Reverse Dictionary: FAN – FARQ


FAN – adjectives
– VENTILABRAL * concerning or pert. to a fan or fans …1882
fan – nouns 
– VENTAIL † something acting as a sail or fan …a1529
– VENTILE † a fan …1555
– VENTILOW †* a fan …1653
– VENTOY †* a fan …1602
 
FAN (person) – nouns
– FANAC an activity for a serious fan …1978 US sl.
fan (person) – person 
– BEETLE a crazy, eccentric, or foolish person; a madman, an obsessive fan …1605 sl.
– BUFF someone who favours or enjoys something; an enthusiast; a fan …1931 sl., orig. US
– FOOL an unusually able person in any field of activity, as a dancing fool, etc.; an enthusiast, a fan …Bk1974 Amer. sl.
– GROUPIE, GROUPY an ardent fan of a rock musician or group, typically a teenage girl, esp. one who follows them on tour, often in hope of achieving sexual intimacy; hence, any ardent fan or devotee …1967 Amer. sl.
– HEAD a person who is very enthusiastic about a particular interest or activity; a devotee, an avid fan; usually with a preceding modifying word, as soccer-head …1960
– NUT a person who pursues a particular interest or activity with ardent or excessive enthusiasm; an avid fan, a devotee …1915 colloq.
– TOUR RAT in the language surrounding the Grateful Dead: a fan who follows the band on tour at all costs …1994 US sl.
 
FANATIC – person
– EXTRAVAGANT † one who does not keep within ordinary or reasonable limits; an exceptional or eccentric person; a fanatic …1627
– FAN † a fanatic …1682 jocular
– FANN a fanatic …1680 colloq.
– PHAN a fanatic …1680 colloq.
 
FANCIED – adjectives
– OPINIONATE † based on opinion, or held in the way of opinion; conjectural, uncertain; supposed, fancied …1553
– OPINIONATIVE † of the nature of opinion; fancied, imaginary; conjectural, speculative …c1555
 
FANCIFUL – adjectives
– ARSE-VERSY fanciful, preposterous …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– ARSEY-WARSEY fanciful, preposterous …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– ARSY-FARCY fanciful, preposterous …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– ARSY-VERSY fanciful, preposterous …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– COCKLE-BRAINED whimsical, eccentric, flighty, fanciful; foolish, chuckle-headed …1824 Sc.
– FANCICAL fanciful; whimsical …1671 rare exc. Eng. dial.
– FANCICLE fanciful, faddy, capricious, fickle …1895 Eng. dial.
– FANSICLE fanciful, faddy, capricious, fickle …1895 Eng. dial.
– FANTASIOUS †* adj. full of fancies, capricious …c1489
– FANTASQUE fanciful, fantastic; curious …1701
– FANTY-SHEENY showy, fanciful, over-particular …1847 Eng. dial.
– KINKY markedly fanciful or eccentric …1847 Amer. sl.
– LAPUTAN pertaining to Laputa, the flying island in Gulliver’s Travels; hence, visionary, absurd, fanciful, preposterous, ridiculous, impossible …1866
– MAGGATIVE full of whims or fancies; whimsical, capricious, crotchety …Bk1905 Sc. 
– MAGGATIVOUS full of whims or fancies; whimsical, capricious, crotchety …Bk1905 Sc. 
– MAGGOT-BRAINED whimsical, fanciful, eccentric; a general epithet of abuse …L17 sl.
– MAGGOT-HEADED whimsical, fanciful, eccentric; a general epithet of abuse …L17 sl.
– MAGGOTISH † crotchety; full of whims or perverse fancies …a1700
– MAGGOT-PATED whimsical, fanciful, eccentric; a general epithet of abuse …L17 sl.
– MAGGOT-PLATED whimsical, fanciful, eccentric; a general epithet of abuse …L17 sl.
– MAGGOTTING full of whims or fancies, whimsical, capricious, crotchety …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– MAGGOTY full of whims and foolish fancies; freakish …1678
– MAGGOTY-HEADED full of whims or fancies, whimsical, capricious, crotchety …1894 Sc.
– MAGGOTY-MINDED full of whims or fancies, whimsical, capricious, crotchety …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– MIMMOCKY fanciful, dainty; used contemptuously …1896 Eng. dial.
– MIMPING affected, mincing; dainty, fanciful about food …1871 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– MIMPSY-PIMSY dainty, fastidious, fanciful, affected …1892 Eng. dial.
– MIMPY affected, mincing; dainty, fanciful about food …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– NATLING trifling, fanciful, ornamental …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– NOTIONAL strange, having odd or peculiar ideas; fanciful, whimsical; opinionated; temperamental; fussy …1791 Amer. dial.
– NOTIONATE given to notions or impulses, fanciful, whimsical …1850 Sc. & Amer. dial.
– VAPOROUS 1. of persons or minds: inclined to be fanciful, vague, or frothy, in ideas or discourse …1605
2. of ideas, feelings, etc.: fanciful, idle, unsubstantial, vain …1605
fanciful – nouns
– FANTASTIC † a fanciful composition ..1641
– JIGGALORUM † a fanciful thing of little value; a trifle …1613 colloq.
– MOTHER HUBBARD nonsense, fanciful talk, lies …1980s sl.
– OMINY a fad or fanciful contrivance …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– WHURLIEGIRKIE an untrue or fanciful tale …1887 Sc.
fanciful – person 
– FADDLE a fanciful person, either fastidious in trifles or devoted to some particular hobby – a fussy, over-particular person – one full of whims and fancies …Bk1881 Eng. dial.
– FANTASTIC † one who has fanciful ideas or indulges in wild notions …1598 obs. exc. arch.
– FANTASTICAL † one who has fanciful ideas or notions …1589
– SABIN a whimsical or fanciful person …Bk1881 
– SANNOCK a fanciful, dainty person; one who is slow and undecided, or namby-pamby …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
fanciful – verbs
– FANCIFY to make fanciful …1890
 
