Reverse Dictionary: CORR – COUF


CORRECT, CORRECTION, CORRECTIVE, CORRECTLY, CORRECTNESS – ADJECTIVES
– completely correct RIGHT AS RAIN Bk2006 US sl.
– correct BY THE BOARD World War II US Army sl.
– correct, accurate, true; in good condition, in good order RIGHT AS MY LEG 1636 obs.
– correct, adequate ABOUT RIGHT 1850 UK
– correct, all right, safe, suitable, what is required, comfortable CAKE-O 2001 UK back-slang for ‘OK’
– correct, exactly right DEAD ON 1888 US sl.
– correct, fine, as it should be, all right SKEWGEE 1896 Amer. dial.
– correct, fine, as it should be, all right SKEWVEE 1892 Amer. dial.
– correct, fine, as it should be, all right SKRUGEE 1905 Amer. dial.
– correct, fine, as it should be, all right SQUEACHY 1916 Amer. dial.
– correct, fine, as it should be, all right SQUEEGEE 1905 Amer. dial.
– correct, genuine, legitimate KOSHER 1896 colloq.
– corrective, chastising, punitive CASTIGATIVE 1641 rare
– corrective, chastising, punitive CASTIGATORY 1613
– correctly or properly so called; genuine, real, true; not counterfeit or false VERITABLE 1483
– correct, right ON THE NOSE Bk1974 Amer. sl.
– correct, right R 1900s sl.
– correct, satisfactory, good OKEY-DOKIE 1942 Amer. sl.
– correct, satisfactory, good, fine, acceptable OKEY-DOKE 1932 sl., orig. US
– correct, straight; evenly balanced AVOIRDUPOIS Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– correct, veritable, true VERIMENT c1590 obs.
– having a show of being correct in opinion or judgement VERISIMILITUDINARY 1675 obs.
 
CORRECT etc. – ADVERBS
– according to correct procedures; as one should under regulations, law, contract, etc. BY THE BOOK 1840s Amer.
– correctly, properly ACCORDING TO COCKER 1785
– correctly, properly PUKKA 1920s sl.
– correctly, properly, as laid down by the rules ACCORDING TO GUNTER L19 US sl.
– correctly, properly, as laid down by the rules ACCORDING TO HOYLE 1906
– correctly, properly; deftly, neatly; cleverly, dexterously TIGHTLY 1790 Sc. & Eng. dial. obs.
– correct, straight; evenly balanced HOBBLE-DE-POISE Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– in a correct or proper manner; without falsification or perversion SINCERELY 1535 obs.
 
CORRECT etc. – INTERJECTIONS
– absolutely correct! HOLE IN ONE! 1970s sl.
 that is correct; you are absolutely right YOU SAID IT! 1919
 
CORRECT etc. – NOUNS
– a correct account; a true statement, truth VERITY 1533
– a correct account; a truth or verity; a true statement VERITABILITY 1864 rare
– a correct expression taking the place of an incorrect but popular one SUMPSIMUS 1545
– a correction, punishment; a close engagement, grappling HAND-SHAKING 1818 Sc.
– a false correction PARADIORTHOSIS 1658 obs. rare
– a house of correction GRINDING-HOUSE 17C sl.
– correction, chastisement, corrective punishment or discipline, chastening CASTIGATION c1397 obs.
– correction, reproof; a beating, a drubbing DICHELS 1794 Sc.
– correctness; freedom from falsification, adulteration, or alloy; purity SINCERITY 1546 obs.
– correctness of taste ELEGANCE 1660 obs.
– the correct or best thing or person THE CHESHIRE 1841 US sl.
– the correct or right thing; the exact thing THE TICKET 1836
– the correct or right thing; the exact thing THE TICKET FOR SOUP Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– the correct thing; the fashion; the best; anything first-rate or highly becoming THE CHEESE 1818 sl.
– the correct thing; the ‘ticket’ THE CARD 1851 colloq.
– the correct thing; the ‘ticket’ THE DANDY 1784 sl. or colloq.
 
CORRECT etc. – PHRASES
– it’s the correct thing, what is wanted, expected or fashionable THAT’S THE TICKET 1838 sl.
 
