Reverse Dictionary: FAL – FAM


FALCON – nouns
– FLAGS * the long feathers on the leg of a hawk or falcon …1486
– LANNARD the peregrine falcon, Falco Peregrinus …Bk1902 Eng. dial.
– MANTEAU the plumage of a falcon …1852
– SINGLE in falconry: the middle or outer claw on the foot of a hawk or falcon …1486 now arch.
falcon – person
– ACCIPITRARY a person who keeps and trains hawks or falcons; a falconer, one who catches birds of prey …1633 arch. & hist.
 
FALKLAND ISLANDS – nouns
– CAMP, THE the area outside Port Stanley in the Falkland Islands …20C sl.
– EGG-MARKET, THE the Falkland Islands …c1830 whalers’ sl.
Falkland Islands – person
– BENNY an inhabitant of the Falkland Islands …2003 UK army usage
– KELPER a native of the Falkland Islands …1900 Falkland Islands usage 
 
FALL (season) – see AUTUMN
 
FALL – adjectives
– CADUKE † falling, liable to fall …c1420
– FALLABLE † capable of falling, liable to fall …1548
– FALL-DOWN that falls down, turned over …1829
– ILLAPSABLE †* not liable to fall …1662
– ILLAPSING that does not fall or slip …1740
– IMPERIAL adj. in sporting; said of a fall on one’s head or ‘crown’ …1861 sl.
– LAPSABLE, LAPSIBLE liable to err or fall; liable to pass or change …1678
– LUNGEOUS † of a fall: heavy …1681 Eng. dial.
– SUCCIDUOUS †* ready to fall; tottering …1656
– TANTY unstable, ready to fall, giddy …1880 Sc.
– TICKLE † insecure, unstable, tottering, easily upset; ready to fall …1579 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– UNCANNY harsh, unkind, rude; severe, esp. used of a blow or fall …1773 Sc.. & Eng. dial.
fall – adverbs
– LAMPUS of a fall: suddenly, heavily, awkwardly …Bk1902 Eng. dial.
– SCAT BANG with the sound of a heavy fall …1858 Eng. dial.
fall – nouns 
– ARSE-POSS †* a heavy fall on to the buttocks …1611
– ARSE-PUSH †* a heavy fall on to the buttocks …1660
– ARSER a fall on one’s behind …20C sl.
– ASS-ENDER n. a backward fall …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– BACK-BREADTH a fall on the back …1864 Sc.
– BACK-BREED the breadth of one’s back; hence, a throw, a fall …1864 Sc.
– BELK a heavy fall or blow …1885 Eng. dial.
– BELOWNDER the noise of a heavy fall …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– BELPER a heavy fall …1892 Eng. dial.
– BELT a heavy fall …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– BLEACH a blow; a fall …Bk1911 Sc.
– BLEECH a blow; a fall …Bk1911 Sc.
– BURSTER a heavy fall, a cropper …1863 sl.
– BUTT-ENDER n. a  backward fall …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– CADUCITY tendency to fall; quality of being perishable or fleeting; frailty …1793
– CHEWALLOP a fall or a dive that makes a big splash or flopping noise …20C Amer. sl.
– CHEWALLOPER a fall or a dive that makes a big splash or flopping noise …20C Amer. sl.
– CORONER a heavy fall …c1870 sl.
– CRACKER † a heavy fall; a smash …c1865
– CROPPER a heavy fall …M19 colloq.
– DEVESHER a heavy fall; a crash …1850 Eng. dial.
– DIRDUM a heavy blow, a stroke; a fall …1827 Sc.
– DUNT a sudden, jolting impact such as a heavy fall; the dull sound caused by such an impact; a bump. a bang, a thud …1828 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– EGGBEATER in skiing: a head-over-heels fall …1950 Amer. dial.
– FALL something that falls; a trap-door; a trap …c1440
– FACE-PLANT a face-first fall …1984 US sl.
– FANNY FLOP a  backward fall …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– FARTKNOCKER a hard fall; esp. when thrown from a horse …1968 Amer. cowboys’ usage
– FLIER a bad fall …Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
– FLUMP a sudden heavy fall …L18 sl.
– GUSTA a heavy fall …1918 Aust. sl.
– GUTSER, GUTZER a heavy fall; a collision …1918 colloq.
– GUTZER a heavy fall; a collision …c1905 sl.
– HAICHES a heavy fall; the sound resulting from it, a thud …1790 Sc.
– HAPPEN-CLASH an accidental blow or fall …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– HAYLUNSH a headlong fall …1809 Eng. dial.
– HEADER a headfirst fall; a plunge or dive head foremost …1849 colloq.
– KEEL-UP a heavy fall on one’s back …1941 Sc.
– KEERIKIN a heavy fall …1825 Sc.
– KELTER a fall in which one is thrown head over heels …1825 Sc.
– LANDER a fall on the ground, as when skating …1925 Sc.
– LAPSABILITY liability to err or fall …1661
– LAPSIBILITY liability to err or fall …1661
– MUCK a heavy fall …L19 sl.
– OCCASE †* falling, fall …1609
