Reverse Dictionary: FOOD


FOOD – adjectives
– ALL HOLIDAY AT PECKHAM lacking in food …L18 sl.
– BACK-HET † of food: twice heated or cooked …1911 Sc.
– BAITLESS * without food, without refreshment …1600
– BATHY of food: moist, sodden …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– BEARING † of food: sustaining, substantial …c1618
– BENIGN † of food: easily digested …1651
– BLITZ of food, esp. pastry: easy or quick to prepare …1946 Amer. dial.
– BOILED TO RAGS of food: very much overdone …Bk19C Eng. dial.
– BUNCOMBE excellent, first-rate, esp. of food …1859 Amer. dial.
– BUNK excellent, first-rate, esp. of food …1941 Amer. dial.
– BUNKUM excellent, fine, first-rate, esp. of food …1834 Amer. dial.
– BUNKUMSQUINT fine, excellent, first-rate, esp. of food …1911 Amer. dial.
– CIBARIOUS relating to food, useful for food, edible …1656
– COMFORTATIVE † strengthening, reviving, as medicine, food, etc. …1398
– CREMATED said of the effect of an overhot oven on a piece of meat …Brit. sl.
– CRUDE † of food: raw, uncooked …1542
– ELEGANT of food and drink: excellent, first-rate …1848
– ENOUGH of food: cooked sufficiently …1854 Eng. dial.
– FAKEY out of condition; of food: inferior, bad; putrid, rotten …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– FRIAND † dainty; delicious to the palate; fond of delicate food …1599
– FUNKY of food or drink: having a rich, intense, or overripe smell or flavour; also, rancid, mouldy …1747
– GAUDY † of fare: luxurious …1540
– GORGEOUS of food: rich, cloying …1950 Amer. dial.
– HEARTLESS of food or drink; without stimulating or sustaining power …1657
– ICKY of food: sticky, sweet, unpleasant …1929 US sl., chiefly teen usage
– ICKY-BOO of food: sticky, sweet, unpleasant …1920s US sl., chiefly teen usage
– ICKY-POO of food: sticky, sweet, unpleasant …1920s US sl., chiefly teen usage
– KOSHER right, good; applied to meat and other food prepared according to the Jewish law …1851
– ILL-SAIRED not having sufficient food …Bk1905 Sc.
– LAPPING GOOD of food: exceptionally good …1965 Amer. dial.
– LARRUPING very good, excellent; esp. used of food …1900s US sl.
– LASH of food, fruit, grass, etc.: soft, watery …c1440
– LECHEROUS † of food: rich, dainty …1474
– LICKERISH fond of and eager for choice food …arch.
– LICKING GOOD of food: very good; highly palatable …1893 Amer. dial.
– LIQUORISH fond of and eager for choice food …arch.
– MALMY of food generally: vapid, tasteless …1843 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– MEAT-RIFE abounding with food …1802 Sc.
– MESSY of food: unpalatable, soft, pulpy …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– NAUGHTY of articles of food or drink: of bad quality, in bad condition …1535
– NEAR of food: underdone in cooking …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– OMNIVORANT devouring or eating all kinds of food …1852
– OMNIVOROUS devouring or eating all kinds of food …1656
– ONKUS * of food or drink: inferior, of poor quality …1941 Aust. sl.
– PABULOUS † of the nature of food; abounding in or affording food or aliment …1646 rare or obs.
– RAFTY of edibles: rancid, tainted …Bk19C Eng. dial.
– RASPED of cooked food: overdone …1876 Eng. dial.
– SAM half or imperfectly done; half-heated; esp. used of food …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– SAM-SODDLING of food: overcooked …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– SAM-ZAWEY of food: lukewarm; neither hot nor cold …1891 Eng. dial.
– SAM-ZOAKY of food: sodden …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– SAM-ZRUDDLED of food: boiled to rags …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– SAPID of food: having a pleasant taste, savoury, palatable …1646
– SCRUM of food: enjoyable, delicious …L19 sl.
– SITOPHOBIC having a morbid aversion to food or eating …1891
– SKRUM of food: enjoyable, delicious …L19 sl.
– SLIDDERY of food: loose and flaccid; easily eaten …1889 Sc.
– STODGY of food: heavy or uninteresting
– STRONG ENOUGH TO WALK of food or drink, esp. coffee: very strong-flavoured …1965 Amer. dial.
– STRONG ENOUGH TO WALK ALONE of food or drink, esp. coffee: very strong-flavoured …1861 Amer. dial.
– STRONG ENOUGH TO WALK BY ITSELF of food or drink, esp. coffee: very strong-flavoured …1965 Amer. dial.
– STRONG ENOUGH TO WALK OFF of food or drink, esp. coffee: very strong-flavoured …1965 Amer. dial.
– STRONG ENOUGH TO WALK ON of food or drink, esp. coffee: very strong-flavoured …1965 Amer. dial.
– STRONG ENOUGH TO WALK ON ITS HANDS of food or drink, esp. coffee: very strong-flavoured …1915 Amer. dial.
– STRONG ENOUGH TO WALK OUT OF THE CUP of food or drink, esp. coffee: very strong-flavoured …1965 Amer. dial.
– STRONG ENOUGH TO WALK OUT OF THE POT of food or drink, esp. coffee: very strong-flavoured …1965 Amer. dial.
