Reverse Dictionary: FRU – FUL


FRUGAL – adjectives (also see THRIFTY)
– CANNY careful, frugal, thrifty …1725 Sc.
– INHOLDING frugal, penurious, parsimonious …1897 Sc.
– NEAR niggardly, miserly, stingy, parsimonious, frugal, mean, greedy, covetous  …1616
– NEAR-SIGHTED stingy, frugal, parsimonious …c1820 Amer. dial.
– PENNY-PINCHING frugal …1920 US colloq.
– SCOTCH stingy, frugal, mean, greedy in money matters …1932 Amer. dial.
– SCOTCHY stingy, frugal, mean, greedy in money matters …1965 Amer. dial.
– SCOTTISH stingy, frugal, mean, greedy in money matters …1965 Amer. dial.
– SKINCHING stingy, frugal, niggardly …1866 Amer. dial.
– SKINCHY stingy, frugal, niggardly …1942 Amer. dial.
– SKINCHY-SCRIMPLY stingy, frugal, niggardly …1866 Amer. dial.
– SKINCY stingy, frugal, niggardly …1969 Amer. dial.
– THROUGAL mispronunciation of ‘frugal’ …1890 Sc.
– THROUGHGAL mispronunciation of ‘frugal’ …1890 Sc.
– TIDY honest, decent, respectable; thrifty, frugal …1813 Eng. dial.
frugal – person
– GATHERER a frugal, saving, thrifty person …1901 Sc.
– SPARER a sparing, frugal, economical, or thrifty person; one who spares in using anything …c1440 
frugal – verbs 
– HAMBONE to live very frugally …1942 Amer. dial.
– LANK DOWN to become sparing or frugal …1935 Amer. dial.
– SCOTCH to act in a frugal or stingy way …1999 Amer. dial.
frugal – phrases 
– EAT WHAT YOU CAN AND CAN WHAT YOU CAN’T used for urging someone to be frugal and conservationist …1989 Can. sl.
 
FRUGALITY – nouns
– INHOLDING frugality, parsimoniousness …1660 Sc.
– NEARNESS parsimony, niggardliness; frugality …1584
– PARCITY † sparingness, frugality …1526
– THROUGH-GALLITY frugality …1823 Sc.
 