CORRECT etc. – VERBS
– to correct someone’s information or opinion CALIBRATE 2003 US sl.
– to correct, to amend; to bring into better state, to put right, to reform faults, evil ways, etc.; to make good misdeeds BEET c950 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– to correct, to beat, to strike, to chastise; to knock on the head COBNOBBLE Bk1826 Eng. dial.
– to correct, to chastise, to punish CORRIGE c1374 obs. 
– to correct, to chastise, to punish; to inflict disciplinary punishment on ORDER 1526 obs.
– to correct, to rebuke, to scold, to chastise SCHOOL 1746 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– to correct, to rectify RIGHTIFY 1916 Amer. dial.
– to correct, to reprove, to chastise severely; to blister with rebuke SCOUTHER 1825 Sc.
– to correct, to set right CORRECTIFY a1625 obs. nonce word
– to correct, to set right; to rebuke, to scold; to sum up the faults of, to criticize REDD 1819 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– to correct; to set a person right who is wrong READY Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– to get it absolutely correct or exactly right HIT IT ON THE BUTTON 1925 colloq.
– to get the correct information FIND OUT THE SCORE World War II Amer. sl.
– to need correction or rebuke NEED BOILING DOWN 1884 Amer. dial.
– to sound correct LISTEN O.K. Bk1942 Amer. sl.


CORRESPOND, CORRESPONDENT, CORRESPONDING – ADJECTIVES
correspondent; appropriate RESPONSAL 1647 obs. rare
corresponding, matching SUIT-LIKE 1570 obs.
corresponding, similar, like, equal MARROW 1892 Eng. dial.

CORRESPOND etc. – ADVERBS
corresponding, alike, equal A-MARROWS Bk1905 Eng. dial.

CORRESPOND etc. – VERBS
to correspond, to fit MAT Bk1905 Eng. dial.
to correspond, to fit, to tally, to agree PAN 1571 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
to correspond, to match RANGE ALONG OF A THING Bk1905 Eng. dial.
to correspond, to match READ B1900 Eng. dial.
to correspond, to pertain, to relate, to be becoming, appropriate EFFEIR 1705 Sc.


CORRIDOR – NOUNS
a corridor, portico, gallery, balcony, etc. ORIEL 1385 obs.
an indoor corridor or passage PASS 1818 Sc.


CORROBORATE – VERBS
to corroborate, to confirm, to ratify (a charter, league, etc.) ROBORATE 1432-50 obs. exc. Sc.


CORRODE, CORRODED, CORROSION – ADJECTIVES
corroded, rusted; tarnished CANKERED 1570 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
corroded, rusty; affected as if with rust CANKERY 1744 obs.
corroded with rust CANKERFRET 1603 obs.
tending to corrode SUCCORROSIVE 1541 obs. rare

CORRODE etc. – NOUNS
corrosion by rust CANKERFRET 1618 obs.

CORRODE etc. – VERBS
to corrode, to rust, to tarnish CANKER c1420 obs. exc. Eng. dial.


CORRUPT, CORRUPTED, CORRUPTING, CORRUPTION, CORRUPTLY – ADJECTIVES
– acting in a corrupt manner SCALLYWAGGING L19 sl.
– addicted to corruption and bribery BOODLEISTIC 1898 sl.
– corrupt PORK-BARREL L19 US sl.
– corrupt, clandestine, secret UNDER THE BED M19
– corrupt, clandestine, secret UNDER THE TABLE M19
– corrupt, crooked; fraudulent SHYSTER M19 US sl.
– corrupt, defective, cut awry, mangled MANKIT 1928 Sc.
– corrupt, degenerate, debased BASTARDLY 1587 obs.
– corrupt, depraved; infected with evil CANKERED c1440
– corrupt, dishonest BENT 1914 sl., orig. US
– corrupt, dishonest CROOK 1898 Aust. & NZ sl.
– corrupt, dishonest CROOKED 1859 sl.
– corrupt, dishonest; obtained by fraud CRONK 1889 Aust. sl.
– corrupted, debased ADULTERED 1624 obs.
– corrupt, foul; festering RANK 1579
– corrupt; fraudulent; of playing cards: tampered with FUNNY 20C sl.
– corrupt, illegal; hedonistic FAST E19 sl.
– corrupt, infected TAINT 1620 obs. rare
– corrupting, debasing, adulterating ADULTERING 1599 obs.
– corrupt, mischievous, troublesome SAD 17C sl.
– corrupt, stained with the same or similar faults or obnoxious qualities TARRED WITH THE SAME BRUSH 1823
– corrupt, stained with the same or similar faults or obnoxious qualities TARRED WITH THE SAME STICK 1818
– corrupt, stained with the same or similar faults or obnoxious qualities TOUCHED WITH THE SAME TAR-BRUSH 1895
– corrupt through sin or wrongdoing SICK c960 obs.
– corrupt, underhand; dishonest SINISTROUS 1600 obs.
– corrupt, untrustworthy JACKIE TRENT 1990s rhyming sl. for ‘bent’
– corrupt, vile, loathsome CARRIONLY 1547-64 obs.
– corrupt, weak; lacking moral strength ROTTEN-BONED 1912
– easily corrupted or bribed VENAL 1670
– morally corrupt ROTTEN-LIVERED a1898
– morally, socially, or politically corrupt; characterized by a lack of integrity or moral virtue; wicked, dishonest ROTTEN 1395
 
