Reverse Dictionary: FAI – FAK


FAIL – person (also see FAILURE)
– FAIL one that fails or disappoints …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– FLUNKEE one who fails an examination …19C US campus sl.
– FLUNKER one who regularly fails their examinations or recitations …L19 US campus sl.
– FLUNK(E)Y 1. one who fails …Bk1913-17 Amer. college sl.
2. one who fails an examination …19C US campus sl.
– MORNING GLORY a person who fails to fulfil apparent potential or maintain early achievement …1898 colloq.
– PROUGHAL, PROUGHLE a person who has failed to do something he or she has boasted to do …1983 Irish sl.
fail – verbs 
– BAG to botch, to do poorly on something, to fail …1968 Amer. sl.
– BALL UP †* to fail …1856 sl.
– BANK to become bankrupt, to fail …1790 Eng. dial.
– BE COPPERED ON THE JACK to fail; to lose one’s point (from the game of faro) …1878 Amer. sl.
– BE LEFT to fail; to be outdistances metaphorically; to be placed in a difficult situation …c1895 colloq.
– BIFF to fail …Bk1934 US students’ sl.
– BITE THE DUST to break; to fail; to give out …Bk2006 US sl.
– BLOW to fail at something …Bk1995 US sl.
– BLOW UP to be out of order; to fail, to collapse …1923 Amer. dial.
– BOMB to fail a test, exam, etc. …Aust. sl.
– BOUNCE to fail …Bk1934 college sl.
– BURST ONE’S BOILER to come to grief, to meet with disaster or failure …1824 colloq.
– BUST A HAME STRING to fail in an undertaking …1923 Amer. dial.
– BUST ONE’S BOILER to come to grief, to meet with disaster or failure …1834 colloq.
– COME A CROPPER to have a setback; to fail badly …1874 sl.
– COME A GUTSER to come undone; to fail miserably; to fall heavily; to trip over and fall …1918 Aust. sl.
– COME OUT OF THE LITTLE END OF THE HORN to get the worst of a bargain; to be reduced in circumstances; to fail …17C colloq.
– COME TO GRIEF to get into serious trouble; to fail …1850 UK
– CRACK THE BELL to fail, to muddle things, to make a mistake, to ruin it …1909 Cockneys’ sl.
– CRACK UP to fail in an examination …US Civil War usage
– CRAP OUT to fail; to break down …Bk2006 US sl.
– CRASH AND BURN to fail utterly …1978 US sl.
– DEAL IN ZEROES to achieve nothing; to fail completely; to draw a blank …1960s US Black sl.
– DECADE † to fall down, to fail …a1500 Sc.
– DECAID † to fall down, to fail …a1500 Sc.
– DEFAULT † to be wanting; to fail …c1340
– DIE ON ONE’S ARSE to fail badly; to suffer an irreversible decline, to come to a sudden or premature end …1984
– DIP OUT to come off worse; to miss out on an opportunity; to fail …1987 UK sl.
– DO A BRODIE to fail, to slip back into bad habits …L19 sl.
– DRIFT ASTERN to fail of success …1945 Amer. dial.
– DROP ASTERN to fail of success …1945 Amer. dial.
– DROP THE BALL to fail at something; to allow something to fail …Bk2006 US sl.
– EAT IT to fail …Bk1995 US sl.
– EXFLUNCT to cause to fail, to render useless, to overcome completely …1831 Amer. dial.
– EXFLUNCTIFY to cause to fail, to render useless, to overcome completely …1840 Amer. dial.
– FADE † to grow small or weak; to decline, decay, fail, or faint; to shrink …1388
– FAIL OUT to fail …1910 Amer. dial.
– FALL to fail …1910 sl.
– FALL ASTERN to lose ground, to fail …1945 Amer. dial.
– FALL DOWN (ON) to fail; to ‘come to grief’ …1899 US sl.
– FALL DOWN AND GO BOOM to fail, esp. utterly and obviously …1930s Amer. sl.
– FALL DOWN ON THE JOB to fail at one’s responsibilities; to shirk an obligation …1898 Amer. sl.
– FALL FLAT ON ONE’S ASS to fail, esp. ignominiously and spectacularly …1940s Amer. sl.
– FALL FLAT ON ONE’S FACE to make an embarrassing mistake, failed attempt, catastrophic decline, etc. …1970s Amer. sl.
– FALL ON ONE’S ASS to fail, esp. ignominiously and spectacularly …1940s Amer. sl.
– FALL ON ONE’S FACE to make an embarrassing mistake, failed attempt, catastrophic decline, etc. …1970s Amer. sl.
– FALSE † of a thing: to prove unreliable, to fail, to give way …c1205
– FAULT † to come short of a standard; to make default, to fail …a1400
– FISH FOR HERRING AND CATCH A WHALE to fail miserably ,,,B1900
– FIZZLE to fail, to make a fiasco, to come a lame conclusion …1847 US colloq.
– FIZZLE OUT to fail, to make a fiasco, to come a lame conclusion …a1848 US colloq.
– FLAG to fail a course …Bk2006 US sl.
– FLAT to fail; to give way …Bk1893 sl.
– FLIVVER to fail …Bk1934 college sl.
– FLOP to fail completely …1900 US sl.
– FLUB THE DUB to fail to do the right thing …Bk2006 US sl.
– FLUMMOX, FLUMMUX to blunder; to fail; to die …M19 US sl.
