Reverse Dictionary: CAU – CEL


CAUGHT – ADJECTIVES
– able or open to be caught or taken CAPTABLE 1649 obs.
– caught GONE 1954 Aust. sl.
– caught in the act, caught red-handed BANGED TO RIGHTS 20C sl., orig. US, esp. criminals’ usage
– caught in the act, caught red-handed BANG TO RIGHTS 1904 sl.
– caught in the act, generally of sexual intercourse IN FLAGRANTE E17 sl.
– caught in the very act NABBED IN THE HOCK 1872 Amer. sl.
 
CAUGHT – NOUNS
– a person who is caught CATCHEE 1839 nonce word
 
CAUGHT – PHRASES
– having been caught in the act of doing something wrong or illegal CAUGHT RED-HANDY 1940 Amer. dial.
 
CAUGHT – VERBS
– to be caught in the act JACKET M19 US criminals’ sl.
– to be caught in the act NAB IN THE HOCK 1872 US criminals’ sl.
– to be caught or arrested by the police BAG UP 1980s UK & US sl.
– to have caught him properly HAVE ONE BY THE SHORT AND CURLIES c1935 army sl.


CAUL – NOUNS
the caul of a child, calf, etc. VEIL 1879 Eng. dial.


CAULDRON – NOUNS
a cauldron KAWDRON c1483 obs.
a cauldron MUCKLE-POT 1892 Eng. dial.


CAULIFLOWER – NOUNS
– a cauliflower CABBAGE FLOWER 1693 obs.
a cauliflower COLLEYFLOWER 1976 Amer. dial.
a cauliflower COLLY 1961 UK sl.
a cauliflower CULLYFLOWER 1968 Amer. dial.
– the edible head of cauliflower or broccoli CURD 1759


CAUSE, CAUSED – ADJECTIVES
– capable of being caused or occasioned OCCASIONABLE a1677 rare
 
CAUSE etc. – ADVERBS
– with cause or occasion, with ground or reason OCCASIONEDLY 1631 obs.
 
CAUSE etc. – NOUNS
– a cause, a reason SAKE Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– cause CAZEN 1911 Amer. dial.;  KAZEN 1931 Amer. dial.
– cause, occasion, reason KAISHIN 1908 Sc.
– cause, reason MANNER 1390 obs.
– cause, reason, ground SKILL 1390 obs.
– the fact of being the cause of all things OMNICAUSALITY 1678
 
CAUSE etc. – VERBS
– to cause CAZEN 1911 Amer. dial.;  KAZEN 1931 Amer. dial.
– to cause one to do something GAR a1300 chiefly Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– to cause, to bring about, to occasion; to involve as a consequence or result IMPORT 1550 obs.
– to cause, to bring upon, to occasion ILLATE 1533 obs. rare
– to cause, to create, to make happen POP UP 1930s sl.
– to cause, to occasion GAR c1460 chiefly Sc. & N. Eng. dial.


CAUTERIZE – VERBS
to cauterize, to sterilize FIRE 1940 Amer. dial.


CAUTION, CAUTIOUS, CAUTIOUSLY – ADJECTIVES
– cautious CAT-EYED 1934 US Western sl.
– cautious, alert, vigilant, prepared, on one’s guard, watchful, WARE c1000 arch.
– cautious, careful, provident PRECAUTIOUS 1645
– cautious, careful, prudent; industrious, wide-awake, eager; attentive to business VERTIE 1804 Sc. obs.
– cautious, circumspect, prudent WARELY a900 obs.
– cautious, gradual, and discreet SOFTLY-SOFTLY 1850
– cautious in worldly matters, worldly-wise, shrewd, having a constant eye to the main chance CANNY 1816 Sc.
– cautious, on one’s guard ON WARE c1300 obs.
– cautious or careful WARISOME 1628 obs. rare
– cautious or careful in motion or action CANNY 1785 Sc.
– cautious, wary FEARFUL 1526 obs.
– cautious, wary CAGEY 1893 orig. US
– cautious, wary, crafty, cunning, reticent, non-committal CAGY 1893 US colloq.
– cautious, wary; cunning, astute, knowing, artful; wide-awake; alert LEARY;  LEERY 1718 sl.
– cautious, wary, heedful, careful, attentive HEEDY 1548 obs.
– cautious, wary, heedful, prudent CAUTELOUS 1574 obs. or arch.
– cautious, wary, heedful; well-advised; circumspect ADVISY c1300 obs.
– cautious, wary, judicious ADVISED 1475 obs.
– cautious, wary; knowing, sagacious, judicious, prudent CANNY 1637 Sc.
– cautious, wary; prudent, careful, esp. with regard to money matters SICKER c1662 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– cautious, watchful WAREFUL 1548 obs.
– cautious, watchful; careful, heedful, attentive TENTY 1685 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– extremely cautious, wary; feeling suspicion HINKEY;  HINKY 1956 Amer. sl.
– needing cautious handling or action; liable to end in disaster unless treated with great care; delicate, critical, precarious, risky, hazardous TICKLISH 1592
 