FANCIFULNESS – nouns
– QUAINTISE † fine or curious dress; fineness, elegance or fancifulness in dress …?1300
– MAGGOT †* fancifulness …1701
 
FANCILY – adverbs
– FANCY fancily, affectedly …1940s
 
FANCY – adjectives
– CHI-CHI smart, stylish; pretentious, affected; fancy …20C Amer. sl.
– DANDILLY fancy, over-ornamented …1895 Sc.
– DANDY fancy; fashionable; hence, splendid, first-rate, excellent, fine; very good of its kind …1792 colloq., orig. US
– FANCY-DAN fancy; pretentious; affected …1938 Amer. sl.
– FANCY-PANTS fancy or snobbish; used derisively …1949 Amer. sl.
– FANCY-SCHMANCY very fancy …Bk2006 US sl.
– JAZZY fancy; flashy …1923 Amer. sl.
– RANCY-TANCY fancy, refined …1950s Aust. rhyming sl.
– SANNOCK fancy …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– SPINORTY fancy, fussy, dressy, stylish …Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
– SPONORTY fancy, fussy, dressy, stylish …Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
– WALLIE decorative, fancy, ornamental, esp. applied to porcelain figures of dogs, etc. set out for decoration on mantelpieces and sideboards …1904 Sc.
– WALLY decorative, fancy, ornamental, esp. applied to porcelain figures of dogs, etc. set out for decoration on mantelpieces and sideboards …1904 Sc.
fancy – nouns
– BEES whims, fancies …1776 Sc.
– CALF-RASH a foolish fancy; boy’s love …1882 Eng. dial.
– CAPRICCIO † a sudden change or turn of the mind without apparent or adequate motive; a desire or opinion arbitrarily or fantastically formed; a freak, whim, a mere fancy …1601
– CAPRICH † a sudden change or turn of the mind without apparent or adequate motive; a desire or opinion arbitrarily or fantastically formed; a freak, whim, a mere fancy …1656
– CASTLE IN THE AIR a visionary project or scheme; a daydream, an idle fancy …c1400
– CHI-CHI something stylish or fancy; fanciness, stylishness …20C Amer. sl.
– CHICKEN-FIXIN’S anything fancy, in food, dress, or otherwise …Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
– DALLDRUMS † foolish fancies …1824 Sc.
– DIDO something fancy or frivolous …1909 Amer. dial.
– FAGERRY a vagary, a whimsical notion, a fancy …1892 Ireland
– FALDERAL an idle fancy; conceit, nonsense; a trifling excuse; a falsehood …1865 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– FALDERUMDAL an idle fancy, a vagary; a fuss about trifles; a trifling excuse …1866 Sc.
– FANCYETTE a little fancy …a1834 nonce word
– FANTADS fancies, whims …1880 Eng. dial.
– FANTASQUE † fancy, whim …1698
– FANTASTIC † power of fancy or imagination …1764
– FANTIGUE a vagary, a fancy, a whim; a joke, a ‘lark’ ..1894 Eng. dial.
– FANTODS fancies, whims …1880 Eng. dial.
– GAIRY † a whim, fancy …1822 Sc.
– IMAGINARY † an imagination; a fancy …1709
– ITEM an intention, purpose; a crafty design; a trick; a fancy, a fad …1887 Eng. dial.
– JAG a whim; a fancy …Bk1896 Amer. sl.
– KICKIE-WICKIE a whim or erratic fancy …B1900
– KICKSEY-WINSEY † a fantastic device; a whim or erratic fancy …1599
– MAGGOT a whimsical or perverse fancy; a crotchet …a1625
– MAUNDRELS idle tales; foolish, feverish fancies …1791 Sc.
– MAWK a whim, a foolish fancy; a joke; a trick …1790 Eng. dial.
– MAY-GAMES tricks, frolics, antics, practical jokes; whims, fancies …1825 Eng. dial.
– MEGRIM a whim, fancy, caprice; an absurd notion or fancy; generally in plural …1831 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– MIRLIGOES ridiculous fancies; mad frolicsomeness, the effect of drinking …B1900 Sc.
– NANNICK an idle whim; a childish fancy or fear; a jibe …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– NOTION a liking or fancy, esp. for a person of the opposite sex …1864 Amer. dial.
– ODD KICK IN ONE’S GALLOP a whim, a fancy; an eccentricity …L18 sl.
– QUIDDLES whims, foolish fancies …1891 Eng. dial.
– QUILICOM †* an idle fancy, conceit, or quibble …1644
– QUIRK a fuss; a whim, fancy …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– SCHISM a frivolous excuse; roundabout reasoning; a nice distinction; an  unnecessary apology; a foolish fancy …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– TANCHIMENTS frippery; articles of finery; fanciful appliances …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– TANGLEMENTS fanciful appliances; frippery; articles of female finery …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– TANTADLIN(G) a contemptuous term for anything strange, fanciful, or fantastic …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– TANTRUM a foolish fancy; a whim, vagary; a fluster …1824 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– TICK a whim, a fancy; a peculiar habit or notion; an idiosyncrasy …1896
– VAPOUR † a fancy or fantastic idea; a foolish brag or boast …1614
fancy – person
– CHI-CHI something or someone stylish or fancy; fanciness, stylishness …20C Amer. sl.
– FADDLE a fussy, over-particular person; one full of whims and fancies …19C Eng. dial.
fancy – verbs 
– DICKEY UP to dress up in fine clothes; to make pretty or fancy …1969 Amer. dial.
– FANCIFY 1. † to have a fancy for; to like …1656
2. † to fancy, to imagine …1748
– FANTASTICATE † to conceive or represent in the fancy; to fancy …1600
– FANTASY † to take a fancy or liking to; to be favourably inclined to; to fall in love with …1548
– GUSSY UP to decorate; to make fancy …L1940s Amer. sl.
– HAVE THE SHINERS FOR to find attractive or appealing; to have a fancy or affection for …M19 sl., orig. US
– TAKE A SHINDY to find attractive or appealing; to have a fancy or affection for; to take a liking to someone …M19 sl., orig. US
– TAKE A SHINE TO to find attractive or appealing; to have a fancy or affection for …1839 sl., orig. US
 