– FLUNK 1. to fail an examination; to give a fail mark …E19 sl., orig. US campus
2. to fail; to blunder; to make a mistake …L19 US sl.
– FLUNK OUT to fail an examination; to give a fail mark …E19 sl., orig. US campus
– FOLD to fail; to close …Bk2006 US sl.
– FOUR OUT to fail …Bk1934 college sl.
– GET LEFT to fail; to be outdistanced metaphorically; to be placed in a difficult situation …c1895 colloq.
– GO ALL MOODY ON to fail, to go wrong …1930s sl.
– GO ASTERN to fail of success …1945 Amer. dial.
– GO BUNG to die; to fail; to go bankrupt …1882 Aust. & NZ sl.
– GO FOR A SKATE to fail; to be brought up before court …1962 NZ sl.
– GO OFF AT HALF-COCK to speak or act without due forethought or preparation, and consequently to fail in attaining one’s object …1848
– GO PEAR-SHAPED of plans or schemes: to fail; to collapse; to go wrong …1990s sl.
– GO TO THE BOW-WOWS ‘go to the dogs’; to fail …1839 Amer. sl.
– GO TO THE PACK to fail persistently …E20 Aust. & NZ colloq.
– GO TO THE WALL to fail in business, to be ruined, to collapse financially …1842
– GO UNDER to fail; to perish; to die …1848 Amer. dial.
– GUTSER to fall; to fail badly …20C Aust. sl.
– HIT THE CEILING to fail in examination …1900 Amer. sl.
– LEESE †* to fail to do something …a1300
– LOSE ONE’S TAFFY to fail …1927 Amer. dial.
– LOSE THE FANG to miss one’s aim; to fail in an attempt …1825 Sc.
– LUNCH to spoil, to ruin, to fail …1950s US college sl.
– MANK † to fail; to be insufficient …1737 Sc.
– MANKIE to fail; to miss …1882 Sc.
– MISCANTER to fail, to be disappointed in an undertaking …Bk1903 Eng. dial.  
– MISGIVE † to fail, to fall through, to miscarry …1631 Sc.  
– MISGO to go wrong; to go astray; to fail, to miscarry …1766 Sc. & Eng. dial.  
– MISS ONE’S TIP to fail in one’s aim or object …1854 sl., orig. circus usage
– MISS STAYS to fail, to make a mistake …1907 Amer. dial.
– MISSTAY to fail, to make a mistake …1916 Amer. dial.
– MISS THE BUS to lose an opportunity; to fail in an undertaking …1915 sl.
– MISS THE CUSHION † to miss the mark; to make a mistake; to err; to fail in an attempt …c1525
– MUCK to fail at …L19 sl.
– NOT GET ANYWHERE to fail to reach your goal; to not succeed in achieving your object …1932 US sl.
– PEG OUT to fail completely …1854 Amer. sl.
– PIP to reject or disqualify; to fail a candidate in an examination; of a candidate: to fail an examination …1908
– PLAY WHALEY to blunder, to fail; to play havoc with something; to spoil, to ruin; to make a mistake …1897 Amer. dial.
– POOH OUT to fail, to grow weak or tired; to come to night  …1930 Amer. dial.
– PUNCH to fail at or to ruin something; esp. to fail a course in school …Bk1974 Amer. sl.
– QUAIL † to fail or give way; to break down …c1440 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– RANK to fail, esp. in the commission of a crime …1920s US criminals’ sl.
– RAVEL THE CLEW to fail in business …B1900 Eng. dial.
– RETURN BY WEEPING CROSS to regret deeply some undertaking, and repent of it; to be in a state of lamentation; to fail; to suffer defeat …1659
– RUN ASTERN to fail of success …1945 Amer. dial.
– SCAT to fail; to become bankrupt, to collapse …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– SOUP to place in difficulties, to cause to fail, to bring to grief …1895 colloq.
– SPIN to fail in an examination …1869
– STRIKE THE BALL UNDER THE LINE to fail in one’s purpose …1546
– TAKE A BRODIE to fail, to slip back into bad habits …L19 sl.
– TAKE A DIVE to fail …1980s sl., orig. US
– TAKE A DROP to find oneself in difficulties; to come to grief …1970s US sl.
– TAKE A NOSE-DIVE to collapse; to fail utterly …1920s sl.
– TAKE OFF to fail, to give way, to break down …1900 Sc.
– TAKE THE PIPE to fail to act or achieve under pressure, esp. in sports; hence, to be punished …1960s US sl.
– TANK to fail …1920s sl.
– TAP OUT to fail, to ‘draw a blank’ …1960s sl.
– TINE ONE’S ERRAND to fail in an errand or purpose …1873  Sc.
– TIRE † to fail, to cease (as a supply, etc.); to diminish; to give out, to come to an end …c725
– UNBESEEM to fail in, to fall short of …1812
– WANT 1. to fail; to give out; to be insufficient for a purpose, etc. …c1400
2. to fail to do something; to be wanting in one’s endeavours …1426
– WUSS OUT to lose courage; to back down; to fail to do as promised …1977 US sl.
– ZAP to fail in an examination …1961 US sl.
– ZONK to fail …1960s sl.
– ZONK OUT to fail …1960s sl.
– ZOO to fail an exam …1970s US college sl.
 