CAUTION etc. – ADVERBS
– cautiously LAIRILY 1990s sl.
– cautiously, carefully, attentively TENTY 1785 Sc.
– cautiously, carefully, heedfully TENTILY 1874 Sc.
 cautiously, slyly; sagaciously, skilfully, prudently CANNILY 1636 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– cautiously, watchfully, circumspectly; prudently WARELY c897 obs.
– cautiously, with hesitation; anxiously; in a state of apprehension or uneasiness FEARFULLY 1586 obs.
 
CAUTION etc. – INTERJECTIONS/PHRASES
– used of a cautious, niggardly person HE WOULD LIVE EVEN IN A GRAVEL PIT c1660 chiefly rural usage
– used to advocate caution and/or restraint STEADY!;  STEADY ON!;  STEADY THERE! 1825
 
CAUTION etc. – NOUNS
– caution, a taking heed; a warning to take heed, a caution TAKE-HEED 1611 obs.
– caution, carefulness WAREFULNESS 1548 obs.
– caution, carefulness WARELINESS c1000 obs.
– caution, carefulness WARISOMENESS 1607 obs.
– cautiousness; prudence, sagacity, skilfulness,; gentleness, quietness CANNINESS a1662 Sc.
– cautiousness, vigilance WARENESS 971 obs.
– chronic caution and slowness THE SLOWS 19C US Civil War usage
 
CAUTION etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– a cautious, nervous, timid person RABBIT 1951 US sl.
– an especially cautious, observant person BIG EYE Bk1992 sl.
– an overly cautious person AUNT BETTIE 1945 US sl.
– a very cautious, rather tight-fisted person SANNIE SICCAR-SOLES 1951 US sl.
 
CAUTION etc. – VERBS
– to act cautiously and conservatively; to be conventional, conservative, or modest HOLD CLOSE TO THE WILLOWS 1913 Amer. dial.
– to advance with caution; to craw forward SNURGLE 1983 UK sl.
– to be cautious, clever, or wise HAVE HAIR ON ONE’S HEAD 1825 Sc.
– to be cautious or ‘cagey’ PLAY CAGEY-CANNON 1968 Ireland
– to be cautious or watchful; to take precautions WAIT a1300 obs.
– to be cautious, thoughtful, or intelligent; to be able to think; to remember BEAR A BRAIN a1529 obs.
– to be cautious, to beware READ 1892 Sc.
– to be cautious; to watch out for oneself PULL IN ONE’S EARS 20C Amer. sl.
– to caution beforehand; to warn of impending danger or trouble TIP OFF 1891 colloq.
– to caution, to warn; to inform AVISE 1894 Eng. dial.
– to proceed cautiously, to go gently CALL CANNY 1892 Sc.


CAVALRY – NOUNS
cavalry HAYBURNERS 1941 Amer. army sl.
the Cavalry THE GEE-GEES Bk1909 sl. obs.
the Cavalry; so-called by Indians LONG SWORDS 19C US Civil War usage

CAVALRY – NOUNS, PERSON
a cavalryman FLY-SLICER 19C sl.
a cavalryman or cavalrymen BOWLEGS 1907 army usage
a shoeing smith in a cavalry regiment SHOEY 1919 Brit. sl.


