Reverse Dictionary: END – ENDZ


END, ENDING – adjectives
– DESINENT † forming the end, ending, closing, terminating …1605
– LATTER † pert. to the end of life, of a period, the world …1513
– MORIBUND on the point of coming to an end …1837
– TAPER at an end, nearly exhausted …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
end, ending – adverbs
END – adverbs
– ENDWAY to the end or finish; at the end …1795 Eng. dial.
– IN THE LAST †* in the end, finally …1607
end, ending – nouns
– ADIOS MUCHACHOS the end; goodbye everyone (Spanish) …Bk2000 Amer. sl.
– A-END the end; the final part …1942 Brit. sl.
– ARSE END the end; the final part …1942 Brit. sl.
– ARSEHOLD the end, the back of anything …1940s sl.
– ARSEHOLE the end, the back of anything …1940s sl.
– CASH-IN, THE the end; death …1926 US sl.
– CHICKEN SWITCH a switch that will abort a mission; a notional switch that will end a project …1960 US sl.
– DEAD FINISH the end …1881 Aust. sl.
– DECLINE the end …1821 Sc.  
– DOG-END the very end of something; the last or worst part …1941 
– DOUP the end or last part of anything, as a candle …E18 Sc.
– EFFLUX the lapse, passing away of time, or of a particular period; hence, expiry, end …1647
– END-DAY a termination, end …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– END OF THE BALL GAME the end of everything …Bk2006 US sl.
– FAG the last part or remnant of anything, after the best has been used; the extreme end …c1580
– FAG-END the last part or remnant of anything after the best has been used; the extreme end, as of a portion of time, a collection of persons, a written composition, etc. …1613
– FINISHMENT an end, conclusion …1872 Amer. dial.
– HEEL the remains or end part of anything, as a crust of a loaf, the rind of a cheese, etc. …LME
– HURDIES the end or ‘tail’ of anything …B1900 Sc.
– KIBOSH, KYBOSH an end, a finish …1836 UK sl.
– LAST RUN OF SHAD, THE the end of a project …1985 Amer. dial.
– OMEGA the last of a series; the last word; the end or final development …1651
– ORD AND END † the beginning and end …c1000
– RATHENESS * premature ending …1883
– STICKY END an unhappy end …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– SUM † the ultimate end or goal; the highest attainable point …1340 obs. or arch.
– TAIL-ENDER someone or something coming at the end …colloq.
– TAILING the end or latter part …1646
– TAWSTOCK-GRACE † the end …B1900 Eng. dial.
– WRAP the end of a session …1972 sl., orig. entertainment usage
– WRAP-UP a completion; a final treatment, a summary; the end, the conclusion …1950s Amer. sl.
end, ending – person 
– TAIL-END CHARLIE the person or vehicle that comes last in a queue one who comes at the end …1940s sl.
– TAIL-ENDER someone or something coming at the end …1885 colloq.
end, ending – verbs
– ABROGATE to do away with; to put an end to …1588
– ACHIEVE 1. † to bring to an end or termination; to finish, to terminate …c1385
2. † to come to a natural end or conclusion; to end, to result, to turn out …1393
– ADETERMINE †* to bring to an end, to terminate …1413
– BAG to quit, to end, to discontinue …Bk1994 sl. 
– BATE 1. † to beat down or away; to put an end to …c1300
2. † to come to an end, to cease …c1325
– BE IN THE SHORT ROWS to be near the end or the climax of something …1894 Amer. dial.
– BREAK THE NECK OF † to destroy, to finish, to bring to an end …1576
– CALL IT GEORGE to agree that a matter it concluded; to bring something to an end, such as a day’s work …20C W. Indies sl.
– CALL IT WALLY to agree that a matter it concluded; to bring something to an end, such as a day’s work …20C W. Indies sl.
– COME OUT to end; to eventuate …1896 Amer. sl.
– CUT OUT to finish; to come to an end; to cease …1919 Aust. & NZ
– DAMPER to stop; to bring to an end …1970s US Black sl.
– DECORRE † to run or flow away; to pass or haste away; to end, to cease to exist …1377
– DIE ON ONE’S ARSE to fail badly; to suffer an irreversible decline, to come to a sudden or premature end …1984
– DING OUT THE BOTTOM of anything: to make an end of anything …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– END OFF to come to an end, to terminate …1934 Amer. dial.
