– cash; money itself; common in rap music lyrics BANK 20C teen & high school sl.
– cash, money; the necessary funds THE NEEDFUL 1774 colloq.
– cash; money, usually stolen DARB 1904 US criminals’ sl.
– cash; often in plural DUCAT 1794
– cash or money of any value, or in any quantity BLUNT Bk1890 sl.
– cash, rather than cheques, etc. READIES 1930s sl.
– cash, ready money BARE GELT 1591 obs.
– cash; ready money DARBY 1682 criminals’ sl. obs.
– hard cash, money CLINK 1720s Sc.
– petty cash rather than a large amount that needs investing or depositing WALK-ABOUT MONEY 1930s sl.
– ready cash GO-AND-FETCH-IT 1898 Amer. dial.
 
CASH – PHRASES
– short of cash, temporarily impoverished BEAT FOR THE YOLK 1940s African-American sl.
 
– an exceptionally impressive roll of cash 
  A WAD THAT WOULD CHOKE A WOMBAT 20C Aust. sl.
  A WAD THAT WOULD CHOKE A COAL CHUTE 20C US sl.
  A WAD THAT WOULD CHOKE A DONKEY 20C US sl.
 
CASH – VERBS
– to hand over the cash FORK OVER THE DARBY 1859 sl.


CASHEW – NOUNS
the cashew nut ACAJOU 1725
the cashew nut HEART-NUT 1568 obs.


CASH MACHINE – NOUNS
an automated cash machine MAC 1996 US sl.
an automatic teller machine PUGGY 1985 Sc. sl.
an automatic teller machine MONEY-PUKER 1993 Amer. jocular usage
an automatic teller machine installed in the external wall of a bank, etc. HOLE IN THE WALL 1980s sl.


CASH REGISTER – see TILL


CASINO – INTERJECTIONS
– used as a humorous admonition to casino employees at a craps table when the players are losing ADJUST THE STICK! 1983 US sl.
 
CASINO – NOUNS
– a carpeted and well-furnished or well-equipped gambling casino CARPET JOINT 1961 Amer. sl.
– a casino ACADEMY E18 sl.
– a casino or any place of entertainment where confidence tricksters or crooked gamblers operate BRACE HOUSE;  SKINNING DEN;  SKINNING HOUSE;  SKINNING JOINT L19 US sl.
– a casino where the games are crooked GAFF JOINT 1920s US criminals’ sl.
– a casino, in which money that has been gained through criminal activities can be decriminalized LAUNDROMAT;  LAUNDRY 1980s sl.
– a cheap, possibly corrupt, casino ACADEMY M19 sl.
– a coin-operated gaming machine, orig. operated by a single lever ONE-ARM BANDIT;  ONE-ARMED BANDIT 1930s sl., orig. US
– a counter, similar in size and shape to a sovereign, used in casinos JACK M19 sl.
– a crooked casino or similar place designed to fleece innocent victims GAFF 1930s US criminals’ sl.
– a small casino or gambling establishment with low-stakes games DIME STORE 1953 US sl.
– casino betting in $100 increments BLACK ACTION 1991 US sl.
– in a casino: a $25 chip Q 1983 US sl.
– in a casino: a $25 chip QUARTER 1980 US sl.
– in a casino: a bet comprised of different colour and different value betting chips RAINBOW 1991 US sl.
– in a casino: a private game of blackjack CADDY BLACKJACK 1981 US sl.
– in a casino: an electronic poker machine POKIE 2002 NZ sl.
– in a casino Keno game: the two clear plastic tubes through which the number balls are blown RABBIT EARS 1993 US sl.
– in a casino: the poker game with the highest stakes A-GAME 1949 US sl.
– in American casinos: a $20 chip BANANA 1985 US sl.
– in American casinos: a $25 chip GREEN 1985 US sl.
– in American casinos: an early dismissal from work due to smaller than expected numbers of gamblers EARLY OUT 1980 US sl.
– in American casinos: a silver coin or $1 chip SILVER 1980 US sl.
– in casino gambling: a betting chip from another casino ALIEN 1983 US sl.
– surveillance stations or camera in casinos concealed above two-way mirrors on the ceiling EYE IN THE SKY 1961 US sl.
– the disguise and staged personality assumed by an expert card counter playing blackjack in a casino in the hope of avoiding detection and ejection ACT 1991 US sl.
 