FRUGALLY – adverbs
– NEARLY parsimoniously, frugally …1592
 
FRUIT – adjectives  (also see APPLE, etc.)
– ALIVE of bread or fruit: retaining freshness …1912 Amer. dial.
– BASK of fruit: sharp, bitter, rough to the taste …1864 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– CRUDE of fruit: unripe; sour or harsh to the taste …1555
– HASTIF † of fruit and vegetables: maturing early …1727-51
– HASTING † of fruits or vegetables: that ripens early …1578
– HASTIVE † of fruit and vegetables: maturing early …1727-51
– LASH of food, fruit, grass, etc.: soft, watery …c1440
– MALMY of fruit: mellow, soft, juiceless; of food generally: vapid, tasteless …1843 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– MAWKSY soft; tasteless; esp. said of over-ripe fruit …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– MERVE of fruit: rich, mellow, ripe …1899 Sc.
– MERVY of fruit: rich, mellow, ripe …1899 Sc.
– PANCARPIAL †* composed of all kinds of fruits …1592
– QUASHY of overripe fruit or young peas: pulpy …Bk1905 Eng. dial
– RANDED of fruit and vegetables: specked, bruised on the outer coat, but not beyond …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– RANK RIPE of fruit: quite ripe; overripe …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– RATHE-RIPE  of fruits, grains, etc.: coming early to maturity; ripening early in the year …1578 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– RATH-RIPE  of fruits, grains, etc.: coming early to maturity; ripening early in the year …1578 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– SAPPY † of edible fruit; juicy; succulent …1562
fruit – nouns
– ANGELS’ FOOD fruit salad …1891 S. Afr.
– BARK † the rind, husk, or shell of fruit and grains …1377
– BAY † a berry, a small fruit, esp. used of that of the laurel or bay-tree …1398
– CHANKINGS the rejected parts or chewed remains of fruit, esp. apples, and occasionally other foods …1895 Amer. dial.
– CHONKINGS the rejected parts or chewed remains of fruit, esp. apples, and occasionally other foods …1882 Amer. dial.
– CORKLE the core of an apple  or other fruit …19C Eng. dial.
– CRASHING-CHEATS apples, pears, or any other fruits …M16 sl.
– DIGGLES thick clusters of fruit; abundance, plenty …1892 Eng. dial.
– EATER a fruit that is good to eat uncooked …1926 Amer. dial.
– FALLERS windfall apples, pears, etc. …L19 colloq.
– FALLINGS fallen fruit, windfall apples …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– FRESHIES fresh fruit and vegetables …1990 Antarctica usage
– GRIGGLES small apples remaining on the tree after the crop has been gathered in; small, worthless fruit, vegetables, etc., left after gathering …1827 Eng. dial.
– GUTS the pulp and membrane inside a fruit …1990 Trinidad and Tobago sl.
– HANG a crop of fruit …1830 Eng. dial.
– HARD-FRUIT stone fruit, plums, etc. …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– HASTING † an early-ripening fruit or vegetable …1573
– HOPPLE the short stem on which the berries grow …Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
– LEMMA † the husk or shell of a fruit …1753
– LEMMATA † the husks or shells of a fruit …1753
– NUT † the kernel of a peach, date, etc. …1600
– PAIP the stone of a cherry, plum, or other stone fruit; an orange pip, etc. …1721 Sc.
– PAPE the stone of a cherry, plum, or other stone fruit; an orange pip, etc. …1721 Sc.
– PATCH the stone of fruit …1867 Eng. dial.
– PEP the stone of a cherry, plum, or other stone fruit; an orange pip, etc. …1721 Sc.
– RARE-RIPE an early fruit or vegetable …1799 Eng. & Amer. dial.
– RATHE-RIPES † early fruit and vegetables, esp. peas and apples …1677 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– SASS fresh or preserved vegetables or fruit eaten as part of a meal or as a relish …1775 US colloq.
– SAUCE fresh berries served as dessert; stewed or preserved fruit served as a condiment or dessert …1894 Amer. dial.
– SCHNITZ slices or sections of fruit, esp. apples dried in slices …1869 Amer. dial.
– SCRIGS small fruit left after the gathering of the crop …1881 Eng. dial.
– SHELL the skin or rind of a fruit …1935 Amer. dial.
– SNITS slices or sections of fruit, esp. apples dried in slices …1848 Amer. dial.
– SNITZ slices or sections of fruit, esp. apples dried in slices …1886 Amer. dial.
– TAIL † the stalk of a fruit …1613
– TINE †* the stalk of a fruit …1300s
– UNDERLING a small or inferior fruit or vegetable …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– VERDURE † freshness or agreeable briskness of taste in fruits or liquors; also, taste, savour …1513
– YIRMS † small-sized fruit …1824 Sc.
fruit – person
– APPLEKNOCKER (often derogatory) a fruit picker or farmer …1922 Amer. dial.
– FRUITESTER †* a female seller of fruit …c1386
– OPOROPOLIST † a fruit-seller, a fruiterer …1671 nonce word
fruit – verbs
– DAFFLE of fruit: to become bruised; to decay on the surface …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– DAGGLE to grow thickly together, as fruit …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– DIGGLE to grow thickly together, as fruit …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– FALL of fruit when cooked: to become soft and tender …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– SCHNITZ to cut fruit into pieces …1907 Amer. dial.
– SCRUMP to steal fruit, usually apples, from orchards …1866 UK sl.
 