CAVE, CAVERN, CAVING – NOUNS
– a cave EARTH-HOLE 1813 obs.
– a cave LUSTRE 1615 obs.
– a cave; a culvert NANNY-HOLE 1900 Eng. dial.
– a cave, a deep hole, a well, a pond VOUT;  VOWT 1866 Sc.
– a cave in a cliff FOGO 1891 Eng. dial.
– a cave or cavern; a deep, dark place in the sea or land; a gulf, abyss, or chasm; often used in the plural DUNGEON c1475
– a cave or shelter beneath an overhanging cliff SAND HOUSE MANDRITE 1844 rare
– a natural cave or grotto; the den or hole of a wild beast CABIN 1377 obs.
– a natural cavern, cave, or overarched space VAULT 1535
– an underground cave, chamber, or dwelling SUBTERRANE 1774 rare
– an underground cave, chamber, or dwelling SUBTERRANEAN 1797
– caves along the shore; cliff caves OGOS Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– in caving, pot-holing, & mountaineering: a karabiner (coupling device) KRAB 1963 UK sl.
 
CAVE etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– a person who lived in a solitary cave MANDRITE 1844 rare
– a person who lives under ground; a cave-dweller SUBTERRANEAN 1625
 
CAVE etc. – VERBS
– to dress and equip yourself for caving and pot-holing TROG UP 2004 UK sl.


CAVIAR – NOUNS
caviar ICARY;  IKARY 1591 obs.


CAVIL, CAVILLER, CAVILLING – ADJECTIVES
– cavilling, full of objections; apt to object or criticize without good reason; captious, quibbling CAVILLOUS 1572 obs.
– prone to making objections; ​cavilling, peevish, captious, complaining EXCEPTIOUS 1602
 
CAVIL etc. – NOUNS
– a cavilling, a cavil, a quibble; over-refinement in arguing; subtle disputation ARGUTATION 1641 obs.
– a cavilling or taking exception; an objection or cavil; fallacious or captious argument; a quibble, sophism CAPTION 1605 obs.
– a cavilling, subtle dealing, dodging; holding off, hesitation, demur HAFTING 1519 obs.
– cavil, carping speech; power of speech CARP c1325 obs. rare
 
CAVIL etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– a caviller; a contentious person ARGLE-BARGLER 1820 Sc.
– a caviller, a wrangler, a haggler, a dodger HAFTER 1519 obs.
– a person who cavils or sneers; a jester or satirist GIRDER 1584 obs. rare
 
CAVIL etc. – VERBS
– to cavil CANGLE 1825 Sc.
– to cavil or quibble; to dispute captiously or obstinately BRABBLE c1500 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– to cavil, to argue, to quarrel, to dispute, to contend; to haggle, to bandy words ARGLE-BARGLE 1727 chiefly Eng. dial. and Sc.
– to cavil, to bandy words; to dispute ARGOL-BARGOL Bk1911 Sc.
– to cavil, to carp, to sneer, to nag SNAG 1554 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– to cavil, to dispute; to argue; esp., to dispute the terms of a bargain HAGGLE 1777 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– to cavil, to make fine or cavilling distinctions; to ‘split hairs’ CUT THE HAIR 1652
– to cavil, to quarrel, to wrangle CAFFLE 1886 Eng. dial.
– to cavil, to use subtlety or deceit; to use shifts or dodges; to avoid coming to the point HAFT 1519 obs.


CAVITY – ADJECTIVES
resembling a cavity, hollow, or ‘lacuna’ LACUNOUS 1653 obs. rare

CAVITY – NOUNS
– a cavity, an empty space or spot LACUNA 1872
– a cavity, an empty space or spot LACUNE 1846


CAVORT – VERBS
to cavort; to have a good time; to have sexual intercourse MOLLOCK 1932 sl.
to cavort, to leap about CADARUP 1911 Amer. dial.
– to cavort, to romp; esp. to engage in sexual play SMOLICK;  SMOLLICK 1913 Amer.
dial.
to cavort, to waltz around; to caper, to frisk, to move in a quick light way PAVIE 1804 Sc.