– STRONG ENOUGH TO WALK UP A HILL BACKWARDS of food or drink, esp. coffee: very strong-flavoured …1965 Amer. dial.
– STRONG ENOUGH TO WALK UP HILL of food or drink, esp. coffee: very strong-flavoured …1965 Amer. dial.
– SUBTLE † of food: delicate, light …a1400-50
– TAD-LARRUPING very good, excellent; esp. used of food …1900s US sl.
– TAKIE  of food: lasting …1825 Sc.
– WABBLIE of liquid food or drink: wishy-washy, thin …1949 Sc.
– WAIRSH squeamish; feeling a desire for dainty food; having a griping in the bowels …1804 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– WOULD KILL A BROWN DOG of food: dreadful, disgusting, inedible …1966 Aust. sl.
– WOULDN’T FEED IT TO A JAP ON ANZAC DAY (racist) of food: absolutely disgusting …Aust. sl.
food – adverbs
– ABOARD of food or, esp. drink: in one’s stomach …1833 Amer. sl., orig. nautical
– UP of food: ready, as in ‘grub’s up’ …1910s sl.
food – nouns 
– ACKEMPUCKY any food mixture of unknown ingredients …1944 Amer. dial.
– AIR PIE AND A WALK AROUND a clerk’s lunch; i.e. no food …L19 sl.
– AIR PUDDING nothing, esp. nothing to eat …M19 US sl.
– AIRTIGHT canned food …1897 Amer. dial.
– ALLIGATOR BAIT unpalatable food, esp. liver …1926 Amer. dial.
– AMMUNITION food …1924 Amer. jocular
– BABY’S LEG any food, sweet or savoury, that is presented as a pastry roll; meat loaf, jam roly-poly …1924 UK school & services’ usage
– BACHELOR the last piece of food left on a plate …1950 Amer. dial.
– BACK-UP a second helping of food …20C Aust. sl.
– BAG AND BOTTLE food and drink …17C Eng. colloq.
– BAGGING 1. food eaten between regular meals; an afternoon meal …1750 Eng. dial.
  2. food, provisions …1805 Eng. dial.
– BAIT food, refreshment; a feed for horses, or slight repast for travellers, upon a journey; light refreshment taken between meals …1570
– BAIT-TIME the time for taking food …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– BAKE a meal or food usually prepared by baking …1939 Amer. dial.
– BAKER any item of food which is suitable for baking …1948 Amer. dial.
– BAKE-STUFF baked goods …1903 Amer. dial.
– BAKIE any item of food which is suitable for baking …1948 Amer. dial.
– BALLAST heavy food …E19 sl.
– BANIAN-DAY a day when little or no food is to be had, or when the scraps remaining from the previous days are consumed …1851 Eng. dial.
– BEETING † the act of making food; mending, repair; making a fire, kindling …1517
– BEGGAR the last piece of food let on a plate …1969 Amer. dial.
– BELLY-CHEAT something for the belly; food …1622 sl.
– BELLY-CHEER † food of all kinds; provisions …1579
– BELLY-FURNITURE something wherewith to furnish the belly; food …1653 sl.
– BELLY-METAL food …1590
– BELLY-TIMBER † food, provisions …1607 obs. exc. Eng. & Amer. dial.
– BENE PECK good food …M16 sl.
– BENJORAM a liberal supply; a large plateful of food …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– BIB a small drink; a sip; a small quantity of food …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– BINDER 1. a large quantity, esp. of food …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
2. constipating food …Bk1998 sl.
– BOOTIE FOOD food that goes right straight to the butt …Bk1998 sl.
– BRAXY food of any kind …Bk1911 Sc.
– BROKEN ARMS leftover food …1910s US sl.
– BUB AND GRUB food and drink …c1750 sl.
– BUEL food (body and fuel) …1980s US college sl.
– BURNT OFFERING burned food; a badly cooked meal …Bk1990 sl.
– BUZZARD SHIT vile or unappetizing food …1939 Amer. military usage
– CAFFRE’S TIGHTENER bread or food of any kind, as distinguished from drink …Bk1892 S. Afr. sl.
– CAGMAG bad, unwholesome food; refuse of any kind; anything worthless, valueless, or rubbishy; rubbish; scraps; odds and ends …1851 sl.
– CAMMICKS broken victuals, small pieces left at a meal …1863 Eng. dial.
– CAMMOCKS broken victuals, small pieces left at a meal …1863 Eng. dial.
– CANT food …1851-61 tramps’ sl.
– CATES † provisions or victuals bought, as distinguished from, and usually more delicate or dainty than, those of home production; in later use, sometimes merely victuals, food …1461-83
– CATHEAD the last piece of food left on a plate …1966 Amer. dial.
– CAUTCH food improperly cooked or otherwise ruined …1891 Amer. dial.
– CHARGE an amount or quantity of anything consumed …1887 Amer. dial.
– CHEW food …20C S. Afr. schools’ usage
– CHEWINGS food …1907 Amer. sl.
– CHICK prison food …20C Amer. criminals’ sl.
– CHINKS (usually offensive) Chinese cuisine; Chinese food …1948 Amer. sl.