FANFARE – nouns
– FANFARADE fanfare …1883
– FANFARON † fanfare; noisy or boastful parade; ostentation …1848
– FANFARONADE fanfare …1812
– FANFARRADO fanfare …1824 nonce word
fanfare – person 
– FANFARON one who makes a parade of something; a trumpeter of …1857
 
FANG – nouns
– MEATHOOK a tooth or fang …1844 Amer. sl.
– TUSH a pointed or protruding tooth; a tusk, a fang …1781 Amer. dial.
– TUSHER a pointed or protruding tooth; a tusk, a fang …1925 Amer. dial.
 
FANTASIZE – verbs
– JACK OFF to fantasize …1990s US sl.
 
FANTASTIC – adjectives
– ALL-TIME memorably good; absolutely first-rate; great, fantastic, wonderful …1945 Amer. sl., esp. surfing usage
– AWESOME excellent, fantastic, great …1979 colloq.
– BOTTLER extremely good; excellent, great, fantastic …1938 Aust. & NZ sl.
– DEADLY excellent; fantastic; brilliant; cool …1960s sl. Aust. sl.
– FANTABULOUS very good, fantastic, fabulous …1958 US sl.
– FANTASQUE fanciful, fantastic; curious …1701
– JOLLY D! wonderful, excellent, fantastic …20C juvenile usage
– KICK-ASS fantastic, excellent, thrilling …1980 US sl.
– KICKSEY-WINSEY † fantastic, whimsical, erratic …c1650
– KWAAI excellent, great, fantastic; cool …1974 S. Afr. sl.
– QUISTICAL odd, queer, fantastic, eccentric …1822 Sc.
– RAGING of a party, a drug: wild, fantastic, very enjoyable …1980s US campus & Teen sl.
– WICKED really good, fantastic, excellent, first-rate, wonderful; great; deeply satisfying …1920 sl., orig. US
fantastic – nouns
– FINGLE-FANGLE † a trifle; a thing of no importance; something whimsical or fantastic …1678
– SEVEN-PLY GASSER something that is fantastic, better than a ‘gasser’ …1960s Amer. sl.
fantastic – person
– MIND-BLOWER an incredible or fantastic person …1968 sl. 
fantastic – verbs 
– FANTASTICATE to frame fantastic notions …1880
– FANTASTICIZE †* vb. to throw oneself into fantastic or strange attitudes …1603
fantastic – phrases
– AWESOME! expressing enthusiastic approval; excellent, fantastic, amazing …1984 colloq.
 
FANTASY – adjectives
– WOOLLY-HEADED inclined to idealism and hopeful fantasy; impractical …1883 Amer. sl.
fantasy – nouns 
– EYE WORM †* a fantasy or whim which establishes itself through visual impression …1591
– LA-DI-DAH-DI a fantasy …1980s sl.
– LA-LA LAND a state of being out of touch with reality; dreamland; a fantasy world …1985 US sl.
– LYRICS fantasies, wild talk …1980s UK Black sl.
– OLD MOTHER HUBBARD an unbelievable story; a fantasy …L19 sl.
 