CAW – NOUNS
a caw; a squawk; a screech; a quackQUAWK 1899 Eng. & Amer. dial.

CAW – VERBS
to caw KAE Bk1902 Sc.
to caw, as a crow KAAK 1605 obs.
to caw or croak; to squawk like a raven CROCIATE;  CROCITATE 1623 obs.
to caw; to screech as a bird QUARK;  QUAWK;  QUORK 1820 Eng. dial.


CAYENNE – NOUNS
cayenne pepper GARDEN-GINGER 1597


CEASE, CEASING, CESSATION  – ADJECTIVES
– ceasing, stopping, halting DEVALLING 1894 Sc.
 
CEASE etc. – INTERJECTIONS
– a warning or command to cease any improper inactivity in order to avoid detection CHEESE IT!;  CHEEZE IT! 20C Amer. sl.
– cease, stop, be quiet HAVE DONE! 1842 Eng. dial.
 
CEASE etc. – NOUNS
– a cessation; a pause; a relief LET-UP 1837 US
– cease, cessation CESS 1912 Amer. dial.
– cessation, a pause, halt DEVALL 1871 Sc.
– cessation, deduction, diminution, abatement BATE c1450 obs. exc. N. Eng. dial.
– cessation, intermission, rest LEATH c1175 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– cessation, stop DEVALLING 1891 Sc.
 
CEASE etc. – VERBS
– to cause to cease, to put an endo to; to bring to a conclusion, to complete; to terminate TERMINE c1390 obs.
– to cease an activity or to function; to become useless PACK IN 1942 sl.
– to cease an attempt, to throw up a job THROW UP THE DRUMSTICKS 1899 Eng. dial.
– to cease doing something; to abandon; to give up GIVE THE GAME AWAY 1953 Aust. sl.
– to cease for a time TURN DOWN A LEAF a1659 obs.
– to cease from an action; to stop talking PACK UP ONE’S PIPES;  POKE UP ONE’S PIPES;  PUT UP ONE’S PIPES M16 sl.
– to cease from one’s labours; to take a rest HANG UP ONE’S HATCHET a1327 obs.
– to cease from; to stop doing something QUIT OFF 1861 Amer. dial.
– to cease talking, singing, or making a noise STOP ONE’S THROPPLE 1901 Ireland
– to cease, to abate LEATH 1205 obs.
– to cease, to become less severe LET UP c1857 orig. & chiefly US
– to cease; to be lost; to perish TINE 1806 Sc.
– to cease; to be pacified TAKE REST 1889 Eng. dial.
– to cease, to come to an end BATE c1325 obs.
– to cease, to come to an end BURST a1100 obs.
– to cease, to desist, to stop NARK 1889 sl.
– to cease, to desist, to stop SIST a1676 obs.
– to cease, to desist, to stop; to cause to stop BLIN Bk1911 Sc.
– to cease, to finish; to come to an end CUT OUT 1919 Aust. & NZ
– to cease, to finish quickly BALL OFF 1846 Eng. dial.
– to cease; to get away; to lose; to miss something absent BLOW Bk1914 criminals’ sl.
– to cease, to give up, to desist QUIT 1827 Sc.
– to cease, to halt, to stop, to desist DEVALL 1823 Sc., N. Ireland, & Eng. dial.
– to cease, to put a stop to CLAP A GUY ON 1814 obs., nautical usage
– to cease, to quit CHOP Bk1914 criminals’ sl.
– to cease, to reject, to turn down ICE 1960s African-American sl.
– to cease, to slacken EASE 1583 obs.
– to cease, to stop CHATHAM AND DOVER L19 rhyming sl. for ‘give over’
– to cease, to stop PALL M19 sl.
– to cease, to stop at a certain point SUBSIST a1637 obs.
– to cease, to stop, to abandon; to quit a job; to leave something unfinished BUNCH 1927 Amer. dial.
– to cease, to stop; to stay, remain STUT B1900 obs.
– to cease; to stop work or activity LOW 1790 Sc. obs.
– to cease work; to desist from, to stop QUAT 1790 Sc.