– PARDOOS a thump, a crash; a violent fall; a resounding blow, a whack …1866 Sc.
– PASH a crash, a smash; a heavy fall or collision; a blow …1781 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– PRAT FALL a  backward fall …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– PURLER a throw or blow that hurls a person or animal head first; a heavy fall, a ‘cropper’ …1850 colloq.
– QUALK a heavy fall …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– QUALKER a heavy blow; a heavy fall …1866 Eng. dial.
– RACKABIMUS a sudden or unexpected stroke, jolt, or fall; a thud …1808 Sc.
– REEMISH a loud, rumbling noise, esp. the sound caused by a body falling; a weighty stroke or blow …1742 Sc.
– REMISH a loud, rumbling noise, esp. the sound caused by a body falling; a weighty stroke or blow …1742 Sc.
– SCLAFF a blow with the palm of the hand or some flat instrument; a slap; a box on the ear; a falling-flat; a clap, a thud …1866 Sc.
– SCLAFFER a slight blow, esp. with the open hand; a flat, soft fall …Bk1904 Sc.
– SCLATCH a heavy fall, esp. into water or mud; a splash, a dashing down, slap, smack or the noise of such …1808 Sc.
– SCLUTE a thin, semi-liquid mass; a fall, esp. of a semi-liquid mass; the sound made by such a fall …Bk1904 Sc.
– SCLYTE a thin, semi-liquid mass; a heavy fall; the sharp sound made by such a fall …BK1904 Sc.
– SCOUP a blow; a sudden fall …1844 Sc.
– SEATER a  backward fall …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– SIT-DOWN a  backward fall …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– SIT-DOWN STRIKE a  backward fall …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– SKLAFF a slight blow, esp. with the open hand; a flat, soft fall …Bk1904 Sc.
– SKLAFFER a slight blow, esp. with the open hand; a flat, soft fall …Bk1904 Sc.
– SKLATCH a heavy fall, esp. into water or mud; the noise made by such a fall; a stroke with the palm of the hand …Bk1904 Sc.
– SKLUTE a thin, semi-liquid mass; a fall, esp. of a semi-liquid mass; the sound made by such a fall …Bk1904 Sc.
– SKLYTE a thin, semi-liquid mass; a heavy fall; the sharp sound made by such a fall …Bk1904 Sc.
– THUNGE a loud, hollow sound; the report of a gun, or of a loud peal of thunder; a heavy blow or fall producing such a sound …1849 Eng. dial.
– TIRL a twirl, a whirl; a fall over and over; the act of rotating …1825 Sc.
– VELLYE a crash, a heavy fall or thud …1973 Sc.
– WALLACH, WALLOCH a noisy step, thump, or fall …1880 Sc. 
fall – verbs
– ADUSH † to cause to fall heavily, to throw down headlong …c1220
– AFALLE 1. † to fall down, to fall in battle; to fall upon as a destroyer …c1000
2. † to fall in amount, price, estimation, rank, moral state …a1121
– BEFALL † to fall …c897
– BELK to roll over, to fall down …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– BELLYFLOP to throw oneself down; to collapse; to fall badly …1920s sl.
– BERINE †* to touch; to fall upon, to fall …a1300
– BESINK † to sink, to fall down through any substance …c893
– BIFF to fall, to fail, to crash …Bk2006 US sl.
– BITE THE DUST to fall in death, to die; also to fall to the ground, to fall wounded …1749
– BITE THE GROUND to fall in death, to die; also to fall to the ground, to fall wounded …1697
– BITE THE SAND to fall in death, to die; also to fall to the ground, to fall wounded …1716
– BLEACH, BLEECH to strike; to fall flat …Bk1911 Sc.
– CLISP to fall, to let fall …Bk1890 tinkers’ sl.
– COME A CROPPER to fall heavily; to be victim of an accident …1874 sl.
– COME A GUTSER to fall heavily; to trip over and fall …1918 Aust. sl.
– COME A PEARLER to fall down; to trip over an obstacle, usually sustaining some form of injury …M19 sl.
– COME A PURLER to fall down; to trip over an obstacle, usually sustaining some form of injury …1908 colloq.
– COME A STINKER to fall heavily …1923 sl.
– COME A WALLOP to take a fall …E19 sl. 
– COME DOWN WITH A HARK to come down with a run, to fall suddenly …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– COME TO GRIEF to take a tumble; to have a fall …1854 UK
– DECADE † to fall down, to fail …a1500 Sc.
– DECAID † to fall down, to fail …a1500 Sc.
– DECIDE †* to fall off …1657
– DECLINE † to come down, to fall, to descend, to sink …a1400-50
– DEVALL to descend, to fall, to hurry …1725 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– DEVEL to strike, to beat, to fell with a blow; to maul; to fall heavily …1827 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– DO THE CAT-ACT to fall on one’s feet …1908 Amer. dial.