– EXTERMINE † to exterminate; to destroy utterly; to put an end to; to abolish …1539
– FAIL † of a period of time or anything that has a finite duration: to come to an end; to expire …1399
– FOLD to go out of business owing to lack of funds; to come to an end …Bk1974 Amer. sl.
– HEARKEN TO THE HINDER END to hear the end of the story, to wait and see what the end will be …1790 Eng. dial.
​- KIBOSH, KYBOSH to put an end to …1884 UK sl.
– NAIL to put an end to …1910s sl.
– PULL THE CHAIN to make a decisive end, to end all negotiations; hence, to take decisive action, esp. against a person …1935 US sl.
– QUAIL † to overpower, to destroy, to put an end to …1551
– QUENCH † to come to an end, to perish, to disappear …c1305
– SETTLE A PERSON’S HASH to reduce to order; to silence, to subdue; to make an end of …a1825 colloq.
– SHATTER to ruin, to put an end to, to utterly destroy …L17
– SHUT UP to bring to an end, to reduce to a state of incapacity …E19 sl.
– SNUFF OUT to suppress, put an end to …colloq.
– TANG OUT to abandon; to put an end to …1970s US college sl.
– TERMINE † to put and end to, to cause to cease; to bring to a conclusion, to complete; to terminate …c1390
– TIRE † to fail, to cease (as a supply, etc.); to diminish; to give out, to come to an end …c725
– TOLL THE BELL ON to put an end to; to forbid …1900s sl.
– TOP UP to end up, to conclude …M19 sl.
– WORK OUT to end, to eventuate …1885 Amer. sl.
– YEN to end …1886 Eng. dial.
– YEND † to end …c1000 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
end, ending – phrases
– EGG AND BIRD † in youth and maturity, from beginning to end, first and last …1711
– FULL STOP used as a firm signal that a matter is at an end …1976 UK
– FULL STOP – END OF STORY used as a firm signal that a matter is at an end …1976 UK
– HERE OR THERE THE HARE GOES AWAY here or there the matter ended …1600
– THAT’S ALL SHE WROTE that’s all there is; there is more; the end of something …1948 Amer. dial.
– THAT’S THE BALLGAME that finishes it; that is the end, esp. of one’s chances …1948 US sl.
– THERE GOES THE BALLGAME that finishes it; that is the end, esp. of one’s chances …1946 US sl.
– TILL ALL IS BLUE * to the absolute end, for an indefinite period …1838
– TILL THE GROUND LOOKS BLUE † to the absolute end, for an indefinite period …a1606
– UNTIL THE LAST CAT IS HUNG until the very last, to the end …1985 Amer. dial.
– UNTIL THE LAST DOG IS DEAD until the very last, to the end …1943 Amer. dial.
– UNTIL THE LAST DOG IS HUNG until the very last, to the end …1902 Amer. dial.
 
ENDANGER – verbs
– PERICLITATE † to expose to peril, endanger, risk, hazard …1623
 
ENDANGERING – nouns
– DANGERMENT endangering …1864 Sc.
 
ENDEAR – verbs
– DEAR †* to endear …1603
 
ENDEARMENT – nouns
– CANOODLING endearments …1859 Amer. sl.
 
ENDEARMENT, TERM OF – nouns
– ACUSHLA a form of address, darling, dear heart; a term of endearment …1825 Irish
– ALANA, ALANAH, ALANNA, ALANNAH a form of address; a term of endearment …1839 Ireland
– ANGEL a term of endearment or an affectionate term of address for a beloved person …1598
– ASTHORE a term of endearment, my treasure! …1869 Ireland
– BABA a baby; a child; also, a term of endearment …1841 orig. & chiefly South Asian
– BABE a term of endearment …1890 sl., chiefly US
– BABELET * a tiny babe; an infant; also, a term of endearment …1856
– BABES a term of affection or simply of address between either sex …1930s sl.
– BABY a lover; also a spouse; a term of endearment, a darling, a sweetheart or girlfriend; orig. only applied to women  …1684 colloq.
– BABY-BUNTING a term of endearment …Bk1891
– BABYCAKES a term of endearment or affectionate form of address; darling, sweetheart, dear …1949
– BABYKINS a baby; a term of endearment for a baby …M20
– BACH a term of endearment common in Wales and the border counties; frequently following a personal name: dear, little one, friend …1889
– BALLOCKS-STONES a term of endearment …Bk1891 sl.
– BARGEE a term of affection …1899 UK sl.
– BASTARD a term of man-to-man affection, often as ‘old bastard’ …1924 sl., orig. Aust.
