Reverse Dictionary: FE – FEH


FEAR – adjectives
– ADRAD † frightened; greatly afraid, in a state of fear, put in dread …c1225
– AFEARD affected with fear or terror; frightened, afraid …c1000
– AFEARED affected with fear or terror; frightened, afraid …c1000
– AFFERED affected with fear or terror; frightened, afraid …c1000
– AGGISOM frightful; fear-inspiring …1908 Sc.
– AWESOME that fills someone with reverential fear, wonder, or respect …1578
– BLIRT pale with fear …Bk1911 Sc.
– CAREFUL  causing trouble or fear; dreadful …c1340-70
– CREEPS a feeling of repugnance or fear; the unease felt in the presence of a ‘creepy’ person or in a spooky place …Brit. sl.
– DARING † staring, trembling, or crouching with fear, etc. …1333
– EFFRAYED † frightened, shaking with fear …1553
– FAINTY weak from fear; scared …1965 Amer. dial.
– FUNKED * seized by fear or panic; agitated, unsettled, disturbed …1831
– FUNKED OUT * seized by fear or panic; agitated, unsettled, disturbed …1859
– GHASTFUL full of fear, scared …LME arch.
– HALULU annoyed, upset; weak from fear …1967 Hawaii
– HORRESCENT * shuddering with fear; expressing or showing horror …1865
– IREY † melancholy, gloomy; causing fear …1733 Sc.
– IRIE † melancholy, gloomy; causing fear …1733 Sc.
– PANTOPHOBIC having irrational fears …1857
– PANTOPHOBOUS having irrational fears …1893
– QUAKEFUL † causing fear or quaking …1609
– SCAFE wild, rude; awkward, esp. used of boys; full of fear …1884 Eng. dial.
– SCARED SHITLESS extremely frightened; senseless with fear or physical distress …M20 sl.
– TIMBERSOME † characterized by fear; timorous, timid …1599-1600 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– TIMOROUS † causing fear or dread; dreadful, terrible …1455
– TIMORSOME † characterized by fear; timorous, timid …1599-1600 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– UNCOUTHY 1. † dreary, causing fear …1768 Sc.
2. † under the influence of fear …Bk1905 Sc.
fear – nouns  (also see FEARS for phobias)
– AMP fear, terror …B1900 Sc.
– ARGHNESS timidity, superstitious fear …Bk1898 Sc.
– BACK-FEAR an object of fear from behind …1728 Sc.
– BLUE FUNK extreme nervousness; tremulous dread; fear …1861 sl.
– BOGGLE a fright, fear, scruple …Bk1911 Sc.
– BRITTS fear …1945 Aust. rhyming sl. for ‘shits’
– COLD FEET fear of doing something risky or dangerous …1896 sl., orig. US
– CREEPS, THE a feeling of repugnance or fear; the unease felt in the presence of a ‘creepy’ person or in a spooky place; a feeling of horror caused by something uncanny …1879 sl.
– DARE a feeling of awe or fear …Bk1900 Sc.
– EDGARS a bad mood, anxiety, fear …1983 Aust. rhyming sl. for ‘the shits’ (Edgar Britts)
– EDGAR BRITTS a bad mood, anxiety, fear …1983 Aust. rhyming sl. for ‘the shits’
– EFFERE †* fear …1553 Sc.
– EFFRAY † fear, terror …1375
– EIR † fear, dread …1808 Sc.
– ERE † fear, dread …1808 Sc.
– EYE † fear, terror, dread …c1175
– FEAR † an object of fear; something that is, or is to be, feared …1535
– FEAREDNESS † the condition of being frightened or afraid; terror, fear; also, a cause of fright …a1300
– FEARLAC † fear, terror …a1225
– FEARLING a creature that fears …1837 nonce word
– FRIGHTENER fear …1960s sl.
– FUNK a state of panic, extreme nervousness, agitation, etc.; utter fear or terror …1743 sl.
– FUNKINESS * fear, nervousness, timidity …1859
– FUNKING the act or fact of showing fear, nervousness, or cowardice; a backing out of or evading something due to nerves, cowardice, etc. …1823 colloq.
– HEART-QUAKE sudden and violent emotion, as of terror, delight, etc.; a trembling of the heart; fearfulness …1561
– HEEB a jittery sensation; a fearful feeling; a sense of anxiety …1996 UK sl.
– JIMMY BRITTS fear …1945 Aust. rhyming sl. for ‘shits’
– MEEMIES a feeling of anxiety and fear …1946 US sl.
– NANNICK an idle whim; a childish fancy or fear; a jibe …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– PANOPHOBIA a form of melancholia marked by causeless or excessive terror; sudden fear or panic …1799
– PANTAPHOBIA total absence of fear …1893
– PANTOPHOBIA an irrational fear marked by terror …1842
– PANTOPHOBY an irrational fear marked by terror …1857
– RADDOUR † fear, terror …c1375 Sc.
