Reverse Dictionary: COM – COMM


COMA – NOUNS
– a coma, a faint IRISH PASTURE 1931 US sl.


COMB – NOUNS
– a comb BUG RAKE 1983 UK juvenile sl.
– a comb GARDEN GNOME 1992 UK rhyming sl.
– a comb IDEAL HOME 1950s rhyming sl.
– a comb LOUSE-TRAP 1699 sl.
– a comb RACK M19 Irish sl.
– a comb RAKE M19 sl.
– a comb RAKER M19 sl.
– a comb READY-COMB 1790 Eng. dial.
– a comb READYING-COMB 1790 Eng. dial.
– a comb designed specifically for use on an Afro type of hairstyle RACK PICK 1960s African-American sl.
– a comb for ordering the hair REDDYING COMB 1887 Amer. dial.
– a comb for ordering the hair RIDDING COMB 1870 Sc. & Eng. Amer. dial.
 a comb for the hair REEVING-TOOTH COMB Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– a comb for the hair RID-COMB Bk1904 Sc.
– a comb for the hair THEAK-LEISHER 1879 Eng. dial.
– a combing of the hair KAME 1920 Sc.
– a combing the hair REDDING 1878 Amer. dial.
– a fine-toothed comb FINING COMB 1936 Amer. dial.
– a fine-toothed comb NAB-NANNY-TRAP Bk1903 Eng. dial.
 a gap-toothed comb used for an Afro hairstyle AFRO PICK 1986 US sl.
– a large-toothed comb DASHER Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– a large-toothed comb RED-COMB Bk1904 Sc.
– a large-toothed comb REDDING-COMB 1812 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– a long-pronged comb CAKE-CUTTER 1980s sl.
– a small tooth comb IRISH-RIFLE Bk1896 sl.
– a small-tooth comb TOOTH-COMB 1893
– a wide-toothed comb LASH-COMB 1869 Eng. dial.
 
COMB – VERBS
– to comb RAKE 1910s Irish sl.
 to comb READY 1790 Eng. dial.
– to comb one’s hair; to groom oneself RED UP 1931 Amer. dial.
– to comb one’s hair; to groom oneself REDD OUT 1895 Amer. dial.
– to comb out the hair REEVE Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– to comb the hair LASH 1863 Eng. dial.
– to comb the hair REDD 1721 Sc. & Eng. & Amer. dial.
– to comb the hair RID 1783 Eng. dial.
– to disentangle and smooth hair by drawing a comb through it KEMB c1400 obs. exc. Eng. dial.


COMBAT, COMBATANT – ADJECTIVES
– allergic to combat A.T.C. 1944 US military sl.
– combatant, warlike, fighting; engaged in battle; prepared for battle BATTAILANT 1591 obs.
– engaged in combat, under fire ASS-IN-THE-GRASS 1973 US military sl.
 
COMBAT etc. – NOUNS
 a combat, a competition; a strenuous struggle AGONISM 1688
– a combat, encounter, or contest; a debate, a public dispute, a discussion; often applied in the 17th & 18th centuries to a duel TILT 1567
– a combat in which one’s own side wins without any difficulty, killing and destroying on a large scale TURKEY SHOOT 1940s US sl.
– a combat mission in which the object is to capture enemy troops for interrogation SNATCH PATROL 1977 US sl.
– combat THE ELEPHANT 19C US Civil War usage
 combat, battle ACOUNTERING a1400 obs.
– combat, encounter OPPOSITION 1596 obs.
– combat, fight, battle; contention or contest for the mastery BARGAIN 1375 obs. exc. Sc.
– combat, fight, battle, war; martial contest CAMP c1000 obs.
 
COMBAT etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– a combatantone who does battle BATTAILANT 1620 obs.
– a combatantone who fights in single combat as a trial of strength or bravery, or to decide a judicial question CAMPION c1320 obs.
 
COMBAT etc. – VERBS
– to combat, to contend with; to strike or thrust at with a weapon TILT 1588
– to combat, to withstand, to resist; to stand in the way of, to obstruct OPPONE 1610 obs.
– to meet in combat, to fight with MATCH a1400-50 obs.


COMBINATION, COMBINE, COMBINING – NOUNS
a combination, a mixture SILLABUB 1859
the act of combining together ACCOMBINATION B1900 rare

COMBINATION etc. – VERBS
to combine harmoniously UNANIMY 1602 obs.


COMBUSTIBLE – ADJECTIVES
combustible; characterized by the faculty or power of burning; able to be burnt USTORIOUS 1724 obs.


COME, COMING – NOUNS
a coming; arrival VENUE a1400 obs.
coming, advent TO-COMING a1300 obs.
coming, arrival, advent TOCOME c897 obs.

COME etc. – VERBS
to come TILL 1777 Eng. dial. obs.
to come, to arrive LEND a1100 obs.


COMEDIAN, COMEDY – NOUNS (also see COMIC)
– a comedian’s routine; an act SCHTICK;  SHTICK;  SHTIK 1948 colloq.
– a low physical comedy; slapstick; vulgarity JASBO;  JAZZBO 1917 Amer. Vaudeville sl.
– comic writing for the theatre; comedy or comic drama  SOCK 1809
– the realm of comedy; humour YUKDOM 1990s sl.
 