– DUMP † to fall with sudden force; to plunge …1333-52
– DUSH † to fall with a thud; to move with violent impulse or collision; to rush or strike forcibly against something …c1400 obs. exc. Sc.
– EAT GRASS to be thrown or to fall on one’s face …20C US sl.
– EAT IT to suffer an accident, esp. a fall …1982 Hawaiian youth usage
– FALL DOWN AND GO BOOM to take a tumble, to fall heavily …1930s Amer. sl.
– FALL HEADLAND to fall headlong …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– FALL OFF ONE’S FEET to tumble, to fall …1889 Sc.
– FLUMP to collapse or fall heavily …M19 sl.
– GO SCAT to fall down; to break in pieces …1867 Eng. dial.
– GO TO GRASS * to lie down on or fall to the ground …a1640
– GO WALLOP to fall noisily …1896
– GUTSER to fall; to fail badly …20C Aust. sl.
– HANG BY THE EYELIDS to be loosely attached; to be loosened; to be ready to fall, to have a very slight hold …1877
– HAPPER to fall with a heavy sound; to rattle down, to patter; to crackle; generally used with ‘down’ …1863 Eng. dial.
– HEEL to fall; to lean or incline …1836 Amer. dial.
– ILLAPSE to fall, glide, or slip in …1666
– KELTER to tumble headlong; to go head over heels, to fall …1805 Sc.
– LAB to fall flatly …1883 Sc.
– LABASCATE † to begin to fall or slide …1727
– LABEFACTATE †* to cause to totter or fall …1657
– LABEFY †* to weaken, to impair; to cause to fall …1620
– LAPSE † to cause to slip or fall; to draw down …1664
– PLAY SCLAFF ON THE GROUND to fall down flat …Bk1904 Sc.
– POP to fall or drop with a quick, light sound; to plop …1791 Sc.
– RAP to fall sharply or smartly; to fall in pattering drops, esp. of tears …1508 Sc.
– RUSH * to fall quickly or violently; to collapse …c1440 Sc.
– SANNICK, SANNOCK to stagger or fall from excessive weakness …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– SANNY to fall or stagger, as from weakness …1895 Eng. dial.
– SCLATCH to dash down or fall heavily, with a great thud or clash …1866 Sc.
– SCLUTE to throw down or pout out in a mass; to fall flat, esp. in mud or soft soil …Bk1904 Sc.
– SCLYTE to throw down or pour out with force so as to produce a sharp sound; to fall heavily …Bk1904 Sc.
– SCOODER to cause to fall quickly; to take great effect upon …1875 Eng. dial.
– SILE to fall or sink down …a1400-50 obs. exc. N. Eng. dial.
– SKLATCH to dash violently; to fall heavily; to walk with a heavy, awkward step …Bk1904 Sc.
– SKLUTE to throw down or put out in a mass; to fall flat, esp. in mud or soft soil …Bk1904 Sc.
– SKLYTE to throw down or pour out with force so as to produce a sharp sound; to fall heavily …Bk1904 Sc.
– SKOODER to cause to fall quickly; to take great effect upon …1875 Eng. dial.
– SONNOCK to stagger or fall from excessive weakness …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– TAKE A FLIER to fall heavily …1920s sl.
– TAKE A FLYER to fall heavily …1920s sl.
– TAKE A HEADER to fall headfirst or headlong …1928 Amer. dial.
– TAWM OVER to swoon; to fall from faintness or sickness …1684 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– TEEL to place anything so that it may easily fall, esp. to bait or set a trap, snare, etc. …1777 Eng. dial.
– TERVE † to turn; esp. to turn upside down, to topple over, to fall down; also, fig. to turn to some course or action …c1400
– THUD † to fall heavily; to move quickly; of wind: to blow in gusts; to rush with a hollow sound …1800 Sc.
– TIFF † to fall headlong …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– TILT 1. † to fall over, to tumble; to be overthrown …1300s
2. † to cause to fall; to thrust, to push, to throw down or over; to overthrow, to overturn, to upset …1300s
– TIP † to be overthrown; to fall …c1400
– TIPE to tip over; to overturn; to fall over; to faint, to swoon …1873 Eng. dial.
– TIPPLE to cause to fall; to tip …1887 Eng. dial.
– TIRVE † to turn; esp. to turn upside down, to topple over, to fall down; also, fig. to turn to some course or action …c1400
– TOTTLE to fall, to topple; to cause to fall …1838 Amer. dial.
– TUMP to fall over abruptly, to capsize …1952 Amer. dial.
– TUMP OVER to fall over abruptly, to capsize …1952 Amer. dial.
– VAIL † to fall down; to descend …c1400.
– WALT † to be thrown down, to fall over, to be upset or overturned; to totter; to lean to one side …c1400
– Y-FALLE † to fall; to befall …971
 