FRUITFUL – adjectives
– FECUNDIOUS † productive, fruitful …1630
– FECUNDOUS † productive, fruitful …1737
fruitful – verbs 
– BATTLE † to become fertile and fruitful …1576
– FECUNDATE to render fruitful or productive …a1631
– FECUNDIFY †* to render fruitful or productive …1730
– FECUNDIZE to render fruitful or productive …1828
– HUBERATE † to make plentiful or fruitful …1623
 
FRUITFULNESS – nouns
– UBERTY rich growth; fruitfulness; fertility; copiousness, abundance …a1412
 
FRUITLESS – adjectives
– SISYPHEAN of or pert. to Sisyphus (a king of Corinth, whose punishment in Hades was to roll a heavy stone up a hill; as he reached the top, the stone rolled down again); resembling the fruitless toil of Sisyphus; endless and ineffective …1635
– SISYPHIAN of or pert. to Sisyphus (a king of Corinth, whose punishment in Hades was to roll a heavy stone up a hill; as he reached the top, the stone rolled down again); resembling the fruitless toil of Sisyphus; endless and ineffective …1599
fruitless – nouns
– BAD HALFPENNY a fruitless errand; a ne’er-do-well …Bk1892 Aust. sl.
– WATER HAUL a fruitless or useless effort of any kind …1823 Amer. dial.
fruitless – verbs
– ABORTIVATE †* to render abortive; to render ineffectual or fruitless …c1630
fruitless – phrases
– WET ARSE AND NO FISH said of a fruitless errand …Bk1999 Aust. sl.
 
FRUSTRATE – adjectives
– FRUSTRATORY † tending to frustrate, balk, defeat, or make void …1529
frustrate – verbs 
– BILK to cheat, to refuse to pay; to frustrate, to disappoint …1820 Eng. sl.
– LANGLE to involve, to encumber, to curb, to restrain, to hamper, to frustrate …1713 Sc.
– LICK THE MOLASSES OFF ONE’S BISCUIT to frustrate, to anger, to torment …1978 Amer. dial.
– LICK THE RED OFF ONE’S CANDY to frustrate, to anger, to torment …1972 Amer. dial.
– LUDIFICATE †* to deceive, to beguile, to mock; also, to frustrate …1623
– NAP to stop, to frustrate …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– OBVENT †* to prevent, to frustrate …1599
– PUT THE KIBOSH ON to frustrate, to ruin, to prevent, to jeopardize …1830s sl.
– PUT THE KYBOSH ON to frustrate, to ruin, to prevent, to jeopardize …1830s sl.
– PUT THE MOCKERS ON to frustrate someone’s plans; to jinx someone; to bring bad luck to …1949
– STYMIE to frustrate; to destroy …1920s sl.
– VAIN † to frustrate …1628
 
FRUSTRATED – adjectives
– ILL frustrated …1900s US Black sl.
– STYMIED confused; frustrated; in difficulties …20C sl., orig. US
frustrated – verbs
– HAVE THE SCREAMING ABDABS to be in a state of enraged frustration …c1950 Royal Navy sl.
frustrated – phrases
– SPITTING CHIPS indicates one is angry or frustrated …1901 sl.
 
FRUSTRATING – nouns
– SICKENER anything depressing, disappointing, or frustrating; a sad outcome …19C sl.
– SICKNER anything depressing, disappointing, or frustrating …19C sl.
– STYMIE a frustrating situation …1910s sl.
 