CORRUPT etc. – ADVERBS
– corruptly; by underhand means SINISTROUSLY 1817
– corruptly; debauchedly DEBOISTLY 1604 obs.
 
CORRUPT etc. – NOUNS
– any scheme seen as corrupt, immoral, or underhand FAST ONE 1923 US sl.
– a receptacle or gathering-place of corruption, vice, etc. SINK 1526
– corrupt behaviour in an office, commission, employment, or position of trust; an instance of this MALVERSATION 1549
– corruption; adulteration; debasement ADULTERY 1609 obs.
– corruption and bribery; embezzlement of public funds BOODLEISM 1894 sl.
– corruption and bribery; embezzlement of public funds BOODLERISM 1887 sl.
– corruption and bribery; embezzlement of public funds BOODLERY 1887 sl.
– corruption and bribery; embezzlement of public funds BOODLING 1890 sl.
– corrupt or dishonest activity GRAFT 1865 sl., orig. US
– corrupt or dishonest activity GRIFT 1914 US sl.
– corrupt or dishonest activity MALVERSATION 1549
– corrupt or dishonest activity; underhand dealing; jugglery, legerdemain; trickery; deceit HANKY-PANKY 1841 sl.
– corrupt or foul matter BAGGAGE B1700 Sc.
– corrupt or shameful fact or practice; anything opposed to propriety; bad or improper usage ABUSION c1374 obs.
– moral corruption, defilement IMPOSTHUME 1565
– moral corruption, defilement IMPOSTUME 1565
– political corruption SLEAZE 1983 US sl.
– proceeds of corruption; counterfeit money; money illegally or dishonestly acquired or used BOODLE 1858 Amer. dial.
 subject to corrupt or mercenary influences; connected or associated with sordid and unprincipled bargaining VENAL 1718
 
CORRUPT etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– a corrupt and devious man; an incompetent person; an untrustworthy person WRONG GEE;  WRONG GUY 1920s US criminals’ sl.
– a corrupt and dishonest person; someone who uses unscrupulous methods SHYSTER 1844
– a corrupt or dishonest person; a politician, official, etc. who uses his or her position in order to obtain dishonest gain or advantage GRAFTER 1896 sl., orig. US
– a corrupt or dishonest person; a professional criminal CROOK 1877 sl., orig. US
– a corrupt or dishonest person; someone who lives by sharp practice LURKMAN 1945 Aust. sl.
– a corrupt person; a person who has been in questionable society or under unholy influence, and become tainted SCABBY SHEEP M19 sl.
– a corrupt person; one who uses improperly, misuses, misapplies or perverts; a perverter ABUSER c1450
– a corrupt public official BEARD Bk1992 criminals’ sl.
– a morally corrupt person a very dirty or scruffy person DUNGHILL 1542
– a person who corrupts, adulterates, or debases ADULTERER 1650 obs. rare
– a person who corrupts; a morally diseased person ULCER 1844
– a person who corrupts or harms something; one who impairs PAIRER 1408 obs. rare
– a person who makes a point of portraying themselves (sincerely or otherwise) as free of corruption, esp. in politics, business, sport or other forms of public life in which a proclaimed moral stance is useful MR. CLEAN 1970s sl., orig. US
– a person who practices corruption and bribery BOODLER 1894 sl.
 