FALLACIOUS – adjectives
– FALLACE †* fallacious; deceitful; deceptive, misleading …1393
– FALLIBLE †* fallacious, delusive …1559
– FALLACITY † the quality of being fallacious …1664
– PARALOGISTIC fallacious, illogical …1879
– ROTTEN not based on sound or reliable evidence or reasoning; unsound, fallacious …1529
fallacious – nouns  (includes FALLACY) 
– ELENCH † a sophistical argument, a fallacy …1565
– FALLATION † a fallacy, a deceptive or misleading argument …a1568
– FALLAX † deception; guile, trickery; fallacy …1530
– FALLAXITY † deception, guile, trickery; fallacy …c1640
– IDOLISM a false mental image or notion; a fallacy …1671
– IDOLUM a false mental image or conception; a fallacy …1640
– PARALOGISM a piece of false or erroneous reasoning; an illogical argument; a fallacy …1565
– PARALOGY †* a piece of false or erroneous reasoning; an illogical argument; a fallacy …1646
– SUBREPTION a fallacious or deceptive representation …1865
 
FALL BACK – verbs
– ORERE † to fall back …c1450
 
FALLEN – adjectives
– GRASSED fallen to the ground; knocked to the ground …1814 sl.
– YFALLEN † fallen …971
 
FALLIBILITY – nouns
– DECEIVABLENESS liability to be deceived; fallibility …1674
 
FALLING – adjectives
– CADENT † falling …1605 obs. or arch.
– CADUKE † falling, liable to fall …c1420
– DECIDENT † falling …1674
– DECIDUOUS † falling down or off …1656
– FALLABLE † capable of falling, liable to fall …1548
– LABANT † sliding, falling down, wavering …1727
– LABENT † falling, sliding, running, or passing away …1727
falling – nouns
– BACKIT-ARSE the act of falling backwards …1923 Sc.
– DECIDENCY †* falling, failing, subsidence …1651
– REEMLE a confused, falling mass …Bk1904 Sc.
falling – verbs 
– WAG † to totter, to stagger; to be in danger of falling …c1340
 
FALLING AWAY – nouns
– DECLINATION † a turning aside, swerving, deviation from a standard; a falling away …1533
 
FALSE – adjectives
– APOCRYPHATE † of spurious creation or character; of doubtful authenticity; fictitious, false …1486
– APOCRYPHICAL †* of doubtful authorship or authenticity; spurious, fictitious, false …1719
– BELIED calumniated, falsified, proved false …1610
– BODGER inferior, false, second-rate …Aust. obs. sl.
– BODGIE of names, etc.: false; assumed …Aust. sl.
– CRANK bogus; false; phony …Bk2006 US sl.
– FAKE fraudulent; spurious; counterfeit; false; pretended …1775
– FALSE AS A BULLETIN inaccurate, false …c1795 colloq.
– FALSE AS MY KNIFE, AS ‘as with knives, so with false friends – they’ll cut me’ …20C
– FALSE AS NEWGATE, AS very false …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– FALSE AS WAGHORN very false …1721 Sc.
– FALSELY †* false, deceptive …a1310
– FALSIDICAL * suggesting as true what is really false; falsehood-telling …1886
– FALSIFIC † making false, falsifying …1736
– FALSISH * somewhat false …1873
– FLAM false …1692 sl.
– GAMMONING † counterfeit, false, pretended, feign …1802 UK sl.
– LEASE † untrue, false, lying …a900
– MARGARINE sham, bogus, falsified, false …1891
– SHNIDE, SNIDE false, counterfeit, sham, bogus, phony, fake; hence, mean, contemptible, underhand …1859 UK
– SNIDEY false, counterfeit, sham, bogus  …1859 UK
– TIN mean, petty, worthless, counterfeit, false …1886
– ULYSSEAN characteristic of or resembling Ulysses in craft or deceit, or in extensive wanderings; deceitful, cunning, false …1639
false – nouns
– ABRAHAM-WORK shams of all kinds, false pretenses …Bk1909 cant
– BILLIARD SLUM, THE false pretenses …Bk1892 Aust. sl.
– FALSE what is false; a falsehood; a lie …c1380
– FALSIE anything false or artificial; a prosthesis …1940s Amer. sl.
– FALSILOQUENCE †* false speaking; deceitful speech …1710
– FALSITY † false or treacherous conduct; treachery, fraud …c1330
– FALSY anything false or artificial; a prosthesis …1940s Amer. sl.
– PACKET a false report …L18 sl.
– SUGGESTION † the act of making a false statement or supplying underhand information; an instance of this, a false representation or charge …c1375
– UMBRAGE † a pretext or pretense; a false show …1634
– WANTROKING † despair; false or mistaken expectation …c1315
false – person
– FALSARY † a false or deceitful person …1573
– NABS a false, deceitful, dishonest, or waggish fellow …Bk1902 Eng. dial. 
– PSEUD a false, artificial, or pretentious person …1964 colloq.
– QUID PRO QUO † one who assumes a false character …1689
false – verbs 
– AFFECT to put on a pretense of; to assume a false appearance of, to counterfeit or pretend …1661
– BELIE † to give the lie to; to call false, to contradict as a lie or a liar; to reject as false, to deny the truth of …1577
– DECEIVE † to be or prove false to, to play false, to deal treacherously with; to betray …a1300
– FABLE † to speak falsely; to talk falsehoods, to lie …1530 obs. exc. arch.
– FAIT † to act or speak falsely, to use false pretenses; to beg on false pretenses …c1320
– FALSEN * to make false or unreal …1888
– FALSIFY 1. † to prove false; to break or violate one’s faith, word, etc. …1532
2. † to make a false representation or statement; to deal in falsehoods …1629
– NAIL TO THE COUNTER to expose as false or spurious; to expose as a lie …1842
– NEGATIVE to disprove; to show to be false …1790
 
FALSE-HEARTED – adjectives
– FALSE-HEART † false-hearted; deceitful; unfaithful …1593
false-hearted – person 
– RAMMACK a large raw-boned person who speaks and acts heedlessly; a false-hearted fellow; a backbiter; a double-dealer …19C Sc.
 
FALSEHOOD – see LIAR, LIE
 
FALSEHOOD, FALSENESS – nouns
– DUNT a slanderous falsehood …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– FALLACE † deception, trickery, falsehood; deceitfulness …a1300
– FALSAGE †* deceit, falsehood …a1400
– FALSE † fraud, falsehood, treachery; in early use, counterfeiting of coin; forgery …c1000
– FALSEHOOD † as an attribute of persons: falseness, deceitfulness, mendacity, faithlessness …1297
– FALSELEKE †* falsehood …a1310
– FALSERY † deception, falsification, falsehood …1594
– FALSET † falsehood, treachery, fraud …1375 chiefly Sc.
– FALSIMONY † falsity, falseness …1736
falsehood, falseness – verbs
– LET THE AIR OUT OF to debunk; to expose the falseness of …1940s sl.
 