– RADNESS † fear, fright …a1300 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– SHITS, THE fear …1967 sl.
– SKRIK a fright; a tremor of fear …L19 S. Afr.
– TIMERITY † fear, timidness, timidity …1582
– TIMOR * fear …1599
– TRENCH DREAMS fear; esp. the fear that one will show cowardice …World War I Amer. sl.
– TRENCH HORRORS fear and cowardice, or fear of same …World War I Amer. sl.
– UG † fear, dread …a1240 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– UGGING dread, fear, horror, loathing …c1250
– WHITE-KNUCKLER an event or experience provoking extreme fear, suspense, or anxiety; a very frightening or suspenseful book, film, etc. …1968 colloq.
– WIND-UP fear …1917 sl.
fear – verbs
– ADOUBT †* to fear, to dread …c1400
– ADRAD 1. † to dread, to fear greatly …a900
2. † to fear for oneself; to be afraid …a1000
– ADREAD 1. † to dread, to fear greatly …a900
2. † to fear for oneself; to be afraid …a1000
– AIGH to frighten; to control through fear or awe …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– AWHAPE † to amaze, to stupefy with fear, to terrify, to confound utterly …c1300
– BOTTLE OUT to lose one’s nerve, to avoid doing something out of fear …1979 Brit. sl.
– CHICKEN OUT to be scared; to be too frightened to act; to back out; to avoid or to withdraw from a plan, task, or endeavour because of fear; to quit …1934 sl., orig. US
– CURDLE THE BLOOD to afflict a person with strong negative emotion, esp. fear or dread; to terrify …1760
– DARE 1. † be in dismay, to tremble with fear, to lose heart, to dread …c1300
2. † to daunt, to terrify, to paralyze with fear; to stupefy .,..1611 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– DERE 1. to terrify, to paralyze with fear, to stupefy …1790 Sc.
2. † to be afraid, to shake with fear; to crouch, to hide, to lie hid …1808 Sc.
– DINGO to behave in a treacherous, contemptible, or cowardly manner; to lose one’s nerve, to avoid doing something out of fear …1935 Aust. sl.
– EFFEIR †* to fear, to be afraid of …1552 Sc.
– EFFRAY † to feel fear of; to fear …1485
– FEAR-BLAST to blast a person with fear …1593
– FREEZE to become immobile and ineffective from fear …1970s Amer. sl.
– FREEZE UP to become immobile and ineffective from fear …1970s Amer. sl.
– FUNK 1. to act in a cowardly manner; to flinch or shrink through fear; to worry …E18 sl.
2. to be afraid; to lose one’s nerve, to avoid doing something out of fear …1813 sl.
– FUNK IT to avoid an issue or an act through fear …18C sl.
– FUNK ON to act in a coward mannerly; to flinch or shrink through fear; to worry …E18 sl.
– GLIFF † to take fright, to alarm, to startle; to be seized with a panic or sudden fear; to frighten …1823 obs. exc. Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– MAKE SOMEONE JUMP to keep someone in a state of anxiety or fear …20C sl.
– MISDOUBT to doubt, to suspect; to fear, to apprehend; to think; to having an inkling or suspicion of …1877 Sc. & Eng. dial.  
– OGGLE †* to shudder or quiver for fear …c1450
– PUNK OUT to lose one’s nerve, to avoid doing something out of fear …1920 US sl.
– QUAIL to be frightened; to quake with fear …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– SELL OUT to run in fear …1930s US Black sl.
– SQUIB to lose one’s nerve, to avoid doing something out of fear …1918 Aust. sl.
– STARKLE † to shudder with fear, to quake, to be afraid …1527
– TERRICULAMENT † to inspire with groundless fear …1644
– TREPIDATE * to tremble with fear or agitation …1623
– WEEN to exhibit fear; to weaken …1926 Amer. dial.
– WIMP OUT to lose one’s nerve, to avoid doing something out of fear …1981 sl., orig. US
– YDOUT † to fear …1297
– ZOMBIE UP to ‘freeze’; to become incapable of acting or speaking through fear, etc. …1940s sl.
fear – interjections/phrases
– AVOY! † an exclamation of surprise, fear, or remonstrance …c1300
– DARE NOT QUETCH † implies fear or absolute submission …a1300
– DURST NOT QUETCH † implies fear or absolute submission …a1300
– IT STRIKES A DREAD TO ME I fear it greatly …Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
– LORD SAVE US! an exclamation of surprise, fear, etc. …1789 Sc.
– OO-ER! an exclamation of fear or alarm …1912
– SAINTS PRESERVE US! used for expressing fear …1966 US sl.
– YIKES! an exclamation of fear or alarm …1971
 
