Reverse Dictionary: HOC – HOMN


HOCKEY – ADJECTIVES (also see ICE HOCKEY)
– a curved hockey stick • CAMMOCK 1678 Sc.
– a curved hockey stick • DANDRIL Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– the game of hockey • CAMMOCK 1821 Sc.
– the game of hockey • CAMMON 1790 Sc. & Ireland


HOE, HOEING – NOUNS
– a field or garden hoe • PADLE  • PAIDLE a1568 Sc.
– a hoe • GAFF Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– a hoe • IDIOT STICK 1930s US sl., esp. among loggers and miners
– a hoe • MUD-HOOK 1941 Amer. dial.
– a hoe • SARCLE 1745
– a hoeing or stirring the soil • SARRITION a1722 obs. rare
– a long-handled hoe • AGGEY  • AGGIE 1960s US prison sl.
– weeding with a hoe, hoeing • SARCULATION 1733 obs. rare
 
HOE – VERBS
– to hoe roughly; to loosen weeds with a hoe • SPROTTLE Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– to hoe, to loosen the ground • PADLE  • PAIDLE 1825 Sc.
– to hoe, to weed, to clear from weeds • SARCULATE 1623 obs. rare
– to weed with a hoe • SARCLE  • SARKLE  1543 obs.


HOG – see PIG


HOIST – VERBS
– to hoist, to raise, to exalt • HALSE  • HAUSE  • HAWSE c1500 obs.
– to hoist, to uplift • HIGHST Bk1890 Eng. dial.
– to hoist up one’s back • GIVE A BACKIE  • GIVE A BACKIE-UP Bk1898 Sc.


HOLD, HOLDING – ADJECTIVES
– holding or containing all things • OMNITENENT 1656 obs.
 
HOLD etc. – NOUNS
– a hold, a grip, a grasp • YOKE 1892 Sc.
– a holding by the hand • MANUTENTION 1854 rare
– a holding in the hand or upholding; support, maintenance • MANUTENENCY 1633 obs.
– firm hold or grip with the hands • HANDFAST 1545 obs.
– hold; holding quality; adherence, endurance, stability, strength, substance, solidity • TACK 1412-20 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
 
HOLD etc. – VERBS
– to get hold of • RATCH  1859 obs. rare
– to get hold of, to grab, to latch on to • LOP ONTO 1934 Amer. dial.
– to hold in one’s breast or bosom • IMBREAST 1867 rare
– to hold so that escape is painful or difficult • GET BY THE SHORT HAIRS  • HAVE BY THE SHORT HAIRS 1890s
– to hold tight, to squeeze, to press down, to pinch • QUEAK  • QUEEK 1876 Eng. dial.
– to hold, to contain, to take in, to receive • KEEP c1020 obs.
– to hold, to desist • SALIST Bk1904 Sc.
– to hold, to take, to secure • CAFFLE M19 UK criminals’ sl.
– to lay hold of a person or thing; to seize • NAP 1673 sl.
– to lay hold of forcibly, to clutch, to seize • TIT c1425 obs.
– to lay hold of suddenly • BECLAP c1386 obs.
– to lay hold of; to grasp; to hold; to seize; to clasp. to embrace • FANG c1200 obs.
– to lay hold of, to grip • TACKLE E19 sl.
– to lay hold of, to seize • HAVE BY THE BACK a1555 obs.
– to lay hold of; to seize; to arrest • NATCH Bk1905 Sc.
– to lay hold of, to seize upon • BECATCH c1200 obs.
– to lay hold of, to seize upon, to grip; to catch, to overtake • BECLIP c1380 obs.
– to lay hold on, to seize, to grasp, to catch • BEFONG a1000 obs.
– to succeed in catching hold of a person or thing • NAIL 1760 sl.
– to take a hold with the fist • NEFFLE 1825 Sc.
– to take fast hold of. to grasp • HANDFAST c1530 obs.
– to take hold of, to grasp, to seize, esp. with the hand or claws; to clasp, to embrace • LATCH c1000 obs.
– to take hold of; to latch onto • MAT ONTO 1914 Amer. dial.


HOLD BACK – VERBS
– to hold back; to stall • BACKSTALL  1952 Amer. dial.
– to hold or keep back • ABACK 1735 Sc. obs.