FALSELY – adverbs
– DECEIVABLY † deceitfully, fraudulently, falsely …1387
 
FALSE TEETH – see TOOTH
 
FALSIFICATION – nouns
– FALSEHOOD † deception, falsification, imposture; a forgery, counterfeit …1340 obs. or arch.
– FALSERY † deception, falsification, falsehood …1594
 
FALSIFIED – adjectives
– BELIED calumniated, falsified, proved false …1610
– COOKED altered; falsified; doctored …1860 Amer. sl.
– MANAGED † falsified; ‘cooked’ …1810
– MARGARINE sham, bogus, falsified, false …1891
 
FALSIFY – person
– FALSARY † one who falsifies, or fraudulent alters a document, etc.; a falsifier …1435
– FALSER † a falsifier, a forger, a counterfeiter …1340
falsify – verbs
– COOK to falsify, as accounts; to tamper with …1636 colloq.
– COOK THE BOOKS to falsify financial accounts …sl.
– COOK UP to falsify …colloq.
– DOCTOR to make different in order to deceive; to tamper with; to falsify or adulterate
– FAKE UP to counterfeit or forge; hence, to make or shape for a fraudulent or deceptive purpose; to falsify …1851 sl., orig. criminals’ usage
– FALSE † to falsify; to make untrue; to introduce falsehood into; to corrupt …c1380
 
FALSITY – nouns
– BASTARDISE † illegitimacy; falsity …1579
 
FALTER – verbs
– FRIBBLE † to falter, to stammer …a1627
– HAFFLE to hesitate; to speak confusedly; to falter; to stammer; to prevaricate, to quibble …1790 Eng. dial.
– HAFFLE-CAFFLE to falter, to vacillate, to act with indecision …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– STOTAY † to falter, totter, stumble, stagger; to come to a stand …a1400
– TITUBATE * to stammer, to falter in speaking …1623
 
FALTERING – nouns
– TITUBATION faltering, suspense, perplexity, embarrassment …1710
 
FALTERINGLY – adverbs
– WANDSOMELY †* reluctantly, falteringly …a1400
 
FAME – nouns
– KUDOS glory, fame, renown …1831 colloq.
– TONGUE †* eulogy, fame …c1616
fame – person 
– IMMORTALS people, especially authors, of enduring fame …1882
fame – verbs 
– WALK † of reports, fame, and of letters, money: to circulate, to pass from one to another …a1300
 
FAMED – adjectives
– NAMELY noted, noteworthy, famed for some attribute or accomplishment, of good repute …1815 Sc.
 
FAMILIAR – adjectives
– ACQUAINTABLE † easy to be acquainted with, affable, familiar …c1400
– AINLIE † familiar, not estranged …1825 Sc.
– BEKNOWN known, acquainted, familiar …1429 arch.
– BUDGE intimate, familiar …1890 Amer. dial.
– CAIF familiar …Bk1898 Sc.
– FAMILARY familiar, acquainted, intimate, friendly …c1450
– FAMILIOUS familiar …1884 Amer. dial.
– GALLANT improperly familiar …1826 Sc.
– HAIL-FELLOW on a most intimate footing; over familiar or unduly intimate …1580
– HAIL-FELLOW-WELL-MET on a most intimate footing; over familiar  or unduly intimate …1581
– HAIL-MATE † on a most intimate footing; over familiar  or unduly intimate …1577
– KENSPECKLE, KENSPICKLE easily recognizable; conspicuous; of familiar appearance …1768 Sc.
– NATURAL affable, familiar, gentle; guileless …1894 Sc.
– NATURAL-LOOKING familiar …1946 Amer. dial.
– OBVERSANT † standing over against, opposite, contrary; also, placed in front of; hence, familiar, well-known …1579
– QUAINTED † familiar …1586
– QUIM AND COSH intimate and familiar …1723 Sc.
– THICK AS THIEVES in close association, familiar, intimate, inseparable …1833 UK sl.
– THRANG intimate, familiar, friendly; esp. used in a bad sense …1819 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– THRONG intimate, familiar, friendly; esp. used in a bad sense …1819 Sc. & Eng. dial.
familiar – nouns
– ACCUSTOMING † the act of making oneself familiar with, using, practising, consorting …1567
– PART OF THE FURNITURE anyone or anything so familiar as to make no more impression than a familiar piece of furniture; one taken for granted …L18 sl.
– TAME † a thing with which one is familiar …1606 poetic
familiar – person 
– HABITUDE †* a person with whom one is familiar; an associate; an acquaintance …1676
– HAIL-FELLOW † an intimate or familiar associate …1650
– PART OF THE FURNITURE anyone or anything so familiar as to make no more impression than a familiar piece of furniture; one taken for granted …L18 sl.
familiar – verbs
– CUSTOM † to make usual, habitual, or familiar; to practise habitually …1392
 
FAMILIARITY – nouns
– HABILITY the quality of being habile; deftness; readiness; easy familiarity …1840
– HABITUDE † familiar relation or acquaintance; familiarity, intimacy; association …1612
– PACKNESS friendship, harmony, familiarity, intimacy …1825 Sc.
– THICKNESS familiarity, intimacy, friendliness …1895 Eng. dial.
 
FAMILIARIZE – verbs
– HABIT † to accustom, to familiarize, to habituate …1615
 
FAMILIARIZED – adjectives
– HABITED † familiarized, accustomed, practised, used to …1615
 
FAMILIARLY – adverbs
– HAND FOR NEIVE hand in glove, intimately, familiarly, close together …1813 Sc.
– HAND TO NEIVE hand in glove, intimately, familiarly, close together …1787 Sc.
– PACKLIE in a friendly manner, intimately, familiarly …1844 Sc.
– PACKLIKE in a friendly manner, familiarly …1844 Sc.
 