FAR – adjectives
– ABACK-O’-BEHIND far away, remote …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– BACK-A-BUSH far away, deep in the country, in the ‘back of beyond’ …20C W. Indies & Jamaica
– BACK OF GOD SPEED very far away …20C Irish sl.
– BEHIND AND BEYOND far away; in the distance …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– BEHIND GOD SPEED very far away …20C Irish sl.
– FAR-FET  brought from far …1579
– FAR-FETCHED brought from far …1583 arch.
– LONGINQUE † distant; far …1614
– SIDE †* far-off, distant; going far …1399
far – adverbs
– BACK-ALONG of position: far in the rear; a long way off …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– FAR-FORTH † to a great distance or extent; far, far on …c1470
– FARLY † far, to a great extent or distance …c1460
far – nouns
– BACK OF B(O)URKE a long way away, a place far away …20C sl.
– BACK O’ SUNSET a long way away, a place far away …20C sl.
– B.F.A. somewhere very far away (Butt Fucking Africa) …1980s US college sl.
– B.F.E. somewhere very far away (Butt Fucking Egypt) …1980s US college sl.
– EYEREACH an expanse of country which extends as far as the eye can see …1903 Amer. dial.
– FAIR DEAL an honest transaction; a fair bargain; an honest and equitable usage …1876, orig. US
 
FARCE, FARCICAL – adjectives
– FARCIC †* farcical; of the nature of a farce …1763
– FARCIFUL †* ludicrous, farcical …1731
farce, farcical – nouns 
– FARCEDOM farcical spirit or style …1842 nonce word
farce, farcical – verbs 
– FARCIFY to turn into a farce …1834
 
FARE – nouns
– TOLL † a charge made for passage in a ship, fare …c1000
 
FAREWELL – adjectives
– VALEDATORY † uttered in bidding or taking farewell obs.
– VALEDICTORY uttered in bidding or taking farewell …1651
farewell – nouns 
– BONAILLIE, BONALLY farewell; good-speed; a farewell feast …Bk1911 Sc.
– CABMAN’S FAREWELL any form of farewell that is essentially a curse …1940s sl.
– DAY-DAY a gesture of farewell …1950 Amer. dial., chiefly Black usage online
– FARWEDDLE farewell …1854 Eng. dial.
– LEAVE-NIMING † the taking leave of a person; saying farewell …1340
– VALE a goodbye, farewell, or leave-taking …1580-3
– VALEDICTION 1. the act of saying farewell to a person, etc.; a farewell or leave-taking …1614
2. an utterance made at leave-taking or bidding farewell …1619
– VALE-DICTUM †* an utterance made at leave-taking or bidding farewell …1638
– WRITE-OFF a farewell, a termination …1970s sl., orig. military
farewell – verbs
– VALEDICT to bid farewell …1721
farewell – interjections/phrases 
​- ABCING YOU used as a farewell …1947 US sl.
– ADIOS AMOEBAS a farewell …1980s US campus sl.
– BE GOOD TO YOURSELF used with humour as a farewell …1950 US sl.
– DAY-DAY goodbye; a gesture of farewell …1901 Amer. dial., chiefly Black usage online
– DIG YOU LATER used as a farewell …1947 US sl.
– EASY used as a farewell …1972 Hawaiian youth usage
– LATRONIC used as a farewell; ‘later on’ …1991 US sl.
– MAY ALL YOUR CONSEQUENCES BE HAPPY ONES used as a humorous farewell …1962 US sl.
– MY FEET ARE STAYING a farewell …1980s US college sl.
– SAME BAT TIME, SAME BAT CHANNEL a humorous farewell …1966 US sl.
– SAYONARA farewell, goodbye …1870 Japanese
– SEE YOU IN CHURCH! used as an expression of farewell …1950 Amer. dial.
– STAY UP used as a farewell …1998 US sl.
– VALE! farewell; goodbye …1550
 
FAR-FETCHED – adjectives
– FAR-FAUGHT far-fetched …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– FAR-FET † of an argument, notion, etc: studiously sought out; not easily or natural introduced; strained; far-fetched, unlikely and unconvincing …1533
– FAR-FETCH † far-fetched; unlikely and unconvincing …1603
far-fetched – nouns 
– FAR-FETCH † fondness for far-fetched ideas …1813
far-fetched – verbs 
– FAR-FETCH † to derive in a far-fetched manner …1639
 