COMEDIAN etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– a comedian GAG-MAN 1928
– a comedian GAG-WRITER 1959
– a comedian LAFFMEISTER 2002 UK sl.
– a comedian YUCK-HUCKSTER 1995 US sl.
– a comedian YUK-HUSTLER 1967 US sl.
– a comedian YUKMEISTER 1990s sl.
– a comedian YUKSTER 1980s sl.
– a comedian, a joker; an amusing, exciting, eccentric and/or resolute person; a ‘character’; HARD DOER 1894 Aust. & NZ
– a comedian; a person who plays pranks, or one who likes to joke around FUNSTER 1788 colloq.
– a comedian or gag-writer GAGSTER 1935 colloq.
– a comedian pure and simple LIGHT-COMEDY MERCHANT 1887 Brit. theatre sl.
– an Irish comedian HARP Bk1962 Amer. Vaudeville usage
– a radio comedian HARRIS FROM PARIS Bk1945 jive usage
– a stage comedian having a specified position within a team or act BANANA 1948 colloq., chiefly Amer.
– a stooge (comedian’s assistant) MOULIN ROUGE 1980 UK theatrical rhyming sl.
– the leading comedian in vaudeville, burlesque, etc. TOP BANANA 1953 theatre sl., chiefly US


COME IN – VERBS
to come in, to enter INCOME 1743 Sc.


COMELINESS, COMELY – ADJECTIVES
– comely and plump; round like a ball TISTY-TOSTY 1888 Eng. dial.
– comely, beautiful DECOIR;  DECORE 1500-20 Sc. obs.
– comely, beautiful FEATURED 1567 obs.
– comely, beautiful, graceful, or fine in any way; morally excellent PULCHRITUDINOUS 1912 US
– comely, fair-faced, pretty, handsome, good-looking; in frequent use in the 16th and early 17th century, usually with some disparaging suggestion SNOUT-FAIR 1530 obs.
– comely, good-looking GAINLY a1300 obs. exc. Sc. & Eng. dial.
– comely, good-looking; decent, clean, orderly FARRINKLY 1860 Eng. dial.
– comely, good-looking; neatly dressed; said chiefly of females GAINLY-LOOKING Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– comely, goodly, fair, handsome; elegant, fine TALL c1450 obs.
– comely, handsome DECENT 1600 obs.
– comely, handsome, comely, graceful; pleasant AVENANT 1340 obs.
– comely, handsome, good-looking FARRANDLY 1790 Eng. dial.; FARRANTLY 1674 N. Eng. dial.
– comely, handsome, pleasing to the eye VIEWSOME Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– comely, handsome; rather ‘braw’ BRAWSOME Bk1911 Sc.
– comely in appearance; handsome, beautiful; elegant, graceful VENUST 1513 obs.
– comely, in good condition TIDY 1776 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– comely, pleasant to look at EYEABLE 1889 Amer. dial. arch.
– comely, pleasing, agreeable, beautiful FAVOURABLE 1398 obs.
– comely, pleasing to the sight; expressing homely beauty BONNY L15 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– comely, seemly, agreeable to the eyes or perception; good, worthy; very satisfactory CANNY 1802 Sc.
– comely, seemly, good-looking MACKLY 1721 Eng. dial.
– comely, sightly, good to look at, handsome VIEWLY 1868 Eng. dial.
– comely, sightly, good to look at, handsome VIEWLYSOME 1868 Eng. dial.
– comely, well-favoured, handsome FARRAND;  FARRANT a1300 Sc. & N. Eng. obs.
– most comely, best-looking BEST-LIKE 1889 Sc. & Eng. dial.
 
COMELINESS etc. – NOUNS
– comeliness; beauty; attractiveness; an attraction, charm FAVOUR c1300 obs. exc. arch.
– comeliness, beauty, ornament DECOR 1656 obs.
– comeliness; elegant form, shapeliness MAKEDOM c1470 Sc. obs.
– comeliness; good form or shape FEATURE 1594 obs.
– comeliness; grace; beauty arising from fitness, or from absence of the incongruous DECORUM 1613 obs.
 
COMELINESS etc. – NOUNS,  PERSON
– a comely person of a lively disposition BRINKIE 19C Sc.


COMET – ADJECTIVES
having a trail or tail; said of a comet, meteor, etc. BEARDED c1380

COMET – NOUNS
a comet BESOM 1566
a comet FIERY BESOM 1566
a comet THUNDER-PLANET 1897 Eng. dial.
a comet, from the resemblance of its tail to hair FAXED STAR a1259 obs.
a stream of dust emitted by some comets, appearing on the opposite side to the tail BEARD 1563
the tail of a comet HAIR 1594
the train or tail of a comet when it appeared to precede the nucleus BEARD 1647 obs.


COMFORT, COMFORTED, COMFORTING – ADJECTIVES
– affording or giving comfort, solace, or amusement SOLACIOUS 1375 obs.
– comforted YCONFORTID a1422 obs.
– comforted, cheered EMMOISED c1400 obs. rare
 comforting, cheering; that is intended to cheer someone up CHEER-UP 1846
– having an appearance of comfort and well-being BIEN-LIKE 1808 Sc.
– in comfort IN CLOVER;  ON CLOVER L18 Aust. sl.
 
COMFORT etc. – NOUNS
– a comfort; that which cheers the heart HEART-HEEZING 1892 Sc.
– a notional place of great comfort and ease EASY HALL 1980 Barbados sl.
– anything tending to interfere with domestic comfort or peace, as a scolding wife, a smoking chimney, etc.; domestic trouble or discomfort JOBLIJOCK Bk1868 Eng. dial.
– a state of comfort and wealth FAT CITY Bk2006 US sl.
– comfort, consolation, relief, convenience; furtherance, assistance; formerly also, gratification, enjoyment EASEMENT c1400 obs.
– comfort, ease MAKANDE a1400 obs.
– comfort, health, welfare HALE 1795 Sc.
– comfort, leisure, relief from anxiety, pain, etc. EASEDOM 1832 Sc.
– comfort, prosperity, the condition of being well-to-do BIENNESS 1818 Sc.
– comfort, solace MINTIE 1930s Aust. sl.
– comfort, well-to-do condition BEINNESS 1874 Sc.
– something that gives comfort and security SUGAR TIT 1892 Amer. sl.
– something used to comfort someone CRYING TOWEL Bk2006 US sl.
– the comforting of someone who is having a bad experience, usually through injudicious use of drugs, esp. a hallucinogen TALK-DOWN 1892 Amer. sl.
 