FAILED – adjectives
– BUSTED failed …1925 US sl.
– GONE DEMOCRATIC failed, gone against one …1893 Amer. dial.
– MUFFED spoilt, bungled, failed …L19 sl.
failed – phrases
– HIS NAME IS PANTS he is discredited or unpopular, or he has failed …1886 US colloq.
– ONE’S CAKE IS DOUGH † one’s project has failed …1596
– THAT CAKE’S ALL DOUGH denotes that a project or undertaking has failed …1895 Eng. dial.
– THAT CAKE’S ALL DUFF denotes that a project or undertaking has failed …1895 Eng. dial.
 
FAILING – adjectives
– DYING ON ITS ARSE failing …2001 UK sl.
– ON A BUST failing, doing badly …M19 sl.
failing – nouns 
– DEFAILANCE, DEFAILLANCE † failing, failure …1603
– DEFAILLANCY † failing, failure …1649
– DEFALLATION † failure, failing …1490
– FAILANCE † the fact of failing; failure, neglect, omission…1612
– FALSENESS † the fact of failing or ‘giving way’ …1552
– FAULT † default, failing, neglect …c1325
– FAULTURE a failing …1828
– WANT † a defect, failing, fault; a shortcoming …1592
 
FAILURE – nouns
– ABORTION something of very poor quality; a messy failure; a misfortune; an ugly person or thing …1943 US sl.
– ALSO-RAN a useless person; a failure; an irrelevance …L19 sl., orig. Aust. horse-racing usage
– BAD IRON failure; misadventure; bad luck …Bk1896 workmen’s sl.
– BALK the failure of an expectation; a disappointment …1733
– BIFF a failure …Bk1934 college sl.
– BLOOMER a very great mistake; an error; a failure …1889 sl.
– BLUE DUCK a disappointment; a dud; a lost cause, a failure …1889 Aust. & NZ sl.
– BOBBLE an unsuccessful undertaking; a failure …1920 Amer. dial.
– BREAK a breakaway or break-down; a collapse or failure …1827 US
– BUMMER a disappointing, unpleasant, or unwanted situation or experience; a disappointment, a failure …1967 orig. US
– BUST-OUT a collapse or failure; hence, a smash-up; a person who is a failure …1963 US sl.
– CROPPER a severe misfortune, personal failure, etc. …M19 colloq.
– CRULLER a failure; an unsuccessful performance or entertainment …Bk1974 Amer. sl.
– DAMP SQUIB something that fails to come to a conclusion; a fiasco; a failure; a dud …1845 Amer. sl.
– DEADBEAT of things: a failure, a deception …1866 sl., orig. US
– DEAD DUCK a complete, irredeemable failure …1829 US sl.
– DEAD FROST a fiasco, a complete failure …c1875 theatrical sl.
– DEAD LOSS an absolutely useless person, idea, or undertaking; a useless, unworkable object; a complete failure; an absolute waste of time or money …1927 sl., orig. Royal Air Force
– DEAD NIP an unimportant project that turns out to be a failure …L19 sl.
– DEAD PIGEON a guaranteed and absolute failure; often in context of a forthcoming election …1910s US sl.
– DEFAILANCE, DEFAILLANCE † failing, failure …1603
– DEFAILLANCY † failing, failure …1649
– DEFAILMENT † failure …1612
– DEFAILURE †* failure …a1677
– DEFALCATION falling away, defection; shortcoming, failure, delinquency …1750
– DEFALLATION † failure, failing …1490
– DIMRACKER a disaster; a complete failure …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– DOG a thing of poor quality; something worthless or inferior; a failure, a dud …1917 sl., orig. US
– DUD a worthless or unsuccessful person or thing; a failure …1915 UK sl.
– FAILANCE † the fact of failing; failure, neglect, omission…1612
– FAILERY a failure …1913 Amer. dial.
– FAILLZENCY † default, failure …1710 Sc.
– FAILYIE † failure, non-performance …1551 Sc.
– FAILZURE † failure …1726 Sc
– FALSENESS † the fact of failing or ‘giving way’ …1552
– FIZZER a disappointing failure, a fiasco …1957 Aust. sl.
– FIZZLE a failure or fiasco; a failure in recitation or examination …1846
– FLAMEOUT a complete failure
– FLASH IN THE PAN a failure …Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
– FLAT a failure …Bk1893 Amer. sl.
– FLIVVER a failure …Bk1934 college sl.
– FLOP a complete, dismal failure …1919 US sl.
– FLOP SWEAT a panic associated with the possibility of failure, whether or not actual perspiration is involved …1966 US sl.
– FLOPPEROO a failure …1931 US sl.
– FLUKE a fiasco; a failure …US Civil War usage
– FLUMMOX a failure ,,,19C US sl.
– FLUMMUX a failure …19C Amer. dial.
– FLUNK a failure …M19 Amer. dial.
– GAFFLE defeat, failure, betrayal …1990s US Black sl.