FRUSTRATION – adverbs
– BALDHEADED to the point of frustration or exhaustion …1889 US sl.
frustration – nouns 
– ABDABS, THE a state of enraged frustration …1946 UK sl.
– AGOMENT aggravation, annoyance, frustration …1957 Amer. dial.
– ALBATROSS a source of frustration, obstruction, or guilt, from which it is difficult to rid oneself; a burden, an encumbrance; a hindrance …1883
– ALBATROSS AROUND ONE’S NECK guilt, the haunting past, an unforgettable problem; a source of frustration or obstruction; a burden, an encumbrance; a hindrance …1883
– HABDABS, THE a state of enraged frustration …1946 UK sl.
– SCREAMING ABDABS, THE a state of enraged frustration …1946 UK sl.
frustration – verbs
– TAKE IT ON THE CHIN to suffer a severe failure; to undergo complete defeat or frustration …20C Amer. colloq.
– VENT to express frustrations in larger-than-life dimensions; to let off steam …1996 US sl.
frustration – interjections 
– ARSE! expressing frustration, regret, or annoyance; damn! …1994 UK sl.
– DAD BURN! blast it! an exclamation of surprise, irritation or frustration …1829 Amer. sl.
– DAG BURN! an exclamation of surprise, irritation or frustration …1829 Amer. sl.
– DAMN! a profane imprecation; an exclamation of disappointment, irritation, annoyance, frustration, etc. …1589
– DAMN AND BLAST! used to express anger or frustration …1943 UK sl.
– DAMN IT! an exclamation of disappointment, annoyance, irritation, frustration, etc. …1589
– DANG! an exclamation of disappointment, irritation, frustration, etc. …1821
– DANG IT! damn! an exclamation of disappointment, irritation, frustration, etc. …L18 euphemism
– DARN! damn!; an exclamation of disappointment, annoyance, irritation, frustration, etc. …1781
– DARN IT! an exclamation of disappointment, annoyance, irritation, frustration, etc. …1781
– DERN! an exclamation of disappointment, irritation, frustration, etc. …1780s euphemism
– DERN IT! an exclamation of disappointment, irritation, frustration, etc. …1780s
– DINGNUTS! used for registering annoyance or frustration as a euphemism for ‘bollocks’ …2000 UK sl.
– DURN! an exclamation of disappointment, irritation, frustration, etc. …1780s
– DURN IT! an exclamation of disappointment, irritation, frustration, etc. …1780s
– I DON’T GIVE A MONKEY’S (FUCK) an expression of one’s annoyance, frustration, or defiance …1960 UK sl.
– OH, FIDDLE-FADDLE! used as a non-profane expression of frustration …1963 US sl.
– OH FUDGE! a mild expression of disappointment or frustration …20C sl.
– OH MY STARS! used for expressing frustration …1966 US sl.
– SACRÉ BLEU! used for registering shock, frustration, anger, esp. in a context of Frenchness …1869 UK usage
– SON OF A GUN! expressing surprise or frustration …N. Amer.
– THAT’S DONE IT an exclamation of frustration when something is ruined
 
FRY – verbs
– DIP to fry in deep fat …1968 Amer. dial.
– SAUTER to fry with a little butter over a brisk fire, to sauté …1869
 
FRYING PAN – nouns
– BANJO any banjo-shaped object, esp. a frying pan …Bk1999 sl.
– OILET a frying-pan; a gridiron …1870 Eng. dial.
– RASHER WAGON a frying pan …M19 sl.
– SKIDDLE a frying pan, a skillet …1900 Amer. dial.
– SKITTLE a frying pan, a skillet …1900 Amer. dial.
 
FUCHSIA – nouns
– BELLS the Fuchsia plant …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– EARDROP a fuchsia …1822 Amer. dial.
– EAR-DROPS the flowers of the garden fuchsia …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– EAR-RING the common fuchsia …Bk1897 Eng. dial.
– LADY’S EARDROPS the fuchsia …Bk1902 Eng. dial.
 
FUDDLE – verbs
– BREEL to drink plentifully, to fuddle …19C  Sc.
– RADDLE to fuddle, to stupefy …1931 Sc.
– TAKE ON to begin to get fuddled …Bk1905 Sc.
 
FUDDLED – adjectives
– BLEEZED fuddled; at the state of intoxication when the face reddens or is flushed …Bk1911 Sc.
– BUNG tipsy, fuddled …1721 Sc.
– IN THE SUDS † slightly intoxicated, fuddled, drunk …1770
– MUCKIBUS † intoxicated, slightly drunk, tipsy, fuddled; confused or muddled with drink …1756 sl.
– RADDLED †* fuddled; drunk; tipsy …1694
– WUZZY confused, bewildered, fuddled …1905 Amer. dial.
fuddled – nouns
– WOOZINESS a fuddled state; muzziness …1977 US sl.
 