FARM, FARMING – adjectives
– FARMERIC farming, farmer-like; countrified …1867 Eng. dial.
– FARMERING farming, engaged in farming …1892 Eng. dial.
– FARMERLY † like a farmer …a1674
– FARMERY like a farmer …1861
– OFF-HAND of a farm: owned by a tenant who does not reside there …1898 Eng. dial.
– OFF-HANDED of a farm: owned by a tenant who does not reside there …1898 Eng. dial.
farm, farming – nouns
– BACK HELP assistance given reciprocally, as among farmers …1940 Amer. dial.
– BARGAIN † a small farm-holding …1602 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– BARTON a large farm, esp. the demesne lands of a manor; a farmhouse ..1790 Eng. dial.
– BOARDER an unproductive farm animal not worth its keep …1932 Amer. dial.
– BONANZA FARM a very large and productive farm …1878 Amer. dial.
– DIJEY a small farm or homestead …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– ESTATE a farm belonging to the occupier …1890 Eng. dial.
– FARMERING farming, the occupation of a farmer …1895 Eng. dial.
– FARMERY 1. the buildings, yards, etc. belonging to a farm …1656
2. the business of cultivating land, raising stock, etc.; agriculture, farming …1801
– FARMHOLD a quantity of land held and cultivated as a farm …1449
– FARMLET a little farm …1881
– GAINERY † a farm …1424
– GARBAGE farm produce …1976 US sl.
– HA † a farmhouse, the main dwelling of a farm; a house, esp. on a farm, occupied by the farmed himself as opposed to the cottar houses …1721 Sc.
– LABOURING a farm …1798 Sc.
– MAILING 1. a rented farm …1452 Sc.
2. the rent paid for a farm …1725
– MAINS the farm attached to a mansion house; a home farm …1533 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– OFF-FARM a farm held by a tenant who does not reside on it …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– ON-GEAR the stock on a farm; the dwellings and other appurtenances …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– ONSTEADING the houses and buildings forming a farm-stead; a cluster of farm-workers’ houses or the like …1830 Sc.
– PADDOCK a small farm …1824 Sc.
– TILTH labour or work in the cultivation of the soil; tillage, agricultural work, husbandry …c1000
– TILTURE †* tilth, tillage, agriculture …1573
– YOKELET an old name for a little farm or manor …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
farm, farming – person, farmer, farmhand, farm labourer 
– ACREMAN † a cultivator of the ground; a husbandman, or ploughman …c1000
– AFTERNOON FARMER a procrastinating one; hence a lazy person …B1874 Eng. sl.
– AGREGADO a farmhand or a man allowed to work for himself on part of the landowner’s soil …1871 Amer. dial.
– ALL-WORKS a man employed on a farm to do odd jobs …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– APPLEKNOCKER 1. (often derogatory) an itinerant farm labourer …1941 Amer. dial.
2. among loggers: a farmer  …1950 Amer. dial.
– APRON-STRING FARMER an effeminate town-bred farmer …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– ARKIE, ARKY any poor Southern farmer, esp. a sharecropper …20C US sl.
– BAAYLEY a farm bailiff or overlooker of labourers …Bk1888 Eng. dial.
– BACK-BREAKER the leader of a gang of farm-labourers …1867
– BACK-DOOR BOY a boy employed in a farm house for domestic purposes …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– BACKWOODS JOCKEY a farmer …1954 Amer. dial.
– BAILIE a man, boy or girl in charge of the cows on a farm …1880 Sc.
– BAILIE-BOY a boy employed on large farms to take messages and make himself generally useful …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– BAILLIE LOON a lad in charge of the cattle …1916 Sc.
– BANG-STRAW one who threshes with a flail; also, a thatcher or any farm-worker…1785 
– BARN-GRIEVE one whose duty on a farm was to superintend the women outworkers and boys …c1890 Sc.
– BARTONER one who took care of and managed a farmyard; a farmer …1832
– BENE FARMER a wealthy farmer, one who is in easy, or even in affluent circumstances …1825 Sc.
– BENEFIT-MAN a farm servant who receives part of his wages in kind …1839 Sc.
– BILL SHEARS a farmer; a rustic …c1920 Amer. tramps’ sl.
– BILLY TURNIPTOP an agricultural labourer …1885 UK sl.
– BIRSEY a patronizing term for a farmer or country yokel; someone who looks depressed or unwell …Bk1997 Ulster sl.
– BOO-MAN the cattleman on a large farm …Bk1911 Sc.
– BOSMAN a farmer …Bk1864 sl.
– BOTHIER a farm servant living in a ‘bothie’ (cottage) …Bk1911 Sc.
– BOUNDE † a husbandman, a peasant, a serf …c1320
– BOWER the manager of a dairy on a dairy-farm …Bk1911 Sc.
– BOWMAN a cottager; a ploughman; a cattleman on a farm …Bk1911 Sc.
– BONNET-LAIRD a yeoman, one who farms his own land; one who farmed land as tenant, in its natural state and at a nominal rent, for a long lease, sometimes of 99 years …Bk1911 Sc.