CASINO – NOUNS, PERSON
– a casino dealer, who typically wear black slacks and a white shirt or blouse BLACK-AND-WHITE Bk1997 gambling cheats’ sl.
– a casino employee or executive who worries extensively about money being lost to gamblers BLEEDER 1974 US sl.
– a casino or gambling house owner or operator who may become involved in crime by using gangsters to protect him from other gangsters or to help collect gambling debts; a financier of a drug-importing ring – the one least likely ever to be arrested or jailed BANKER Bk1988 criminals’ sl.
– a confederate who shields a casino cheat from being seen as he robs a slot machine BLOCKER 1984 US sl.
– a dedicated player of casino slot machines, esp. those with higher bets and higher payouts HIGH PULLER 1985 US sl.
– a fan or spectator who crowds round the rails that surround a big game in a casino RAILBIRD 1940s gambling sl.
– a house player in a casino who entices genuine players to bet, and usually lose, their money BOOSTER 20C US sl.
– in a casino: a female who tips generously GEORGETTE Bk1997 gambling sl.
– in a casino: a gambler who insists on betting wit $100 notes, not betting chips C-NOTE CHARLIE 1949 US sl.
– in a casino: a generous tipper ACORN 1984 US sl.
– in a casino: an employee who accepts and records bets on Keno WRITER 1972 US sl.
– in casino blackjack: the gambler immediately to the dealer’s right ANCHOR MAN 1985 US sl.
– in casino gambling: a confederate of a cheat AGENT 1996 US sl.
 
CASINO – PHRASES
– in American casinos: observing the gambling but not playing ON THE RAIL 1985 US sl.
– of gambling in a casino: using money borrowed from the casino OUT OF THE APRON 1982 US sl.
– used at casino craps tables for encouraging a player to take a turn as a shooter ALL ROOTERS AND NO SHOOTERS 1983 US sl.
 
CASINO – VERBS
– to have your chips placed in a chip rack to be cashed in RACK UP 1982 US sl.
– to patrol a casino in search of coins left in the tray of a slot machine or dropped on the floor SILVERMINE 1985 US sl.
– to spread playing cards on a table and move them randomly as part of the shuffling process MUCK 2003 US sl.
– to supervise the blackjack game in a casino DEAL 1980 US sl.


CASK – NOUNS
– a bung for a cask, etc. TAMPION c1460 obs.
– a bung for a cask, etc. TOMPION 1729 obs.
– a cask CAST 1969 Amer. dial.
– a cask; a closed wooden vessel CAP 1519 obs.
– a cask, a vat CUVE a1400 obs.
– a cask or barrel, esp. of herrings CADE 1337 obs.
– a cask or barrel for wine or other commodities TONNEL 1483 obs.
– a cask or barrel to contain dry things FAT 1540 obs.
– a cask or other container for liquor MONKEY 1839-40 Amer. sl.
– a large cask, barrel, tub, box, etc., used to hold dry things, as opposed to liquids DRYFAT 1526 obs.
– a large cask or barrel; later, one used to collect and store rain water BUTT 1572
– a little cask or barrel BARELLET;  BARRELET 1611 obs.
– a peg or spigot to stop the vent-hole in a cask or in a tap; a vent-peg FAUCET c1430 obs.
– a small cask BOSS Bk1911 Sc.
– a small cask or barrel BARRICO 1607
– a small cask or barrel open at one end; a tub BOWIE Bk1911 Sc.
– a small cask; a firkin BARRIKET;  BARRIQUET 1611 obs.
– a small cask; a keg CAG 1452 obs. exc. Sc. and Amer. dial.
– a small cask, a keg KAG 1818 Eng. dial.
– a straw used to extract liquor from a cask MONKEY-PUMP 1867 nautical usage, obs. rare
– a wine cask FAT c1400 obs.
– the faucet or bung of a cask QUILL 1777 Eng. dial. obs.
 