– BAWCOCK a fine fellow; a good fellow; a jolly fellow; a burlesque term of endearment …1599 arch.
– BEAUTIFUL a beautiful person; chiefly used as a term of endearment, esp. for a woman …1534
– BEST-BELOVED a most beloved person; spec. a lover, a sweetheart; often used as a term of endearment …1459
– BIDDIES-NIE  a term of endearment …Bk1880
– BIRD a term of endearment applied to a young woman or child …Bk1888 Sc.
– BIRDALANE a term of sorrowful endearment, applied to an only child, especially to a girl, to signify that she is without household comrades or companions …Bk1888 Sc.
– BIRDSNIE † a term of endearment …1661
– BIRDSNIES a coarse term of endearment used to a woman …1681 UK
– BIRD’S-NYE  an obsolete vulgar term of endearment …1661
– BLOSS a term of endearment applied to a buxom young woman …Bk1911 Sc.
– BOOBEE a term of endearment …1982 Amer. dial.
– BOOGER a baby, a child, esp. an impish one; a term of endearment to a child …1892 Amer. dial.
– BOYKIN a little boy: used as a term of endearment …1547
– BUBALEH, BUBELEH a term of endearment; honey, sweetie-pie …1980 Amer. dial.
– BUBELE a term of endearment; honey, sweetie-pie …1970 Amer. dial.
– BUBELICKS a term of endearment to a baby …1930 Amer. dial.
– BUG a baby, a child, esp. an impish one; a term of endearment to a child …1950 Amer. dial.
– BUGGER a baby, a child, esp. an impish one; a term of endearment to a child …1892 Amer. dial.
– BULLY † a term of endearment and familiarity, orig. applied to either sex; sweetheart, darling; later applied only to men, implying friendly admiration: good friend; fine fellow …1548 obs. exc. arch.
– BURDIE-BEETON a fondling term for a little child …Bk1911 Sc.
– CAKES a term of affection between friends …1960s US sl.
– CAKIE a term of affection between friends …1960s US sl.
– CHICKABIDDY a loved one, esp. a child; a term of endearment to a child …1848
– CHICKADEE a loved one; a sweetheart; a child; a term of endearment …1860 Amer. dial.
– CHICK-A-DIDDLE a term of endearment addressed to children …19C
– CHICKIE a term of endearment; one’s wife or sweetheart …1966 Amer. dial.
– CHUCK a term of endearment …1588 Brit. sl.
– CHUCKABY † a term of endearment …1607
– COCK-FARTHING – a term of endearment used to a little boy …Bk1830 Eng. dial.
– DAINTY † a term of endearment …1611
– DAISY a term of affection …L19 sl.
– DARL a term of address or endearment; darling …1930 & Aust. & UK sl.
– DARLS a term of address or endearment; darling …1930 UK sl.
– DAUGHTER † a term of affectionate address to a woman or girl by an older person or one in a superior relation …c1000 obs. or arch.
– DAUTIE a person caressed or indulged; a darling, a pet, a favourite; a term of affection …1676 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– DAWTIE darling, pet, dear; a term of affection …1787 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– DEAR HEART a term of endearment; chiefly used in addressing a person …c1350
– DEARIE, DEARY a term of endearment …1681 sl.
– DEEDLEY-DUMPLIN’ n. a term of endearment …1890 Sc.  
– DEVIL a term of mildly reproving affection …17C sl.
– DILLING † a child born when the parents are old; a darling or favourite child, a pet; the youngest of the family, the last born; a term of endearment …1584 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– DING-A-DING † a term of endearment …1620
– DING-DING † a term of endearment …1564
– DING-DONG a term of endearment …1564
– DOVELING a term of endearment for a small child …E17
– DOVEY, DOVIE a term of endearment …M18
– DOY a term of endearment for a child; a pet…1884 Eng. dial.
– DUCK a term of endearment …1590 Brit. sl.
– DUCKIE, DUCKY a term of endearment …1819 Brit. sl.
– DUCKS a term of endearment …1590 Brit. sl.
– FART a term of endearment …1967 Amer. dial.
– FATHERLING a little father; used as an affectionate mode of address …1625
– FILTHY FELLOW a mild endearment …18C colloq.
– FREAK a term of endearment …1954 US teen sl. 
– FUBS † a small chubby person; a plump young person or child; chiefly used as a term of endearment …1614
– GALAT, GALLET a term of endearment, generally addressed to a girl …1825 Sc.