CEASELESS – ADJECTIVES
– ceaseless, unceasing, ceaseless; constant, continual NEVER-CEASING c1602


CEDE – VERBS
– to cede; to yield up, to give up TO-YIELD c1350 obs.


CEILING – ADJECTIVES
– having a low ceiling; said of a room LOW-POSTED 1965 Amer. dial.

CEILING – NOUNS
a ceiling SILOUR 1424-5 obs.
the ceiling OVERHEAD 1986 Amer. dial.


CELEBRATE, CELEBRATING, CELEBRATION – ADJECTIVES
– out celebrating or enjoying oneself, esp. while drinking freely ON THE RAZZON THE RAZZLE L19 sl.
 
CELEBRATE etc. – NOUNS
– a celebrating in the streets in an uproarious manner, esp. during a national celebration; general street rowdyism MAFFICKING 1900s sl.
– a celebration GLORIFICATION 1843 colloq.
– a celebration JOLLYO 1970s sl.
– a celebration; a good time; a party; a party at which liquor is drunk JOLLO 1907 Aust. sl.
– a celebration, a party; a formal social ceremony or gathering BIG DOINGS 1932 Amer. dial.
– a celebration; a wild party; a spree CHIVOO;  SHIVOO 1889 Aust. colloq.
– a celebration or party, esp. a wild one DING 1956 Aust. sl.
– a celebration or party, esp. a wild one WINGDING 1949 sl., orig. & chiefly US
– a celebration or party, a riotously good time BALL 1929 US sl., esp. African-American usage
– a celebration or party; a social gathering or activity DOINGS 1892 Amer. dial.
– a celebration; blowout BUST-OUT 1959 US sl.
– a celebratory event; a gathering together of counterculturists to enjoy music and drugs FREAK-OUT 1967 US sl.
– a convivial celebration or party; a social gathering; an enjoyable time BIG TIME 1863 Amer. dial.
– a fourth anniversary, or its celebration QUADRENNIAL 1856
– an informal celebration or meeting; a festival; usually used in combinations, as talkfest FEST 1910 Amer. dial.
– a noisy celebration following a wedding TIN-PANNING c1938 Amer. dial.
– a noisy celebration or mock serenade for newlyweds CHARIVARI;  CHEVRARAI;  CHIVERIE;  SHIVAREE 1843 Amer. dial.
– a noisy celebration or mock serenade for newlyweds SKIMELTON;  SKIMMELTON 1886 Amer. dial.; SKIMMERTON 1868 Amer. dial.;  SKIMMITON 1941 Amer. dial.
– a noisy celebration or mock serenade for newlyweds; bells, shotguns, or any noise-making device was used BELLING 1862 Amer. dial.
– a noisy celebration or party WHOOP-UP 1913 sl., chiefly Amer.
– any kind of celebration or party INFARE 1893 Amer. dial.
– a small celebration before initiating some project or journey FAIR-WEATHER DRINK 1970s sl.
 
CELEBRATE etc. – VERBS
– to celebrate a victory with a delirious uproar MAFFICK 1900
– to celebrate, esp. with eating and drinking, to make merry, to hold or attend a banquet or feast JUNKET 1607 obs.
 to celebrate for the first time, esp. by drinking; to give money or a present to celebrate a new undertaking, etc. HANDSEL 1789 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– to celebrate or welcome lavishly or extravagantly KILL THE FATTED CALF 1647
– to celebrate riotously; to enjoy oneself; to have fun BALL IT UP c1953 US sl., orig. African-American usage
– to celebrate, to announce, to declare; to pronounce, to proclaim; to tell, to say, to utter DEEM a1000 obs.
– to celebrate; to have fun; to have a riotously good time BALL 1942 US sl., orig. African-American usage
– to celebrate; to party BASH Bk2006 US sl.
– to celebrate; to party RAGE 1979 colloq.
– to celebrate wildly; to enjoy oneself in a wild, boisterous manner, usually with much noise and whisky; to be drunk and boisterous RAISE HELL 1920s Amer. colloq.;  RAISE SAND 20C Amer. colloq.
– to celebrate wildly; to ‘let off steam’ LET THE BADGER LOOSE 1970s US Western sl.
– to slap hands as a form of celebration, affirmation, congratulation, etc. HIGH FIVE 1990s sl.
– to spend all of one’s money on a celebration KNOCK DOWN M19 Aust. & NZ sl.
– to stage a celebration; to enjoy oneself; to have fun HAVE A BALL 1938 sl., orig. US