– CHOKE-DOG bad food or drink; a wretched substance which would choke a dog; a strong variety of home-distilled liquor …E19 US sl.
– CHOW food; a meal …1856 sl.
– CHOW-CHOW food of any kind …Bk1892 Chinese Pidgin
– CHUCK food …Bk2006 US sl.
– CHUMP food …L19 UK criminals’ sl.
– COMESTIBLE an edible, an article of food …1837
– CRUD unpalatable food …1943
– DAGO (derogatory) Italian food, esp. pasta …1942 US sl.
– DA KINE anything good, as food, drugs, liquor …1960s US sl.
– DAPATICALL MEATS † dainty meats …1623
– DESIRES OF THE FLESH food, drink, and sex, usually the latter …euphemism
– DINNER-PIECE dinner, food for dinner …1894 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– DODGER food, esp. bread …Aust. colloq.
– DO ME GOOD food …1910s rhyming sl.
– DOUBLE-DECKER a food item consisting of two main layers, as a sandwich made with three slices of bread and two layers of filling …1825 Amer.
– DUFF any sweet edible …Bk1913-17 Amer. navy sl.
– DUTCHING the practice of sending food destined for the UK market for irradiation abroad (usually in the Netherlands), to mask any bacterial contamination before it is put on sale …1989 Brit. sl.
– EAT † that which is eaten, food …a1000
– EATINGS food …1876 US sl.
– EATMENTS food …1942 Amer. sl.
– EATS food, a meal …1782 UK
– EETEMTATION the smallest particle of anything, particularly of food …1918 Sc.
– ENDGATE the last piece of food left on a plate …1968 Amer. dial.
– FAG eatables …c1800 Brit. school sl.
– FALLOCH a lump, heap, large piece of anything; generally used of edibles …Bk1900 Sc.
– FANG a slice, a large piece cut off from something, usually of food, and esp. of cheese; a chunk …1742 Sc.
– FARIN food, fare …c1800 Sc.
– FARING food, fare …1877 Sc.
– FARM † food, provision; hence, a banquet, a feast …a900
– FARMER’S SCRAP the last piece of food left on a plate …1968 Amer. dial.
– FATTER † fattening food …1528
– FEED food or drink for human consumption …1818 Amer. dial.
– FIGHT PIECE the last portion of food, which more than one person wants for himself …1967 Amer. dial.
– FOOD COMA the drowsiness often experienced after eating too much …1987 US sl.
– GAINESBURGER in the military: canned beef patties …1983 US Vietnam war usage
– GALLIMAFRAY † a hotch-potch; a dish of varied ingredients …1900 Sc.
– GALLIMAUFRY a dish made by hashing up odds and ends of food; a hodge-podge …1591 rare exc. Eng. dial.
– GALSH tainted food …1925 Sc.
– GARBAGE any and all food, usually low in protein and high carbohydrates, not in a bodybuilder’s diet …1984 US sl.
– GAUDIES † dainties, luxurious viands …1622
– GEDUNK ice-cream, sweets, potato crisps and other junk food; the ship store where junk food can be bought …1927 US Navy sl.
– GLOP a sticky or liquid mess, esp. inedible food, unappetizing food …1945 US sl.
– GOB a lump or large mouthful of food, esp. raw meat, fat, or gristle …M16
– GOBBET 1. a lump of half-digested food …M16
2. a lump or mouthful of food …LME
– GOO FOOD East Asian food …1990s US campus sl.
– GOOGLUM a viscous food, such as a sauce, gravy, syrup, molasses …1911 Amer. dial.
– GOOK distasteful food …1940s US sl.
– GOOZLUM a viscous food, such as a sauce, gravy, syrup, molasses …1911 Amer. dial.
– GORGE a large amount of food, a surfeit; a heavy meal …1894 Amer. dial.
– GORK baked stuff; in general, the baker’s product …1903 Amer. dial.
– GRAZE a snack; something to eat …S. Afr. colloq.
– GROCERIES food to eat …1986 Amer. dial.
– GRUB food; provisions of food …1659 sl.
– GRUB AND BUB food and drink of any kind …c1750 sl.
– GRUBBERY food …c1830 sl.
– GRUBBINS food, provisions; a meal …1847 Amer. sl.
– GRUBBY food …c1820 cant
– GRUB-STAKES ‘grub’, food …c1890 sl.
– GRUNT 1. the bill, for food, drink …1950s US sl.
2. food, esp. snack food …1968 US campus sl.
– GRUNTS food, esp. snack food …1968 Amer. sl.
– GUSTABLE * a thing that can be tasted; an article of food …1642
– GUT BAG a plastic bag containing frozen food, the exact identity of which is not clear …1991 US sl.
– GUTBASH a bellyful of food; hence, a resultant belly-ache …c1925 Services sl., esp. Royal Navy
– GUT BOMB a greasy hamburger; broadly; any greasy, tasty, heavy food; any food considered to be especially unhealthy …1968 Amer. sl.
– GUT BOMBER a greasy hamburger; broadly, and food considered to be especially unhealthy …1980 Amer. sl.
– GUTFUL as much as the belly will contain; a sufficiency of food …1900 Eng. dial. & sl.
– GUT-ROT unwholesome or unpalatable liquor or food …1916 colloq.