– GIPSIE, GIPSY, GYPSY a term of contempt for a woman, as being cunning, deceitful, fickle, or the like; in more recent use merely playful, and applied esp. to a brunette; a thoughtless, giddy girl; sometimes used playfully as a term of endearment …1632
– GIRLIE, GIRLY a young woman, a girl; in earlier use, a little girl; also, a term of endearment …1786
– GIRLKIN a little girl, a term of endearment …Bk1920 Eng. dial.
– GITTSEY a term of endearment to an infant or baby …1887 Eng. dial.
– GITTY a term of endearment to an infant …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– GOLLIWOG a term of affection for any small living thing, baby, etc. …1932 Amer. dial.
– HAIRY-LEGS a term of endearment …Bk1988 Aust. sl. 
– HALF-PINT a term of endearment for a small child …M20 US sl.
– HARD MAN a term of affection …1969 Irish sl.
– HASH a term of endearment for a boy …1685 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– HEARTIKIN † a term of endearment …1540
– HEARTLET a term of endearment …1885
– HEARTLING a sweetheart; a term of endearment …1608 arch.
– HEART-ROOT  a sweetheart; a darling; a beloved or loved one; also, a term of endearment …c1460
– HEARY, HEERY † a term of endearment used by married couples to each other, esp. used by old women in addressing their husbands; also used when addressing a female inferior …1768 Sc.
– HEIFER DUST a loved one; a term of affection …1982 Amer. dial.
– HEN a form of address for a girl or woman, typically as a term of affection or endearment …1768 Sc. colloq.
– HINNEY, HINNI(E), HINNY a term of endearment or affectionate form of address, sweetheart, darling …1724 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– HINNY-BLOB a term of endearment …1746 Sc.
– HIZZIE a housewife; a woman of any age, but generally applied to a young girl, a lass, a wench; a term of jocular endearment …1685 Sc. 
– HONEY a term of endearment …c1350
– HONEY-BABY a term of endearment …1904 sl.
– HONEY-BUN a term of endearment …1904 sl.
– HONEY-BUNCH a term of endearment …1904 sl.
– HONEY BUNCH PLUMMINS a term of endearment for children …Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
– IARTO a term of endearment or friendship – ‘my dear’ …1821 Sc.
– KAE a term of affection for a neat little person …Bk1866 Sc.
– KARRIEWHITCHIT a term of endearment for a child or young animal …1808 Sc.
– KECK a term of endearment for a child …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– LAAMIET a term of endearment …Bk1866 Sc.
– LADDIE a term of endearment to a lad …1546 chiefly Sc.
– LADDIE-COWT a term of affection …Bk1902 Eng. dial.
– LADDIKIE a little lad, a term of affection for a boy …1882 Sc.
– LADDOCK a little lad, a term of affection for a boy …1883 Sc.
– LADY-BIRD a sweetheart; often used as a term of endearment …1592 (Shakespeare)
– LADYKIN a little lady; sometimes used as a term of endearment …1853
– LAMB a term of endearment …a1553
– LAMB CHOP a term of affection, usually of a woman …1970s sl.
– LAMBIE a term of endearment for a lamb, and hence for a child or young person …1718 Sc.
– LAMBKIN a young tender person; chiefly used as a term of endearment …1597
– LAMMIE, LAMMY a term of endearment …1810 Sc.
– LAMMIKEN a term of endearment …1874 Sc.
– LAMMIT a term of endearment, my lamb! …1892 Sc.
– LIGHT O’ LOVE a harmless term of endearment for a girlfriend; a loved one; a sweetheart …Bk1942 Amer. sl.  
– LITTLE CHICKABIDDY a loved one, esp. a child; a term of endearment to a child …1848
– LITTLE DEVIL a term of mildly reproving affection …17C sl.
– LITTLE MARMOSET † a term of endearment or playful reproach to a woman or child …1604
– LITTLE NICKERIE –  a term of endearment for a child …1825 Sc.
– LITTLING an endearment; a caress …1963 Amer. dial.
– LOLLIPOP a sweetheart; also, a term of endearment …1913 Amer. dial.
– MACHREE a term of endearment; my heart! …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– MAMTAM a term of endearment …B1900
– MANDOZY a term of endearment among London Jews …19C sl.
– MANITOODLIE a term of endearment for a baby boy or a male child…1824 Sc.
– MANNIE, MANNY a little man; frequently used as a term of endearment to a little boy …L17 orig. and chiefly Sc.
– MAN OF WAX a smart, clever fellow; a very handsome man; also a term of endearment …1597 Eng. dial.