CASK – NOUNS, PERSON
– a cooper who makes casks for liquids TIGHT COOPER 1889


CASKET – NOUNS
a casket, a small case FARSET 1639 obs. rare
a casket, box, chest, case CAP-CASE 1597 obs.


CASSETTE PLAYER – NOUNS
a mini cassette-player with lightweight headphones, for listening while one is on the move BOOGIE-PACK c1981 sl.
a portable radio and cassette player with large speakers JAM BOX 1982 US sl.


CAST – VERBS
to cast or throw a stone, etc., by jerking the arm against the thigh HAINCH 1788 Sc.
to cast violently; to throw with a jerk; to toss YARK;  YERK 1823 Sc. & Eng. dial.
to cast, throw, or fling violently; to hurl, dash, knock THRING a1300 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
to cast, to throw TIP Bk1905 Eng. dial.
to cast, to throw off UNCASE 1581 obs.
to cast, to throw, to hurl, to fling SKEW 1824 Eng. dial.
– to cast, to throw, to toss out, over, etc.; to fling to the ground; to overturn, to upset WALT a1300 obs. exc. Eng. dial.


CASTANETS – NOUNS
castanets, bones; performers on the castanets MARROWBONES 1893 Eng. dial.


CAST ASIDE – NOUNS
anything that has been cast aside or rejected CASTER M19 sl.

CAST ASIDE – NOUNS, PERSON
a person who has been cast aside or rejected CASTER M19 sl.

CAST ASIDE – VERBS
to cast aside, to relinquish, to forsake the truth, one’s faith or god, a state or condition, etc. WAIVE 1303 obs.


CASTAWAY – NOUNS, PERSON
a castaway WA-CAST 1898 Sc.
a castaway; an outcast OFF-CAST 1631 Sc.


CAST DOWN – ADJECTIVES
– cast down, abashed, ashamed, bashful DASHED 1803 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– cast down; brought low; downtrodden, desperate ABJECT c1450 rare
– cast down, humbled, abased, debased, dejected ABESSED 1707 obs.
– cast down in confidence, spirits, or courage; dispirited, disheartened, dejected; subdued in demeanour FEATHER-FALLEN 19C Eng. dial.
– cast down in spirit; very down in the mouth; having a forlorn and hopeless expression; depressed, dejected LIKE A DYING DUCK IN A THUNDERSTORM 1874
 
CAST DOWN – NOUNS
– a casting down; abasement, humiliation, degradation ABJECTION c1525 obs.
 
CAST DOWN – VERBS
– to cast down ADUST a1250 obs.
– to cast down, to abase, to humble LAY a1300 obs.
– to cast down; to cast into melancholy, to sadden, to grieve DUMP c1585 obs.
– to cast down, to depress UNDER 1502 obs.
– to cast down, to depress; to daunt, dispirit, or discourage DASH 1550
– to cast down, to humble, to depress, to deject; to lower, to let down BATE c1380
– to cast down, to lay low, to fell, to strike down AFELL; AFELLE c1000 obs.
– to cast down; to lower, to degrade, to abase, to debase ABJECTATE 1731 obs.
– to cast down; to make subject, to subdue UNDERCAST a1340 obs.
– to cast down, to put down, to quell DAUNT a1400 obs.
– to cast down, to shame FASH Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– to cast down, to throw down, to cast away or off ACAST c1220 obs.


CASTIGATE, CASTIGATION – NOUNS
– a castigation; a ‘skelping’ on the buttocks (skelping – a smack, slap, or blow given with the open hand on the buttocks) HIPSY-DIPSY 1881 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– castigation; a beating BATTING 1863 Eng. dial.
– castigation; punishment; thrashing PAYS 1790 Sc. & Eng. dial.
 