– ILL SUCCESS failure, misadventure, misfortune …1823 arch.
– KISS OF DEATH something that causes failure, destruction, etc. …colloq.
– LARRY a failure …1980s US sl.
– LEAD BALLOON a failure; a flop…1954 US sl.
– MUCK-UP a complete failure; confusion or muddle; a botch …L19 colloq.
– NAILS a disappointment; a failure …1981 Hawaii juvenile usage
– NO-HOPER something doomed to failure …1944 colloq.
– NO-NO an impossibility; a failure; any negative outcome …1975 UK sl.
– PURLER a sudden dramatic misfortune or failure …1883 colloq.
– QUINCE of a situation or object: a failure …1900s US sl.
– SMASH a failure …Bk1934 college sl.
– TURKEY a failure …Bk1995 US sl.
failure – person  (also see FAIL)
– BED-WETTER one who is a failure; an incompetent person …2002 US sl.
– BIG L a person who is a failure; a loser …1984 US college sl.
– BUST-OUT a collapse or failure; hence, a smash-up; a person who is a failure …1963 US sl.
– DEADBEAT of people: a failure, a down-and-out, an impoverished person; a person down on their luck; a jobless and homeless person …M19 sl., orig. US
– DEAD DUCK a person lacking good prospects; a person or thing doomed to failure or disaster; one whose case is hopeless; a goner …1829 sl.
– DEADLEG a down-and-out, a failure …1960s sl.
– DUD a worthless or unsuccessful person or thing; a failure …1915 UK sl.
– GONER someone who is doomed to failure …1970 US sl.
– HELEN MOVIESTAR someone who tries too hard; a future failure …Bk1972 homosexual sl. 
– NO-HOPER a hopeless person; a useless or incompetent person; someone or something doomed to failure …1944 colloq.
– NO-USER a failure; a ‘loser’ …1980s Irish sl.
– PIKER a useless person; a failure …Aust. & NZ sl.
– SAD SAL a failure; an unpopular person …1943 US teen sl.
– SAD SAM a failure; an unpopular person …1943 US teen sl.
– WICKED LOSER a failure; a loser in a temporary way, esp. a person who could have avoided being a failure …Bk1989 US college sl. 
– YUTZ a fool, an idiot; a simpleton; a failure …1983 US sl.
failure – verbs (also see FAIL)
– BRING ONE’S EGGS TO A BAD MARKET to suffer the failure of one’s schemes …1809
– BRING ONE’S HOGS TO A BAD MARKET to suffer the failure of one’s schemes …a1616
– COME A PURLER to fall heavily head first; so suffer sudden misfortune or failure …1908 colloq.
– DEFAULT † to fail in strength or vigour, to faint; to suffer failure …1382
– DROP ONE’S CANDY to make a big blunder or serious mistake; to do something to cause the failure of a plan …Bk1905 Amer. dial.
– FIZZLE OUT to prove a failure …Bk1905 Amer. dial.
– GO OVER LIKE A LEAD BALLOON to be an utter failure …1950 US sl.
– LAUGH ON THE OTHER SIDE OF ONE’S FACE to cry; to experience unexpected failure, defeat, or regret …1946 Amer. dial.
– LAUGH ON THE OTHER SIDE OF ONE’S MOUTH to cry; to experience unexpected failure, defeat, or regret …1843 Amer. dial.
– LAUGH ON THE WRONG SIDE OF ONE’S MOUTH to cry; to experience unexpected failure, defeat, or regret …1899 Amer. dial.
– LAUGH OUT OF THE OTHER CORNER OF ONE’S MOUTH to cry; to experience unexpected failure, defeat, or regret …1912 Amer. dial.
– LOSE THE HOG FOR A HALFPENNYWORTH OF TAR to lose an object, spoil an enterprise or court failure by trying to save in a small matter of detail …1670
– LOSE THE SHEEP FOR A HALFPENNYWORTH OF TAR to lose an object, spoil an enterprise or court failure by trying to save in a small matter of detail …1678
– LOSE THE SHIP FOR A HALFPENNYWORTH OF TAR to lose an object, spoil an enterprise or court failure by trying to save in a small matter of detail …1869
– MAKE A SPOON OR SPOIL A HORN to make a determined effort to achieve something, whether ending in success or failure; to succeed in an enterprise or fail deplorably …1880
– POINT THE BONE AT to predict or will the failure of an enterprise; to bring defeat or failure on a person; later, to accuse, to blame, to condemn a person …1923 Aust. colloq.
– TAKE IT ON THE CHIN to suffer a severe failure; to undergo complete defeat or frustration …20C Amer. colloq.
failure – interjections & phrases
– ALL THE FAT IS IN THE FIRE used to indicate that a plan has failed …M16 sl. 
– BLOOEY!, BLOOIE! used to denote failure or collapse …1920s sl.
 