COMFORT etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– a person who comforts or consoles with mere words LIP-COMFORTER a1815
– a person who comforts someone CRYING TOWEL Bk2006 US sl.
 
COMFORT etc. – PHRASES
– a jocular expression of comfort or encouragement to a small boy YOU’LL BE A MAN BEFORE YOUR MOTHER 1863
– something that detracts from one’s comfort or pleasure A WHIP AND A BELL 1644 obs.
 
COMFORT etc. – VERBS
– to comfort, ease, alleviate, assuage ALLEVATE 1613 obs. rare
– to comfort a person who is having a bad experience, usually after taking drugs, esp. LSD TALK SOMEONE 1960s drug culture sl. DOWN 


COMFORTABLE, COMFORTABLY – ADJECTIVES
– comfortable COMFY E19 colloq.
– comfortable EATHFUL Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– comfortable WAFFY 2003 US sl.
– comfortable; at ease CUSHY 1915 sl.
– comfortable, at ease, free from pain EATH;  EITH c1205 obs.
– comfortable, at ease with OK;  OK ABOUT;  OKAY;  OKAY ABOUT;  OKAY WITH;  OKEY ABOUT;  OKEY WITH;  OK WITH 1978 US sl.
– comfortable, comfortably furnished BEIN 1533 Sc.
– comfortable, easy CUSHIONY 1908
– comfortable, pleasant; esp. used of accommodation CUSHY 1915 colloq.
– comfortable, quiet, easy, snug, pleasant, cosy CANNY a1758 Sc.
– comfortable, snug, cosy BIEN 1725 Sc.
– comfortable, snug, cosy SNOD 1695 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– comfortable, snug; neat, symmetrical COBBY 19C Eng. dial.
– comfortable, snug, well-off: applied to living POVIE 1841 Sc.
– comfortable, soothing; that gives comfort, ease, or relief; quiet, peaceful, restful EASEFUL 1375
– extremely comfortable COMFORTABLE AS PIGS IN SHIT L19 colloq.
– extremely comfortable SNUG AS A BUG IN A RUG M18 sl.
– extremely comfortable SNUG AS A PIG IN PEASE-STRAW M17 sl.
– extremely comfortable SNUG AS OLD PAMP L19 sl.
– living a comfortable, secure life ON EASY STREET L19 sl.
– more comfortable BINNER Bk1911 Sc.
– thoroughly comfortable and at home AT EASE IN ONE’S INN 1885
– very comfortable COMFORTABLE AS A BEE ON A RASHER OF WATERMELON 1890 Amer. dial.
 
COMFORTABLE etc. – ADVERBS
– comfortably BINGLY Bk1911 Sc.
– comfortably FAT 1900s sl.
– comfortably, easily, happily BIENLY 1788 Sc.
– comfortably; gently, softly CANNILY 1636 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– comfortably, idly EASEFULLY 1611
– comfortably, pleasantly, cosily BEENLIE;  BEINLY c1450 Sc.
 
COMFORTABLE etc. – NOUNS
– a comfortable or easy position; a delightful resting-place BED OF FLOWERS 1777
– a comfortable or easy position; a delightful resting-place BED OF ROSES 1806
– a comfortable or easy position; a delightful resting-place BED OF DOWN 1604
– a comfortable, snug, or cosy room, house, etc., esp. a room of small size into which a person retires for seclusion or quiet SNUGGERY 1815
– anything that appears to be relatively comfortable and undemanding COUNTRY CLUB 1973 US sl.
 
COMFORTABLE etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– a comfortable, privileged or contented person, esp. one who conspicuously enjoys wealth, food, etc. PIG IN CLOVER 1795
 
COMFORTABLE etc. – VERBS
– to be comfortable, safe, fortunate; hence, to be winning BE LAUGHING World War I Brit. usage, colloq.
– to live a comfortable, secure, and well-off life LIVE HIGH OFF THE HOG’  LIVE HIGH ON THE HOG 1940s sl., orig. US
– to make comfortable or snug SNUGIFY 1796


COMFORTER – NOUNS
a comforter, a heavy quilt; a wadded covering for a bed HAP 1907 Amer. dial.
a thin comforter or quilt, often stuffed with feathers HEN-SKIN 1902 Amer. dial.


COMFORTLESS – ADJECTIVES
comfortless, cheerless GABBERNY Bk1900 Eng. dial.
comfortless, deep, dark, gloomy; resembling a dungeon DUNGEONOUS 1908


COMIC, COMICAL – ADJECTIVES (also see COMEDIAN)
– comical, causing amusement QUIZZY 1797
– comical, humorous DROLLERICAL 1656 nonce word
– comical, quizzical, causing amusement QUIZZISH 1792 obs.
– comical, strange, odd, mysterious, peculiar ONDALI a1838 Sc. obs.
– comical, strange, odd, mysterious, peculiar OONLY a1838 Sc. obs.
– crudely comic; coarse or earthy RORTY 1882 sl.
– funny in the sense of comical or amusing FUNNY-HA-HA 1916
– ridiculously comical QUEER AS DICK’S HATBAND 1856 Eng. dial.
 
COMIC etc. – NOUNS
– a comical action, remark, etc.; a joke, a witticism FUNNIMENT 1826
– a comical action, remark, etc.; a joke, a witticism FUNNIOSITY 1871 colloq.
 
