Reverse Dictionary: CL – CLEQ


CLAIM, CLAIMING – INTERJECTIONS/PHRASES
– a claim call NIBS! 1957 Amer. dial.
– I claim it I BONAS IT 1895 Amer. dial.
– I claim it I BONERS IT 1966 Amer. dial.
– I claim it I BONEY IT 1944 Amer. dial.
– I claim it I BONNY IT 1950 Amer. dial.
– I claim it! YAKERS ON IT! 1944 Amer. dial.
– I claim that! CHAPS ME THAT! M19 Sc. children’s usage
– that’s mine! I want to do that!; a child’s term used to claim the whole or an equal part of an object AIKIES! 1930s US sl.
– that’s mine; used as a claim or rights to something GOODS!;  GOODS ON IT! 1944 Amer. dial.
– they’re all mine; a children’s expression used to lay entire claim to something found or won ALL MINES! 1956 Amer. dial.
– used to claim part ownership DIGSIES! 1957 Amer. dial.
– used to lay claim to something TABS! 1956 Amer. dial.
– used to stake a claim KEEPS! 1956 Amer. dial.
 
CLAIM etc. – NOUNS
– a claim; ‘dibs’; rights; right of priority VENCHES 2000 Amer. dial.
– a claim; ‘dibs’; rights; right of priority VENS 1991 Amer. dial.
– a claiming; a challenging to oneself VENDICATION 1658 obs.
– a claim or right to something WACKIE(S) 1943 Amer. dial.
– a claim; rights, dibs GOOFIES 1905 Amer. dial.
– a claim; rights; right of priority DIBBIES 1968 Amer. dial.
– a claim; rights; right of priority DIBS 1930 Amer. dial.
– a claim; rights; right of priority; ‘dibs’ BEANS 1956 Amer. dial.
– a making a preposterous claim; telling a lie; exaggerating HASSAYAMPING 1901 Amer. dial.
 
CLAIM etc. – VERBS
– to claim BAG 1910s sl.
– to claim a privilege or possession BAR 1865 Eng. dial.
– to claim by right of first choice, to bespeak BARLEY 1865 Eng. dial.
– to claim for oneself VENDICATE 1531 obs.
– to claim possession of MUGS 1936 Amer. dial.
– to claim possession of something BONEY 1944 Amer. dial.
– to claim possession of something BONEY-EYE 1968 Amer. dial.
– to claim possession of something BONNY 1950 Amer. dial.
– to claim rights to something; to reserve something BAGS 1944 Aust. sl.
– to claim to do something TAKE a1500 obs.
– to lay claim to an object, partner in a game, etc., by right of first choice BALLOW Bk1898 Eng. & Amer. dial.
– to lay claim to, to latch on to FINNIE 1956 Amer. dial.
– to lay claim to; to win, to rescue BETELL c1205 obs.
– to stake a claim or reserve a right to something VINCE 1922 Amer. dial.
– to stake a claim or reserve a right to something WACKIE 1956 Amer. dial.


CLAIRVOYANCE, CLAIRVOYANT – NOUNS, PERSON
a person who follows or believes in clairvoyance, spiritualism, mysticism, etc.; a mystic; a seer YOGI-BOGEY 1901 rare, disparaging usage


CLAM – NOUNS
fried clams FANNIE DADDIES 1939 Amer. dial.
a clam or oyster SALT-WATER VEGETABLE M19 sl.

CLAM – NOUNS, PERSON
a person who digs for clams and oysters MUD DIGGER 1970 Amer. dial.
a person who drags for freshwater clams MUSSEL-MUCKER 1938

CLAM – VERBS
to open clams or oysters SHOCK 1856 Amer. dial.


CLAMBER – NOUNS
a clamber, a climb SCRAWM 1897 Eng. dial.
a clamber, a crawl SCRAUCHLE Bk1904 Sc.