FEARED – adjectives 
– FEARABLE * giving cause for fear; to be feared …1886
– VERRID † feared …1876 Eng. dial.
– YDOUTED † feared …1399
 
FEARFUL – adjectives 
– AIRTH afraid, fearful …Bk1852 Eng. dial.
– AIRTHFUL afraid, fearful …Bk1852 Eng. dial.
– ARFISH timid, fearful, apprehensive …1788 Eng. dial.
– BANG fearful, afraid …Bk1913 S. Afr. 
– CHICKEN-SHIT cowardly, fearful …1945 sl., orig. US
– CRAINTIVE † fearful, timorous, timid …1490
– CREMETOUS †* fearful, timid ….c1477
– DIRT-FEARED excessively fearful …1722 Sc.
– DIRT-FLEYD excessively fearful …1722 Sc.
DOUTOUS † fraught with terror; fearful, dreadful, terrible …a1300
– EISFUL † fearful, terrible …a1000
– EISLICH † fearful, terrible …c888
– ELDRITCH weird, ghostly, unnatural; frightful, hideous, ghastly, fearful, terrible …1508 Sc.
– FERDY †* fearful, timid, afraid, terrified …c1340
– FORMIDOLOUS † to be feared, fearful, dreadful, terrible …1656
– FUNKY afraid, fearful, timid, nervous, cowardly …1837 sl.
– GRUEFUL fearful, horror-struck …1880
– GUN-SHY apprehensive; reluctant; fearful …1884 Amer. sl.
– HARE-EYED watchful; fearful …1611
– JEALOUS † suspicious; apprehensive of evil, fearful …c1532 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– OGGLESOME fearful, horrible, gruesome …1864
– PALE-HEARTED wanting in spirit or courage; cowardly, fearful, timid …1605
– PANICFUL full of panic, fearful …1846
– PAVID * fearful, timid, shy, quaking …1656
– SCAREDY afraid, fearful, timid, cowardly …1955 Amer. dial.
– SCARY easily frightened, fearful, afraid, timid, cowardly …1800 Amer. dial.
– TIMIDSOME timorous, fearful …1898 Eng. dial.
– TIMMERSOME timorous, fearful; timid, nervous …1740 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– TIMMY timid, fearful; nervous …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– TIMORSOME * inspiring fear, fearful, dreadful …1894
– TREMEBUND † inclined to tremble, fearful, trembling much; timorous, timid …c1560 Sc.
– UGGLESOME * fearful, horrible, gruesome …1561
– YARROW † fearful, faint-hearted …1616 Eng. dial.
fearful – person
– NERVOUS NELLIE, NERVOUS NELLY a fearful, foolish, and timid person …1920s US sl.
– SCARECAT a fearful person; anyone who is, or appears to be, frightened …1897 Amer. dial.
– SCARED-CAT a fearful person …1966 Amer. dial.
– SCARE TOAD a fearful person; one who is easily frightened …1941 Amer. dial.
– SCARY-CAT a fearful person …1966 Amer. dial.
fearful – verbs 
– ARGH to be timid or fearful; to feel reluctant from timidity, to hesitate …1725 Sc.
– HAIR OUT to be fearful …1990s sl.
– HAVE THE CAFARD to be fearful and sad …Amer. World War I sl.
– PACK to be fearful …1988 Aust. sl.
– PACK DEATH to be fearful …1975 Aust. sl.
– PACK’ EM to be fearful …1944 Aust. sl.
– PACK IT to be fearful …1945 Aust. sl.
– PACK SHIT to be fearful …1971 Aust sl.
– PACK THEM to be fearful …1944 Aust. sl.
– PACK THE SHITS to be fearful …1971 Aust sl.
 
FEARFULLY – adverbs
– AFEAR † in fear …c1386 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– AFEIR † in fear …c1386 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– AFERE † in fear …c1386 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– EISLICHE † fearfully; timidly …c1175
– FEAREDLY † fearfully, timidly …c1470
– FEARFUL † fearfully …1634
– FEARINGLY with fear, timidly …1820
 
FEARFULNESS – nouns
– HEART-QUAKE sudden and violent emotion, as of terror, delight, etc.; a trembling of the heart; fearfulness …1561
 
FEARLESS – adjectives 
– BARDACH stout, fearless …1768 Sc.
– DOUGHTY fearless and resolute; stout-hearted …OE now arch. or jocular
– GUTS-HIGH extremely courageous; fearless …1958 Amer. sl.
– GUTS-UP extremely courageous; fearless …1950s Amer. sl.
– IMPAVID fearless, undaunted …1857
– RACKLE rash, violent, headstrong, fearless …Bk19C Eng. dial.
– TALLAWAH sturdy, fearless, physically capable …1950s W. Indies sl.
fearless – person
– RAMBETTE a female ‘Rambo’ – reckless, fearless, the warrior woman …1992 US sl.
 
FEARLESSLY – adverbs
– IMPAVIDLY fearlessly …1849
 
FEARLESSNESS – nouns
– IMPAVIDITY fearlessness …1604
– KODAK COURAGE a brief burst of fearlessness encountered when being photographed …1997 US sl.
 