FUEL – adjectives
– FAT of a fuel mixture: too rich …2001 US bikers’ usage
fuel – nouns
– ALKIE methanol used as a fuel for racing cars …1970 US sl.
– ALKY methanol used as a fuel for racing cars …1970 US sl.
– AVGAS jet fuel …1990 US sl.
– BETTING † material for a fire; fuel …1521
– BUG JUICE gasoline …1942 Amer. sl.
– DINOSAUR JUICE petrol, gasoline …1976 US sl.
– DIRTY MIXTURE gasoline …World War II Amer. sl.
– ELDIN any kind of fuel, esp. inflammable material such as peat, sticks, brushwood, etc; firewood …1724 Sc.
– ELDING † fuel of any kind, esp. pear, turfs, sticks, brushwood, etc. …a1300 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– ELET † fuel …c1200 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– FAG dried peat; turf cut for fuel …1796 Eng. dial.
– FIRING fuel …1931 Amer. dial.
– FLANAGAN a gallon (of motor fuel) …1992 UK rhyming sl.
– FLANAGAN AND ALLEN a gallon (of motor fuel) …1992 UK rhyming sl.
– GRASSOLINE dried animal dung used as fuel …1914 Amer. dial.
– INGLIN fuel …Bk1902 Eng. dial.
– JUICE petrol, diesel …1909 UK sl.
– MEXICAN CREDIT CARD (derogatory) a hose and siphon used for pilfering gasoline at night …1962 Amer. sl.
– MEXICAN FILLING STATION a siphon used for stealing petrol/gas from a parked car …1979 US sl.
– MO-GAS gasoline for vehicles’ ‘motor-gas’ …1974-77 Amer. military usage
– MOTION LOTION motor fuel …1976 US sl.
– OKIE CREDIT CARD a siphon tube used for stealing gasoline …1966 US jocular
– OKLAHOMA CREDIT CARD a siphon tube used for stealing gasoline …1966 US jocular
– OLLARDS decayed branches of trees or small pieces of wood used as fuel for warming furnaces, etc; fuel …1669 Eng. dial.
– OLLET decayed branches of trees or small pieces of wood used as fuel for warming furnaces, etc; fuel …1669 Eng. dial.
– PAD † dried cow-dung, formerly collected for fuel …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– POP GOES THE WEASEL diesel …20C rhyming sl.
– PRAIRIE FUEL hunks of dried cattle dung used for fuel …20C US colloq.
– SAUCE petrol, gasoline …1910s US sl.
– SCONE a piece of dried cow-dung used as fuel …1865 Sc.
– TALWOOD † wood for fuel, cut up usually to a prescribed size …1350
– TANNEL dried twigs or other vegetation used for fuel, firewood …1887 Sc.
– TUG peat used for fuel …1826 Amer. dial.
fuel – person
– GAS HOG one who used too much gasoline during the gasoline shortages, abusing the gasoline-rationing privileges …World War II Amer. sl. 
fuel – verbs
– TIND to add fuel to a fire …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
 