FAINT (weak and dizzy) – adjectives
– AFEYNTED † rendered faint, enfeebled …1393
– BABBISH weak, helpless, faint ….1876 Eng. dial.
– DADDET faint, weary, tired through overwork …1908 Sc.
– FAINTFUL † ready to faint; causing or indicating faintness …1589
– FAINTIFIED weak, faint …1933 Amer. dial.
– FAINTISH weak, faint …1965 Amer. dial.
– FAINTIVE inclined to faint, faintish, languid …1790 rare exc. Sc.
– FAINTLY † inclined to faint …1892 Sc.
– FAINTY † faint, sickly, languid; later, inclined to swoon; causing faintness …1530 obs. exc. poetic usage
– FAINTY-SICK physically weak, faint …1926 Amer. dial.
– FANSOME feeling faint …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– LANGUESCENT growing faint or languid …1837
– LANGUIFIC †* that makes weak or faint …1727
– LANGUIFICAL †* that makes weak or faint …1656
– MAWKISH slightly indisposed; faint; sick from drinking …1896 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– SAPPY pallid, sickly, faint …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– TEARY weak, frail, delicate; faint …1825 Eng. dial.
– WAIRSH weak, delicate, wanting in stamina; faint, as from want of food; sickly-looking …1808 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– WALLOW pinched-looking; faint from want or illness …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– WALLOWISH pinched and miserable-looking; faint from hunger …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– WELSH pinched and miserable-looking; faint from hunger …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– WOOZY dizzy, faint, unwell …1897
faint (weak and dizzy) – nouns (includes fainting, faintness)
– DWALM, DWAM a swoon; a fainting fit …a1513 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– FALL-OUT a fainting spell …1970 Amer. dial.
– FAINT faintness …a1300
– FAINT-FIT † a fainting fit …1795
– FAINTINGNESS † faintness …1634-5
– FAINTS, THE a tendency to faint …c1890 colloq.
– FAINT-OUT a feeling of weakness or faintness …1965 Amer. dial.
– TAWM a fit of faintness or sickness …1846 Sc.
– VAPORS sickness; a fainting spell; nausea …20C colloq.
– WEAK JERKS a feeling of faintness and shakiness or palpitations, often as a result of hunger, fear, or anxiety …a1978 Amer. dial.
– WEAK TREMBLES a feeling of faintness and shakiness or palpitations, often as a result of hunger, fear, or anxiety …1889 Amer. dial.
faint (weak and dizzy) – person
– ADMIRAL OF THE WHITE a woman in a faint …Bk1921 sl.
faint (weak and dizzy) – verbs 
– BOP OUT to faint, to pass out …1970 Amer. dial.
– DEFAULT † to fail in strength or vigour, to faint; to suffer failure …1382
– DWALM, DWAM to faint, to swoon; to become unconscious; also, to sicken or fail in health …a1513 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– FADE † to grow small or weak; to decline, decay, fail, or faint; to shrink …1388
– FAINT 1. to depress, to enfeeble, to weaken; to make faint or weak …c1386
2. † to become faint; to grow weak or feeble, to decline …c1400 obs. exc. poetic
– FAINTEN †* to make faint, to depress, to dispirit …1612-15
– FAINT OVER to fall over in a faint …1954 Amer. dial.
– FALL OUT to faint, to lose consciousness …1884 Amer. dial.
– KECK † to faint or swoon suddenly …1825 Sc.
– LANGUEFY †* to make faint or languid …1607
– PALL 1. † to become faint; to faint, to fail in strength, virtue, etc. …1390
2. † to make faint or feeble; to enfeeble, to weaken; to daunt, to appal …1690
– PASS OUT to faint …20C colloq.
– PUT ONE’S HEART AWAY to cause one to faint …1801 Sc. 
– QUAIL to languish; to fall ill; to faint; to have a sinking sensation in the stomach …1790 Eng. dial.
– QUEAL † to languish; to fail in any way; to fall ill; to faint; to have a sinking sensation in the stomach …1515 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– QUOATH † to faint …1567
– QUOTHE † to faint …1567
– SILE to fall down in a swoon; to faint away …1790 Eng. dial.
– TAKE A PASSER to pass out, to faint …1970s US sl.
– TALM † to become exhausted; to fail, to tire, to faint, to swoon …c1325 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– TAUM * to fall gently asleep; to faint; to become unconscious …1887 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– TAWM to swoon; to fall from faintness or sickness …1684 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– TAWM OVER to swoon; to fall from faintness or sickness …1684 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– TIPE to tip over; to overturn; to fall over; to faint, to swoon …1873 Eng. dial.
– WHITE-EYE to be overcome by heat or exhaustion while working; to faint from exhaustion; to quit working, to quit on one; to desert, to abandon …1911 Amer. dial.
 
FAINT (not clearly seen) – adjectives
– DIM-DISCOVERED dimly or faintly seen …1750
faint (not clearly seen) – verbs
– LANGUISH † of light, colour, sound, etc.: to become faint …1626
 
FAINTED – adjectives
– LAID OUT injured; having fainted …Amer. World War I sl.
 