CLAMBER – VERBS
to clamber about; to romp; to rush about riotously RAMMACK;  RAMMOCK;  RAMMUCK 1884 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
to clamber or climb up; said of a child KAME 1938 Sc.
to clamber, to climb SCRAWM 1790 Eng. dial.


CLAMMY – ADJECTIVES
clammy, covered with perspiration URY Bk1905 Sc.
clammy, gummy CLITCHY Bk1896 Eng. dial.
clammy, moist, damp, wet WACK 1513 Sc. obs.
clammy, sticky GARRIE 1929 Sc.
clammy, sticky, dirty, untidy DAUBY Bk1900 Eng. & Amer. dial.
clammy, sweaty; damp and sticky from perspiration; dirty, grimy PUGGY 1790 Eng. dial.
clammy, viscid LENTOUS 1646 nonce word
clammy, wet; foggy WACHIE Bk1905 Sc.


CLAMOROUS, CLAMOUR – ADJECTIVES
– clamorous, noisy CLAMOSE c1380 obs.
– clamorous, noisy CRIOUS a1382 obs.
– clamorous, noisy GLAMROUS 1488 Sc. obs.
– clamorous, noisy; characterized by great noise or outcry, esp. in opposition OBSTREPEROUS c1600;  OBSTROPOLOUS 1748
– making a clamour or outcry YAMMERING 1895
 
CLAMOROUS etc. – NOUNS
– a clamour REEMOUS Bk1904 Sc.
– a clamour, a confused noise or uproar; a disturbance; a hubbub; a fuss; noisy public talk or rumour ORATION 1828 Eng. dial.
– a clamour, a din, a hullabaloo TAIRDY 1930 Sc.
– a clamour, a fuss; a display of wonderment, surprise, or admiration MIRATION 1888 Amer. dial.
– a clamour, a fuss, to-do, outcry SANG 1739 Sc.
– a clamour, an outcry YAMMERING 1937
– a clamour, an uproar, a fuss, noisy altercation, disturbance NARRATION 1871 Sc.
– a clamour, noise; an outcry PEAL;  PEEL Bk1903 Eng. dial.
– a clamour, the confused noise caused by many people talking loudly and together; a babel of tongues; unintelligible speech YATTER 1825 Sc.
– a loud clamour or noise; a riot; confusion; a sudden report RAIRD Bk1905 Sc. obs.
– a noisy clamour of voices YABBLE 1827 Sc.
– clamour SCLAMMER 1920 Sc.
 clamour, an outcry, shouting HUTE 1292 obs. rare
– clamour, noise LUDE a1275 obs.
– clamour, outcry, shouting, roaring; the noise of voices of men or animals BERE c1205 obs.
– clamour, outcry, tumultuous noise; the mingled noise of people shouting CRY c1275 obs.
– clamour, uproar, racket, din; a loud and confused noise TINTAMARRE 1567 rare
– clamour, vociferousness; noisy behaviour; noisy and unruly resistance to control OBSTREPEROUSNESS 1655
 
CLAMOROUS etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– a clamorous, noisy, empty-headed person BAUSON;  BAWSON 1830 Eng. dial.
– a clamorous, noisy person BELYORE 1924 Sc.
– a clamorous person; one ready to give mouth; a gossiping woman; a fretful child BELL-WETHER;  BELWEATHER c1460
– a clamouring, foul-mouthed person; a vulgar abuser; a scolding impudent slut BILLINGSGATE 1683 obs.
 
CLAMOROUS etc. – VERBS
– to make a great clamour; to talk loudly and volubly, to jabber away TEAR THE TARTAN 1934 Sc.
– to make a loud clamour, noise, or outcry OBSTREPERATE 1765 obs. rare