COMIC etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– a comic; a jolly sort; a lively, entertaining person TEAR 1935 Sc.
 a comical or eccentric person ARCH-DUKE E18 sl.
– a comical or joking fellow; hence, a smart alec GUY c1862 Amer. sl.
– a comical person; one quick at making jokes MERRIMENT Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– a comic who does obvious jokes on trite themes HACK Bk1997 standup comedians’ usage
– a person who acts comically; a mimic; a mischievous person; a rascal, a scamp MONKEY 1589


COMING – see COME


COMMA – VERBS
to sprinkle with commas BECOMMA 1881


COMMAND, COMMANDED, COMMANDER, COMMANDING – ADJECTIVES
– commanded, ordered BIDDEN 1614
– commanded, ruled IMPERATE c1470 obs.
– commanding fifty men QUINQUAGENARIAN 1600 obs. rare
– commanding, ruling IMPERANT 1617 obs.
– expressing a command or order JUSSIVE 1846
– of commanding aspect MANTLING 1875 Eng. dial.
– pert. to absolute command IMPERATORIAL 1690 obs.
– pert. to command JUSSORY 1613 obs. rare
– pert. to command MANDATIVE 1651
– pert. to or befitting a commander or emperor; imperial IMPERATORIAL 1660;  IMPERATORIAN 1640 obs.;  IMPERATORIOUS 1625 obs.;  IMPERATORY 1616 obs.
 
COMMAND etc. – ADVERBS
– as a commander or general IMPERATORIOUSLY 1620 obs.
– of a command or prohibition: strictly FAST c1310 obs.
 
COMMAND etc. – NOUNS
– a command, an order IMPERE 1548 Sc. obs. rare
– a command, an order; that which is commanded; also, a commanding, command, rule MANDMENT 1297 obs.
– a command; an ordinance ARDENE Bk1852 obs.
– a commanding IMPERATION 1786-9 rare
– command; absolute power; supreme or imperial power IMPERIUM 1651
– command, bidding BEHESTING 1583 obs. rare
– command, control WALD 1908 Sc.
– command, control, command; possession I-WALD a1000 obs.
– command, direction MAGISTRATION 1490 obs. rare
– command, dominion, sovereignty; imperial or supreme rule or authority IMPERY a1300 obs.
– command, edict EDICTION c1470 obs.
– commanding quality, commandingness IMPERANCE 1595 obs.
– commanding quality; authoritativeness IMPERATIVENESS 1840
– command, injunction, MANDAMENT 1834 obs. rare
– command, order I-BOD c888 obs.
– commands, commissions DEMANDS B1900 Ireland
 
COMMAND etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– a commander; a general; a leader MARSHAL a1300 obs.
– a commander, a leader; a ruler GENERAL 1582
– a commander, a leader; a ruler; a person to whom others are subordinate; a principal person HEAD c897
– a commander, a ruler; one having direction or control over the action of others; a leader; a chief; a governor MASTER c1000 obs.
– a commander, head, or chief of a division of ten DEAN 1388 obs.
– a commander of leader of ten DOYEN 1422 obs.
– a commander of ten in ancient Greece DECADARCH 1794
– a commander of ten soldiers DECENER 1555 obs.
– a commander or captain of ten men DECURION 1382
– a commander or leader chosen by mutineers ELECTO 1609 obs.
– a commander or ruler; absolute ruler; an emperor IMPERATOR 1588
– a person who commands or orders BIDDER 1340
– a title for the commander of 900 men A1 c1866 obs.
– the commander of a fleet’ an admiral (Greek Antiq.) NAVARCH 1828-32 rare
– the commander of a fortress WARDEN 1297 obs.
– the commander of a unit OLD MAN 19C US Civil War usage
 
COMMAND etc. – VERBS
 to be in command of someone or something: to rule or reign over a people or place; to govern AWELD c1175 obs.
– to command BOD Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– to command MAND 1483 obs.
– to command MANDATE 1623 obs. rare
– to command MANDY Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– to command an army, etc.; to govern or rule a country; to administer or manage affairs or an office GUY c1330 obs.
– to command, to bid BIBEDE c1000 obs.
– to command, to order, to bid a person to do something, or that a thing be done ORDAIN 1375 obs. or arch.
– to command, to proclaim, to offer I-BEDE a800 obs.
 to command, to rule, to govern IMPERATE 1599 obs.
– to do as commanded; to obey, to comply MORIGERATE 1623 obs.
– to place in command or office; to appoint or set up authoritatively IMPOSE 1617 rare or obs.


COMMENCE, COMMENCEMENT, COMMENCING – ADJECTIVES
– commencing; beginning; in an initial stage INCIPIENT 1662
– commencing; beginning, incipient INCEPTIVE 1662
 
COMMENCE etc. – NOUNS
– a commencement, start, beginning, outset OFF-START 1889 Eng. & Amer. dial.
 a commencement, start, outset OFF-GANG 1881 Eng. dial.
– a commencement, start, outset OFF-GOING 1885 Sc.
– a commencement, start, outset OFF-SET 1892 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– commencement, beginning IMPRIMING c1633
– commencement, beginning; origination; initial or early stage INCHOATION 1530 
– commencement, beginning; the act of making a start GO-OFF 1830 colloq.
– commencement, start, beginning, outset OFF-GO 1886 Sc.
– commencement, the beginning HEFT-END 1891 Sc.
– the commencement, approach, advent, or beginning, of a thing, esp. of one that requires great exertion; an onset; development, progress ONCOME 1823 Sc.
 the very commencement, the beginning of a thing FIRST END Bk1875 Eng. dial. 
 