– BRIAR HOPPER, BRIER HOPPER a poor farmer or worker; a rustic …1940 Amer. dial.
– BRIER HEISTER a poor farmer or worker; a rustic …1967 Amer. dial.
– BULL DRIVER a rough farmer from the back country; a rustic …1930 Amer. dial.
– CADET a young man learning sheep-farming …M19 NZ
– CARL(E) a man of the common people; more particularly a countryman, a husbandman …1375 arch.
– CEDAR SAVAGE (derogatory) a farmer; a rustic …1958 Amer. dial.
– CHOKECHERRY FARMER an unsuccessful farmer …1987 Can. sl.
– CLODBUSTER a farmer …1950 US sl.
– CLOVER-KICKER a yokel; a rustic; a farmer …1918 US sl.
– COCKATOO a small farmer …1845 Aust. & NZ sl.
– COCKY a small farmer …1872 Aust. & NZ sl.
– CORNCRACKER a poor White farmer; a rustic …M19 US sl.
– COW-SPANKER a dairy farmer or stockman …1906 Aust. & NZ sl.
– DAIRY QUEEN a homosexual farmer …1960s US gay sl.
– DAME a wife, esp. the wife of a farmer or yeoman …1740 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– DIRT-DOBBER a dirt farmer; hence, a worthless man …1947 US sl.
– DIRT FARMER one who grows root vegetables, esp. a potato farmer with over 200 acres of potatoes …1968 Amer. dial.
– DIRT-SCRATCHER a poor farmer …1942 US West sl.
– EARER  a ploughman …1382
– EARMAN †* a cultivator …c1230
– EARTHLING  a ploughman; a cultivator of the soil …c1000 obs.
– EARTH-TILLER † a farmer; a cultivator or tiller of the ground …c1000
– FARMER 1. the eldest son of the occupier of a farm …a1825 Eng. dial.
2. a recently arrived Southern farm worker who persists in his country ways despite the pressing sophistication of the Northern cities …1940s US Black sl.
– FARMER ARTERNOON a slovenly farmer, one who is always behindhand …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– FARMERESS a woman who farms land; a farmer’s wife …1672
– FARMER GILES a farmer, esp., in later use, one stereotypically characterized as rustic, simple-minded or unsophisticated …1770
– FREE SELECTOR a farmer …Bk1892 Aust. sl.
– GADMAN † the man or boy who directed or guided a team of oxen by means of a gad or goad, esp. in ploughing – a goadsman …c1450 chiefly Sc.
– GADSMAN † the man or boy who directed or guided a team of oxen by means of a gad or goad, esp. in ploughing – a goadsman …1827 chiefly Sc.
– GAFFMAN the bailiff or superintendent of a farm …1859 Eng. dial.
– GAINOR †* one who occupies or cultivates arable land; a cultivator, a husbandman …1607
– GALKABAW a girl who looks after cows …Bk1823 Eng. dial.
– GANG-MAN the supervisor or master of a gang of field-labourers hired by a farmer …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– GANG-MASTER the overseer, foreman, or head of a gang of workmen; the supervisor or master of a gang of field-labourers hired by a farmer …1886 Eng. dial.
– GEBUR a tenant-farmer in the early English community …1706 hist.
– GEESKIN a country bumpkin; a yokel; a farm worker; a casual labourer …1825 Sc.
– GENTLEMAN-FARMER a country gentleman engaged in farming, usually on his own estate; a farmer who holds a better social position than the generality of his class …1749
– GEOPONIC  a practitioner of agriculture; a farmer …1612
– GEORGIC †* a husbandman, a farmer, a tiller of the soil…1703 
– GRANGER a farmer …1877 Amer. dial.
– GRASS COMBER a farmer; a country person …1825 UK sl.
– GREEN FARMER one who raises no stock, only crops …1965 Amer. dial.
– GROUND PARROT a small farmer …Bk1999 Aust. sl.
– GULLY JUMPER a farmer, a rustic, a countrified person …1939 Amer. dial.
– HAA-MAIDEN a maid servant in the farmer’s house …Bk1893 Eng. dial.
– HAB (derogatory) a share-cropper; a tenant farmer …1978 Can.
– HAGGLER the upper servant of a farm …Bk1883 Eng. dial.
– HAIN a hind; a farm bailiff …Bk1880 Eng. dial.
– HALFER a sharecropper or tenant farmer …1970 Amer. dial.
– HALF FARMER a farmer who shares his crop with landowner half and half …1967 Amer. dial.
– HALF HAND a sharecropper or tenant farmer …1967 Amer. dial.
– HALF-LONG a half-grown lad; one engaged in farm work …1708 Sc.
– HALF MAN a sharecropper or tenant farmer …1967 Amer. dial.
– HALF-RENTER a sharecropper or tenant farmer …1969 Amer. dial.
– HAND MAN a man who is employed to help with work on a farm …1969 Amer. dial.
– HANK KELLY a farmer …1902 US tramps’ sl.
– HAY BARBER one who works on a farm or ranch during the summer, and as a miner during the winter …1949 Amer. dial.
– HAY-EATER a farmer …Bk1975 Amer. sl. 
– HAYFIELD LOBSTERMAN one who is both farmer and fisherman by season …1975 Amer. dial.
– HAYFOOT a farmer; a rustic; used derisively …1901 Amer. sl.
– HAY JOHN one who works on a farm or ranch during the summer, and as a miner during the winter …1943 Amer. dial.
– HAY KICKER a farmer; a rustic, a countrified person, an unsophisticated person …1941 Amer. dial.