HOLD-UP – NOUNS
– a hold-up, an armed robbery • RAISE-UP 1940s US criminals’ sl.
– a hold-up or robbery • HEIST 1930 US sl.

HOLD-UP – VERBS
– to hold up, steal, rob • HEIST 1931 sl., orig. US


HOLE – ADJECTIVES
– full of hiding holes or dens holes • LATEBROUS 1656 obs. rare
– having many holes • MULTICAVOUS 1721 obs.
– riddled with holes • AIR-CONDITIONED 1938 US sl.
– full of holes and windings, like a rabbit warren • CUNICULOSE 1727 obs.
– full of holes and windings, like a rabbit warren • CUNICULOUS 1634 obs.
 
HOLE – NOUNS
– a deep hole, a cave, a well, a pond • VOUT  • VOWT 1866 Sc. 
– a hole • BOR Bk1911 Sc.
– a hole • PARRILLE Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– a hole • PUKA E20 Amer. dial.
– a hole, a gap, a hollow • WANT 1663 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– a hole; an opening • VENT 1838 Eng. dial.
– a hole, hollow, depression • DALK  • DELK c1325 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– a hole in a hedge, wall, etc. • SMEUSE 1819
– a hole in a sack or bag • KATE a1838 Sc. obs.
– a hole in a sock or stocking though which the skin shows • SPUD 1960 sl.
– a hole in a sock or stocking through which the skin shows • POTATO 1885 sl.
– a hole in one’s sock or stocking • POP-POP 1940s Irish sl.
– a hole in one’s sock or stocking • POPPY 1940s Irish sl.
– a hole in the ground; a hollow, a pit, a gulf • DALE a800 obs.
– a hole or cavity in the earth • SINUS a1676 obs.
– a hole or opening at the foot of a wall, the bottom of a fence, etc., esp. one allowing the passage of rabbits, hares, or sheep • SMOOT 1615 N. Eng. dial.
– a hole, puddle, pit • PUTCH Bk1888 Eng. dial.
– a small hole • MOUSEHOLE Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– a tortuous or somewhat inaccessible hole or crevice; a cranny • CRANK 1562 obs.
– holes • R.J. KNOWLES c1892 theatrical rhyming sl.
 
HOLE – VERBS
– to fill full of holes, often by shooting • AIR-CONDITION 1930s sl., orig. US
– to go or escape through a hole in a hedge, wall, etc. • SMEUSE 1851
– to make holes or ditches • LACUNATE 1623 obs. rare


HOLIDAY – ADJECTIVES/ADVERBS
– on holiday; out for a frolic • ON THE DAFFIN 1885 Sc.
– taking a holiday; playing truant • LAKING Bk1902 Eng. dial.
 
HOLIDAY – NOUNS
– a bank holiday • ST. LUBBOCKS DAY L19 sl.
– a day given as a (half-)holiday • ROPE-YARN 1886 sl., chiefly naval usage
– a holiday • LAKE 1872 Eng. dial.
– a holiday • LAKE-DAY Bk1902 Eng. dial.
– a holiday • LAKING 1896 Eng. dial.
– a holiday • REMEDY c1519 sl.
– a holiday • REMI Bk1903 Westminster School
– a holiday; a bout of idleness • LAKING-BOUT 1865 Eng. dial.
– a holiday, a saint’s day; a holy day • HALLOW-DAY a1825 Eng. dial.
– a holiday; a trip taken for pure enjoyment • JAUL  • JAWL  • JOL 1980s S. Afr.
– a holiday, a vacation • VACANCY 1703 Sc.
– a holiday or festive period that is spent drinking alcohol • ALCOHOLIDAY 20C sl.
– a holiday, relaxation from work, time off • SCOUTH  • SCOWTH 1867 Sc. 
– a holiday, vacation • VAC 1709 Brit.
– an annual holiday • ANNUAL L19 sl.
– an uproarious holiday, a feast • RANDY-BOOZE Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– a small holiday house • BACH E20 Aust. & NZ colloq.
– a small holiday house at the seaside or at a holiday resort • CRIB 1862 NZ
– holiday-makings, jaunts, pleasure-trips • GALLIVANTINGS Bk1900 Ireland
– holidays • HOLS 1905 sl.
– holidays; a period during which there is formal suspension of activity • VACANCE 1563-7 chiefly Sc. rare
– holidays; a vacation • VACANCE-TIME 1773 Sc. obs.
– holidays; vacation • HOLLIERS  • HOLLYERS 1991 Irish sl.
– holiday times such as at Christmas, Easter, etc. • TIDE-TIMES Bk1905 Eng. dial.