CLANDESTINE, CLANDESTINELY – ADJECTIVES
– clandestine; secret HUGGRY-MUGGRY B1900 Sc.
– clandestine, secret, corrupt UNDER THE BED M19
– clandestine, secret, corrupt UNDER THE TABLE 1938
– clandestine; secret, hidden, underhand HIDLINGS L18 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– clandestine; secret; in hiding UNDER COVER 1928 US criminals’ sl.
– clandestine; secret; private; concealed CLANCULAR 1621 obs.
– clandestine; secret, private; underhand CLANCULARY 1563 obs.
– clandestine; secret; private; unknown; underhand CLANCULARIOUS 1656 obs.
– clandestine; secret, surreptitious UNDERHAND 1592
– clandestine; surreptitious SIDE 20C sl.
​- clandestine, surreptitious SUBREPTITIOUS 1610
 
CLANDESTINE etc. – ADVERBS
– clandestinely UNDER THE LAP 1940s Aust. sl.
– clandestinelyin an underhand or secret manner; not openly or honestly; opposed to ‘aboveboard’ UNDERBOARD 1581 obs.
– clandestinelysecretly, stealthily HIDLINS a1225 Sc.
 
CLANDESTINE etc. – NOUNS
– clandestine conduct HUGGRY-MUGGRY B1900 Sc.
– clandestine or secret operations HIDLINGS 1597 Sc. & Eng. dial.
 
CLANDESTINE etc. – VERBS
– to peep or pry in a clandestine manner TEET 1785 Sc.


CLANG, CLANGING- NOUNS
a loud clanging noise SISERARY a1770

CLANG etc. – VERBS
to clang, to ring; to emit a sharp and loud clanging or ringing sound TANG 1686


CLAP, CLAPPING – NOUNS
clapping; applause MITT POUNDING 1930s African-American sl.

CLAP, CLAPPING – VERBS
to clap BEFLAP 1388 obs.
to clap, to applaud BEAT ONE’S SKIN;  BEAT SKIN 1940s African-American sl.
to clap the hands TACK Bk1905 Eng. dial.


CLARET – NOUNS
claret LONG CORK L18 sl.
claret RED-FUSTIAN 1834 sl.
a drink composed of claret and lemonade PARLOUR FULL OF RAZORS 1930s US sl.

CLARET – NOUNS, PERSON
a person fond of claret DR. MAGNUM BONUM c1755 Sc.


CLARIFY – VERBS
to clarify one’s thoughts or thinking on a specific subject; to contribute facts or ideas to a discussion LET DAYLIGHT INTO;  LET SUNLIGHT INTO 20C Amer. sl.


CLARINET – NOUNS
a clarinet AGONY PIPE 1930s US sl.
a clarinet GOBSTICK 1914 sl.
a clarinet LICORICE STICK 1935 US jazz sl.
a clarinet LIQUORICE STICK c1945 Brit. sl.

CLARINET – NOUNS, PERSON
a person who plays the clarinet LICORICE-STICKER 1935 US jazz sl.


CLASH, CLASHING – ADJECTIVES
clashing, discordant, conflicting JARRING 1661

CLASH etc. – NOUNS
a clash, fight, or similar confrontation; an argument or quarrel RUN-IN 1894 colloq.
a clash or crash RASH c1470 Sc.

CLASH etc. – VERBS
to clash, to come into conflict JAR 1621


CLASP, CLASPED – ADJECTIVES
 fit to be clasped or embraced CLIPSOME 1816 rare
 
CLASP etc. – NOUNS
– a clasp, a hook HASPEDE a1300 obs. rare
– a clasp; a buckle, a hook, a nail; that which fastens one thing to another, or things together TACK a1300 obs.
– a clasp; a buckle, ribbon, or fastening for clothes; a pendant TASH;  TATCH 1772 Sc.
– a clasp or similar fastening KEEP 1615 obs.
– a clasp, pin, brooch, buckle DALK c1000 obs.
– a clasp; the act of clasping SCLASP Bk1904 Sc. obs.
 