FAINT-HEARTED – adjectives
– CAFF-HEARTED faint-hearted, timid, cowardly; of a worthless, mean disposition …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– CAFFY faint-hearted, timid, cowardly …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– CAFT faint-hearted, timid, cowardly; of a worthless, mean disposition …1830 Eng. dial.
– COWARDOUS † cowardly; timid; faint-hearted …1480
– DUNGHILL † lacking in courage, spirit, or fight; cowardly, faint-hearted …1775
– FAINT-HEART faint-hearted; timid; spiritless; cowardly …1590
– FAINTLING † faint-hearted, timid, cowardly, spiritless …1712
– HEN-HEARTED timorous, cowardly; faint-hearted …a1529
– KECKEN-HEARTED squeamish; loathing the sight of food; dainty; over-fastidious; faint-hearted …Bk1901 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– KECKER-HEARTED faint-hearted, nervous …1896 Eng. dial.
– KICKEN-HEARTED cowardly, faint-hearted …1808 Sc.
– MALTEN-HEARTED † faint-hearted …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– MILK-LIVERED cowardly, timid, faint-hearted …1605
– NESH † timid; wanting in courage, cowardly; faint-hearted; poor-spirited …1382 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– PIPPIN-HEARTED cowardly, chicken-hearted, faint-hearted, timid …1809
– PUSILLANIMOUS lacking in courage and strength of mind; of weak spirit; faint-hearted, cowardly, mean-spirited …1586
– WHITE-HEARTED faint-hearted, timid, cowardly …1598
– YARROW † fearful, faint-hearted …1616 Eng. dial.
faint-hearted – person
– FAINTLING † one who is faint-hearted, timid, spiritless, or cowardly …1614
– WILYART  a timid, faint-hearted fellow …1824 Sc.
faint-hearted – verbs 
– ACCOWARD † to render cowardly; to intimidate, to cow, to make faint-hearted …1530
– ACCOWARDIZE † to render cowardly; to intimidate, to cow, to make faint-hearted …1480
– NESH IT to turn faint-hearted; to draw back …1881 Eng. dial.
 
FAINTING – adverbs
– AFAINT in a fainting state …1878
– ASOOND in a fainting fit …Bk1898 Sc.
 
FAINTNESS – adjectives
– FAINTY † causing faintness; sickly …1590 obs. exc. poetic usage
faintness – adverbs 
– ALIST † recovering from faintness or decay; used with regard to one recovering from a swoon …1768 Sc.
faintness – nouns 
– GONENESS a sinking feeling; weakness, faintness, exhaustion; great depression …1848 Amer. dial.
– TALM † faintness, exhaustion …c1375
– TAUM a sudden feeling of faintness, a drowsy or sick turn …1887 Sc.
 
FAIR (marked by impartiality and honesty) – adjectives
– DINKUM honest, aboveboard; true; also, fair, just …1905 Aust. & NZ
– DINKY fair, honest …1941 Aust. sl.
– FAIR AND TIDY fair and square; equitable …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– FAIR DINKUM fair, honest, equitable …1947 Aust. sl.
– HARMLESS fair to both parties, just …1876 Eng. dial.
– JANNOCK sociable; fair; just; straightforward; genuine  …1828 Eng. dial.
– JENICK fair, straightforward; genuine …1828 Eng. dial.
– JONNOCK sociable; fair; just; straightforward, genuine …1828 Eng. dial.
– KOSHER fair, square, proper, satisfactory …1896 Yiddish
– LEAL † just, fair …c1350
– MIDDLINGISH moderate, fair, tolerable …1878 Eng. dial.
– RIGHT AS AN ACORN honest, fair …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– SATIABLE † fair-seeming, plausible, specious …1592
– SKILLWISE † just, equitable, fair …a1300
– TOLERABLISH somewhat tolerable, pretty fair, just passable …1798
– UP AND UP fair, honest, straightforward …1920s sl., orig. US
fair (marked by impartiality and honesty) – nouns
– DECENT SHAKE a fair or acceptable situation …E19
– EVEN SHAKE a fair chance, fair treatment; an equal chance …1830 US
– FAIRATION fair play …1861 Eng. dial.
– FAIR AWNEY fair play …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– FAIR BALLS fair play …1810 Sc.
– FAIR BOLLIX a fair deal; a just proportion …2000 Ireland sl.
– FAIR BUCK a fair chance …1940s NZ sl.
– FAIR COP any situation seen as fair and about which there is no complaint …L19 sl., orig. UK criminals’ usage
– FAIR COW a call for fair treatment …20C NZ sl.
– FAIR CRACK OF THE WHIP fair treatment; equal opportunity; a reasonable chance …1929 Aust. sl.
– FAIR DINKUM fair dealing; that which is just and equitable …1881 Eng. dial. & Aust. sl.
– FAIR DO decent treatment …M19 Aust. & NZ
– FAIR DOES a fair deal, justice …1865 colloq.
– FAIR DOOS a fair deal, justice …1865 colloq.
– FAIR DO’S a fair deal, justice, decent treatment …1859 colloq.
– FAIR DO’S ALL ROUND a fair deal, justice …c1930 colloq.
– FAIR DUES a fair deal, justice, decent treatment …1859 colloq.
– FAIR GO, A a fair chance, a ‘square deal’ a fair contest; equitable or reasonable treatment …1888 colloq.
– FAIR HORN fair play …1866 Sc.
– FAIR HORNIE fair play …1866 Sc.
– FAIR RATIONS fair dealings; honesty …c1875 sporting sl.
– FAIR SHAKE, A a fair deal …1830 US sl.
– FAIR SPIN fair treatment, a reasonable chance …1910s sl.
– FAIR SUCK a fair or equal chance …1960s Aust. & NZ sl.
– FAIR SUCK OF THE SAUCE STICK fair treatment, equal opportunity …1971 Aust. sl.
– FAIR SUCK OF THE SAUSAGE a fair or equal chance …1960s Aust. & NZ sl.
– FAIR SUCK OF THE SAV a fair or equal chance …1960s Aust. & NZ sl.
– FAIR UPS fair play …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– GOOD SHAKE, A a fair or equal chance, fair treatment …1830 US
– GUNS ON THE TABLE fair play …Bk1942 Amer. West. sl.
– ONE DOG, ONE BULL fair play …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– SHAKE a fair or acceptable situation …E19
fair (marked by impartiality and honesty) – verbs
– DEAL OFF THE TOP to treat fairly …1969 US sl.
– GIVE SOMEONE A FAIR CRACK OF THE WHIP to deal fairly with that person …1929 Aust. sl.
– KOSHER to give the appearance or effect of being fair, honest, or legal …1962 UK sl.
– SEE FAIR to ensure fair play by watching …1837 colloq.
– TOTE FAIR to do one’s fair share; to act fairly …1866 Amer. dial.
fair (marked by impartiality and honesty) – interjections & phrases
– FAIR CRACK OF THE WHIP request for reasonable or fair treatment …1929 colloq.
– FAIR GO! exhortation for fair treatment …1911 colloq.
– FAIR SUCK OF THE SAUCE! be fair! …Bk1999 Aust. sl.
 