HOLIDAY – NOUNS, PERSON
– a holiday-maker, a tourist; a person at leisure • VACATIONER 1890 US
– a holiday-maker, a tourist; a person at leisure • VACATIONIST 1885
– a person who has a holiday on Saturday afternoons • SATURDAY-AFTERNOONER 1906

HOLIDAY – VERBS
– to have a day’s holiday • TO BREAK A DAY Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– to keep holiday, to give oneself to pleasure; to enjoy oneself • FEAST 1608 obs.
– to take a holiday; to go on vacation • VACANT 1752 obs. exc. Sc.
– to take a sudden holiday • THROW THE CAP UP 1902 Eng. dial.


HOLIER-THAN-THOU – NOUNS, PERSON
– a holier-than-thou, sanctimonious person • BIBLE-BACK 1840 sl.
– a person who acts holier-than-thou, but is not; a hypocrite • BABE OF GRACE E19 sl.


HOLINESS, HOLY – ADJECTIVES
– holy, devout; having the thoughts and affections set on things above • HEAVENLY-MINDED a1656
– holy in character; sacred, holy, consecrated • SANCTIMONIAL 1721 obs. rare
– holy in character; sacred, holy, consecrated • SANCTIMONIOUS 1604 obs.
– holy, sacred, consecrated • SANCT 1890 rare
– holy, sanctified • SANCTIFICATE c1485 obs. rare
– serving to make holy or sanctify • SANCTIFICATIVE 1607 obs. rare
– speaking of or discoursing on holy or sacred things • SANCTILOQUENT 1656 rare
 
HOLINESS etc. – NOUNS
– a holy day; a saint’s day; a holiday • HALLOW-DAY a1825 Eng. dial.
– a holy place, chapel, sanctuary • HALIDOM c1000 arch.
– a holy thing, a holy relic; anything regarded as sacred • HALIDOM c1000 obs.
 fear or dislike for the holy and the saints • HAGIOPHOBIA Bk1991
– holiness of mind • SANCTANIMITY 1801 rare
– holiness, sanctity • HALIDOM 971 obs.
– the quality of being holy or saint-like; holiness, sanctity • SANCTITUDE c1450 rare
 
HOLINESS etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– a candidate for holy orders • SI QUIS c1860 sl.
– a holy man; a spiritual leader, teacher, or healer • BABA 1811 orig. & chiefly South Asian
– a holy personage; a saint (little used after 1500) • HALLOW a885
– a person who writes holy things; a sacred writer • HAGIOGRAPHER 1656
 
HOLINESS etc. – VERBS
– to call upon in the name of something holy; to implore, to entreat, to beseech • HALSE c825 obs.
– to call upon in the name of something holy; to adjure • HALSEN c1290 obs. exc. Eng. dial. obs.
– to keep a day, festival, etc. holy; to observe solemnly • HALLOW 971
– to make holy, to sanctify • SANCTIZE 1691 obs. rare
– to make holy; to sanctify, to purify • HALLOW c1000
– to set apart as holy or sacred; to sanctify • SANCTIFICATE a1677 rare


HOLLOW, HOLLOWNESS – ADJECTIVES
– hollow • BOSE Bk1911 Sc.
– hollow, empty • BOSS Bk1911 Sc.
– resembling a hollow or ‘lacuna’ • LACUNOUS 1653 obs. rare