CLASP etc. – VERBS
 to clasp SCLASP Bk1904 Sc. obs.
 to clasp in one’s arms, to embrace HALCH a1300 obs.
 to clasp or embrace a person FATHOM c1440 obs.
– to clasp, to embrace AMPLECT 1525 obs.
 to clasp, to embrace AMPLEX 1543 obs.
 to clasp, to embrace HASP a1300 obs.
 to clasp, to embrace, to fold in the arms BECLIP c1000 arch.
 to clasp, to embrace; to fold in the arms LAP c1350 obs.
 to clasp, to embrace; to lay hold of; to grasp; to hold; to seize FANG c1200 obs.
 to clasp, to embrace; to take hold of, to grasp, to seize, esp. with the hand or claws LATCH c1000 obs.
 to clasp, to enfold FAIK 1513 Sc. obs. rare
 to clasp, to enfold, to envelop; to environ, to surround BELAP c1200 obs.


CLASS – ADJECTIVES (also see HIGH-CLASS, LOW-CLASS) 
– of the highest class, best, excellent PUCKER 20C sl.
 
CLASS – NOUNS
– a class, set, kind of persons or things RANK 1585 obs.
– the highest social class TIP-TOP 20C colloq., chiefly Brit.
– the lowest class LAG 1607 obs.
– the upper classes THE UPPER CRUST 1843 sl.
 
CLASS – NOUNS, PERSON
– a fashionable and conventional upper-middle-class young person (usually female), esp. living in London SLOANE RANGER 1975 Brit. sl.;  SLOANIE 1982 Brit. sl.
– a member of the underclass PIKEY 20C Brit. sl., derogatory
– a person of the lowest possible social class MUDSILL 19C US Civil War usage
– a wealthy (usually married) woman from the upper-class districts, and in some senses likely to be ‘racy’ or sexual accommodating GIN AND JAGUAR BIRD 1970s sl.
 
CLASS – PHRASES
– in the highest class IN THE TOP FLIGHT 1991
 
CLASS – VERBS
– to class, to rank ORDER 1662 obs. rare


CLASSIFY – VERBS
to classify BAG 1967 Amer. sl.


CLASSY – ADJECTIVES
classy BLIP 1948 US sl.
classy, excellent; great BITCHEN-TWITCHEN 20C teen & high school sl.
classy, sophisticated SWANK 1920s sl.
classy, stylish, fashionable RITZY 1920 US sl.

CLASSY – NOUNS, PERSON
a very classy, stylish woman BARNBURNER 1930s US sl.


CLATTER, CLATTERING – NOUNS
– a clatter, a din RALLION 1790 Sc.
– a clatter, a loud, rattling noise RATTLE-CUM-BANG B1900 Eng. dial.
– a clatter, a rapping sound, as the crackling of wooden articles when disturbed, a creak NICKER 1881 Sc.
– a clattering noise RANGE Bk1905 Sc.
– a clattering noise RATTLE-TRAP B1900 Eng. dial.
– a clattering noise, as of a wheel when it requires tightening SCATTER-BASKET;  SKATTER-BASKET Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– a loud clatter RATTLE-BAGGER B1900 Eng. dial.
– a loud clatter, anything that makes a rattling noise RATTLE-BAG 1781 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– a loud clattering noise REELING Bk1904 Sc.
– a loud clattering noise; the crash of thunder or of a storm; a noisy fray BRATTLE Bk1911 Sc.
– a loud clattering sound REESHLE 1773 Sc.
– clatter, noise, confusion DING-DANG;  DING-DONG 1730 Sc. & Eng. dial.
 
CLATTER etc. – VERBS
– to clatter NECKLE 1819 Eng. dial.
– to clatter; to make a clicking sound, to creak NICKER 1931 Sc.
– to clatter; to work continuously at something which makes a slight noise; to work a person hard NATTER Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– to emit a clattering, ringing noise, as when pieces of crockery or metal fall; to crash RANGE 1865 Sc.
– to make a clattering, cracking sound REESHLE 1826 Sc.


CLAUSE – NOUNS
a clause, sentence, or the like VERSE c1000 obs.


CLAW – NOUNS
– a claw ONGLE 1484 obs.
– a claw UNCE 1609 obs.
– a claw or talon FANG 1731 obs.
– claws, talons CLENCH-HOOKS 19C Eng. dial.
– the claws of a scorpion, etc. TAKER 1608 obs.
 