FAIR (appearance) – adjectives
– BEAU † fair, beautiful …c1325
– BEL † fair, fine, beautiful …c1314
– QUEME † of pleasing appearance; beautiful, fair; neat, tidy …a1300
– SNOUT-FAIR † having a fair countenance; fair-faced, comely, pretty, handsome, good-looking; in frequent use in the 16th and early 17th century, usually with some disparaging suggestion …1530
– TALL † comely, goodly, fair, handsome; elegant, fine …c1450
fair (appearance) – person (also see ATTRACTIVE, PRETTY, etc.)
– BELLAMOUR † a loved one of either sex; a lady love, a fair lady …1596
– BELLE a handsome woman, esp. one who dresses so as to set off her personal charms; a fair lady, a fair one …1622
– BELLE DAME fair lady, belle …1767
– BELLIBONE †* a fair maid, a bonny lass, a beautiful woman …1579
fair (appearance) – verbs 
– FAIR † to make fair; to make clean or good-looking; to beautify …c1175
– VENUSTATE † to make beautiful, fair, or sightly …1656
 
FAIR (carnival, etc.) – nouns
– DEAD PONY GAFF of circus and fairgrounds: a bad site …1961 UK travelling showmen’s usage
– FAIRING a present given at or brought from a fair …1574
– FAIRINGS tawdry articles sold or to be won at a fair …20C
– GAFF a fair …1753 sl.
– MART a periodical gathering of people for the purpose of buying and selling; a fair …1437 arch.
– MUCKLE FRIDAY the day on which a large fair is held …1896 Sc.
– PACK-AND-PENNY DAY the last day of a fair, on which goods are sold cheap …1869 Eng. dial.
– PACKING-PENNY DAY the last day of the fair, when articles are cheap …1790 Eng. dial.
– SLUM cheap prizes at a fair, carnival, etc. …1929 US sl.
– TAN-DAY † the second day of a fair; the day after a fair; a fair for fun …1873 Eng. dial.
– TIDE an annual feast or festivity; a fair …1865 Eng. dial.
– WALK a village fair; a village fair for hiring servants …1858 Eng. dial.
fair (carnival, etc.) – person
– FAIR-KEEPER † a person appointed to keep order at a fair …1858 Sc.
– GAFFER a fairground superintendent …1934 pitchmen’s sl.
– MAGGIEMAN a fairground showman …20C Irish sl.
fair (carnival, etc.) – verbs
– NUNDINATE † to buy and sell at fairs or markets …1623
 
FAIR, NOT – phrases
– NOT CRICKET not fair play …colloq.
 
FAIRGROUND – verbs
​- PULL DOWN to close up a fairground …20C fairground and grafters’ colloq.
 
FAIRLY – adverbs
– FAIR AND MODERATE fairly and moderately …1891 Sc.
– FAIR DINKUM fairly …1947 Aust. sl.
– FAIRISH in a pleasant manner; fairly, pretty well …1891 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– FAIRLINGS moderately, fairly …1877 Eng. dial.
– FARRANTLY adv. fairly; very, exceedingly …1819 Eng. dial.
– GAILY fairly, tolerably; pretty well …1553 chiefly Sc. & Eng. dial.
– JUSTICELY * with justice; fairly; rightly; justifiably …1865
– MEETERLY tolerably, moderately, fairly …1703 Eng. dial.
– METERLY tolerably, moderately, fairly …1703 Eng. dial.
– MIDDLING moderately, tolerably, fairly …1765
– TALLY † in a seemly manner; becomingly, elegantly; fairly, well; bravely …c1350
 