– GUTTLE-SHOP a tuck-shop …c1860 Brit. school usage
– GUY something to eat; bread …20C S. Afr. sl.
– HABBEN bread; hence, corn or food …a1861 Sc. gypsy cant
– HABEN bread; hence, corn or food …a1861 Sc. gypsy cant
– HACK AND HARBOUR food and shelter …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– HAGGRIE a mass of badly cooked an untidily served food …1866 Sc.
– HARDS that part of boiled food which sticks to the pot …Bk1905 Sc.
– HARDTACK coarse food …US Civil War usage
– HASKINESS dryness and insipidity of food; the parched condition of land …Bk1902 Eng. dial.
– HEART-HUNGER a ravenous desire for food …1825 Sc. 
– HOG AND HOMINY southern rations …US Civil War usage
– HUNGRIES the craving for food that follows the smoking of marijuana …1970 US sl.
– INSIDE LINING food …1851
– IN THE NUDE food …1979 UK rhyming sl.
– INWARD MEAT the edible parts of the entrails of an animal …Bk1902 Eng. dial.
– IRON-RATIONS tinned meat; boiled salt-beef …Bk1896 nautical sl.
– JABBLE a quantity of liquid or half-liquid food; a quantity of any kind of liquid; soup …1790 Sc.
– JABBLICK a quantity of worthless liquid or half-liquid food …Bk1902 Sc.
– JACK-BIT food …1939 army sl.
– JEWISH PIECE the last piece of food left on a plate …1968 Amer. dial.
– JOCK food …1879 sl., orig. dialect
– KAI food …M19 NZ colloq.
– KALE dinner, food …1794 Sc.
– KANT food …1851-61 tramps’ sl.
– KARIBAT food …M19 Anglo-Indian
– KEDGING food of all kinds; stuffing …Bk1901 Eng. dial.
– KEGGY decaying vegetables or food …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– KEG-MEG bad, unwholesome food; refuse of any kind, anything valueless or worthless …1875 Eng. dial.
– KEMPLE † a lump, a fragment, esp. of food …1866 Sc.
– KETTLE MEAT foods made from parts of the head and inner organs of an animal, as heart, liver, etc. …1968 Amer. dial.
– KITCHEN † anything eaten as a relish with other food …Sc.
– KITCHEN PHYSIC food, esp. nourishing, healthy, or substantial food …1889 Amer. dial.
– LAB-OATS sloppy food …Bk1902 Eng. dial.
– LAMMING LOAD a large amount of food taken into the body through gluttony …1950 Amer. dial.
– LOBLOLLY 1. a soft or gelatinous food; jelly; pudding …1902 Amer. dial.
2. food in general, esp. an unappetizing meal …1916 Amer. dial.
– LOUNCE, LOWNCE a ration of food …Royal Navy colloq.
– LUSH MUSH good food …Bk1947 Amer. sl.
– MACCAS food from McDonald’s™ restaurant …1996 Aust. sl.
– MALHAVELINS odds and ends, bits and pieces, typically of food or small change …M19 sl.
– MALT AND MEAL food and drink …1861 Sc.
– MAMMOCK a fragment, a scrap; a broken piece, esp. of food; a slice …1520 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– MANABLINS odds and ends, bits and pieces, typically of food or small change …M19 sl.
– MANAROLINS odds and ends, bits and pieces, typically of food or small change …M19 sl.
– MANAVALINS, MANAVELINGS, MANAVELINS. MANAVELLINGS, MANAVILINS odds and ends, bits and pieces, typically of food or small change …M19 sl.
– MANGA food …1907 Aust., NZ & services’ sl.
– MANGARLY food …M19 Brit. sl.
– MANGARY food …M19 Brit. sl.
– MANGE food …L19 sl.
– MANGERY † board; necessary food …1596
– MANNERS-BIT a portion of a dish left by the guests that the host may not feel himself reproached for insufficient preparation; the last slice or small portion left on a plate or dish …1829 Eng. dial.
– MAN’S MEAT † food for men …1475 obs.
– MARROW nourishing food …1382
– MARROW AND FATNESS nourishing food …1535
– MASHLUM a mixture of any kind of edibles …Bk1905 Sc.
– MASS AND MEAT prayers and food …1827 Sc.
– MAST † luxurious or fattening food …1575-85
– MATTER a number, quantity; a quantity of food …1824 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– MEAL-OF-MEAT food enough for one meal; the food taken at a meal; a meal …1898 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– MEAL OF VICTUALS a meal; food enough for a meal …1895 Amer. dial.
– MEAL’S MEAT food enough for one meal; the food taken at a meal; a meal …1880 Eng. dial.
– MEAL’S VICTUALS food enough for one meal; the food taken at a meal; a meal …1830 Eng. & Amer. dial.
– MEAL’S VITTLES a meal; food enough for a meal …1878 Amer. dial.
– MEALTIDE † meal-time; the hour for a meal; the customary time of taking food; also, a meal, food …c1200 obs. exc. Sc.
– MEAT food in general, victuals, board; a meal …1802 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– MEAT AND MALT food and drink …1892 Sc.
– MEATIES food for infants or very young children …Bk1905 Sc.
– MEAT-STINT lack of food …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– MESS a dish of food; a quantity of food sufficient for a dish or a meal …1697 Eng. & Amer. dial.