CLAW – VERBS
– to claw and pound with the claws as a cat upon a carpet QUILT Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– to claw or scratch with the open hand and nails; to beat, to thrash CAPERCLAW 1589 obs.
– to claw, scratch, scrape CAPERCLAW 1589 obs.
– to claw, scratch, slap, fight with the open hand and nails; to beat with the open hand, to thrash (generally used of women) CLAPPERCLAW 1590 arch. exc. Eng. dial.
– to claw, to scratch, to rub; to scrub hard FAUCH 1923 Sc.
– to claw, to scratch, to tear with the talons TALON 1685 obs.
– to claw, to scratch, to tickle, to scrape CURRY 1598
– to claw; to scratch, to wound severely MAKE THE FUR FLY 1848 sl.
– to claw; to tear with the nails; to scratch SCLAW;  SCLOW;  SKLAW 1777 Eng. dial.


CLAY – ADJECTIVES
plastered with clay KATTED 1684 obs.

CLAY – NOUNS
clay, mire, mud LAIR a1340 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– clay, mud URE Bk1905 Sc.

CLAY – VERBS
to work in clay, etc., so as to mix it thoroughly TAMPER 1573 obs.


CLAY-SHOOTING – NOUNS, PERSON
in clayshooting: a competitor who by devious methods shoots in a lower class than his true form warrants SANDBAGGER 1983 UK sl.

CLAY-SHOOTING – VERBS
in clayshooting: to hit the target accurately KILL 1983 UK sl.


CLEAN, CLEANED, CLEANING, CLEANSE, CLEANSING – ADJECTIVES
– clean AJAX 2002 US sl.
– clean, decent, orderly FARRINKLY 1860 Eng. dial.
– clean, decent, respectable; tidy, neat MENSE 1879 Eng. dial.
– cleaned GABOOTZT 1939 Amer. dial.
– cleaned or tidied up UP-RED 1882 Sc.
– cleaner than clean NASTY NEAT 1975 US sl.
– clean, free from dirt or impurities NEAT 1542 obs.
– clean, free from filth, etc.; bright, clear NET 1967 Amer. dial.
– clean, healthy FRESH UNION 1980s US sl.
– cleaning DIGHTING 1870 Sc.
– clean only on the surface; clean by sweeping though not by washing BESOM-CLEAN Bk1898 Sc.
– cleansing; having power to cleanse MUNDATORY 1706 rare
– cleansing, purgative ABSTERSORY 1623 obs. rare
– clean, tidy, neat; in good order MENSEFUL 1703 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– clean, tidy, smart; generally used ironically TIPLEY Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– clean, unsoiled, unstained FAIR c1225 obs.
– having the quality of cleansing or scouring; tending to cleanse DETERSORY 1657 obs. rare
– made clean or pure YFAIRED 1340 obs.
– perfectly clean SPAN CLEAN Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
– very clean CLEAN AS A WHISTLE Bk1999
– very clean SPANDY-CLEAN 1838 Amer. dial.
– very clean and neat PERNICKETY 1967 Amer. dial.
– washed and rinsed so clean as to squeak SQUEAKY CLEAN 1976 sl.
– washed clean, washed away ABLUTED 1650 obs.
 
CLEAN etc. – NOUNS
– a cleaning, cleansing DIGHTING 1796 Sc.
– a cleaning, setting in order, tidying; arrangement, settlement REDD 1892 Sc. & Eng. dial.;  RED-UP Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– a cleansing SCOUR Bk1904 Sc.
– a cleansing agent DETERSORY 1657 obs. rare
– a cleansing or washing LAVEMENT 1650 rare
– a hurried or partial cleaning CAT BATH 1953 Amer. dial.; CAT CLEANING 1968 Amer. dial.
– a means or implement of cleansing MUNDATORY 1859 rare
– a spring-cleaning THOROUGH-CLEANING Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– a thorough cleansing; a rub; the act of rubbing; the sound caused by rubbing; the act of working with energy SCRINGE 1886 Sc.
– a washing clean; the washing or cleansing of one’s person ABLUTION 1748
– a weekly mass cleaning SCRUBOUT 2003 Antarctica usage
– a wiping clean; cleansing, scouring ABSTERSION 1543
– the cleaning up of a street, a ship, etc. TOILET 1885
 