FEARS – see nouns
 
FEASIBLE – adjectives
– EFFECTUABLE †* that can be effectuated; feasible …1611
– ON possible, feasible, worthy of an attempt …1935 UK sl.
– OPERABLE † that may or should be done; practicable, feasible …1646
feasible – nouns 
– FEASIBLES † things feasible …1661
 
FEAST – adjectives
– EPULARY having to do with a feast or banquet …1678
– FEASTEN * made for a feast …1891
feast – adverbs 
– FEASTLY † as men do at a feast; merrily …c1250
feast – nouns 
– BELLY-RIVE a great feast; a social gathering …Bk1911 Sc.
– BENDER a bout of drinking; a spree; a riotous feast; often lasting several days and including random acts of excess, violence, etc. …1827 US
– BIRLING a feast, a carousal; a drinking-match in which the drink is clubbed for …1819 Sc. 
– BLAW-OUT a good meal; a great display or feast …Bk1911 Sc.
– BLOW-OUT a feast, entertainment; a large meal …1821 sl.
– BLOW-UP a dinner, supper, or other entertainment for which an abundant supply of food and drink is provided or at which it is consumed; a feast …1807-8 chiefly US
– BONAILLIE farewell; good-speed; a farewell feast …Bk1911 Sc.
– BONALLY farewell; good-speed; a farewell feast …Bk1911 Sc.
– BREAKINGS the remains of a feast, broken meats …Bk1911 Sc.
– EATING MATCH a feast …M19 W. Indies sl.
– FAIRUCH a feast, a ‘tuck-in’ …1936 Sc.
– FARM † food, provision; hence, a banquet, a feast …a900
– FEED a meal; a sumptuous meal; a feast; a full meal …1808
– GAUDY a grand feast or entertainment; an annual dinner in commemoration of some event in the history of a college …1651
– GAWDY a grand feast or entertainment; an annual dinner in commemoration of some event in the history of a college …1651
– MANGERY † a banquet; a ceremonial feast; a series of festivities …a1300
– MERRY-MEAL a feast held to celebrate the birth of a child …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– MERRY-MEAT a feast held to celebrate the birth of a child …1824 Sc.
– RANDY-BOOZE n. a feast, an uproarious holiday …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– REVEL a parish feast; a wake …1825 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– RUSH † a feast, a party …1788 Eng. dial.
– TROIL a feast …1886 Eng. dial.
– TIDE an annual feast or festivity; a fair …1865 Eng. dial.
feast – person
– BANQUETEER a guest at a banquet; a feaster; a reveller …1821
– BANQUETER a guest at a banquet; a feaster; a reveller …1549
– BIRLER a master of the revels, who presides at a feast …1851 Eng. dial.
– CONVIVE one who feasts with others; a table companion …1651
– FEASTER † the giver of a feast, a host, an entertainer …c1425
– FEAST-MAKER the giver of a feast …a1661
– FEAST-MASTER one who presides at a feast …1610
– FEASTRESS a female feaster …1836-48
– HAINER the master who holds or sustains the expenses of the feast …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– JUNKETER orig., a person who holds or attends a feast, banquet or other festive gathering; a reveller; a party-goer …1721
feast – verbs
– BEGIN THE DAIS † to take the chief seat, or preside at a feast …1297
– BELLY-CHEER † to feast luxuriously, revel; to indulge in food and drink …1549
– DELICIATE †* to take one’s pleasure; to enjoy oneself; to indulge in delicacies; to feast; to revel; to luxuriate …1633
– EPICURIZE † to play the epicure; to eat or feast daintily or luxuriously …1634
– GALRAVIDGE to make an uproar; to gad about, to romp; to live riotously, to feast …1793 Sc.
– GALRAVITCH to make an uproar; to gad about, to romp; to live riotously, to feast …1793 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– GAMMOCK to go feasting and frolicking from place to place …1876 Eng. dial.
– JUNKET † to hold or attend a banquet or feast; to make merry, to celebrate, esp. with eating and drinking …1607
– KILL THE FATTED CALF to prepare an elaborate feast in welcome or celebration 
– OBLIGURATE †* to ‘spend all on the belly’; to ‘spend on belly-cheer’; surmised to mean: to spend time feasting …1623
– OBLIGURE †* to banquet …1623
– SMOUSE to feast, to eat up, consume, as a delicacy …1775
 
FEASTING – adjectives
– EPULOUS †* feasting to excess; full of banqueting …1692
– FEASTLY †* festive, fond of feasting, jolly …c1385
– JUNKETING † that holds or attends feasts, parties, etc.; convivial, sociable …1653
feasting – nouns 
– BELLY-CHEER † a feasting, gluttony, luxurious eating …1549
– COMESSATION † a frolic and jovial meeting to eat, drink, and make good cheer; feasting, banqueting, revelling …c1380
– GALRAVITCHING riotous living, feasting; a noisy merrymaking …1820 Sc.
– JUNKETING the act of feasting, banqueting, or merrymaking …1555
– OBSONATION †* a feasting …1623
– WAITING † entertainment, feasting …a1300
 
FEAT – nouns
– BANDY a stunt or feat; feats of agility or strength …1914 Amer. dial.
– DAGS a feat; an achievement; a performance …c1850 colloq.
– MAISTRICE † mastery; superiority, superior force or skill; a deed of might or skill; a feat …a1300, chiefly Sc.
 