CELEBRATED – ADJECTIVES
– celebrated; famous CHAUNTED E19 sl.
– celebrated, famous CRACK 1835 Amer. sl.
– celebrated, famous, glorious BREME a1000 obs.
– very or most celebrated CELEBERRIMOUS 1768 obs. rare
– widely celebrated, well-known FAR-FAMED 1624
 
CELEBRATED – NOUNS, PERSON
– a celebrated, high-ranking, or important person BIG NOISE 1906 sl., orig. US
– a celebrated, influential, important, or high-ranking person; a superior person, or one who claims to be BIG SHOT 1908 sl., orig. US;  BIG SNAG 1842 US sl.
– a celebrated, influential, or important person; a big shot BIG 1833 Amer. colloq.
– a celebrated, influential, or important person; a big shot; a superior person or one who claims to be BIG ASS 1956 US sl., derisive usage
– a celebrated or important person BIG SCREECH 1912 US sl.
– a celebrated or self-important person HIGH BICYCLE 1931 US sl.
– a celebrated person; a person in charge; the head of any organization; the boss MAIN STEM 1899 Amer. sl.
– a celebrated, prominent, famous, or important person, usually in the field of entertainment BIG NAME Bk1975 Amer. sl.
– a celebrated, wealthy, influential, or important person BIG-BUG 1817 US sl.
– a celebrated, wealthy, influential, or important person; an aristocrat BIG BUTT 1912 US sl., derisive usage
– an important or self-important person; a celebrated person BIG DEAL 1947 sl., orig. US
 
CELEBRATED – VERBS
– to make celebrated or famous FAMOSE 1590 obs.
– to make celebrated or famous FAMOUS 1590 obs.


CELEBRITY – ADJECTIVES
– used for denoting all that is associated with the greatest contemporary celebrity and fame A-LIST 1984 US sl.
 
CELEBRITY – NOUNS
– celebrity, notoriety, renown FAMOSITY 1535 obs. rare
– celebrity, renown FAMOUSNESS 1548
– celebrity, renown; ‘lustre’ of reputation; social distinction ÉCLAT 1742
– newspaper photographs of celebrities ART 20C Amer. sl.
– what happens when an entertainer ages and is no longer able to perform as well as when younger CELEBRITY ROT 1983 Amer. sl.
 
CELEBRITY – NOUNS, PERSON
– a celebrity CELEB 1916 Amer. sl.
– a celebrity, entertainer, or other person with always newsworthy name or doings PAGE-ONER Bk1975 Amer. sl.
– a celebrity, esp. a show-business notable FACE 1960s Amer. sl.
– a celebrity; a person of either sex who thrills the heart; a lover, esp. used of film stars and other entertainers THROB 1910s sl.
– a celebrity; a recognizable person; a well-known person; a famous personality; a celebrity; a show-business notable FACE 1960s Amer. & Aust. sl.
– a celebrity who is the centre of attention at all events FRAME GRABBER 20C sl.
– an attractive male celebrity HEART-THROB 1926 colloq., orig. US
– a person, typically a young woman, who engages in promiscuous sexual intercourse with film stars or other celebrities; broadly, a hanger-on among celebrities CELEBRITY-FUCKER 1969 Amer. sl.
– a vacuous female celebrity or hanger-on (Actress, Model, Whatever) AMW 1988 US sl.
– ex-wives of players at an exhibition game by celebrity filmmakers ALIMONY GALLERY 2002 Can. sl.
– really famous celebrities PAINTED IMAGES Bk1972 homosexual sl.
 