COMMENCE etc. – VERBS
– to commence an action WADE IN;  WADE INTO M19 sl.
– to commence, to begin BECOMSE c1350 obs. rare
– to commence, to begin BEGIN TO COMMENCE Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– to commence, to begin COMSE a1225 obs.
– to commence, to begin CUT LOOSE Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– to commence, to begin DIG IN Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– to commence, to begin DIVE IN Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– to commence, to begin FALL ON THE BALL Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– to commence, to begin FALL TO Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– to commence, to begin FIRE AWAY Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– to commence, to begin GET GOING Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– to commence, to begin GIVE THE COMMENCE Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– to commence, to begin HEAD INTO Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– to commence, to begin HIT IT Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– to commence, to begin HIT THE BALL Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– to commence, to begin HITCH UP Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– to commence, to begin JUMP OFF Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– to commence, to begin KICK OFF Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– to commence, to begin MAKE A MOVE Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– to commence, to begin OFF-START Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– to commence, to begin PITCH IN Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– to commence, to begin PUSH OFF Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– to commence, to begin RING (IN) Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– to commence, to begin SHAKE THE LEAD OUT Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– to commence, to begin SHOOT AHEAD Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– to commence, to begin SHOOT IT Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– to commence, to begin SQUARE OFF Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– to commence, to begin START GOING Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– to commence, to begin START THE BALL ROLLING Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– to commence, to begin TACKLE Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– to commence, to begin TAKE AND DO Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– to commence, to begin TAKE OFF Bk1942 Amer. sl.
 to commence, to begin TAKE ON c1200 obs.
– to commence, to begin TUNE IN Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– to commence, to begin TURN ON THE STEAM Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– to commence, to begin TURN TO Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– to commence, to begin UNBELT Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– to commence, to begin UNVEIL Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– to commence, to begin WHIRL IN;  WHIRL TO Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– to commence, to begin an action; to begin to utter or raise laughter, lamentation, etc. TAKE UP c1400 obs.
– to commence, to begin, to initiate, to enter upon IMPRIME 1637 obs.
– to commence, to begin, to start STEVE HART Bk1942 Amer. rhyming sl.
– to commence, to begin, to start TAKE BEGINNING a1300 obs.
– to commence, to begin, to start suddenly PITCH OUT 1909 Amer. dial.
– to commence, to begin; to be the first to act; to start things going OPEN THE BALL 1812 sl.
– to commence, to begin upon BEFONG c1200 obs.
– to commence, to start happening BUST LOOSE 1920s US sl.


COMMEND, COMMENDABLE, COMMENDATION, COMMENDING – ADJECTIVES
 commendable, praiseworthy ALLAUDABLE 1731 obs.
– commendable, praiseworthy, admirable, desirable; also, permissible LOWABLE a1400 obs.
 commending, applauding, laudatory, praising, extolling PLAUDITORY a1845
 publicly or elaborately expressing commendation or praise; eulogistic, laudatory PANEGYRIC a1631
 publicly or elaborately expressing commendation or praise; eulogistic, laudatory PANEGYRICAL 1592-3

COMMEND etc. – INTERJECTIONS/PHRASES
 an exclamation of commendation NOW YOU’RE LOGGING 1930 Amer. dial.
 an exclamation of commendation OH BRAVE! Bk1905 Eng. dial.
 expresses enthusiastic commendation FAR OUT! 1954 sl.

COMMEND etc. – NOUNS
 a commendation ATTABOY 1975 US military & police sl.
 a commendation or compliment RAP;  RAP-UP;  WRAP;  WRAP-UP 1939 Aust. sl.
– an exaggerated commendation of a book, an actor’s performance, etc. PUFF 1602
 commendation, praise, flattery ROOSE a1300 obs. exc. Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
 something thing considered to be commendable or highly pleasing A FAIR TREAT 1884

COMMEND etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
 a person considered to be highly commendable or pleasing A FAIR TREAT 1884
 a person who commends or praises, a well-wisher BENEDICTOR a1633 obs.
 a praiser of something; a boastful assertor, extoller, or commender VAUNTER 1553 arch.

COMMEND etc. – VERBS
 to commend or praise lavishly BRAG UP 1885 Amer. dial.
 to commend or praise loudly BETRUMPET 1828 rare
 to commend or praise to another; to vaunt VALUE 1670 obs.
 to commend, to praise greatly BEPUFF 1843
 to commend, to praise, to extol, to flatter ROOSE a1300 obs. exc. Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
 to commend, urge, or the like, in the manner of a ‘barker’ BALLYHOO 1927


COMMENT – ADJECTIVES
– that makes a comment or gloss upon a book or text GLOSSEMATICAL 1656 obs.
– worthy of comment PASSREMARKABLE 1980s Irish sl.
 
COMMENT – NOUNS
– a comment PARAPHRASE 1642 obs.
– a comment, a gloss GLOSSEM 1608 obs. rare
– a comment, a remark, an observation, scientific or otherwise OBSERVE 1700 Sc.
– any form of comment POP-OFF 1930s US sl.
 
COMMENT – NOUNS, PERSON
– a commentator; a writer of glosses GLOSSATOR c1380
– a writer of commentaries or glosses GLOSSARIAN 1887
– a writer of commentaries or glosses GLOSSARIST 1778
– a writer of commentaries or glosses GLOSSOGRAPHER 1607
 
COMMENT – VERBS
– to comment on, to enlarge upon a subject PARAPHRASE 1644-5 obs.
– to comment; to interpret GLOSE;  GLOZE c1380
– to comment upon, to notice ANIMADVERSE 1642 obs. rare
– to write commentary or glosses upon GLOSSATE 1884


COMMENTATOR – NOUNS, PERSON
a commentator or spokesperson WAG Bk1994 US political news sl.
an aggressive or loud broadcast commentator BARKING HEAD 1988 Amer. political sl.
a radio commentator GABBER 1948 Amer. broadcasting sl.
a senior commentator, civil servant, or politician MANDARIN 1910s sl.


COMMERCIAL – NOUNS
the production or airing of television commercials SPOT TV 20C sl.