CORRUPT etc. – PHRASES
– there is a corrupt element underlying a situation; also, something is incorrect or unsatisfactory SOMETHING IS ROTTEN IN THE STATE OF DENMARK 1603
 
CORRUPT etc. – VERBS
– to act corruptly in a position of trust MALVERSE 1671 obs. rare
– to act corruptly or dishonestly GRAFT 1859 sl., orig. US
– to act corruptly or dishonestly GRIFT 1915 US sl.
– to allow oneself to be corrupted BEND 19C sl.
– to corrupt morally; to deprave by sensuality DEBOISE 1654 obs.
 to corrupt or defile someone or something AWEM a1000 obs.
– to corrupt, to debase ADULTER 1382 obs.
 to corrupt, to debase, to adulterate ADULTERIZE 1593 rare
 to corrupt; to debase; to deteriorate; to make or declare bastard or illegitimate; hence, to make spurious or degenerate ABASTARD 1610 obs.
– to corrupt, to defile; to deprive a woman of chastity DIVICIATE c1470 obs. rare
– to corrupt; to deprave NERONIZE 1675
– to corrupt; to deprave; to infect with moral evil VENOM a1300
– to corrupt; to falsify; to make untrue; to introduce falsehood into FALSE c1380 obs.
– to corrupt; to pervert a person; to undermine the character, loyalty, or faith of SUBVERT c1375 rare
– to corrupt; to pervert; to commit some form of fraudulent manoeuvre, esp. as in losing a race deliberately, bribing a policeman or a sporting competitor BEND 19C sl.
– to corrupt; to pervert; to deprave; to make wicked or evil BESHREW c1325 obs.
– to corrupt; to pollute, to defile, to contaminate, to befoul INQUINATE 1542 obs.
– to corrupt; to taint; to deprive of freshness or vigour FADE c1400 obs.
 to corrupt; to taint; to sully; to defile; to render morally foul or pollute; to destroy the ideal purity of AFILE a1000 obs.
– to engage in corrupt practices RORT 1919 Aust. sl.
– to induce to behave corruptly; to induce a jury to return a corrupt verdict NOBBLE 1856 Brit. sl.
– to speak corruptly CLIP THE KING’S ENGLISH Bk1922


CORSET – NOUNS, PERSON
a girl who wears a corset BATTLESHIP 1926 US sl.


COSILY, COSY – ADJECTIVES
cosy, comfortable, snug SNOD 1695 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
cosy, quiet, easy, snug, comfortable, pleasant CANNY a1758 Sc.
cosy, sheltered; said of a place LOWN a1522 chiefly Sc.
cosy, snug, comfortable BIEN 1725 Sc.

COSILY etc. – ADVERBS
– cosily, pleasantly, comfortably BEENLIE;  BEINLY c1450 Sc.
– cosily, snugly; so as to be sheltered or protected LOWN 1724 chiefly Sc.
– cosily, snugly; so as to be sheltered or protected LOWNLY 1788 Sc. rare

COSILY etc. – NOUNS
a cosy, snug, or comfortable room, house, etc., esp. a room of small size into which a person retires for seclusion or quiet SNUGGERY 1815


COSMETICS – ADJECTIVES (also see make-up)
– said of a woman who uses a lot of cosmetics CHIPPIFIED 1968 Amer. dial.
– set off with cosmetics SNOUTFAIR Bk1775
 
COSMETICS – NOUNS
– a colouring matter, dye, pigment; a dye used as a cosmetic TINCTURE c1400 obs.
– a cosmetics kit; thus, make-up FACE 1946 US sl.
– a cosmetic used to colour the cheeks; rouge CHEEK-VARNISH 1598
– cosmetics DAZZLE DAUB Bk1947 Amer. sl.
– cosmetics FAKEMS 20C sl.
– cosmetics GLAMOUR GOO Bk1947 Amer. sl.
 cosmetics, make-up PAINT 1660 UK
– cosmetics, make-up WARPAINT 1869 sl.
– cosmetics, make-up, esp. poudre de riz used to whiten the complexion SPLASH M19 sl.
– cosmetics, make-up; paint or rouge or powder for the face ADDITION c1690 society sl.
– theatrical make-up GREASEPAINT 1888
 
COSMETICS – NOUNS, PERSON
– a man who uses cosmetics APACHE 1980s US homosexual sl.
– a man who uses cosmetics COMANCHE 1980s US homosexual sl.
– a person claiming the knowledge of how to apply cosmetics correctly HELEN ROOBENBITCH Bk1972 homosexual sl.
– a woman wearing cosmetics; a woman of low morals; a prostitute PAINTED LADY a1637
– a woman who paints her face PAINTED JEZEBEL Bk1903 sl.
– a woman who uses a lot of cosmetics PAINTED DOLL BABY 1968 Amer. dial.
– a woman who uses a lot of cosmetics TWO-BIT WHORE 1966 Amer. dial.
 
COSMETICS – VERBS
– to apply cosmetics PUT THE FAKEMS ON 20C sl.
– to brighten the face, eyes, etc. with cosmetics CHEER 1560 obs.