FAMILIAR WITH – adjectives
– VERSANT versed in or conversant with a subject, etc.; familiar with; knowing the ways of …1711 Sc.
familiar with – verbs 
– FELLOWSHIP to associate with, to be on familiar terms with …1861 Amer. dial.
– KNOW BACKWARDS to be very familiar with …1904 sl.
– KNOW INSIDE OUT to be very familiar with …1921 sl.
– KNOW LIKE THE BACK OF ONE’S HAND to be very familiar with …1943 sl.
– WALK THE WALK to be (or behave as if) totally familiar with, and a part of, a given circumstance; to suit one’s actions to one’s words …2004 UK sl.
– WALK THE WALK AND TALK THE TALK to be (or behave as if) totally familiar with, and a part of, a given circumstance; to suit one’s actions to one’s words …2004 UK sl.
 
FAMILY – adjectives
– FAMILIAR pert. to one’s family or household …c1386
– FAMILIARY †* pert. to the control of a family; domestic …1643
– FAMILIC † pert. to a family; also, domestic, familiar …1660
– FAMILICAL †* belonging to a family …1660
– FAMILIOUS relating to a family …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– FAMILISTIC † pertaining to a family or household …1660
– FAMILISTICAL † pert. to a family or household …1660
– FAMILOUS relating to a family, domestic …19C Eng. dial.
– FAMULOUS relating to a family …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
family – nouns
– BAIRN-TEAM brood of children; offspring; family …c885 N. Eng. dial.
– BAIRN-TIME a large family; offspring …1786 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– BATCH of persons: a set, a clique, a family …1785 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– CUM ANNEXES the members of one’s family …Bk1892 W. Indian sl.
– CUM-ANNEXIS one’s belongings, esp. applied to one’s wife and children …Bk1892 W. Indian sl.
– FAM the family …1970s US Black, gay & teen sl.
– GENARCHASHIP † headship of a family or people …1650
– HAVAGE race, lineage, family stock, parentage …1846 Eng. dial.
– HEARTH-MUSTER the family circle at the fireside …Bk1902 Eng. dial.  
– HEN AND BIDDIES, THE your immediate family group …1969 Amer. dial.
– INCREASE the birth of a child; an addition to a family by the birth of a child …Bk1902 Eng. dial.
– MAKE race, family, lineage, species, kind …1856 Eng. dial.
– MENYIE † a family; household …1703 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– MERDIL a confused crowd of people or animals; a numerous family of little children; a huddle of small animals …1882 Sc.
– MERDLE a confused crowd of people or animals; a numerous family of little children; a huddle of small animals …1882 Sc.
– NATION †* a family, kindred …c1386
– OLD STANDARD an old-established resident; a person of old standing; an old family …1872 Eng. dial.
– PARAGE † equality of birth or station, as in members of the same family …1513
– REEK stock, family, lineage; always used in a bad sense. as ‘a bad reek’ …1865 Eng. dial.
– SEED, BREED, AND GENERATION the whole of one’s family and relatives …1792 Eng. dial.
– SIRENAME a family name; a surname originating from the given name of the father …1542
– TRIBE a large family or group of relatives …1833 sl.
family – person  (also see CHILD, DAUGHTER, FATHER, MOTHER, etc.)
– AFTERTHOUGHT the youngest child in a family, esp. one born considerably later than the other children …1914 sl.
– ANCHOR a younger brother or sister …2003 UK sl.
– ARM BABY a baby small enough to be held in the arms; by extension, the youngest and smallest child in a family …1939 Amer. dial.
– ATTERMITE one who resembles his parents …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– BABY the youngest person in a family, group of people, etc.; also, the most junior member of a team or other group …1854
– BABYCHILD the youngest child in the family, even if he or she is 50 years old …1980 Amer. dial.
– BABY FACTORY a woman who has had a large number of children …1990s US Black sl.
– BAG-SHAKINGS the youngest of a large family …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– BAIRN-TEAM the children of a household; offspring; family …c885 N. Eng. dial.
– BALEBOS an orderly person; a householder, the head of a family …Bk1966 Yiddish sl.
– BECHOR the eldest male child in a family …Bk1982 Jewish 
– BEEBEE the youngest member of a family or brood …1930 Amer. dial.
– BELANGINGS relatives, family connections …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– BENJAMIN the youngest, and consequently, favourite, son of a family …1913
– BLACKBIRD one whose family looks down upon his activities …1966 Amer. dial.
– BLACK SHEEP a disreputable or unsatisfactory member of a family, etc.; a bad character …1640
– BLACK SHEEP OF THE FAMILY a disreputable or unsatisfactory member of a family, etc.; a bad character …1856
– BLACK SHEEP OF THE FLOCK a disreputable or unsatisfactory member of a family, etc.; a bad character …1816
– BUTTONHOLE CONNECTION a distant relative; a family friend …1913 Amer. dial.
– BUTTONHOLE COUSIN a distant relative; a family friend …1959 Amer. dial.
– BUTTONHOLE RELATION a distant relative; a family friend …1913 Amer. dial.
– CABOOSE the last or youngest child in a family …1950 US sl.
– CAD the youngest and smallest of a family of any kind, esp. pigs …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– CADMAN the smallest one of a family …1856 Eng. dial.
– CALABASH COUSIN a person who is not a real relative but who is closely accepted by the family …1967 Hawaii
– CUZ 1. a term used by a Maori to refer to or address a family member …NZ colloq.
2. a term used by an Aboriginal person to refer to or address a family member …Aust. colloq.
– CUZZIE a close friend or family member; often used in direct address …20C NZ
– CUZZIE-BRO a close friend or family member; often used in direct address …20C NZ
– DAILY-BREAD a wage-earner; the working head of the family …c1890 colloq.
– DAILY BREADER the head of the family; the working head of the house …L19 rhyming sl.
– DAILY BREADITE the head of the family …L19 rhyming sl.