CASTIGATE etc. – VERBS
– to castigate in words; to rebuke, to satirize, to vituperate LASH 1590
– to castigate or criticize thoroughly and in anger, to reprimand severely
  RAISE HELL 1920s sl.
  RAISE HELL AND STICK A PROP UNDER IT 1920s sl.
  RAISE MERRY HELL AND PUT A SHINGLE UNDER IT 1920s sl.
– to castigate thoroughly; to punish or otherwise deal with someone in a final or decisive manner NAIL ONE TO THE CROSS 1899 Amer. dial.
– to castigate thoroughly; to punish or otherwise deal with someone in a final or decisive manner NAIL ONE TO THE MAST 1925 Amer. dial.
– to castigate, to beat, to strike, to belabour, to punish PAIK c1639 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– to castigate, to reprimand, to complain at HAVE OVER 1936 Amer. dial.
– to castigate, to thrash; to give one a good drubbing PUT (ONE) THROUGH A COURSE OF SPROUTS 19C Amer. dial.
– to castigate, to whip; to beat NAIL ONE TO THE CROSS 1899 Amer. dial.


CAST IRON – ADJECTIVES
made of cast iron YETLING 1495-6 Sc.

CAST IRON – NOUNS
cast iron; iron not made malleable YETLIN(G) 1777 Sc.


CASTLE – ADJECTIVES
– built like a castle; having battlements CASTELLATE 1830 rare
– built like a castle; having battlements CASTELLATED 1679
– formed like a castle; castle-like CASTELLATED 1762-71
– pert. to a castle; of the nature of a castle CASTELLAR 1789
 
CASTLE – NOUNS
– a castle P AND D c1870 criminals’ sl.
– an alleged term for a castle dungeon MASMORE;  MASSYMORE 1789 Sc.
– a small castle CASTELET c1320
– a small castle CASTELLET c1325
– a small castle CASTLET 1538 obs.
– the building of castles; the furnishing of a house with battlements; a fortified or castellated structure; a battlement CASTELLATION 1818
– the district belonging to a castle CASTELLATE 1809 obs. rare
– the government or jurisdiction of a castle; the territory subject to it CASTELRY;  CASTLERY 1679 obs.
– the government or jurisdiction of a castle; the territory subject to it CASTLESHIP 1598 obs.
– the lordship of a castle, or the district belonging to a castle CASTELLANY 1696
 
CASTLE – NOUNS, PERSON
– a person living in or belonging to a castle; one of the garrison of a castle CASTILIAN 1570-87 obs.
– a person who builds or owns castles CASTLE-MONGER 1655 obs.
– the governor of a town or castle; later, a noble ruling by hereditary right a town or castle, with the adjacent domain BURGRAVE 1551
– the governor or constable of a castle CASTELLAN 1393
– the governor or constable of a castle CASTELLION c1430 obs.
– the warden of a castle CASTLEWARD c1425 obs.
– the watchman on the battlements of a castle GARITOUR 1825 Sc.
 
CASTLE – VERBS
– to build in the manner of a castle; to build with battlements CASTELLATE 1831
– to fortify a castle BASTILLE 1480 obs.


CAST OFF – ADJECTIVES
cast off OFF-KESSEN Bk1905 Eng. dial.
cast off, rejected, cast down, dispirited ABJECTED 1633 obs.

CAST OFF – NOUNS
cast-off LEFT-OFF M19 sl.
that which is cast off or away; refuse, scum, dregs ABJECTION 1447 obs.

CAST OFF – VERBS
to cast off, to throw off or away, to cast out, to exclude, to reject ABJECTATE c1475 obs.
– to cast one off; to reject one SEND ONE A MITTEN 1836 Eng. dial.


CAST OUT – ADJECTIVES
cast out EJECTITIOUS 1736 obs.
cast out EMISSITIOUS 1731 obs. rare

CAST OUT – NOUNS
a casting out EJECTATION 1736 obs.
things cast up or out EJECTMENTS 1658 obs. rare

CAST OUT – VERBS
to cast out, to discard DECK 1781 Eng. dial.
to cast out with violence or exertion WALE Bk1905 Eng. dial.