COMMERCIAL – NOUNS, PERSON
a person who coaches children to perform in commercials BABY WRANGLER Bk1993 advertising and TV usage


COMMERCIAL TRAVELLER – NOUNS, PERSON
a commercial traveller AMBASSADOR OF COMMERCE B1890 UK sl.
a commercial traveller GENTLEMAN OF THE ROAD Bk1903 sl.
a commercial traveller KNIGHT OF THE ROAD Bk1903 sl.
a commercial traveller RIDE Bk1904 Eng. dial.
a commercial traveller RIDE-OUT 1784 Eng. dial.
a commercial traveller RIDER 1810 sl.
a commercial traveller RIDER-OUT 1885 Eng. dial.
a commercial traveller ROAD-AGENT Bk1903 sl.
a commercial traveller SAMPLE-COUNT L19 colloq.
a commercial traveller whose business it is to show samples and solicit orders on behalf of manufacturers, etc. BAGMAN 1788 UK sl.;  BAGSTER 1793 UK sl.
a commercial traveller who used to carry his samples with him on horseback, in a pair of saddle-bags BAGS Bk1898 Eng. dial. obs.
a female commercial traveller; a woman who carries goods for sale in a bag BAG WOMAN 1845 rare
a member of a Christian organization of American commercial travellers, founded in 1899 GIDEON 1906 US
a vulgar, loud-talking commercial traveller BINKSER;  BINXER 1897 sl.
the commercial traveller of former days who travelled on horseback, with his samples, etc., in a pair of saddle bags BAGGS Bk1877 Eng. dial.


COMMISERATE, COMMISERATED, COMMISERATION – ADJECTIVES
commiserated, pitied MISERATED Bk1903 Eng. dial.

COMMISERATE etc. – INTERJECTIONS
used for expressing commiseration with another person’s troubles SAD DAY! 1989 US sl.

COMMISERATE etc. – VERBS
to commiserate; to weep or lament with, or in sympathy with others; to commiserate COLLACHRYMATE 1593 obs. rare


COMMISSION – NOUNS
a buying or selling goods on commission FACTORAGE 1670
a commission, a profit YANK-DOWN L19 sl.
a commission, esp. on some form of illegal deal RAKE;  RAKE-IN L19 sl., orig. US
a commission of any sort COMMISH 19C US Civil War usage
a commission on a more or less shady deal KICKBACK 1930 US sl.
commission on items sold PUSH MONEY 1939 US sl.

COMMISSION – NOUNS, PERSON
a seller on commission BUNCER c1860 sl.


COMMISSIONER – ADJECTIVES
resident in the capacity of commissioner, ambassador, or agent LEDGER 1560 obs. exc. arch.

COMMISSIONER – NOUNS, PERSON
a commissioner; a representative; an agent LEDGER 1603 obs.


COMMIT etc. – ADVERBS
in a committed, important manner BIG CASINO 1990s US sl.

COMMIT etc. – NOUNS
steadfast commitment to a person or thing; loyalty, allegiance; fidelity, devotion ADHESION a1500

COMMIT etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
a person who backs out of a commitment QUEEN WEEN 1990s US college sl.

COMMIT etc. – VERBS
to be totally committed, to be utterly earnest MEAN BUSINESS 1857 sl.
to commit oneself TOUCH ONE’S PIN 1967 Amer. dial.
to commit oneself wholeheartedly, esp. to a fight WADE IN;  WADE INTO M19 sl.
– to commit; to entrust; to hand over as a trust; to give in charge to BETEACH c1000 obs.
– to commit; to entrust; to hand over to the care of; to give in charge to BETAKE 1297 obs.
to do something with maximum commitment TAKE IT TO THE HOOP 1980s African-American sl.
to shift or avoid commitment or responsibility JUMP THE BUCK 1965 Amer. dial.
to shift or avoid commitment or responsibility PASS THE BUCK 1912 colloq., orig. US
to shift or avoid commitment or responsibility PASS THE BUCKET 1965 Amer. dial.
to shift or avoid commitment or responsibility PITCH THE BUCK 1965 Amer. dial.


COMMODIOUS – ADJECTIVES
commodious, convenient NECESSARY 1540-1 obs. rare


COMMODITY – NOUNS
one who causes a dearth or scarcity in commodities DEARTHER 1622 obs.


COMMON, COMMONLY, COMMONPLACE – ADJECTIVES
– as common or rife as pennies; very common or prevalent PENNY-RIFE 1606 obs.
– common, cheap; of poor quality, shoddy; run-down; in poor taste TACKEY;  TACKY 1886 Amer. sl.
– common, low, vulgar, base LEWD c1380 obs.
– commonly practised; that has become habitual; accustomed HABITED 1605 obs.
– common, not noble; of the lowest social status DUNGHILL 1548 rare;  DUNGHILLY 1616 arch. rare
– common, ordinary COMMON OR GARDEN 1892
– common, pert. to crowds GREGARIAN M17 rare or obs.
– common; shared or owned in common I-MENE c1000 obs.
– common, vulgar; unrefined, low, coarse ORDINARY 1659 obs.
– common, worthless COMMON AS GULLY DIRT 1966 Amer. dial.
– commonplace; in common or promiscuous use; hackneyed; trite HACK 1781
– commonplace or conventional BROMIDIC 1906 sl.
– commonplace, ordinary, plain ORNERY 1838 Amer. dial.
– commonplace, ordinary; of an everyday character; trivial QUOTIDIAN 1461-83
– commonplace, ordinary, usual ORDINAR 1508 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– commonplace; physically plain; unattractive ORDINARY M19
– commonplace, trite; worn out, like a hired horse, by indiscriminate or vulgar use; hackneyed HACKNEY 1596 obs.
– commonplace, uninteresting; that has lost taste FADE 1715 obs.
– common to everybody ENTERCOMMON Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– exceedingly common COMMON AS MUCK 1782 UK sl.
– of common or everyday occurrence; frequent; abundant ORDINARY 1597 obs.
– of the common people LANDISH 1489 obs.
– pert. to the common people GREGAL c1550 rare
– pert. to the common people; popular, vulgar DEMOTIC 1872
– very common COMMON AS HORSESHIT 1925 US sl.
– very commonplace or vulgar COMMON AS PIG TRACKS 1952 Amer. dial.
 