FAIRNESS – nouns
– FAIRATION fair play, fair dealing; consideration, fairness …1861 Eng. dial.
– FAIRITY fairness …1895 Ireland
 
FAIRNESS (beauty) – nouns
– BELLITUDE † beauty, fairness …1623
– FAIR † beauty, fairness, good looks …c888
– FAIRLEC † fairness, beauty …a1225
– FAIRSHIP † fairness, beauty …c1320
 
FAIR-SPOKEN – adjectives
– BLANDILOQUENT in the language of compliment; smooth-speaking, flattering, fair-spoken …1599
– BLANDILOQUOUS †* smooth-talking, flattering, fair-spoken …1615
 
FAIRY – nouns
– AWF an elf, a fairy …1790 Eng. dial.
– EEMOCK a person of diminutive stature; a fairy …1914 Sc.
– FAIR FOLK fairies collectively …a1522 
– FANE an elf; a fairy …1806 Sc.
– FAY a fairy or elf …1393
– FAY-LAND fairyland …1870
– GANCANAGH, GANCONER, GONCONER a kind of fairy said to appear in lonesome valleys, making love to milkmaids, etc. …1888 Ireland
– GOOD NEIGHBOURS † the fairies …a1585 Sc.
 
FAIRY RING – nouns
– ELF-RING a fairy ring …1824 Sc.
– HAG-TRACK fairy ring …1858
 
FAITH – adjectives
– BELIEFFUL full of faith, believing …c1175 arch.
– FIDIMPLICITARY putting full trust or faith in another’s views …1652 nonce word
faith – nouns 
– AFFIANCE the act of confiding, or fact of having faith, in a person, quality, etc. faith, trust …1330
– BELIEFFULNESS the quality of being full of belief or faith …1548 arch.
– LEVE † belief, faith …c950
– LEVENESS † faith, confidence …c1400
faith – verbs 
– DIFFIDE * to want faith or confidence; to have or feel distrust …1532
 
FAITHFUL – adjectives
– AEFALD single-minded, simple-hearted, honest, faithful …1796 Sc.
– EVER-LOVING devoted; faithful …1930s Amer. sl.
– FAYFUL † faithful …a1400
– FEAL † faithful, firm in allegiance, constant …1568 arch.
– FIABLE † faithful …1483
– FIDELIOUS † faithful …1650
– I-TREOWE † true, faithful …c1000
– LAWFUL † observant of law or duty; law-abiding, faithful, loyal …c1375
– LEAFFUL † faithful, believing …c950
– LEAL † loyal, faithful, honest, true, upright, sincere …a1300 obs. exc. Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– LEWTIFULL † faithful, loyal; upright, honourable …1563 Sc
faithful – person 
– MONOGAMIST a person who observes or advocates the custom of being married to only one person at a time; a person who  has only one living spouse; now, also, a person who remains faithful to one person during the course of a sexual relationship other than marriage …1731
– STUCKY a faithful lover …1930s W. Indies sl.
 
FAITHFULLY – adverbs
– FAITHLY † with fidelity; faithfully, loyally, steadfastly, truthfully …c1325
– FAYFULLY † in a faithful manner, loyally, reliably …a1400
– LAWFULLY † loyally, faithfully …c1500
– LEAL † loyally, faithfully …a1300 obs. exc. Sc.
– LEALLY loyally, faithfully, truly …a1300
 
FAITHFULNESS – nouns
– LEALNESS faithfulness, loyalty …1882
– LEALTY † faithfulness, loyalty …1860 obs. exc. arch.
 
FAITHLESS – adjectives
– FEDIFRAGOUS † breaking a pledge or agreement, faithless, perfidious …1600
– INFIDOUS †* faithless, unfaithful; not to be trusted …1656
faithless – person 
– HALF-MARROW a faithless spouse …B1900 sl.
 
FAITHLESSNESS – nouns
– FALSEHOOD † as an attribute of persons: falseness, deceitfulness, mendacity, faithlessness …1297
 
FAKE – adjectives
– AFFECTATIOUS †* of the nature of affectation; pretentious, fake, sham, feigned …1687
– BOGUE phony, fake, bogus …1953 Amer. dial.
– BOGUISH phony, fake, bogus …1935 Amer. dial.
– COD fake; parodic; usually in combination, as cod-typewriter, etc. …1950s sl.
– FAT-ASS money-grabbing, superficial, fake …2000s sl.
– FAULTY fake …Bk2006 US sl.
– KAMMA fake, trumped up, spurious; esp. said of emotions or illness …20C S. Afr. sl.
– SCHLENTER counterfeit, spurious, fake …L19 Aust. & S. Afr. sl.
– SKELM fake, counterfeit …20C S. Afr. criminals’ sl.
– SLENTER counterfeit, spurious, fake …L19 Aust. & S. Afr. sl.
– SLINTER counterfeit, spurious, fake …L19 Aust. & S. Afr. sl.
– SPOOF fake, spurious, sham …L19 sl.
fake – nouns
– FALSIES anything fake added to the body, as false eyelashes …1940s sl.
fake – verbs 
– CRACKERJACK to fake, to make-believe …20C sl.
– PALM to pass counterfeit money, or anything fake …18C sl.