COSMETIC  SURGERY – NOUNS
cosmetic surgery designed to alter your appearance FACE JOB 1982 US sl.

COSMETIC  SURGERY – NOUNS, PERSON
a person who performs cosmetic surgery BEAUTY DOCTOR 2010


COSSET – VERBS
to cosset, to pet SUGAR-PLUM 1788


COST, COSTLINESS, COSTLY – ADJECTIVES
– at very small cost or expense ON A SHOESTRING 1904 sl.,  orig. US
– costly, dear, expensive DIGGING 1837 Amer. dial. obs.
– costly, excessive in amount; expensive, high in price. dear SALT 1710 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– costly, expensive COSTIOUS 1340 obs.
– costly, expensive, dear SALTY 1974 Amer. dial.
– costly, expensive; high in price DEARTHFUL 1786 obs. exc. Sc., nonce word
– costly, expensive; lavish, extravagant, sumptuous DISPENDIOUS 1727
– costly, expensive; onerous, burdensome CHARGEFUL c1529 obs.
 costly, expensive; troublesome, severe, oppressive CHARGEOUS 1380 obs.
– costly, highly valuable, precious DEARWORTH c888 obs.
– costly, highly valuable, precious DEARWORTHY c1430 obs.
– costly or expensive to practise or maintain SUMPTUOUS 1551-2 obs., chiefly Sc.
– costly, sumptuous DAPATICAL 1623 obs.
– obtained at great cost, bought at a high price DEAR-BOUGHT c1384

COST etc.  – NOUNS
– a beating down the cost BADGERING 1844 Eng. dial.
– cost, expense DAMAGE;  THE DAMAGE 1755 sl.
– costliness, dearness, high price DEARTH 1632 obs.
– extra or additional cost or expense ONCOST 1725 Sc.
– the cost TAX 1929 Amer. dial.
– the cost of a venture NUT 1912 US sl.
– the cost of something AN ARM AND A LEG 1956 sl.
– the cost of something THE EARTH 1924 sl.
– the cost or charge or cost ANTE 1843 colloq.
– total cost UPTAKE-AND-FELLING Bk1905 Eng. dial. 

COST etc.  – PHRASES
– this is a costly business IT’S LIKE EATING MONEY 1887 colloq.
– what’s the cost? how much is the bill? WHAT’S THE DAMAGE? L17 sl.

COST etc.  – VERBS
– to bear the cost of something PICK UP THE BILL 1945 sl., orig. US
– to bear the cost of something PICK UP THE CHECK 1945 sl., orig. US
– to bear the cost of something PICK UP THE TAB 1945 sl., orig. US
– to cost PUT ONE BACK 1896 Amer. sl.
– to cost a lot DO DAMAGE 1997 US sl.
– to cost, as in ‘that will knock you back a bit’; to be expensive KNOCK BACK 1946 sl.
– to cost more than it is worth EAT ITS HEAD OFF 18C sl.
– to cost one so much SIT 1377 obs. rare
– to cost; to be expensive SET BACK 1896 Amer. sl.
– to cost, to ‘set one back’ LET DOWN 1967 Amer. dial.
– to cost, to set the price; to charge, to make a claim upon one for an amount TAX 1848 Amer. dial.
– to make great cost or expenses or cost SUMPTIFY 1656 obs. rare


COSTA RICA – NOUNS, PERSON
a person from Costa Rica TICO 1905 sl., chiefly US


COSTERMONGER – NOUNS, PERSON (street seller of fruits and vegetables)
a costermonger SPLIT ASUNDER M19 rhyming sl.
a costermonger; a street trader, licensed to sell his goods from a barrow BARROW BOY 1939
a costermonger; one employed in wheeling a barrow BARROW-MAN c1650
a costermonger’s assistant BARKER 1866 sl.
a costermonger’s wife DUTCH;  OLD DUTCH a1889
a female costermonger; one employed in wheeling a barrow BARROW-BUNTER 1771 obs.
a poor class of costermonger looked down on by the mainstream costers, selling pea soup, sweetmeats, spice-cakes, etc. ILLEGITIMATE M19 sl.
a superior costermonger HAWKINS 1895 UK sl.