– HAYMAKER a farmer, a rustic…1847 Amer. sl., esp. nautical
– HAYNECK a humorous name for a rustic; a farmer; a simple peasant …1952 US sl.
– HAYPITCHER a farmer, a rustic …1888 Amer. sl.
– HAY-POUNDER a farmer; a simple peasant; a rustic; a countrified person, an unsophisticated person …1941 US sl. 
– HAYRAKER a farmer; a rustic …1954 Amer. sl.
– HAY RUBE a farmer or rustic; a hick; an unsophisticated or boorish person …1900 Amer. dial.
– HAYSHAKER a farmer; a rustic, a countrified person, a bumpkin; an unsophisticated person …1919  Amer. dial.
– HAYTOSSER a farmer, a rustic …1607 sl.
– HEADMAN a man placed in charge of other workers, labourers, etc., esp. on a farm; a foreman, an overseer; a senior subordinate …1725
– HEAD’S-MAN the chief labourer on a farm …1819 Eng. dial.
– HEN WRANGLER a chore boy on a farm or ranch …1944 Amer. dial.
– HERD-TESTER a man or woman who goes from farm to farm sampling milk to test cows for their productivity and the fat content of their milk …1960
– HERRINGBONER a dairy farmer …2002 NZ sl.
– HEWE  a husbandman; a workman …Bk1886
– HICK an ignorant countryman; a peasant; a farmer …1565
– HICKEY any inhabitant of the countryside; a peasant; a farmer; with derogatory implications …1949 US sl.
– HIGH COUNTRYMAN a (male) native or inhabitant of high country; in NZ: a man working or living on a high-country farm …1678
– HIND 1. a bailiff or steward on a farm (in some parts of England) …1495
2. a servant; esp., in later use, a farm servant, an agricultural labourer …1520
– HINE a servant; esp., in later use, a farm servant, an agricultural labourer …c1230
– HIRED BOY a young farm-hand …Bk1913 Western Can. sl.
– HIRED MAN a farmhand, a labourer …1694 Amer. dial.
– HIRE MAN a farmhand, a labourer …1694
– HIRER a farm-servant …1884 Sc.
– ICONOMICAR †* a writer on husbandry …1523 
– IDLE-MAN a man employed on a farm to do odd jobs …1889 Eng. dial.
– JASPER (often derogatory) a fellow, a guy; a rustic, a countrified person, a farmer, a stranger …1896 Amer. dial.
– KAIL-BAILLIE † the servant who stays home on the farm on Sunday to prepare dinner and feed and water the cattle …a1838 Sc.
– LACKEY-BOY a hired hand; an odd-job man for the farm …Bk1992 Amer. 
– LAD a young male servant or employee, esp. on a farm …1721 Sc.
– LEATHER-NECK an unskilled farm-labourer, esp. on a sheep station …1898 Aust. sl.
– MAIDEN the title given to the eldest daughter of a farmer …Bk1905 Sc.
– MAN ON THE LAND a farmer or other rural worker …1911 Aust. sl.
– MASTER an employer; the head of a shop or works; the name given to a farmer by the farm labourers …1801 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– MOLESKIN SQUATTER a working man who has come to own a small sheep run …L19 Aust. & NZ sl.
– MONTH HAND a temporary farm worker hired by the month …1966 Amer. dial.
– MONTHLY HAND a temporary farm worker hired by the month …1966 Amer. dial.
– MOSSBACK a settler; a homesteader; a pioneer farmer …1883 US Western
– MOSS-FARMER the tenant of a moorland farm …1835 Sc.
– MOSS-LAIRD the owner of a moorland form …1835 Sc.
– MOSS-TENANT  the tenant of a moorland farm …1795
– MUCKLE-MAN the head labourer on a farm …1790 Sc.
– NEEP a rustic, a yokel, a farm-worker …1963 Sc. 
– OAT-CAKE a farmer …1914 Amer. college sl.
– ODD LADDIE, ODD LADDY a youth who acts as a spare hand or odd-job man on a farm …1947 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– ODD MAN a man employed on a farm to do odd jobs; a workman who does odd jobs …1750 Eng. dial.
– O’SULLIVAN a farmer; a rustic …1933 sl.
– PAFFLER one who occupies a small farm …Bk1905 Sc.
– PLOUGH-JOCKEY a farmer, a rustic …1927 Amer. dial.
– PLOWBOY a farmer, a rustic …1950 Amer. dial.
– PLOW JOCK a farmer, a rustic …1950 Amer. dial.
– PLOW-JOCKEY a farmer, a rustic …1927 Amer. dial.
– PLOW-PUSHER a farmer, a rustic …1935 Amer. dial.
– PODDY † a farmer …1831 Eng. dial.
– POSSUM FARMER one who lives on a farm but does no farming, only hunts and traps …1995 Amer. dial.
– PUMPKIN-ROLLER a farmer …c1905 Amer. sl.
– PUNKIN-ROLLER a farmer …c1905 Amer. sl.
– QUARTER HAND a tenant farmer who pays usually one fourth of the crop as rent …1967 Amer. dial.
– QUEEN STREET BUSHIE a businessman who owns a farm as an investment …1950s NZ sl.
– QUEEN STREET COCKY n. a businessman who owns a farm as an investment …1950s NZ sl.
– QUEEN STREET FARMER n. a businessman who owns a farm as an investment …1950s NZ sl.
– QUOTTER a woman worker on a farm without male relations with her in the same employment …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– RABBITCHOKER a farmer; unsophisticated peasant …1950s US sl.
– RAILSPLITTER a farmer; an unsophisticated rustic …1867 Amer. dial.