CELEBRITY – VERBS
– to accost celebrities PULL FACES L20 teen sl.


CELERY – NOUNS
celery SALAD 1901 Amer. dial. obs.
the plant celery SALARY 1866 Eng. dial.


CELESTIAL – ADJECTIVES
celestial, heavenly; pert. to heaven HEAVENISH c1374 obs.
governed by celestial influences ELEMENTAL 1527 obs.


CELIBATE – NOUNS, PERSON
a celibate man; a man who lives alone, a recluse BUCK NUN 1907 Amer. dial.
an involuntary celibate, someone unable to find a sexual partner despite their best efforts WRETCH 1980s US college sl.


CELL – NOUNS
– a cell ALEXANDER GRAHAM BELL 1980s Aust. prison rhyming sl.
– a cell DRUM 1909 UK sl.
– a cell; a place of confinement; a prison CAN Bk1914 criminals’ sl.
– a cell, as in a convent or prison CABIN 1362 obs.
– a cell or guardroom MUSH 1917 sl.
– a cell reserved for drug abusers and alcoholics JUNK TANK 1960s US police sl.
– a holding cell in a jail reserved for drunk prisoners ALKY TANK 1962 US sl.
– a holding cell in a police station or jail CAGE 1930s US criminals’ sl.
– a large cell in a police station THE TANK 1912 US sl.
– an underground prison cell; a deep, dark vault; a dungeon DUNG c1300 obs.
– a padded cell CELL 13 1896 Amer. sl.
– a padded cell PADS 1940s UK prison sl.
– a police cell COOLER 1872 sl., orig. US
– a prison cell APARTMENT 1949 US sl.
– a prison cell too small to permit the person occupying it to assume a comfortable position LITTLE EASE 1690 obs.
– a prison cell BOOB 1908 sl., orig. US
– a prison cell GAFF 1996 UK sl.
– a prison cell SLOT c1950 prison sl.
– a prison cell; a cell in a police station, etc. PETER 1890 sl., orig. Aust.
– a prison cell; a lockup; hence, a jail, prison, or stockade BOX 1834 Amer. sl.
– a prison cell; a padded cell PAD 1943 US criminals’ sl.
– a punishment or solitary confinement cell COOLER 1872 sl., orig. US
– a solitary confinement cell ICEBOX 1920s Can. & US prison sl.
– the punishment cell in a prison DUMMY 1936 NZ sl.
 
CELL – VERBS
– to live in a cell; to share a cell CELL 1901 Amer. prison sl.


CELLAR – NOUNS
– a cellar SILLER 1422 obs.
– a cellar TAVERN 1703 Eng. dial. obs.
– a cellar WARM HOUSE 1936 Amer. dial.
– a cellar door GRADE DOOR 1950 Amer. dial.
– a cellar door GRADE ENTRY 1984 Amer. dial.
– a cellar or underground passage, esp. in a tenement building DUNNY 1906 Sc.
– a cellar suitable for keeping foodstuffs CAVE 1933 Amer. dial.
– a compartment in a cellar with recesses for storing wine CATACOMB 1795
– a root cellar GREENHOUSE 1966 Amer. dial.
– a sloping outside cellar door CELLAR BANG 1971 Amer. dial.
– a sloping outside cellar door ENTRY 1968 Amer. dial.
– a storm cellar THUNDER HOLE 1916 Amer. dial.
– an indoor or outdoor entrance to a cellar CELLAR NECK 1886 Amer. dial.
– an indoor or outdoor entrance to a cellar CELLAR WAY 1761 Amer. dial.
– an outside cellar door LOUK 1968 Amer. dial.
– an outside cellar entrance with sloping doors BULKHEAD 1854 Amer. dial.
– an outside entrance to a cellar, with a sloping door CELLAR CASE 1890 Eng. dial.


CELLO – NOUNS
a cello CHEESE BOX Bk1947 Amer. sl.
a cello SAWBOX 1930s sl., orig. African-American usage


CELL PHONE – see PHONE