– MARMOSET † a term of endearment or playful reproach to a woman or child …1526
– MERYON a term of endearment …Bk1880 Eng. dial.
– MOCHREE a term of endearment; darling, my dear …1918 Sc.
– MONGOLITO a term of endearment …1980s US campus sl.
– MONSTER a term of endearment …1954 US teen sl.
– MOOLY a term of endearment, esp. used to a child; my love, my dear …1933 Sc.
– MOOT a term of endearment applied to a child …1866 Sc.
– MOOTIE a term of endearment, Mother …Bk1975 Amer. sl.
– MOP  a term of endearment for a girl or young woman …1466 obs.
– MOPPET a baby; a young child, esp. a girl; a darling, a favourite, a pet; often as a term of endearment …1601
– MOPS(E)  a young girl; a darling; often as a term of endearment …1565
– MOPSEY, MOPSIE, MOPSY a young girl; a pretty child; a darling, a sweetheart; often as a term of endearment …1582
– MOT a term of affection for a girl or a wife …1965 Ireland
– MOTHERKIN * mother, ‘mummy’; often used as an affectionate form of address; a little mother …1577
– MOTHERKINS mother, ‘mummy’; often used as an affectionate form of address; also used as a form of address to a woman who acts as a maternal figure to another …1870
– MOTHERLING * mother, ‘mummy’ often used as an affectionate form of address …1836
– MOTHER MACHREE a term of endearment; latterly ironic …Bk1997 Ireland
– MOUSE a darling; a sweetheart; often used as a term of endearment, esp. for a woman …c1525
– MOUSY a term of endearment for a child or a woman …1786 colloq.
– MURLY-FIKES a term of endearment for an infant …B1900 Sc.
– MY CHURCH a term of endearment; my dear …L19 sl.
– MY DEAR NUG a term of endearment …L17 cant
– MY MOMMY an affectionate name for a sweetheart …1970 Amer. dial.
– MY NUG a term of endearment …L17 cant
– MY PULSE a term of endearment …1924 Irish sl.
– MY TICKLING †* a term of endearment …1605
– NAUGHTY-PACK a half reproving endearment of children …Bk1902 sl,
– NEW POTATO a term of endearment …1900 Eng. dial.
– NICK-O-FIDGE * a term of endearment for a small child or baby …1608 Eng. dial. 
– NOBS †* a term of endearment applied to a woman; one’s dear or darling …a1529
– NUG a term of endearment …L17 cant
– NUTTY-COCK † a term of endearment …1895 Eng. dial.
– NYKIN † a term of endearment …1693
– OLD BALLS a man; often used as a term of affection …L19 sl.
– OLD BASTARD a man; often used as a term of affection …L19 sl.
– OLD CHIP a term of endearment …L19 sl.
– OLD CHOOK a general term of intimate affection …1910s Aust. sl.
– OLD MAN a term of endearment …US Civil War usage
– PAILWUR a term of endearment for a child …1890 Sc.
– PANGY an affectionate term for a little child …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– PAPPY SACK a term of endearment for a male child …1949 Amer. dial.
– PARRICH a term of endearment for an infant or a young child …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– PARROCK a term of endearment for a baby enclosed in its mother’s arms …1880 Sc.
– PA SACK a term of endearment for a male child …1949 Amer. dial.
– PEANUT a term of endearment for a small child …1915 Amer. dial.
– PIGSNEY, PIGSNY one specially cherished; a darling, a pet; a term of endearment; generally applied to a girl or a woman;  rarely applied to a man or boy (obs. now for this use) …c1386 arch. or Eng. dial.
– PILLICOCK † a flattering word for a young boy; a term of endearment …1598
– PIPPIN a term of endearment; a person of good ability …Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
– POOPSIE, POOPSY a term of endearment …1942 US sl.
– POPPET a term of endearment, esp. to a child …1849 sl.
– POPSY-WOPSY a term of endearment for a girl …1887
– POSSUM a term of endearment …Bk1999 Aust. sl.
– PUDSY a term of endearment, esp. to a baby …sl.
– PUG † a term of endearment …1580
– PUGGY † a term of endearment for women and children …1611
– PUSS a term of endearment for a woman …1602 sl.
– PUSSICKIE a fondling name for a child …B1900 Sc.
– PUSSYCAT a term of endearment …Bk1995 US sl.
– QUEAN a term of endearment for a little girl …1703 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– QUEANIE a woman; a damsel; a term of endearment for a little girl …1703 Sc.