FEATHER – adjectives
– IMPLUMED unfeathered, unfledged; deprived of feathers …1604
– IMPLUMOUS †* unfeathered, unfledged; deprived of feathers …1755
– PLUMATILE †* made of feathers …1715
feather – nouns 
– FEATHERET a small feather …1882
– FEATHERHAM † a covering or appendage of feathers; plumage, wings …a800
– FEATHERLET a small feather …1834
– GANDER’S WOOL feathers …1600
– GOOSE HAIR goose feathers or down; a bed or pillow filled with these …1887 Amer. dial.
– TIDDLER a feather or feather-brush for tickling …1900 sl.
– ULLYA-PLUCK wool, hair, or feathers as remains of the carcass of an animal or bird …1897 Sc.
– VANE the web of a feather …1713
feather – verbs
– IMPLUME †* to pull off the feathers …1604
– PARKEN to ruffle up the feathers ….Bk1905 Eng. dial.
 
FEATHER-BRAINED – adjectives
– DAFFY-HEADED feather-brained; foolish; daft …1981 UK sl.
 
FEATURE – adjectives
– FEATURAL pert. to the features …1883
feature – nouns
– FAVOUR † a feature …1596
 
FEBRUARY – nouns
– FEBBYWERRY February …1922 Amer. dial.
– FIBBYWERRY February …1922 Amer. dial.
– LEAP-MONTH † February of leap year …1566
 
FECES – see EXCREMENT
 
FECKLESS – adjectives
– MALLIFUFF silly, paltry, incapable of energetic action, feckless …1827 Sc.
– NIDDLE-NODDLE trifling, feckless …1964 Sc. 
– PAIDLING toddling, waddling; hence, aimless, feckless …1792 Sc.
feckless – person
– BLAITIE BUM  (derogatory) a lazy or feckless person; an idler; a simpleton, a fool, a bungler; a sheepish fellow …1540 Sc.
– HEN-WIFE a cotquean, a coarse, vulgar, scolding woman; a feckless. irresponsible, or shiftless female …Bk1886 Eng. dial.
– PISS ARTIST a drunkard; a person who fools about; a feckless or irresponsible person …1962 colloq.
– WISGAN a term of abuse; a stunted, useless, feckless person …1894 Sc.
 
FED – adjectives
– ABECHED †* fed, satisfied …1731
– YFED † fed …a1100
 
FEDERAL – adjectives
– G federal …1920s US sl.
 
FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION – nouns
– BAG JOB an illegal search of s suspect’s property by agents of the FBI for the purpose of copying or stealing incriminating documents …1971 US sl.
– FEEBEE, FEEBY the FBI; the Federal Bureau of Investigation …Bk2006 US sl.
– FOLEY SQUARE the Federal Bureau of Investigation …Bk1974 Amer. sl.
Federal Bureau of Investigation – person 
– FAN BELT INSPECTOR an agent of the Federal Bureau of Investigations …1971 US sl.
– FED an FBI agent …1916 US sl.
– G-WOMAN a woman who is an FBI agent …1984 Amer. sl.
– HARD JOHN an agent of the Federal Bureau of Investigation …1945 US sl.
 
FED-UP – adjectives
– BRASSED OFF annoyed and unhappy; fed up, disgruntled …1838
– BROWNED OFF bored, fed-up …1938 Brit. sl.
– CHEESED bored, fed-up …1941 Brit. sl.
– CHEESED OFF bored, disgusted, angry, fed-up …1941 sl.
– CHOCKA disgruntled; bored; fed up …c1920 Royal Navy sl.
– CHOCKER disgruntled; bored; fed up …c1920 Royal Navy sl.
– CHOKED OFF disgusted, fed-up …1980 UK sl.
– CHOKKER bored, fed-up …1942 Brit. sl.
– FED UP TO THE BALLS completely fed up …1965 US sl.
– GUTTED bitterly disappointed and unhappy; devastated, shattered; utterly fed up …1984 sl.
– JACK bored, fed-up …1889 Aust. sl.
– JACKED angry, annoyed, fed up …L19 Aust. sl.
– NAFFED OFF fed up, annoyed …1990s sl.
– PISSED (OFF) angry, irritated; fed up, depressed …1943 sl., orig. US
– SICK AND TIRED OF bored or fed-up with someone or something …1783 UK
– SICK OF bored, fed-up …1597
– SICK TO DEATH OF bored or fed-up with someone or something …1890 UK sl.
 