FUGITIVE – nouns
– OWLHOOT TRAIL, THE the life of a fugitive or outlaw …1936 Amer. Western sl.
fugitive – person 
– ABSCONDER one who absconds or leaves quickly; a runaway from justice; a fugitive; an escapee  …1702
– ACROSS COUNTRY one who is a fugitive from the law …1929 criminals’ sl. 
– BOLTER a fugitive from justice …a1700
– EARTH-PLANET † a fugitive, a wanderer …1591 nonce word
– HEEL LIFTER † a fugitive; a runaway …1583 nonce word
– HIDEAWAY a person who hides himself or herself away; a fugitive …1871
– HIDE-OUT a person in hiding; a fugitive …1915 US criminals’ sl.
– LAMASTER, LAMISTER a fugitive from justice; an absconder …1904 US prison & criminals’ sl.
– LAMMIE a fugitive; an absconder …1933 US sl.
– LAMMISTER a fugitive; an absconder …1911 US prison & criminals’ sl.
– LAMSTER a fugitive; an absconder …1904 US prison & criminals’ sl.
– MIZZLER a fugitive; one who departs slyly …1834 Brit. sl.
– MOSER a runaway; a fugitive …1925 US criminals’ sl.
– OUTFLEME †* one who is banished; a fugitive from his country; an exile …a1300
– OWLHOOT a contemptible fellow, esp. a fugitive or outlaw …1958 Amer. Western sl.
– OWLHOOTER a fugitive or outlaw …1942 Amer. Western sl.
– SKEDADDLER a fugitive …M19 US sl.
fugitive – person, other
– HEAD HUNTER – a person who tracks down wanted criminals; a fugitive hunter …1927 US sl.
fugitive – verbs
– BE ON THE LAM to be a fugitive from justice …1928 US sl.
 
FULFIL – verbs
– FILFIL to fulfil …1922 Amer. dial.
– FILL to fulfil, to carry out the promise or intent of …1836 Amer. dial.
– FURNISH † to accomplish, to complete, to fulfil …1477
– IMPLEMENT † to fulfil, to perform …1714 Sc.
 
FULFILLED – adjectives
– YFILLED † filled; fulfilled …c900
 
FULFILLING – adjectives
– ACCOMPLETIVE having the property of fulfilling; tending to accomplish …1839
 
FULFILMENT – adjectives
– IMPLETORY †* adj. characterized by fulfilment …1647
fulfilment – nouns
– ADIMPLETION †* completion, fulfilment …1650
– IMPLETION fulfilment, accomplishment …1615
fulfilment – verbs
– RATIFY †* to consummate, carry out, or bring to fulfilment or completion …1561
 