– QUEEN a woman; a damsel; a term of endearment for a little girl …1703 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– QUENE a woman; a damsel; a term of endearment for a little girl …1703 Sc.
– QUINE a woman; a damsel; a term of endearment for a little girl …1703 Sc.
– RATTEN a term of endearment …1867 Sc.
– ROCKLING a term of endearment used to a child …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– RUFFINER an exaggerated term of endearment to children …B1900 Eng. dial.
– SAMMY a term of endearment; a favourite …Bk1854 Eng. dial.
– SAUCY BEGGAR a term of endearment …Bk1891
– SKAT a term of endearment …1964 S. Afr. sl.
– SKATTIE a term of endearment …1964 S. Afr. sl.
– SKEESTER a rascal, a rogue; a term of endearment for a child …1966 Amer. dial.
– SKEETER a rascal, a rogue; a term of endearment for a child …1966 Amer. dial.
– SKETCH a term of endearment for someone …1997 Irish sl.
– SLAWSY-GAWSY † a ludicrous term of endearment …B1900 Sc. 
– SNICKELTYFRITZ a mischievous little boy; a scamp, a rascal; usually used endearingly …1916 Amer. dial.
– SNICKETYFRITZ a mischievous little boy; a scamp, a rascal; usually used endearingly …1916 Amer. dial.
– SNICKLEFRITZ a mischievous little boy; a scamp, a rascal; usually used endearingly …1905 Amer. dial.
– SNIGGLEFRITZ a mischievous little boy; a scamp, a rascal; usually used endearingly …1905 Amer. dial.
– SNOOKS a term of endearment, either to a child or a lover …1920s sl.
– SNOOKUMS a term of endearment …1920s sl.
– SNOOKYOOKUMS a term of endearment …1905 Amer. dial.
– SPARLING † a term of endearment …1570
– SPARROW a term of endearment …c1600 
– SQUALL † a girl, a minx; a term of endearment, and of abuse or reproach …1570
– SUCKET † a term of endearment …1605 
– SUCKLER † a term of endearment …1500-20 Sc.
– SUGAR a term of endearment …1930 sl., orig. US
– SUGAR-BABE a term of endearment …1930 sl., orig. US
– SUGAR-BABY a term of endearment …1930 sl., orig. US
– SUGAR-PIE a term of endearment …1930 sl., orig. US
– SWEETHEART a term of endearment …c1325 sl.
– SWEETIE a term of endearment …1932 sl.
– SWEETIE PIE a term of endearment …1928 sl.
– TAID a ‘toad’; a term of endearment for a child or young woman …Bk1825 Sc.
– TAIDIE a ‘toad’; a term of endearment for a child or young woman …Bk1825 Sc.
– TAUDY † a term of endearment for a child …1808 Sc.
– TENDER a term of endearment to a baby …1895 Eng. dial.
– TENDER-DEAR a term of endearment …1885 Eng. dial.
– TEBBIE a term of endearment …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– THING a term of endearment for a child or girl …1801 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– TIB a term of endearment …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– TIBBY a term of endearment …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– TIBBY-LAMB a term of endearment applied pitifully to a child …1896 Eng. dial.
– TID a term of affection or endearment …1896 Sc.
– TOAD a term of endearment, esp. of a child or young woman …1768 Sc.
– TODIE † a term of endearment for a child …1808 Sc.
– TOOTSY-WOOTSY an attractive girl; a loved one; a sweetheart; a term of endearment to one’s sweetheart …1952 Amer. sl. 
– TOWDY † a term of endearment for a child …1808 Sc.
– TREACLE a term of endearment …2001 UK sl.
– WAG-PASTIE a rogue, urchin, rascal; a term of endearment …1534 sl.
– WALLET a small, neatly-made person; generally used as a term of endearment …Bk1866 Sc.
– WALLY-GOWDIE a term of endearment …1866 Sc.
– WANTON † a person, esp. a child, of playful, roguish or sportive conduct; sometimes used as a term of endearment …1589
– WEAN a woman; a damsel; a term of endearment for a little girl …1703 Eng. dial.
– WHITE BOY a term of endearment …17C colloq.
– WHITING-MOP † a fair lass, a pretty girl; a term of endearment for a girl …1701
– WILLY WINKIE a term of endearment for a small child …Bk1905 Sc.
– WOOFIT a term of endearment to an infant …Bk1855 Eng. dial.
– WYFOCKIE a little wife; a little woman; generally used as a term of endearment …1825 Sc.