FEE – nouns
– ALL OUTDOORS an exorbitant fee …1969 Amer. dial.
– SALARY † reward or remuneration for services rendered; fee …c1440
 
FEEBLE – adjectives
– BEHEEMED sickly, feeble …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– CADUKE † of persons; infirm, feeble …1510-20
– DAELESS helpless, feeble, useless …1929 Sc.
– DEADASS very boring, feeble, or very stupid …20C Amer. sl.
– DEBILE † weak, feeble, suffering from debility …1536
– DEBILITATE † enfeebled; feeble …1552
– DECREPIT wasted or worn out with old age, decayed and enfeebled with infirmities; old and feeble; senile …c1450
– DODDERING shaky, feeble, or infirm, as from old age; foolish, senile …Bk1942 colloq.
– DOITY silly; feeble, childish …19C Eng. dial.
– DOWLESS without strength or energy, feeble; infirm …L18 Sc.
– DRIPPY boring, dull, feeble …1952 colloq.
– FADE † faded, feeble, languishing, withered …1303
– FAINT † of persons or animals: weak, feeble; sickly, out of condition …c1350
– FARROCHLESS feeble …1837 Sc.
– FECKLESS of things: ineffective, feeble, futile, valueless, worthless …1599 orig. Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– FEEBLISH somewhat feeble …1674
– FEEBLOSE * rather feeble; weakly …1882
– FIBBLE feeble …1883 Amer. dial.
– GAMMY lame, crooked, injured, sore, feeble …1879 Eng. dial.
– GUTLESS cowardly, feeble, lacking determination …1900 US sl.
– IMPUISSANT weak, feeble, impotent, powerless …1629
– MAFFLING weak, feeble, infirm …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– MAICHERAND weak, feeble, incapable of exertion …1808 Sc.
– MARBEL feeble, inactive …Bk1905 Sc.
– MARCID † weak, feeble, exhausted …1656
– MARCIDIOUS †* rotten, decayed, withered; feeble, weak, exhausted …1656
– MAUGHTLESS feeble, wanting bodily strength …1742 Sc.
– PALTRY unwell, feeble, indisposed …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– PAP of persons or objects: weak, feeble …1910s S. Afr. sl.
– PAPPY feeble or weak in character or will …1893
– PAULIE, PAWLIE of the mind: feeble, silly …Bk1903 Sc.  
– PEAKING sickly, feeble; pinched in appearance …1777 Eng. dial.  
– QUEACHY feeble, sickly, weak, small …1859 Eng. dial. 
– QUEECHY ailing, sickly, queasy, feeble …1859 Eng. dial.
– SACKLESS weak in mind or body; feeble, helpless; wanting in energy …1768 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– SILLY 1. † of persons or animals: weak, feeble, frail …1567
2. weakly, feeble, sickly, ailing …a1585 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– SINEWLESS lacking vigour; feeble, weak, powerless …1644
– SWAK weak, feeble …20C S. Afr. sl.
– TANGLE tall and feeble; loose-jointed …Bk1905 Sc.
– TANGLY long and limp, or flaccid; feeble, flabby …1812 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– THEWLESS feeble, inactive …1895 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– UNDOUGHT sickly, puny, feeble; contemptible …1773 Sc.
– UNFEARY feeble, infirm, weak, unfit for action …1838 Sc.
– UNFIERDY feeble, infirm, unfit for action …Bk1905 Sc.
– UNFREELIE frail, feeble …Bk1905 Sc.
– WABBIT exhausted, tired out, played out, feeble, without energy …1895 Sc.
– WAFF of persons: feeble in body or mind, weak, exhausted, spiritless, stupid, ineffective …1822 Sc.
– WAFFLE inert, limp, feeble, weak, sluggish …1847 Sc.
– WAFF-LIKE of persons: feeble in body or mind, weak, exhausted, spiritless, stupid, ineffective …1822 Sc.
– WAFF-LOOKING feeble or sickly in appearance …1923 Sc.
– WAFFLY feeble, weak …1894 Sc.
– WAMBLY tottery, weak, feeble …1973 Sc. 
– WANDOUGHT feeble, ineffective, worthless …1788 Sc.
– WAPPIT exhausted, tired out, played out, feeble, without energy …1895 Sc.
– WEEFLY feeble …1894 Sc.
– WET AS WATER very feeble or corny …Bk1999 Aust. sl.
– WUBBIT exhausted, tired out, played out, feeble, without energy …1895 Sc.
– YEA-NAY wavering, undecided; feeble in character …1902 Eng. dial.
feeble – person (includes FEEBLE-BRAINED and FEEBLE-MINDED person)
– BARM-STICK a feeble-minded person; a person of weak intellect …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– BEUCHEL a small, feeble, and crooked person …1825 Sc
– DAMP a feeble or inept person …Brit. sl.
– DEADASS a lazy or stupid person; a boring or feeble person; an absolute dullard …1959 Amer. sl.
– DEADLEG a feeble, lazy, or disappointing person …1950s Brit. sl.
– FEEBLE † a feeble person; a weak, frail, or ineffectual person …1340
– FEEBLER †* one who or that which makes feeble or weak …1586
– FEEBLING a feeble person; a weakling …L19
– HECKABIRNEY, HECKABIRNIE a lean, feeble person …1825 Sc.
– MESSAN a derogatory term for a feeble, contemptible or sycophantic person …1721 Sc.
– MORON a stupid or slow-witted person; a fool; an idiot; a feeble-minded person; a dunce …1917 colloq., orig. US
– NAMBY-PAMBY a weakly sentimental person; a feeble or effeminate person; an overly nice person …1885
– NAZZARD † an insignificant or feeble person; a worthless scamp; a silly, foolish fellow …1619 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– PALLYWAT a feeble, complaining person …1899 Sc.
– PANTALOON † a term of contempt applied to an enfeebled, tottering old man; a dotard, an old fool …1596-1600
– PAUCHLE a feeble old person, a tottering old body …1824 Sc.
– PAULIE, PAWLIE a slow, inactive person; a feeble, inanimate person …1825 Sc.  
– REMNANT a feeble old creature, the wreck of a man …1826 Sc.
– SAFT-HAND a feeble or inexpert person …1818 Sc.
– SILLY BILLY a foolish or feeble person …1749
– WAFFLE a feeble, silly, spineless person …1887 Sc.
– WALIDRAG a feeble, ill-grown person or animal; a worthless, slovenly person, esp. a woman …1508 Sc.
– WALKING CORPSE a person hardly distinguishable from a corpse save by the power of movement; a feeble, useless, incapable fellow; a ‘moving piece of flesh’ …1693
– WALLIDRAG, WALLYDRAG a feeble, ill-grown person or animal; a worthless, slovenly person, esp. a woman …1508 Sc.
– WALLIDREG a feeble, ill-grown person or animal …1817 Sc.
– WALLY-DRAGGLE a feeble, ill-grown person or animal; a worthless, slovenly person, esp. a woman …1871 Sc.
– WALLY-DRAIGLE a feeble, ill-grown person or animal …1817 Sc.
– WAMBLIN a puny, feeble, undernourished person or animal …1825 Sc. 
– WANDOUGHT a feeble or puny person …a1728 Sc.
– WARRACH a stunted, feeble, ill-grown person, or puny child …Bk1825 Sc.
– WILLIE-WALLOCK a contemptuous term for a feeble-spirited, effeminate man …1937 Sc.
– WOBART  a feeble, decayed person …1856 Sc.
– WORLIN a puny, feeble child …1819 Sc.
– WOWBAT † a feeble, decayed person …1856 Sc.
– ZINNY a feeble-brained person …Bk1855 Eng. dial.
feeble – verbs
– ACRAZE † to weaken, to impair, to enfeeble …1549
– DACKER to walk slowly, to saunter, to loiter; to walk aimlessly; to go about in a feeble or infirm state …1818 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– DAIBLE to go about in an inactive and feeble way; generally applied to children …1825 Sc.
– FAINT 1. to depress, to enfeeble, to weaken; to make faint or  weak …c1386
2.  to become faint; to grow weak or feeble, to decline …c1400 obs. exc. poetic
– FEEBLE † to become or grow feeble …a1225
– FEEBLISH † to render feeble, weak, or infirm, to enfeeble …1375
– FOOTLE to talk or act foolishly; to do anything in a feeble or ineffectual manner; to dawdle, to trifle, to potter; to idle, to waste time …1892 sl.
– HARL ABOUT to move about feebly; to crawl, to creep …1871 Sc.
– HINGLE to go about in a feeble, languid fashion, as during convalescence; to hang about, to loiter aimlessly …1804 Sc.
– IMBECILITATE † to make imbecile, weak, or feeble; to enfeeble; to deprive of strength …1647
​- PALL † to make faint or feeble; to enfeeble, to weaken; to daunt, to appal …1690
– PAUCHLE to move feebly but persistently; to shuffle, to hobble; to struggle along, to make slow and painful progress, to move painfully forward …1880 Sc.
 