– MESS FOR A MAD DOG, A a queer compound of food, an unsavoury dish …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– MILLION-DOLLAR-HUSBAND PIECE the last piece of food left on a plate …1950 Amer. dial.
– MILLION-DOLLAR-MAN the last piece of food left on a plate …1950 Amer. dial.
– MINCHIN a mite or crumb of anything; a small piece of food …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– MINGIN a mite or crumb of anything; a small piece of food …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– MOBGEE food …Amer. World War I sl.
– MOMMOCK a broken piece, esp. of food; a slice …1816 Eng. dial.
– MONGEE food …1914 Amer. hobo usage
– MONGEY food …1914 military sl.
– MONKEY FARE whatever food has been prepared …1939 Amer. dial.
– MONKEY FOOD snack food, finger food; a small amount of food eaten between regular meals …1940 Amer. dial.
– MOOSH prison food, often porridge …L19 Aust. sl.
– MOTHER-IN-LAW’S BITE the last piece of food left on a plate …1968 Amer. dial.
– MRS. MURPHY’S CHOWDER any unknown food found on the table …1958 Amer. dial.
– MUCK any unpleasant, vile, or disgusting thing to eat or drink …1882 UK sl.
– MUCK-A-MUCK food …1882 Amer. dial.
– MUCKETY-MUCK food, drink …M19 US sl.
– MUCK-MUCK food …1898 Amer. dial.
– MUNCHIE a snack or small meal; food …1959 sl., orig. US
– MUNCHIES, THE hunger; esp. a craving for food brought on by the lowering of blood-sugar levels that is a well-known side effect of smoking marijuana …1971 sl.
– MUNGA food …1907 Aust., NZ & services’ sl.
– MUNGAREE food …1889
– MUNGER food …1907 Aust., NZ & services’ sl.
– MUNGEY food …1907 Aust., NZ & services’ sl.
– MUNGY food …1907 Aust., NZ & services’ sl.
– MUNJARI food …1889
– MUSH prison food, esp. porridge …1945 Aust.
– NAMMET a luncheon; esp. one eaten in the field by farm-labourers either in the middle of the morning or of the afternoon; a plain meal without meat; food generally …1790 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– NAM-NAM a child’s expression for something good to eat …Bk1905 Sc.
– NINE-MILE ANTS anything sustaining, whether to eat or drink …L19 sl.
– NOSE-BAG food handed out in a paper bag …Bk1974 Amer. hobo use
– NOSH food, a meal; orig. food which may nibbled as a snack or delicacy …1873 colloq.
– OLD BACHELOR the last piece of food left on a plate …1966 Amer. dial.
– OLD BACHELOR’S PIECE the last piece of food left on a plate …1966 Amer. dial.
– OLD MAID. the last piece of food left on a plate …1950 Amer. dial.
– OLD MAID’S PIECE the last piece of food left on a plate …1950 Amer. dial.
– OMNIVORACITY a devouring or eating all kinds of food …1889
– OMNIVOROSITY a devouring or eating all kinds of food …1896
– OMNIVOROUSNESS a devouring or eating all kinds of foods …1727
– OPSOMANIA a morbid longing for dainties or for some particular food …1857
– OPSONY †* anything eaten along with bread to give it relish …1657
– ORDINARY † customary fare; a regular daily meal or allowance of food; by extension, a fixed portion, an allowance of anything …1481
– PACKING food …1891 UK criminals’ sl.
– PACKOUT food prepared and packaged by a restaurant to be consumed off the premises; take-out food …1955 Amer. dial.
– PAN-MEAT † cooked food …c1000
– PANNAM any form of food …L19 Aust. sl.
– PAP soft or semi-liquid food for invalids or infants, made of bread, meal, etc., moistened with water or milk …c1430
– PAPPY infant’s food, pap …1807
– PAUNCHINGS the intestines of animal, esp. as used for food, tripe served in potato soup …1866 Sc.
– PECKAGE food; food supply …17C cant
– PECK AND BOOZE meat and drink …18C sl.
– PECK AND PERCH food and lodging …1828 sl.
– PECK AND TIPPLE meat and drink …19C sl.
– PECKIDGE food; food supply …17C cant
– PLANNED-OVERS intentional leftovers …1968 Amer. dial.
– POKE-OUT a bag of food given to a beggar …1894 sl.
– PUKE any food or drink that is repulsive …sl.
– PULE a small amount of food; a bite, a nibble …E19 Sc.
– QUINKINS dregs or leavings of any kind; scum of a liquid; charred traces of food which have stuck to the saucepan; a fry-up after the killing of a pig; tidbits of any kind …1825 Sc.
– RASHER †* a slice of food, intended for broiling …1634
– RATIONS food, without reference to amount …Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
– REVLETS the particles of food from one’s mouth which find their way into a bottle of soda when one gives another a swig …1978 Amer. dial. Black usage
– ROUGH AND ROUND * plain and plentiful food; simple but generous fare or hospitality …1808 Sc.
– RUM PECK good food …L17 cant
– SABBLEMENT sloppy food …1877 Eng. dial.
– SAIKER a large helping; a fill to satiety of food …1929 Sc.
– SAIRING sufficiency, as much as satisfies one, esp. of food …1856 Sc.