CLEAN etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– a person who cleanses FAYER 1611 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
 
CLEAN etc. – VERBS
– to appear or become clean or fair FAIR a1000 obs.
– to clean MUCK UP Bk1913-17 Amer. navy sl.
– to clean NEAT 1574 obs.
– to clean a room DO OUT 1728 sl.
– to clean clothes thoroughly, esp. by boiling, so as to rid them of lice; to clean a place CRUMB UP Bk1974 Amer. sl.
– to clean from dirt, to remove dirt from DECROTT 1653 obs. nonce word
– to clean or make neat GUSSY UP 20C Amer. sl.
– to clean out, to clear out FADE-OUT Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– to clean out; to clear out dirty or disorderly places TOW-ROW 1854 Eng. dial.
– to clean out; to rinse RANGE 1836 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– to cleanse ABSTERGIFY 1612 obs. rare
– to cleanse BLAINCH Bk1911 Sc.
– to cleanse CAST CLEAN 1522 obs.
– to cleanse YCLENSE 971 obs.
– to cleanse anew; to refurbish REPLENISH 1891 Sc.
– to cleanse by wiping DIGHT 1684 Sc. & Eng. dial.
 to cleanse, to clean out, to put in order; to empty FARM Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– to cleanse, to clear or purify oneself SKIRE a1300 obs.
– to cleanse; to clear, to empty USH 1610 Sc. obs.
– to cleanse, to prepare DERSE 1828 Eng. dial.
– to clean something thoroughly SAND AND CANVAS 1912 sl., orig. naval usage
– to clean, to cleanse, to polish; to clear away filth, etc. FAY c1205;  FEIGH c1205 obs.
– to clean, to rub down SCROIL Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– to clean, to scrub, to act as a drudge SCODGY 1898 Sc.
– to clean, to smarten, to revive FRESHEN UP 1937 UK sl.
– to clean, to tidy, put in order; to sweep, to dust DIGHT 1678 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– to clean up anything faded or soiled; to give a new look to; to renovate, to revive FURBISH 1587
 to clean up; to put in order SIDE UP 1895 Amer. dial.
– to clean up, to tidy, to put in order RID 1882 Eng. dial.
– to clean up; to tidy; to set in order, to arrange; to prepare REDD 1787 Sc. & Eng. dial.;  REDD UP;  RED UP 1842 Amer. dial.
– to come in to do cleaning work in a house, shop, office, or institution CHAR(E) 1732
– to make clean and neat; to clear up; also, to dress or smarten oneself up MENSE 1859 Eng. dial.
– to make clean and neat, to put in order MENSEN UP 1889 Eng. dial.
– to make clean or good-looking; to beautify FAIR 1340 obs.
– to wipe clean; to cleanse ABSTERGE 1541;  ABSTERSE 1646 obs. rare


CLEANER – NOUNS, PERSON
a cleaner AUNTIE ENA 1992 UK rhyming sl.
a woman hired to do general cleaning; a charwoman CHAR c1875
a woman who works as a cleaner, a charwoman MRS MOP 1948 UK sl.