COMMON etc.  – ADVERBS
– commonly, by people generally, publicly OPENLY 1154 obs.
– commonly, in an ordinary manner; ordinarily ORDINARY 1596 obs.
 
COMMON etc.  – NOUNS
– something of commonplace or usual character ORDINARY 1624 rare
 the common people; the rabble; the riff-raff; a member of the rabble TAG-RAG 1609 rare
 
COMMON etc.  – NOUNS, PERSON
– a commoner; a peasant; a youth or man of low status; a labourer PAGE c1385 obs. exc. Sc., often depreciative
– a commoner or peasant; a person of low social status; chiefly used as a demeaning term of reproach or abuse DUNGHILL1608 obs., derogatory
– a common person RANK AND SMELL L19 sl.
– a commonplace or dull person; a plodder, a person who works slowly and laboriously PLODDALL 1618 obs. rare
– a common, vulgar person SAD VULGAR 1767 UK society usage
– a common woman TIB 1533 obs.
– a fellow-commoner TABLE-PEER Bk1881
– a gentleman commoner HAT 1830 UK sl. obs.
– a man of the common people; a lad; a fellow; a chap; a low-bred or ill-mannered fellow; a knave JACK 1548 obs.

COMMON etc.  – VERBS
– to render commonplace, vulgar, or trite HACKNEY 1596


COMMOTION – ADJECTIVES
– causing a commotion; devil-raising RAISE-DEVIL c1661 obs. nonce word
 
COMMOTION – NOUNS
– a commotion MURDER IN THE GUN ROOM 1909 Amer. dial.
– a commotion QUACK-QUACK 1982 Trinidad and Tobago
– a commotion TANTHUNDER 1870 Eng. dial. obs.
– a commotion UP-SHAK Bk1905 Eng. dial. 
– a commotion, a brawl SCHEMOZZLE;  SCHIMOZZLE;  SCHLEMOZZLE;  SHEMOZZLE;  SHIMOZZLE;  SHLEMOZZLE 1916 sl.
– a commotion, a brawl, a hubbub;’ confusion, disturbance, disorder, tumult, uproar GARBOIL 1548 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– a commotion, a bustle, a stir, a fuss, a great disturbance TO-DO 1570
– a commotion; a disturbance UPTION Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– a commotion, a disturbance, a hubbub, an uproar HAY-BAY;  HEY-BEY 1805 Eng. dial.
– a commotion, a disturbance, an ado, a fuss, an outcry; a state of agitation TOUSE 1836 Amer. dial.
– a commotion, a disturbance, uproar, confusion UPSTIR 1549 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– a commotion, a fuss; a fit of ill-temper, passion FANTEAGUE;  FANTIGUE 1825 Eng. dial.
– a commotion, a fuss, a rushing about SCOURING 1958 Sc.
– a commotion, a fuss, bustle, a great to-do about nothing; a great state of excitement, either from pleasurable anticipation, or rage PAVIE 1806 Sc.
 a commotion, a hurly-burly, a tumult, strife, uproar, turmoil, confusion BURLY 1835
– a commotion, a loud disturbance or interruption FOFARRAW;  FOOFOORAW Bk1974 Amer. dial.
– a commotion, a noise DANDER Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– a commotion, a pother, disturbance, turmoil CRINKIE-WINKIE 1818 Sc.
– a commotion; a push JICKAJOG 1614 sl.
– a commotion, a riotous party RAMSAMMY 1900s sl.
– a commotion, a row; an altercation, a violent quarrel, a tremendous fuss SHINDIG 1961 sl.
– a commotion; a ruckus; a row, a disturbance; a fuss SHINDY 1828 Amer. dial.
– a commotion, a rumpus CATARUMPUS 1848 US sl.
– a commotion, a stir REVEL Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– a commotion, a stir TARVE;  TERVEE;  TIRVY;  TURVE 1893 Eng. dial.
– a commotion, a stir, a hurry TAVE Bk1905 Sc.
– a commotion, a to-do, a fuss PALLALL 1965 Sc.
– a commotion, a tumult; a frenetic or disastrous event tumult SHITSTORM  1948 sl., orig. US
– a commotion, a tumult, an uproar; a fight HACK AND SWEEP 1902 Sc.
– a commotion, an uproar, a din, tumult, rumpus, row, disturbance CATOUSE 1890 Amer. dial.
– a commotion, an uproar, a tumult, rumpus, row, disturbance KATOWSE 1859 Amer. dial.
– a commotion, disturbance; a state of excitement; a stir, bustle TIRRIVEE 1885 Sc.
– a commotion, disturbance, disorder SUFFLE 1650 obs. rare
– a commotion, fuss, disturbance BILLIBUE Bk1911 Sc.
– a commotion, tumult MEDLEY Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– a commotion, uproar, fuss; display, pomp FARE a1300 obs.
– a great commotion TERRILOO Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– an unpleasant commotion or disturbance, display of temper, tantrums AYROM 1850 Eng. dial.
– a violent commotion or disturbance; a general fight; a brawl; a scuffle; a row; a bustling crowd RAMMY 1935 Sc. sl.
 commotion, agitation; an instance of this AESTURE 1614 obs. rare
– commotion, confusion LANT 1825 Sc.
 commotion, disturbance BUSINESS 1514 obs.
– commotion, disturbance, excitement FALARIE Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– commotion, disturbance, noise, row GARRAY c1460 Sc. & N. Eng. dial. obs.
– commotion, noise, crying BALLYHOOLY 1940s sl.
– commotion, uproar, tumult, disturbance, confusion HUBBLE-SHUBBLE c1550 obs. rare
– the commotion or noise made by a crowd DEVIL-RACKET Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– the commotion or noise made by a crowd DEVIL-ROUTER Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– the commotion or noise made by a dispersing crowd SCALE-BREAK Bk1904 Sc.
 