– YARTA a term of endearment or friendship; ‘my dear’ …1821 Sc.
– YOUNG DEVIL a term of mildly reproving affection …17C
– ZAIDY, ZAYDE a grandfather; an elderly man; frequently used as a respectful form of address or term of endearment …1946
– ZISKEIT a term of endearment, esp. for a child …Bk1982 Jewish 
 
ENDEAVOUR – nouns
– DEVER duty, best endeavour or try …B1900 Eng. dial.
– ETTLE an attempt, an effort, an endeavour, an aim, an intent …1839 Sc.
– ETTLING an effort, a strong endeavour …1883 Sc.
– MINT an aim, attempt at, effort, endeavour …1660 Sc. & Eng. dial.  
– OPEROSITY laboriousness, painstaking endeavour …1623
– YATTLE † an endeavour; strength, force of mind …Bk1905 Sc.
endeavour – verbs
– ACKADUR to persevere, to endure, to endeavour …1866 Sc.
– AFFORCE † to endeavour, attempt, or try …c1300
– DEVER to try, to attempt, to endeavour …1879 Eng. dial.
– ETTLE to attempt, to endeavour; to strive after, to struggle hard to obtain …1725 Sc.
– HEAVE † to put forth effort; to endeavour, to labour, to strive …c1374
– IMITATE † to make an attempt; to endeavour to do something …a1626 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– MINT to endeavour, to attempt; to venture, to dare, to presume …1724 Sc.  
– NIXURIATE † to endeavour, to attempt …1623
 
ENDLESS – adjectives
– AEVITERNAL †* everlasting, endless, eternal …1660
– FOR ENDWAYS endless, without number, continuous …1859 Eng. dial.
– INTERMINATE * that is without end; endless, boundless, infinite …1533
– INTERMINATED † that is without end; endless, boundless, infinite …a1734
– SISYPHEAN of or pert. to Sisyphus (a king of Corinth, whose punishment in Hades was to roll a heavy stone up a hill; as he reached the top, the stone rolled down again); resembling the fruitless toil of Sisyphus; endless and ineffective …1635
– SISYPHIAN of or pert. to Sisyphus (a king of Corinth, whose punishment in Hades was to roll a heavy stone up a hill; as he reached the top, the stone rolled down again); resembling the fruitless toil of Sisyphus; endless and ineffective …1599
 
ENDOWED – adjectives
– MONEYFIED †* endowed with money …1641
 
ENDURABLE – adjectives
– DURABLE † capable of being endured …1509
 
ENDURANCE – adjectives
– FORTITUDINOUS having fortitude; endowed with courage or moral strength; capable of endurance …1752
– SUFFERABLE † capable of endurance …1481
endurance – adverbs
– SUFFERINGLY † with patient endurance …a1340
endurance – nouns
– BANT vigour, strength, endurance, ‘go’ …1856 Eng. dial.
– BEARANCE endurance, patient suffering …1725 arch.
– BELEAVING † remaining steadfast; endurance, perseverance …1340
– BIDING endurance; enduring …Bk1911 Sc. 
– BOTTOM stamina, endurance, staying power; used esp. of horses and dogs …1843 Amer. dial.
– DURABLENESS † power of endurance …1740
– DURANCE endurance of toil or fatigue …1579 arch.
– DURE † power of endurance …c1330
– END OF THE BEAN ROW, THE the limit of one’s patience or endurance …1965 Amer. dial.
– END OF THE ROW, THE the limit of one’s patience or endurance …1904 Amer. dial.
– LEGS the ability of a show, song, public figure, etc. to be an enduring success; staying power …1970s Amer. show business usage
– GAME courage, pluck, spirit, endurance …1824 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– GUTS stamina, toughness of character, tenacity, staying power, endurance …M17 colloq.
– MAIN patience, endurance …Bk1905 Sc.
– SUFFERANCE 1. patient endurance, forbearance, long-suffering …a1300 arch.
2.  capacity to endure, endurance …1544
– SUFFERING † patient endurance, long-suffering …a1340
– TACK † hold; holding quality; adherence, endurance, stability, strength, substance, solidity …1412-20 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– TOLERANCE † the act of enduring or sustaining pain or hardship; the power or capacity of enduring; endurance …1412-20
– TOLERATION † of sustaining or enduring; endurance …1531
– WADE endurance; power of lasting …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
endurance – verbs 
– DIE GAME to maintain one’s spirit and endurance to the last …1727
– HAVE SHOT ONE’S BOLT to have reached the limit of one’s endurance or effort …Aust. sl.
endurance – phrases
– AT THE END OF ONE’S ROW at the limit of one’s patience or endurance …1904 Amer. dial.