– SARRO an unpalatable heterogeneous mixture of food, a mess …1880 Sc.
– SAULEE † satisfaction of appetite; a satisfying meal or quantity of food …1377
– SAVOUR a small quantity or morsel of food …Bk1904 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– SCAFF food, provisions of any kind …1768 Sc.
– SCAFFING food of any kind; abundant provision …1827 Sc. obs.
– SCARF food …1932 US sl.
– SCLAFF a thin flat slice of anything, esp. food …1882 Sc.
– SCOFF food …1846 sl., orig. S. Afr.
– SCRADGE food …2003 Antarctica usage
– SCRAN 1. food, provisions, victuals, esp. inferior or scrappy food …1801 Sc. & Eng. dial.
2. payment for food at an inn …18C sl.
– SCRAND food, esp. various bits of food, leftovers, broken victuals, etc. thrown together for an impromptu meal, or a meal taken onto their job by a labourer …E18 sl.
– SCRANNY food, esp. various bits of food, leftovers, broken victuals, etc. thrown together for an impromptu meal, or a meal taken onto their job by a labourer …E18 sl.
– SCRIM a small piece of anything edible; a fragment, a crumb …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– SCRUNCH food, esp. sweets …1920s Aust. sl.
– SCULCH food unfit to eat, or good food served too often …1890 Amer. dial.
– SECONDS a second helping of food …1792 sl.
– SET-BACK FOOD food that has cooled for a time and then has been placed on the table …1958 Amer. dial.
– SHELLMEAT † edible shellfish; food covered with a shell, as eggs, nuts, etc. …1642
– SITIOMANIA a morbid repugnance or aversion to food …1887
– SITIOPHOBIA a morbid repugnance or aversion to food or eating …1887
– SITOMANIA a morbid repugnance or aversion to food …1882
– SITOPHOBIA a morbid repugnance or aversion to food or  eating …1882
– SKIP nothing to eat …1939 Amer. dial.
– SKRAN food, provisions, victuals, esp. inferior or scrappy food …1801 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– SLOBBER food; a meal …1988 Sc. sl.
– SLOP 1. inferior food …Bk1995 US sl.
2. prison food …1996 sl.
– SLUSH food, esp. of a watery consistency …1941 sl.
– SMACK food, esp. when taken between regular meals; a snack …1941 Amer. dial.
– SMIDGET a small amount; a small piece of food …1893 Amer. dial.
– SNAPS snack food …1986 US sl.
– SOCK eatables of various kinds, esp. dainties …1825 Eton College sl.
– SOUVENIR a penny or a morsel of food …Amer. World War I sl.
– STAY-HOME SAUCE food or drink made with ingredients believed to instil sexual fidelity or attraction …1991 Guyana
– STODGE 1. food …1890 sl.
2. heavy, usually fattening food …1963 sl.
– STOMACH-TIMBER food …1820 sl.
– SUCKLING MEATS † food suitable for infants …c1610
– SUNKET food, something to eat; chiefly plural …1721 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– TABNAB a cake, bun, or pastry; a savoury snack …1933 nautical sl.
– TACK foodstuff …1833
– TACKLE victuals; food or drink …1857 Eng. dial. & sl.
– TACKLING food or drink …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– TAKE-OUT take-away food …Bk2002 Aust. sl.
– TAKEY-AH-WAYS take-away food …1998 NZ sl.
– TAKING food or drink …1873 Eng. dial.
– TANTADLIN(G) a small tart; an apple-dumpling; light delicacies, esp. sweets in contradistinction to more substantial food …1857 Eng. dial.
– TANTADLIN-TART 1. a small light tart; any kind of dainty; fancy food …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
2. unpalatable food …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– TANTATLIN(G) a small tart; an apple-dumpling; light delicacies, esp. sweets in contradistinction to more substantial food …1857 Eng. dial.
– TATS odds and ends; small victuals …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– THICKENING-STUFF food of any kind …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– TIDDLEWINKS knickknacks of victuals …1893 sl.
– TIDDLYWINKS knickknacks of victuals …1893 sl.
– TOMMY food, provisions generally …1911
– TRAIL MARKER an unappetizing piece of food, the identity of which is uncertain …1991 US sl.
– TRUCK food in general …1838 Amer. dial.
– TUCK food …1857 schools’ sl.
– TUCKER food …1850 Aust. & NZ sl.
– VIEVERS food, provisions …1814 Sc.
– VITTLES food …1946 US sl.
– VIVERS food, provisions, victuals, eatables …1714 Sc.
– WABBLE wishy-washy, tasteless liquid food or drink …1899 Sc.
– WAD food, esp. a bun, cake, or sandwich; in all cases its filling qualities are more important than taste etc. …1919 Brit. sl., orig. services’ usage
– WARM-UPS leftover food …1950 Amer. dial.
– WIND PUDDING nothing, esp. nothing to eat …M19 US sl.
– WITH-IT a food accessory to the principal dish of a meal; a side dish …1939 Amer. dial.
– WOMB-JOY † gratification of the appetite, luxurious fare, belly-cheer …1388
– YACKER food …L19 Aust. sl.
– YAKKER food …1942 Aust. sl.