FULL – adjectives
– BANG FULL brimful, quite full …1888 Eng. dial.
– BANK-FULL full to the brim, quite filled up …1875 Eng. dial.
– BEAKING-FULL full to repletion …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– BEAMFULL full or overflowing …Bk1898 Sc.
– BELKIN FULL full to repletion …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– CHOCK-A-BLOCK crammed full; as full as may be …19C orig. nautical usage
– CHOCKER completely full, crammed with ; also, crowded close together …1956 colloq.
– CHOCKERS filled to capacity …1956 Aust. sl.
– CHUG FULL chock full …Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
– EGGFULL as full as an egg is of meat …1839
– EVEN FULL completely full, brimfull …1878 Amer. dial.
– FULL AS A FAIRY’S PHONE BOOK full, replete …Bk1999 Aust. sl.
– FULL AS A FAT WOMAN’S SOCK full, replete …Bk1999 Aust. sl.
– FULL AS A STATE SCHOOL full, replete …Bk1999 Aust. sl.
– FULL AS A TICK, AS completely full, as with food …1678 Eng. dial.
– FULL TO THE GUNWALES absolutely full …colloq.
– FULL TO THE THROPPLE having eaten as much as one can …1808 Eng. dial.
– FULL TO THE THROPPLE END having eaten as much as one can …1808 Eng. dial.
– GLUTTED crammed full or choked up
– HEAP AND THRATCH filled to overflowing …1887 Eng. dial.
– HEAPED having the contents piled above the brim, not levelled …1818 Eng. dial.
– HEAP-FULL † full and heaped up …1530
– HELLFULL extremely full, chock-full …1931 Amer. dial.
– JAM CRAM very full, full to overflowing …Bk1902 Eng. dial.
– JAM CRAM FULL very full, full to overflowing …Bk1902 Eng. dial.
– JAM FULL very full, full to overflowing …1894 Eng. dial.
– LEVEL FULL completely full …1902 Amer. dial.
– LIPPING FULL full to overflowing …1953 Amer. dial.
– PACKED TO THE GUNWALES absolutely full …colloq.
– PACK-FULL as full as can be packed …1858
– PANG completely filled; full to overflowing; at bursting point …1923 Sc.
– PANGED stuffed, full to overflowing …1773 Sc.
– PANG-FULL full, packed tight, stuffed, crammed …1842 Sc.
– PLENITUDINARY characterized by fullness or completeness; thorough, full, complete …1647
– PLUMB FULL completely full …1959 Amer. dial.
– QUAFFED satisfied; full …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– RAM full …1980s UK Black sl.
– RAM-FULL crammed full …1721 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– RAM-JAM tightly packed; full to excess; generally used with ‘full’ …1895 Eng. dial.
– RAM-JAM FULL crammed full …1879 Eng. dial. & sl.
– RAMMED crammed, stuffed full …1996 UK sl.
– RAM UP full …1980s UK Black sl.
– RANK † abounding in, full of …a1300
– RANK FULL full to overflowing …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– RAP FULL of a person: full of food …1975 Amer. dial.
– REAMING foaming, frothing; brimful, overflowing …1787 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– REAMING-FULL full to overflowing …1790 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– RICH † full …1827 Sc.
– SCAT cluttered, full to overflowing, littered …1895 Sc.
– SOLID full, complete, entire, esp. of time …M19
– TEEM † full …1678 Eng. dial.
– TEEMFUL full to the brim …B1900 Eng. dial.
– TEEMING-FULL running over; full to the brim …B1900 Eng. dial.
– TIP-FULL full to the brim, quite full …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– TOP-FULL * full to the top; brim-full …1553
– TOR † full, replete …c1400
– UBEROUS abundant, copious, full …1633
full – adverbs
– AQUAT full to satiety …1691 Eng. dial.
– AQUOT full to satiety …1691 Eng. dial.
– BUDGING entirely full …1968 Amer. dial.
full – nouns 
– TRUNKFUL a full or abundant supply …colloq.
 
FULLER – person
– WALKER one who fulls cloth; a fuller; much of the woollen weaving was formerly performed in country places by hand; at that time small mills of rude construction, turned by water power, for walking cloth, were not scarce; in still older times, the walking was performed by tramping with the feet – hence the term …c1050
– WALK-MILLER one who works at a fulling-mill; a fuller …1752
– WALKSTER  a walker or fuller …1599 Sc.
 
FULL-GROWN – adjectives
– HARD big, strong, robust, well-grown; full-grown …1825 Eng. dial.
– MAN-BIG full-grown …Bk1905 Ireland
– MAN-GROWN full-grown …1884 Eng. dial.
– MAN-MUCKLE full-grown …1856 Sc.
– RANK †* full-grown; mature …c1000
full-grown – person 
– MAN-BODY a full-grown male person …1897 Sc.
 
FULLNESS – nouns
– IMPLETION the act of filling, the condition of being filled; fullness …1583
 
FULLY – adverbs
– ALL-OUT completely, fully …1885
– ALL OVER in every respect, fully, totally …c1225
– BACK AND EDGE through everything, fully, wholly, thoroughly, completely …1641
– EVERY BIT AND GRAIN fully, completely, all …1907 Amer. dial.
– FAIR † completely, fully, quite …c1330 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– JAM completely, entirely, fully; all the way …1905 Amer. dial.
– JAM UP completely, entirely, fully; all the way …1835 Amer. dial.
– LARGE amply, fully, quite, by a great deal; abundantly …a1300 chiefly Sc. & N. Eng., obs.
– LARGIERLY †* more fully, at greater length …1536
– THOROUGH-STITCH † right through to the end; thoroughly, completely, fully; usually in phrase, ‘to go thorough-stitch’, to perform something thoroughly, carry it out completely and effectually …1579 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– TO THE MASTHEAD to the full …1821 Sc.