 
ENDURE – verbs
– ABEAR to endure; to suffer …c885
– ABROOK †* to brook, to endure, to bear …1592
– ABY(E) to pay, as a penalty; to suffer, to endure …1374 arch.
– ACKADUR to persevere, to endure, to endeavour …1866 Sc.
– ADREE † to bear, to endure, to suffer …a1000
– ANSWER to last, to endure …B1900 Eng. dial.
– AWAY WITH to endure, to put up with …1864 Eng. dial.
– BEAR HARD † to endure with a grudge, to take a thing ill or amiss, to have ill will to, to have a resentment against …c1400
– BEAR TACK † to be substantial, strong, or lasting; to hold out, to endure, to hold one’s own …1573
– BEAR UPON THE SPLEEN † to endure with a grudge, to take a thing ill or amiss, to have ill will to, to have a resentment against …1629
– BIDE 1.  to endure, to suffer, to bear, to undergo, to abide …c1200 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
2. to tolerate, to endure, to put up with, to abide …a1325
– CARRY † to bear, to endure …1583
– DO ON ONE’S PRICK to do with ease, esp. to endure any challenging situation, as a prison sentence, with no difficulty …1960s sl.
– DURE † to endure; to undergo, to bear …1297
– GAFF to endure …1970s US college sl.
– GUT IT OUT to be strong or tough in the face of adversity; to be sturdily stoic; to persist; to endure bravely and tenaciously …1930s Amer. sl.
– GUT IT THROUGH to be strong or tough in the face of adversity; to endure bravely and tenaciously …1930s US sl.
– GUT OUT to be strong or tough in the face of adversity; to endure bravely and tenaciously …1930s US sl.
– GUTS IT OUT to endure bravely and tenaciously …1973 Amer. sl.
– GUTS OUT to endure bravely and tenaciously …1973 Amer. sl.
– GUT THROUGH to be strong or tough in the face of adversity; to endure bravely and tenaciously …1930s US sl.
– HACK to put up with, to tolerate, to endure …1915 Amer. sl.
– HACK IT to put up with, to tolerate, to endure …1961 Amer. sl.
– HOLD ONE’S CORNER to hold one’s own against others …M19 colloq.
– I-THOLE † to bear, to suffer, to endure …a1000
– ONDREGH † to endure …c1250
– PATIENCE ALONG to endure patiently …1942 Amer. dial.
– PERTOLERATE †* to endure to the end …1623
– ROUGH IT OUT to endure rough or difficult conditions …c1771
– SAGACIATE to fare; to get on; to bear; to endure …1832 Amer. dial.
– SAGASHUATE to fare; to get on; to bear; to endure …1832 Amer. dial.
– SAGATIATE to fare; to get on; to bear; to endure …1832 Amer. dial.
– SAGATICATE to fare; to get on; to bear; to endure …1832 Amer. dial.
– SEGACIATE to fare; to get on; to bear; to endure …1832 Amer. dial.
– SEGASHIATE to fare; to get on; to bear; to endure …1832 Amer. dial.
– SEGASHUATE to fare; to get on; to bear; to endure …1832 Amer. dial.
– STICK IT OUT to endure something unpleasant …1882 sl.
– SWEAT IT OUT to endure something unpleasant …1876 sl., orig. US
– TAKE HEAT to suffer or endure punishment or criticism …1920s US sl.
– THOLE to bear, to suffer, to endure, to tolerate …1786 Sc. & Eng. & Amer. dial.
– THOOTLE to endure; to wait …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– TOLERATE † to endure, to sustain pain or hardship …1531
– TOUGH IT OUT to endure something unpleasant …1852 sl., orig. US
– UNDERGANG to undergo, to endure …1743 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– WHITE-KNUCKLE IT to endure an event or experience which provokes fear, suspense, or anxiety …1977 colloq.
 
ENDURING – adjectives
– BIDING lasting, continuing, enduring; now usually ‘abiding’ …1430
– DUREFUL † of long continuance; lasting, enduring, continuing, durable …1594
– LASTY durable, long-lasting, enduring …1882 Amer. dial.
– LONGANIMOUS * long-suffering; enduring, patient …1620
enduring – nouns 
– UNDERGANGING the act of undergoing or enduring; anything endured …Bk1905 Eng. dial.