– YAM food …E18 sl.
food – nouns, items and dishes
– ACE a grilled cheese sandwich …Amer. lunch counter usage
– ADAM AND EVE two poached or fried eggs …L19 sl., orig. US short order usage
– ADAM AND EVE ON A RAFT two poached eggs on toast …L19 sl., orig. US short order usage
– ADAM AND EVE ON A RAFT AND WRECK ‘EM two scrambled eggs on toast …L19 sl., orig. US short order usage
– ARMY CHICKEN beans and frankfurters …Bk1944 service sl.
– BABY FOOD cereal …Bk1944 service sl.
– BABY’S HEAD a steak (and kidney) pudding …1905 sl.
– BABY’S LEG meat loaf; jam-roly-poly …L19 sl.
– BACHELOR’S FARE bread and cheese and kisses …L18 sl.
– BEN-FLAKE a steak …M19 rhyming sl.
– BICKY a child’s word for a biscuit …E20
– BIKKY a child’s word for a biscuit …E20
– BLANKETS hot cakes …Bk1944 service sl.
– BLOOD ketchup …Bk1944 service sl.
– BONDAGE PIE a pizza with sausage and mushroom topping …1996 US sl.
– BOWL OF RED chili con carne …Bk1998
– CABOB a leg of mutton stuffed with white herrings and sweet herbs …1690
– CACKLEBERRIES AND GRUNTS bacon and eggs …Bk1974 Amer. sl.
– CREAMED FORESKINS creamed chipped beef …M20 US
– DALMATIAN PUDDING the boiled currant-pudding known as ‘spotted-dog’ …20C Royal Navy sl.
– DANDYFUNK a pudding made of cracker crumbs, slush, and molasses …1849 US nautical sl.
– DC a hamburger with every possible trimming and condiment …1966 US sl.
– DEAD EYE AND HORSE a pie and sauce …20C Aust. rhyming sl.
– DEAD HORSE tomato sauce …20C Aust. rhyming sl.
– DEAD MAN’S HEAD a spherical plum pudding …1994 NZ sl.
– FLOATER a meat pie in a bowl of peas or gravy …Bk1999 Aust. sl.
– GASKET a doughnut …1942 US sl.
– GASPE STEAK fried bologna …1998 Can. sl.
– GREASE PATTY prison-cooked, chicken-fried steak …1990s US prison sl.
– GREASIES fish and chips …NZ colloq.
– GRUNT a slice of ham or pork …1920s US sl.
– GUT BOMB a greasy hamburger; broadly; any greasy, tasty, heavy food; any food considered to be especially unhealthy …1968 Amer. sl.
– GUT BOMBER a greasy hamburger; broadly, and food considered to be especially unhealthy …1980 Amer. sl.
– IRISH CABBAGE the traditional St. Patrick’s Day meal of corned (salt) beef, cabbage and Irish potatoes …1960s US sl.
– KATE AND SIDNEY steak and kidney …1914 Brit. rhyming sl.
– KEGMEG tripe …M19 sl.
– KINGS AND QUEENS baked beans …20C rhyming sl.
– KINGS ON HOLY GHOST baked beans on toast …20C rhyming sl.
– MADE DISH a dish made of several ingredients …1598
– MADE GRAVY a gravy artificially compounded, as opposed to one consisting only of the juices exuding from meat in cooking …1796
– MADE MEAT † a dish made of several ingredients …1598
– MONKEY DICK Vienna sausage; frankfurter, hot dog …1965 Amer. sl.
– MOUNTAIN OYSTERS lamb or calf testicles as food …1857 US sl.
– NERVOUS PUDDING a dish made with gelatine or aspic …1930s US sl.
– NERVOUS SALAD a dish made with gelatine or aspic …1930s US sl.
– OLD FRIEND AND SHAMROCK an order of corned beef and cabbage …L19 US sl.
– PACKING HOUSE QUAIL spare ribs …L19 sl.
– PAIR OF BASTARDS ON A RAFT poached eggs on toast …1980s NZ sl.
– POT-CHEESE cottage cheese …Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
– PUFTERLOONER a type of scone made of dough and fried in fat …1853 Aust. sl.
– PUT UP THE FLAG a plate of macaroni …1900s US sl.
– RECTOR the bottom half of a sliced teacake, which received the most butter …L19 sl.
– REDEYE ketchup …Bk1944 service sl.
– RED LEAD ketchup …Bk1944 service sl.
– RESURRECTION a dish made of leftovers …1884 sl.
– RESURRECTION PIE a dish made of leftovers …1884 sl.
– ROCKY MOUNTAIN OYSTER a testicle of a sheep, bull, or hog, used as food …1906 Amer. dial.
– SINEAD (O’CONNOR) a ‘doner’ kebab …2001 UK rhyming sl.
– SNOB’S DUCK a leg of mutton stuffed with sage and onions …19C sl.
– SOAPY-ISAAC suet pudding …Bk1904 prison sl.
– SUETTY-ISAAC suet pudding …Bk1904 prison sl.
– TANTADLIN(G) a small tart; an apple-dumpling; light delicacies, esp. sweets in contradistinction to more substantial food …1857 Eng. dial.
– TANTADLIN-TART a small light tart; any kind of dainty; fancy food …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– TANTARROW a pie made of meat, apples, etc.; something similar to a ‘squab-pie’ …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– TANTATLIN(G) a small tart; an apple-dumpling; light delicacies, esp. sweets in contradistinction to more substantial food …1857 Eng. dial.