COSTUME – NOUNS
a man who is not wearing a mask at a costume ball BLACKCOAT 1916 Amer. dial.
a masquerading costume MASKEN;  MASQUIN 1578 obs.
a vermilion costume AGONY IN RED L19 sl.
costume, apparel, dress GARNITURE 1827
costume, dress; manner or style of dressing; ‘get-up’; also, a dress or costume, a gown TOILET 1821

COSTUME – NOUNS, PERSON
a man who is not wearing a mask at a costume ball BLACKCOAT 1916 Amer. dial.


COSY see COSILY


COTTAGE – NOUNS
– a cottage, a building, a house; a hut covered with mud or turf BIGGIN 1811 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– a cottage, a house, a dwelling HALLAN 1827 Sc.
 a cottage in common for farm servants BOTHIE;  BOTHY Bk1911 Sc.
– a cottage of irregular plan IN-AND-OUT COTTAGE 1824
– a cottage or farm-house HALL 1791 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– a crudely-built cottage; a native Australian hut GUNYAH 1820
– a farm-worker’s cottage BACH 1920s NZ sl.
– a half-ruined cottage THALTHAN;  THOLTHAN 1889 Eng. dial.
– a little cottage COT c893
– a partition wall in a cottage; particularly, that between the door and the fireplace, which shelters the room from the draught of the door HALLAN 1490-91 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– a room in a cottage, esp. the parlour or sitting-room END 1814 Sc. & Eng. dial.
 a room of a cottage or house BEY Bk1911 Sc.
– a rustic cottage; a little cabin; a dwelling, lodging; a den of a beast CABINET 1572 obs.
– a thatched cottage THACKY Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– a two-roomed cottage BUT-AND-BEN 1937 Amer. dial.
– a vacation cottage BACH 1984 NZ sl.
– cottage property RENTS Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– one of the rooms of a cottage or one-storied house BAY Bk1898 Eng. dial. & Ireland
– the outer room of a house of a two-roomed cottage BUT 1950 Amer. dial.
 
COTTAGE – NOUNS, PERSON
– a cottager; a ploughman; a cattleman on a farm BOWMAN Bk1911 Sc.


COTTAGE CHEESE – NOUNS
cottage cheese BONNYCLABBER CHEESE 1949 Amer. dial.
cottage cheese BONNYCLAPPER CHEESE 1941 Amer. dial.
cottage cheese BUNG CHEESE 1941 Amer. dial.
cottage cheese BUTTERMILK CHEESE 1949 Amer. dial.
cottage cheese IRISH CHEESE 1941 Amer. dial.
cottage cheese JACKASS CHEESE 1941 Amer. dial.
cottage cheese MILK CHEESE 1949 Amer. dial.
cottage cheese POOR MAN’S CHEESE 1941 Amer. dial.
cottage cheese POT-CHEESE Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
cottage cheese QUICK CHEESE 1941 Amer. dial.
cottage cheese TURKEY CHEESE 1968 Amer. dial.
cottage cheese TURKEY FEED 1931 Amer. dial.
cottage cheese TURKEY FOOD 1968 Amer. dial.


COTTON – ADJECTIVES
of cotton XILINOUS 1656 obs. rare

COTTON – NOUNS
a fluffy mass of cotton FUSSOCK 1881 Sc.
cotton ALABAMA WOOL 1958 US sl.
cotton MANCHESTER SILK Bk1933 Eng. sl.


COTTON CANDY – see candy floss


COTTON MILL – NOUNS, PERSON
– a cotton-mill worker LINTHEAD 1933 Amer. dial., derogatory


COTTON WOOL – NOUNS
cotton wool, lint CADDIS 1708 Sc. & Eng. dial.


COUCH – NOUNS
a couch, a bed; that whereon one lies down to sleep; a bed LAIR a1000 obs.
– a couch, a sofa CHESTERFIELD1950 Can.
a couch, a sofa SET 1957 Amer. dial.
a couch for reclining at meals, a triclinium FEAST-BED a1661 obs.
a couch or sofa BAKING-PLACE 1859 Eng. dial. sl.
a couch or sofa DAVVY 1997 US sl.
a couch or sofa on which one can stretch out to rest LOP 1967 Amer. dial.
a couch, usually small DAVENANT;  DAVENET;  DAVENETTE;  DAVINETTE 1951 Amer. dial.
a love-seat DOUBLE CHAIR 1904
an upholstered couch or sofa, sometimes convertible to a bed DAVENO c1955 Amer. dial.
an upholstered couch or sofa, sometimes convertible to a bed DAVENPORT 1902 Amer. dial.
an upholstered couch or sofa, sometimes convertible to a bed DAY-PORT 1968 Amer. dial.