– REUBEN an unsophisticated countryman; a farmer or rustic, a countrified person; a boorish person …1890 Amer. dial.
– RURICOLIST * a husbandman, farmer …1730
– SARVANT LAD a man-servant; a farm labourer …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– SARVANT LASS a servant-girl working on the farm …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– SARVANT MAN a man-servant; a farm labourer …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– SCODGE one who does light rough or dirty work; a drudge, a menial, as a kitchen-boy or girl; one who does odd jobs about a farm …1782 Sc.
– SCODGIE one who does light rough or dirty work; a drudge, a menial, as a kitchen-boy or girl; one who does odd jobs about a farm …1782 Sc.
– SCOGIE one who does light rough or dirty work; a drudge, a menial, as a kitchen-boy or girl; one who does odd jobs about a farm …1782 Sc.
– SCUDGIE one who does light rough or dirty work; a drudge, a menial, as a kitchen-boy or girl; one who does odd jobs about a farm …1782 Sc.
– SODBUSTER a farmer who works the soil …1885
– SPALPEEN a common workman or labourer; a farm worker or harvester; a migratory agricultural labourer …1780 Irish
– STUBBLE-JUMPER a prairie farmer …1961 sl., chiefly Can.
– SUITCASE FARMER a farmer who does not live on the land, but visits it to work or supervise work on it when necessary …1930 Amer. dial.
– SUITCASE RANCHER a farmer who does not live on the land, but visits it to work or supervise work on it when necessary …2003 Amer. dial.
– SWEDE-BASHER (derogatory) a farm worker; hence, any rustic …1943 sl.
– TACKHEAD a stupid person; a rural farmer …1836 US sl.
– TACKY a stupid person, a rural farmer …1836 US sl.
– TACKYHEAD a stupid person, a rural farmer …1836 US sl. 
– TILIE † one who tills or cultivates the soil; a husbandman …c1000
– TILLMAN † a man employed in tillage; a farmer, husbandman; a ploughman, a peasant; a tiller of the soil …940
– TILLSMAN † a ’tillman’ …1561-2
– UNDERLOUT † one who is subject or subordinate to another; an underling or servant; an inferior; the lowest boy on a farm; a lazy servant-boy …a1300 obs. exc. Eng. dial. 
– WAG(G)ONER the head among a farmer’s yearly servants; a carter; a head ploughman …1796 Eng. dial.
– WARP-FARMER a farmer who uses ‘warp’ on his land; one who fertilizes with mud …1799
– WOOL HAT BOY a member of the White rural working class; a small farmer; a redneck; used chiefly in reference to such a person as a political force …1836 Amer. dial.
– WOOL HATTER a member of the White rural working class; a small farmer; a redneck; used chiefly in reference to such a person as a political force …1986 Amer. dial.
– WOP-STRAW  a country farm-servant; a bumpkin, a rustic clown …1876 Eng. dial.
– YAP (derogatory) a farmer; a rustic; a peasant …1899 tramps’ sl.
– YARDMAN a farmer …20C
– YAZZIHAMPER † a farmer; a rustic; a fool, a sucker …1933 criminals’ sl.
– YESHUVNIK a farmer, a rustic …Bk1982 Jewish
– YOMAN a person of inferior station, as a farmer …Bk1825 Sc.
– YUMAN a person of inferior station, as a farmer …Bk1825 Sc.
farm, farming – verbs
– FARMER to practise the trade or operation of farming …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– FARMERY to practise the trade or operation of farming …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– HUSBANDRIZE †* to threat in the way of husbandry; to cultivate, to till …1652
– MANISH to work a farm in a prosperous manner; to apply manure …1893 Eng. dial.
– TAKE THE WHISKERS OFF to work for a farmer gathering the harvest …1920s US tramps’ sl.
– TILTH † to till, to cultivate …1495 obs. or rare
 
FARMHOUSE – nouns
– BARTON a large farm, esp. the demesne lands of a manor; a farmhouse ..1790 Eng. dial.
– BOO a manor-house; a farmhouse; a village …Bk1911 Sc.
– BOW a house; the principal farmhouse on an estate …Bk1911 Sc.
– HALL 1. the kitchen of a farm-house; the principal living-room …1774 Sc. & Eng. dial.
2. a house, a home; a farm-house or cottage …1791 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– HALL-HOUSE 1. † the principal living-room in a farm-house …1564 obs, exc. Eng. dial.
2. † the farm-house, as distinguished from the cottages on the farm …1603 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
 
FARMSTEAD – nouns
– ONSET a farm-house, with its outhouses; a farmstead …1535 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– ONSTEAD a farmhouse with its attached stables, cowshed, and other offices; a farmstead; later sometimes specifically the offices, as distinct from the farmer’s house …1715 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
 
FARMYARD – nouns
– BARKEN an enclosed space or yard; a farmyard …1671 Eng. dial.
– BARTON a farmyard; the outbuildings at the back of a farmhouse …1552
– FAND-GARTH a farmyard …1790 Eng. dial.