– TRAIN SMASH a hastily prepared savoury dish of tomatoes with onions, eggs, sausages, etc. …1960 Aust. sl.
– WORM CASTLE a hardtack biscuit …US Civil War usage
food – person
– CARBOHOLIC – a person who selects food made from grains or starchy vegetables over protein or fat …1973
– FOODIE, FOODY a person who is greatly (even excessively) interested in the preparation and consumption of good food …1982 UK colloq.
– GASTROPHILE one who loves his stomach, or good eating; one who loves good food …1820
– MEAT-MIDDER the food-provider or mistress of a house, one who serves out food …1899 Sc.
– NOSHER a person with a large appetite; someone with a love of food …Brit. sl.
– OMNIVORE a person or animal that eats all kinds of food …1890
– OPSOMANIAC one having a morbid longing for dainties or for some particular food …1842
– PINCH-COMMONS one who stints the supply of food for himself or others; a parsimonious or stingy person; a miser, a niggard …1822
food – verbs
– CATE † to prepare or dress food …1617
– DAPINATE † ‘to provide daintie meates’; to serve up food …1623
– DECK AT to feel disgust at food …B1900 Eng. dial.  
– DO IT WELL to entertain, to provide food or other material comforts to one’s own satisfaction …L19 sl.
– DO ONESELF PROUD to entertain, to provide food or other material comforts to one’s own satisfaction …M19 sl.
– DO ONESELF WELL to entertain, to provide food or other material comforts to one’s own satisfaction …L19 sl.
– DO SOMEONE PROUD to entertain, to provide food or other material comforts to someone’s satisfaction …M19 sl.
– FEEL WALLOW to have a distaste for one’s food …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– FEEL WALLOW-LIKE to have a distaste for one’s food …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– GRUB to provide with food …c1810 sl.
– HASH OVER to reheat food …1931-33 Amer. dial.
– HAVE NEITHER THICK NOR THIN IN THE HOUSE to have neither food nor drink …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– LEAVE SOME MANNERS IN THE DISH to leave a small portion of any dish of food …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– LOLLOP to stir or swish something around; to move food around in the mouth …1956 Amer. dial.
– MAGGLE to spoil by over-handling; to mangle; to spoil food by cutting and handling it too much during its preparation …1713 Sc.
– MAKE ONE’S TONGUE SLAP ONE IN THE FOREHEAD of food: to taste good …2008 Amer. dial.
– MAKE ONE’S TONGUE SLAP ONE’S BRAIN of food: to taste good …2003 Amer. dial.
– MAKE ONE’S TONGUE SLAP ONE’S JAW TEETH OUT of food: to taste good …1986 Amer. dial.
– MAKE ONE’S TONGUE SLAP ONE’S TONSILS of food: to taste good …2009 Amer. dial.
– MAKE ONE’S TONGUE SLAP THE ROOF OF ONE’S MOUTH of food: to taste good …1967 Amer. dial.
– MANG to mix together; to mess about; to touch with the hand; generally of food …1829 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– MEAL to provide food for; to feed; to eat a meal; to take regular meals, as at a boarding house …1630
– MOG to pout, to grow sullen, to mope; to refuse food …B1900 Eng. dial.
– OBLIGURATE  to spend in food; to spend time feasting …1623
– RAKE † of food: to disagree with …1790 Eng. dial.
– RAM 1. to stuff with food …1791 Sc.
  2. to take food without one’s parents’ permission from the refrigerator …1996 US Black dial.
– RAVEN to wander in search of food …1888 Eng. dial.
– REBEL of food: to rise in the stomach …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– SAULE † to satisfy, to fill with food …c1430
– SCAFF to provide food; to devise means for obtaining food; to sponge; to collect by dishonourable means …Bk1904 Sc.
– SCART to scrape a vessel with a spoon, to take the last remnants of food from a dish …1808 Sc.
– SCRAN 1. to collect scraps of food to make up a meal …M18 sl.
  2. to provide with food …M18 sl.
– SPORT to treat, usually to food and/or to drink …E19 sl.
– SUFFICE † to provide enough food for; to satisfy the appetite …c1450
– TAKE TO to serve as food …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– TARROW to find fault with one’s food; to refuse food, etc. merely out of peevishness …1641 Sc.
– TAUNT to sicken from eating disgusting food; to upset the digestion …1898 Sc.
– UPBRAY † of food: to rise in the stomach; to make uneasy with indigestion …1598 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
food – phrases
– ALL THE WAY with everything on it, as with a hamburger …Amer. sl.
– I LIKE IT, BUT IT DOESN’T LIKE ME refers to food or drink that, while delicious, has a deleterious effect on the consumer …L19 sl.
– OFF YOUR OATS off your food …1890 UK sl.
– PUT HAIR ON YOUR CHEST a quality ascribed to an alcoholic drink or, when encouraging a child to eat, used of food, esp. crusts and Brussels sprouts; also applied to robust or challenging questions of aesthetic taste or preference …1964 UK sl.
 
FOOD POISONING – nouns
– PHARAOH’S REVENGE food poisoning, esp. with diarrhoea, suffered by tourists in Mexico or Egypt …1960s sl., orig. US