CASTRATE, CASTRATED, CASTRATION – ADJECTIVES
– castrated ADDED TO THE LIST L19 sl.
– castrated ALTERATED 1968 Amer. dial.
– castrated CUT 1624
– castrated EXTESTICULATE 1884 rare
– castrated SCRIBB’D AND LIBB’D Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– castrated UNPAVED a1616 obs.
– castrated; deprived of virility UNSEMINARED a1616 obs. rare, Shakespeare usage
– castrated; emasculated DEKNACKERED 20C
– castrated; wounded, mutilated, etc. by cutting; carved, sculptured, engraved CUTTED 1438 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
 
CASTRATE etc. – NOUNS
– a castrated animal NEUTER 1900
– castration NUT-CUTTING 1968 US sl.
 
CASTRATE etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– a castrated man, a eunuch CASTRATE 1639 obs.
– a male singer castrated in boyhood so as to retain a soprano or alto voice CASTRATO 1763
– a person who castrates animals NUTTER 1968 Amer. dial.
 
CASTRATE etc. – VERBS
– to castrate ARRANGE 20C US euphemism
– to castrate CAPSIZE 20C US colloq.
– to castrate CASTERATE 1965 Amer. dial.
– to castrate CASTERIZE 1973 Amer. dial.
– to castrate CASTERMINE 1949 Amer. dial.
– to castrate CHANGE Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
– to castrate CUT 1465
– to castrate DEHORN 20C Amer. dial.
– to castrate DE-NUT 1950 Amer. dial.
– to castrate EXCHANGE 1966 Amer. dial.
– to castrate HANDLE 1949 Amer. dial. euphemism
– to castrate HARROW 1753 obs.
– to castrate KNACKER M19 Brit. colloq.
– to castrate LIB 14C Eng. dial.
– to castrate LINE UP 1949 Amer. dial.
– to castrate MAIM ?1300s euphemism
– to castrate NUT 1916 Amer. dial.
– to castrate SATURNIZE 1829
– to castrate TRIM Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
– to castrate UNSEX 20C US medical usage
– to castrate a cock CARVE 1586 obs.
– to castrate a male animal; to spay a female animal; now primarily to castrate GELD c1225
– to castrate an animal DENATURE 1968 Amer. dial.
– to castrate an animal DE-STONE 1969 Amer. dial.
– to castrate, lit. and fig. DE-BALL 1961 sl.
– to castrate or spay an animal DOCTOR 1939 euphemism
– to castrate, to geld UNGEAR 1788 Sc. obs.
– to castrate, to make a eunuch of; to deprive of virility or generative power EUNUCHATE 1646 obs.
– to castrate, to spay ALTER E19 Aust. & NZ
– to castrate, usually in figurative sense of hurting or punishing severely DE-BOLLOCK 1960s sl.


CASUAL, CASUALLY – ADJECTIVES
– casual, chance, occasional HAPPENING 1895 Sc.
– casual, fortuitous ACCIDENTARY 1607 obs.
 casual, fortuitous, accidental; occurring or coming by chance ADVENTUROUS c1374 obs.
– casual, fortuitous, haphazard; acting or happening at random TEMERARIOUS 1660 obs.
– casual, laid-back, conducive to a good time CAJ;  CAS 1990 Amer. sl.
– casual, laid-back, conducive to a good time CAZH;  KAZH 1981 Amer. students’ sl.
– casual, occasional, turning or popping up by chance POPPIN’ 1900 Sc.
– casual, offhand OFF-SIDED 1885 Sc.
– casual, relaxed or easygoing; unconcerned; unhurried LAID-BACK 1969 US colloq.
 
CASUAL etc. – ADVERBS
– casually CASUAL-WISE 1601 obs.
– casually, accidentally, by chance ACCIDENTLY 1611 obs.
– casually, by chance, accidentally ADVENTUROUSLY c1460 obs.
– casually, by chance; perhaps BY HAP 1388 obs.
– casually, incidentally; by way of accident; casually ACCIDENTARILY 1651 obs.
– casually, offhandedly OFFLIKE 1949 Amer. dial.


CASUALTY – NOUNS
the list of casualties in a battle or war; also, the financial cost of a war BUTCHER’S BILL 1829