CLEANER – VERBS
to work as a cleaner or charwoman OBLIGE 1930s euphemism


CLEANSE – see CLEAN


CLEAR, CLEARNESS (free from darkness) – ADJECTIVES
clear, bright NEAT 1591 obs.
clear; bright NET 1481 obs.
clear; bright SCARVISH Bk1904 Eng. dial. obs.
clear; bright; full of light, shining LUCULENT c1420 rare
clear; bright, giving forth light like a torch FACULENT 1560 obs. rare
clear; bright, vivid, distinctly seen or heard, not blurred or faint; said of sights, sounds, colours, memories, etc. VEEVE;  VIEVE,  VIVE 1778 Sc.
very clear CLEAR AS VODKA Bk2006 US sl.
very clear indeed (Clear as a Frapping Bell) CFB 1980 US Air Force usage

CLEAR etc. (free from darkness) – NOUNS
clearness, brightness FACULENCE 1727-36 obs.
clearness, freedom from cloud OPENNESS 1611 obs.


CLEAR, CLEARNESS (easy to understand) – ADJECTIVES
– clear, distinct, fluent REDD 1836 Sc.
– clear, evident; easy to perceive or understand BRIGHT a1200
– clear, intelligible UNCURIOUS1601-3 obs.
– made clear, plain, or lucid DILUCIDATE 1651 obs.
– making clear, manifest, or evident DECLARATIVE a1536 obs.
– perfectly clear, esp. in sound quality CLEAR AS A BELL Bk1999
– perfectly clear or plain CLEAR AS CRYSTAL Bk1999
– very clear, self-evident STICKS OUT LIKE A DOG’S BALLS Bk1999 Aust. sl.
 
CLEAR etc. (easy to understand) – NOUNS
– clearness; lucidness; plainness DILUCIDITY 1603 obs.
 
CLEAR etc. (easy to understand) – VERBS
– to make clear, plain, or evident; to free from obscurity; to elucidate, to explain DILUCIDATE 1538 obs.
– to make clear, to elucidate; to shed light upon ILLUCIDATE a1545 rare
– to make clear, to explain ELIQUIDATE 1596 obs. rare
– to make clear; to teach, to demonstrate, to impart information COMMONSTRATE 1623 obs.
– to make something clear; to inform, to pass on information LAY IT OUT 1930s sl.


CLEARANCE – NOUNS
a clearance, the removal of an obstruction or annoyance; separation REDD Bk1904 Sc. & Eng. dial.

CLEARANCE – VERBS
to make a swift clearance of anything, as food at the table HAG RICE 1871 Eng. dial.


CLEAR AWAY – VERBS
to clear away; to put aside; to remove SIDE 1848
to clear or put away MAKE A SIDATION Bk1905 Eng. dial.


CLEARING UP, CLEAR UP – NOUNS
a clearing up or revelation of what is obscure or unknown; an explanation ÉCLAIRCISSEMENT 1673

CLEARING UP etc. – VERBS
to clear up ECLAIRCISE 1754 obs. rare
to clear up, to sort; to disentangle, to unravel REDD 1641 Sc. & Eng. dial.


CLEARLY – ADVERBS
clearly, completely, thoroughly FAIRLINGS Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– clearly, manifestly, evidently BY THE CLOCK c1920 Amer. sl.
clearly, obviously; so as to be felt, plainly seen, observed, etc. PALPABLY 1584
clearly, plainly FAIR AND CLEAR 1860 Eng. dial.
clearly, plainly, easily, distinctly; frankly, downright FAIR 1393 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
clearly, splendidly, brilliantly; loudly, fiercely BREME a1000 obs.
clearly, vividly VEEVILY 1866 Sc.
clearly, vividly; to the life VIVELY 1631 Sc.


CLEAVE – VERBS
to cleave TO-SLIVE c1050 obs.
to cleave asunder; to split open; to divide or separate into two parts TO-CLEAVE c888 obs.
to cleave or split ACLEAVE 1460 obs. rare
to cleave; to cut, to chop, to hack YARK;  YERK 1827 Sc.
to cleave, to split open; to rive or tear asunder TO-RIVE c1300 obs.


CLEMATIS – NOUNS
clematis LADY’S BOWER 1597


CLEMENCY – NOUNS
– clemency, pity, mercy, grace, favour ORE a1000 obs.


CLENCH – VERBS
to clench the fists; to make a feint of striking QUAVER 1865 Eng. dial.