FEEBLE-MINDED – adjectives
– BEANY mentally defective, whether feeble-minded or insane …1914 Amer. dial.
– BRAIN-DEAD feeble-minded, stupid …1981 sl., orig. US
– EASY feeble-minded, idiotic, silly …1896 Eng. dial.
– SIMPLE-MINDED possessing little or no subtlety of intellect; showing little intelligence or judgement; also, feeble-minded, weak-minded …1744
– SOFT-HEADED feeble-minded; stupid; simple …colloq.
feeble-minded – phrases 
– HIS BREAD AIN’T DONE used to indicate that a person is mentally dull or feeble-minded …1940 Amer. dial.
– NOBODY HOME an expression applied to any person thought to be stupid, feeble-minded, inattentive, etc. …c1915 Amer. sl.
– NOBODY HOME UPSTAIRS said of someone considered to be stupid, feeble-minded, absent-minded, inattentive, etc. …1951 Amer. dial.
 
FEEBLEMINDEDNESS – nouns
– WOOBLES feeblemindedness, foolishness, idiocy …1933 Amer. dial.
 
FEEBLENESS – nouns
– FAINTISE † feebleness, weakness of body or mind; want of energy, cowardice ..1297
– FECKLESSNESS lack of vigour or energy, feebleness …1637
– FEEBILITY †* feebleness …1413
– FEEBLE † weakness, feebleness …c1325
– FEEBLESS † feebleness, infirmity; infirm health …1297 obs. exc. arch.
 