COMMOTION – PHRASES
 here’s a fine commotion THE DEVIL RIDES UPON A FIDDLESTICK 1778
 
COMMOTION – VERBS
– to be full of commotion or agitation; to hurry about, to make haste; to bustle BUSKLE 1545 obs.
– to cause a commotion or disturbance BE FULL OF JACK 1872  Amer. dial.
– to cause a commotion or disturbance CUT UP JACK AND KILL JINNY 1930 Amer. dial.
 to cause a commotion or disturbance KICK UP HIGH JACK 1908 Amer. dial.
 to cause a commotion or disturbance KICK UP JACK 1908 Amer. dial.
 to cause a commotion or disturbance RAISE CAIN 1840 colloq., orig. US
 to cause a commotion or disturbance RAISE JACK 1867 Amer. dial.
 to cause a commotion or disturbance RAISE SAND L19 US sl.
 to cause a commotion or disturbance TEAR UP JACK 1845 Amer. dial.
– to create a commotion (mental or physical) over something AGITATE UP A STORM 1954 Amer. dial.
 to create a commotion, disturbance. or trouble; hence, to have a rousing good time RAISE MERRY NED 1906 Amer. dial.
 to create a commotion, disturbance, or trouble; hence, to have a rousing good time RAISE NED 1849 Amer. dial.
 to create a commotion, disturbance, or trouble; hence, to have a rousing good time RAISE NEDDY-JINGO 1958 Amer. dial.
 to create a commotion, disturbance, or trouble; hence, to have a rousing good time RAISE OLD NED 1942 Amer. dial.
 to create a commotion, disturbance, or trouble; hence, to have a rousing good time RAISE PROMISCUOUS NED 1848 Amer. dial.
 to make a commotion or disturbance; to become tumultuous, turbulent, agitated or restless TUMULTUATE 1611 rare
– to make a commotion or disturbance; to cry out BLATHER;  BLETHER 1850 Sc. & Eng. dial.
 to make a commotion, to ‘blow one’s top’; to make great objections or a big fuss about something TOP (TALL) TIMBER;  TOP THE TREES 1965 Amer. dial.
 to make a great commotion TERRILOO Bk1905 Eng. dial.
 to make a great commotion, noise, or disturbance; to cause great disorder and confusion; to turn everything topsy-turvy THROW THE HOUSE OUT OF THE WINDOW 1621
 to make a great commotion or disturbance; to turn everything into confusion; to cause havoc PLAY OLD GOOSEBERRY 1828


COMMUNICABLE, COMMUNICATE, COMMUNICATION, COMMUNICATIVE – ADJECTIVES
communicable IMPARTABLE 1653 rare
– communicative; declaring oneself; declaring or uttering one’s opinion; communicative DECLARATIVE 1647 obs.

COMMUNICABLE etc. – NOUNS
a medium of communication, means, agency; now ‘channel’ CANAL 1711 obs.
any electronic communication BIT SPIT 1997 US sl.
a state of non-communication DEADHEAD 2000s sl.
communication COMMO World War II Amer. sl.
communication IMPARTANCE 1811 rare
communication by interchange of looks EYE-PARLEY1668 obs. rare
oral, as distinct from written communication TONGUE-SPEAKING 1902

COMMUNICABLE etc. – VERBS
to communicate information etc. IMPORT 1565 obs.
to maintain communication KEEP THE LINES OPEN 20C sl.


COMMUNIST – ADJECTIVES
– communist, socialist, left-wing RED M19 sl.
– holding left-of-centre or mildly Communist views PINKO 1936 sl., derogatory
 
COMMUNIST – NOUNS
– communist propaganda AUNT JULIA 1953 US sl.
 
COMMUNIST – NOUNS, PERSON
– a bogus communist RADISH World War I Amer. sl.
– a Communist COMMIE 1939 sl., often derogatory
– a Communist COMMO 1941 sl., often derogatory
– a Communist PARTY MEMBER 1959 euphemism
– a Communist; a revolutionary RED-NECK 1931 Amer. dial.
– a Communist or extreme socialist RED 1851 sl., derogatory
– a Communist or socialist RED-RAGGER 1916 Aust. sl., derogatory
– a labour organizer belonging to the Communist Party of the United States HACK 1967 Amer. sl.
– a person who holds left-of-centre or mildly Communist views PINKIE;  PINKY 1973 sl., derogatory
– a person who holds left-of-centre or mildly Communist views PINKO 1936 sl., derogatory
– a young, upwardly mobile communist YUKKIE Bk2006 Amer. sl.
– communists, socialists THE REDS 20C sl.
 
COMMUNIST – VERBS
– to harass communists or people with left-wing beliefs REDBAIT 1938 orig. US


COMMUNITY – NOUNS
a nickname for a community or neighbourhood SMOKY HOLLOW 1852 Amer. dial.
a nickname for a community or neighbourhood SMOKY ROW c1903 Amer. dial.
a very small community; a very unimportant place BLINK-EYE 1969 Amer. dial.

COMMUNITY – NOUNS, PERSON
a community leader DADS 1990s W. Indies
the male head of a community or collection of persons living together as a family HOUSE-FATHER B1900

COMMUNITY – VERBS
to separate oneself into an independent community CANTONIZE 1605 obs.


COMMUTER – NOUNS, PERSON
a commuter who bicycles to work GUTTER BUNNY 1996 US mountain bikers’ sl.