– DILLING † a child born when the parents are old; a darling or favourite child, a pet; the youngest of the family, the last born; a term of endearment …1584 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– DOSSER, THE the father of a family; he who provides the ‘doss’ (lodging, a bed) …L19 sl.
– DUSTY MELDER, THE the last child born in a family …Bk1905 Sc.
– EMPTY NESTER either member of a couple whose children have grown up and left home …1962
– FAMILIAR † a member of a person’s family or household …1460
– FAMILIST 1. † the head of a family; a family-man …1612
2. † one of the same family or household …1631
– GENARCH * the founder of a family or race …1879
– GENARCHA †* the founder of a family or race …1649
– GENEARCH the chief or head of a family or tribe …1727
– GENNETE in ancient Greece: the head of a family …1838
– GENTILE in Roman law: a member of the same ‘gens’ or clan, or family …1875
– GERMANE a member of the same family; a kinsman or kinswoman …1490
– HALF-BLOOD one born of the same father or mother as another, but not having both parents in common …1848
– HAND-BASKET PORTION a woman whose family continually gives money to her husband …c1786 UK sl.
– HEAD-BUMMER the head of a house; the chief representative of a family; the principal person …1864 Sc.
– HEAD-STALL the head of a house, a father, a husband, etc. …Bk1902 Sc.
– HIGH-FATHER * a patriarch …Bk1895
– HOUSE-FATHER the father of a family or household …1552
– IRISH TWIN one of two siblings born within a year of each other …1966 Amer. dial.
– LANDLORD the head of a family where one is a guest; one’s host …1824 Sc.
– LAST PEA IN THE DISH the youngest child …1986 Amer. dial.
– MASTER-MAN the head of a household or family; a husband …1885 Eng. dial.
– MOMMY TRACKER a woman who opts for or is forced into an interrupted or delayed career path as a result of raising a family …1989 colloq., orig. & chiefly US
– MOTHER’S PET  the youngest child of a family …1824 Sc.
– NEST-COCK † the youngest child …1674
– NESTLE-BIRD n. the youngest child of a family; a pet, a favourite; one who is fond of staying at home …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– NESTLE-BUB the youngest child of a family; a pet, a favourite; one who is fond of staying at home …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– NESTLE-COCK the youngest child of a family; a pet, a favourite; one who is fond of staying at home …1691 Eng. dial.
– NESTLE-DRAFF a weakling, the smallest and weakest of a brood or litter; the youngest child of a family; a weak, puny child …1777 Eng. dial.
– NESTLE-DRAFT, NESTLE-DRAUGHT a weakling, the smallest and weakest of a brood or litter; the youngest child of a family; a weak, puny child …1777 Eng. dial.
– NESTLE-RIPE a weakling, the smallest and weakest of a brood or litter; the youngest child of a family; a weak, puny child …1777 Eng. dial.
– NESTLE-TRIPE † the youngest child of a family; a weak, puny child; the smallest and weakest of a brood or litter …1616 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– NESTLING the youngest child of a family …1572
– ODDLIN(G) the last remaining survivor of a family or community; the last article of a set; a remainder …1870 Eng. dial.
– OFF a descendant; offspring; one of a progeny or family …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– OLD MAN the father of a family …US Civil War usage
– PIN-BASKET a large ornamental pincushion, with pins of various lengths artistically inserted, so as to resemble a basket; formerly, in some places, presented to the mother of a family on the birth of each child; hence, the youngest child in a family; the last child a woman bears …1730
– PINCUSHION the youngest child in a family …1912 Amer. dial.
– RABBIT a woman who has a large number of children …2002 Jamaica
– RACKLING, RECKLIN(G), RICKLING, RUCKLING the youngest or weakest of a family, a weakling …1781 Eng. dial.
– RIG, WRIG the smallest or weakest of a litter, brood, or family; the youngest or feeblest of a family; a weak, puny child …1805 Sc.
​- SCOUR-THE-BUGGIE, SKOUR-DA-BOGGIE the youngest member of a family; the last child to be born to two parents …a1838 Sc. 
– TAP O’ KIN the head of the family …Bk1880 Eng. dial.
– TAUSHENT the youngest child in a family …1802 Amer. dial.
– TITMAN a person, usually male, that is literally or figuratively stunted; a dwarf; the smallest or youngest or least significant in a family or other group …1818 Amer. dial.
– TOP the head of a clan, family, etc. …1612
– TORSHENT the youngest child in a family …1888 Amer. dial.
– TORTIENCE the youngest child in a family …1890 Amer. dial.
– TOSSANCE the youngest child in a family …1912 Amer. dial.
– TOSSIANCE the youngest child in a family …1912 Amer. dial.
– UGLY DUCKLING, AN a young person who turns out to be beautiful or talented against all expectations; the unpromising child in a family who ultimately surpasses the others …1885 
– WALLIDRAG, WALLYDRAG the youngest of a family; the youngest bird in a nest …1808 Sc.
– WRACKLING, WRECKLIN(G), WREGLING the youngest or weakest of a family, a weakling …1781 Eng. dial.
– YOICK a young one-income couple with kids …Bk2006 Amer. sl.
– YOUNGEST-BORN a youngest child or sibling …1608
– YOYO CHILDREN children who become pawns in a violent matrimonial battle and are constantly changing home …1977 UK sl.
family – verbs
– BE JOHN TAMSON’S MAN to be of one stock or family …1880 Sc.
– DRIVE TAB to go out on a party of pleasure with a wife and family …c1780 sl.
– IMP to ‘engraft’, as by marriage, in a family …1612-15
– WEAR THE PANTS to be the dominant member of a household, relationship, partnership, etc. …1898 colloq.
family – phrases
– APPLE NEVER FALLS FAR FROM THE TREE, THE a person inevitably shares traits with or resembles his or her parents or family …1843
– CHILD IS FATHER OF THE MAN, THE a child’s character shows what kind of an adult they will become …Bk1999 
 