FEEBLY – adverbs
– FECKLESSLY feebly, ineffectually; wretchedly …1862
– MAUGHTLESSLY feebly, impotently …1880 Sc.
– THIEVELESSLY feebly, weakly, aimlessly, without force or energy …1890 Sc.
 
FEED – verbs
– ABECHE, ABESHE †* to feed …1393
– AFEDE, AFEED † to feed, to nourish …c1000
– BAIT 1. † to feed, to take nourishment …c1386
2. of men and horses: to stop to feed …1634 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– DIET to feed, to supply with food …1789 Eng. dial.
– FAMPLE †* to put food into a child’s mouth …c1230
– FARE to feed, to entertain with food …1839 Sc.
– FEED FULL AND HIGH to supply with rich and abundant food …1697
– GREASE ONE’S MOUTH to feed with fatness, as with bacon …1922 Amer. dial.
– HEARTEN † to strengthen with food or nourishment …1586
– MEAT to feed, to provide with food; to board …1641 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– PAMP †* to feed up, to overfill …a1400
– PUT THE BIG POT IN THE LITTLE POT to make emergency preparations to feed unexpected guests; to prepare a lavish meal, esp. for guests; hence, to do something thoroughly; to enjoy oneself thoroughly …1892 Amer. dial.
 
FEEL – verbs
– FAM to feel, to handle; to grope a woman …M18 sl.
– GRUBBLE to feel; to feel a woman; to rudely grasp a woman’s private parts or the breasts …L17 Brit. sl.
– GUDDLE to do sexual foreplay; to feel a woman; to rudely grasp a woman’s private parts or the breasts …E19 Brit. sl.
– MUMMICK to handle or feel an object or person …L19 US sl.
– PALP to touch, to feel; to handle gently, to pat …1534
– PALPABRIZE † to feel, to touch, to handle …1593
– THINK † to feel, to experience …1796 Sc..
– YFELE † to feel …c893
 
FEELING (touching) – adjectives
– PALPATORY touching, feeling with the hand …1876
feeling (touching) – nouns 
– PALMATION † the act of touching or feeling with the palm of the hand …1688
 
FEELING(S) – adjectives
– ASPECTABUND †* expressive in face; exhibiting one’s feelings through the eyes or face …1708
– FULL-HEARTED full of feeling, emotional
– INNERLY-HEARTED of a feeling disposition …1824 Sc.
– QUICK of feelings: lively, vivid, keen, strongly felt …c1449
– SUBTILE of feeling, sense: acute, keen …1610
– TICKLE † easily moved to feeling or action; easily affected in some way …1377
feeling(s) – nouns
– ACT a display of pretended feeling; an affected pretense
– AFFECT † feeling, desire, or appetite, as opposed to reason; passion, lust, evil-desire …1531
– FAREING appearance; feeling; generally used in plural …1864 Eng. dial.
– FARING appearance; feeling; generally used in plural …1864 Eng. dial.
– GUT a gut feeling …2000s US sl.
– GUTS the source of true feelings …L19 sl.
– HEART OF HEARTS one’s most inmost heart of feelings …1602
– HEART-ROOT † the depth or bottom of the heart; the seat of the deepest emotion or most genuine feelings …c1200
– HEART-ROOTS † the depth or bottom of the heart; the seat of the deepest emotion or most genuine feelings …c1200
– HEART-STRINGS the most intense feelings or emotions; the deepest affections; the heart …1596
– NATURALITY natural feeling …1822 Sc.
– NATURALTY natural feeling …1822 Sc.
– OMNISENTIENCE universal feeling or sensation …1851
– SCAM † a hurt to one’s feelings, a wound, a harm, cause of suffering …1875 Sc.
– TEBBITS physical sensation, feelings; energy, strength …1808 Sc.
– TIBBITS physical sensation, feelings; energy, strength …1808 Sc.
– VIBE feelings, intuitions …1960s sl.
– VIBES feelings, intuitions …1960s sl.
feeling(s) – person
– HEART-SEARCHER * a rigorous examiner of another’s feelings or conscience; later, one who rigorously examines his or her own feelings or conscience …1618
– HEDGEHOG † a person who disregards the feelings of others …L16
feeling(s) – verbs 
– ABALIENATE † to remove; to estrange in feeling …1554
– COME APART to collapse emotionally; to lose control of one’s feelings …1930s sl.
– CUT TO THE HEART to distress greatly; to deeply wound the feelings of …1582
– CUT UP to distress greatly; to wound deeply the feelings of …1843
– FALL APART to collapse emotionally; to lose control of one’s feelings; to lose one’s usual poise and confidence …1930s sl.
– HEART-STRIKE * to affect intensely; to make a deep impression upon the feelings of …a1637
– IMPORT † to influence in feeling; to ‘carry away’, to ‘transport’ …1652
– KEEL to grow cold in feeling, etc.; to become less violent, fervid, or ardent; to ‘cool down’; to diminish in intensity …c1325
– MITHE † to remain concealed; to escape notice; to avoid; to hide one’s thoughts or feelings …a900
– PLAY THE HEDGEHOG to go through the world careless of other people’s feelings …1859
 
FEET – see FOOT