FAMINE – nouns
– AFFAMINE †* famine …c1450
famine – verbs 
– AFAMISH † to afflict with hunger or famine; to starve …1568
– AFFAMISH † to afflict with hunger or famine; to starve …1568
 
FAMISH – verbs
– EFFAMISH †* to famish …a1603
– FAINT to starve, to famish …1866 Sc.
– FAME †* to famish, to starve …c1330
– FAMEL to starve, to famish …1875 Eng. dial.
– FAMMEL to starve, to famish …1875 Eng. dial.
– FANT to famish, to starve …1898 Sc.
 
FAMISHED – adjectives
– AFFAMISHED † afflicted with hunger, famished, starving …1552
– FAMMELLED hungry, starved, famished …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– FAMYLOUS †* famished, hungry, starved …c1475
– HUNGRY AS A BLACK DOG hungry, famished …Bk1999 Aust. sl.
– OFHUNGERED † afflicted with hunger, very hungry, famished …c1000
– STARVE-GUTTED famished, starving; fit for starvation …1726
famished – nouns
– FAMISHMENT the state of being famished or starved; hungry appetite …c1470
famished – verbs 
– HAVE A WOLF IN THE STOMACH to be ravenously hungry; to be famished …1785
famished – phrases
– MY STOMACH THINKS ME THROAT’S CUT said when one is absolutely famished …Bk1999 Aust. sl.
 
FAMISHING – adjectives
– FANTIN’ starving, famishing …Bk1900 Sc.
famishing – nouns 
– AFFAMISHING † afflicting with hunger; famishing, starving …1649
– AFFAMISHMENT the act of famishing or starving with hunger; the state of being starved; starvation …1590
 
FAMOUS – adjectives
– BIG-NAME famous, important …Bk2006 US sl.
– BREME † celebrated, famous, glorious …a1000
– CELEBRIOUS well-known, famous, renowned, noted …1608 arch. or Eng. dial.
– CHAUNTED celebrated; hence, famous …E19 sl.
– CLAREOUS, CLAROUS †* illustrious, renowned, famous …a1636
​​- CRACK favourite; also, celebrated, famous …1835 Amer. sl.
– EXIMIOUS † select, choice; hence, extraordinary, excellent, rare, distinguished, eminent, famous, renowned …1547 rare or 
obs.
– FAMEFUL full of fame, famous, renowned …1591
– FAMOSE † famous …1432-50
– FAR-KEND known far and wide, famous …1786 Sc.
– NAME-COUTH † known by name; famous; renowned; well-known …a1000
– NAMECUND †* famous …c1200
– NAMELY † distinguished, famous, notable for a thing …c1440 obs. exc. Sc.
– NOSCIBLE †* knowable, famous, well-known …1654
– ODD † singular in valour, worth, merit, or eminence; unique, remarkable; distinguished, famous, renowned; rare, choice …c1400
famous – person
– BIG NAME a prominent, famous, important, or celebrated person, usually in the field of entertainment …Bk1975 Amer. sl.
– BIG-TIMER a famous or leading person …1917
– FACE a recognizable person; a well-known person; a famous personality; a celebrity; a show-business notable …1960s Amer. & Aust. sl.
– HEADLINER a famous person; a person of note; a prominent person; a performer who takes top billing at a show, venue, etc., and who typically appears last …1896 orig. US
– IT GIRL a woman who is very famous, fashionable, or successful at a particular time; esp. a glamorous, vivacious, or sexually attractive actress, model, etc., or a young, rich woman who has achieves celebrity because of her socialite lifestyle …1927 colloq., orig. US
– MONSTRE SACRÉ a striking or eccentric public figure; a person of controversial renown, esp. in the world of entertainment …1959
– NAME an important or famous person …1975 US sl.
– TOP-SAWYER a famous or eminent person …1854
famous – verbs 
– BEFAME † to make famous …1574
– CRACK INTO FAME to make famous by constant praise …L19 sl.
– CRACK INTO REPUTATION to make famous by constant praise …L19 sl.
– CRACK INTO REPUTE to make famous by constant praise …L19 sl.
– FAME to make famous; to talk of …1388
– FAMOSE † to make famous; to render celebrated …1590 obs. exc. arch.
– FAMOUS † to make famous; to render celebrated …1590