HOLLOW etc. – NOUNS
– a hole, hollow, depression • DELK c1325 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– a hollow, a gap, a hole • WANT 1663 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– a hollow, a pit, a gulf; a hole in the ground • DALE a800 obs.
– a hollow, declivity, slope • FALLING 1563 obs.
– a hollow, hole, depression • DALK c1325 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– a hollow in a surface; a depression, furrow, incision • DAWK 1703 Eng. dial.
– a hollow or dip; a gully • SYKE 1859 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– anything hollow • BOSS Bk1911 Sc.
– anything inflated, hollow, and empty • BALLOON 1812
– hollowness; emptiness from lack of food • BOSSNESS Bk1911 Sc.
– something hollow, worthless, or unsubstantial • DEAF NUT 1613

HOLLOW etc. – VERBS
– to become hollow, to sink in, to shrink in person • FALL IN 1854 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– to make a hollow or incision in • DAWK 1703 Eng. dial.
– to make hollow; to empty of contents; to open up • UNBOWEL 1597 obs.
– to make hollow; to scoop out roughly • SCOBE 1790 Sc. & Ireland


HOLLY – NOUNS
– the holly • JACK-SHARP Bk1902 Eng. dial.


HOLLYHOCK – NOUNS
– hollyhock • HOCKHOLLER Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.


HOLLYWOOD – see CALIFORNIA


HOLY – see HOLINESS


HOMAGE – NOUNS
a paying reverential homage to a divine being; religious worship • CULT 1613 rare
– homage • MANHEAD 1297 obs.
– homage • MANHOOD 1340 obs.
– homage • MANRED c1000 obs.
– homage • MANRENT 1375 Sc. now Hist.
– homage, worship; honour, dignity • MANSHIP a1175 obs.
– reverential homage; worship • CULTURE 1483 obs. rare


HOME – ADJECTIVES
– absent from and missed at home • LACKER Bk1902 Eng. dial.
– belonging to home; domestic; home-grown, homemade; homely, vernacular; unpolished • HAMALD   • HAMEL  • HAMELT a1400 Sc.
– caused by unfavourable home environment • CACESTOGENOUS Bk1960
– close to home • CLOSE TO TAW 1954 Amer. dial.
– far from home • FAR FROM TAW 1875 Amer. dial.
 
HOME – ADVERBS
– at home • AHOME Bk1865 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– at home; opposite to ‘abroad’ • IN FATHERLAND 1683 obs.
– belonging to home; home-grown; home-made; home-keeping • HAMERT 1794 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– suggestive of home; domestic • HAMIE 1798 Sc. obs.
– on the way towards home • AGATEWARD(S) 1790 Eng. dial.
 
HOME – NOUNS
– a fashionable, chic, well-designed home • FANCY CRIB 20C African-American sl.
– a home, a dwelling-place, a lodging • BEING 1839 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– a home; a hearth • ASTRE a1500 obs.
– a home, a house • BOUROCH Bk1911 Sc.
– a home, a house; a farm-house or cottage • HALL 1791 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– a home, a house, a flat, a place of residence • DRUM 1846 UK sl.
– a home, a house or other dwelling place • YARD 1920s W. Indies & Black British sl.
– a home; a house or residence • CRIB 1819 thieves’ sl.
– a home, an apartment • PAD 1950s Amer. sl.
– a home, a place of residence • GAFF 1932 UK sl.
– a home, dwelling, abode • PALYIR 1879 Sc.
– a home, house; anything that shelters or shades • BIEL  • BIELD Bk1911 Sc. 
– a home, location • DOWN-SITTING 1865 Sc.
– a home, lodging, shelter, home, bed, etc., esp. of a secluded or comfortable nature; a snug retreat • NEST a1000
– a home or house • PODUNK 1916 Amer. dial.
– an abnormal attachment to home • OIKOMANIA Bk1991
– an unconscious tendency to walk away from home • PORIOMANIA Bk1991
– any problems accruing to one’s home life (rather than criminal/professional life) • DOMESTIC 1970s sl.
– anything tending to interfere with domestic comfort or peace, as a scolding wife, a smoking chimney, etc.; domestic trouble • JOBLIJOCK B1900 Eng. dial.
– a staying at home with one’s family • COCOONING 1970s US sl.
– a typical suburban dream home • TRIPLE-FRONTED BRICK VANILLA Bk1999 Aust. ironic usage
– a typical suburban dream home • TRIPLE-FRONTED BRICK VENEREAL Bk1999 Aust. ironic usage
 fear or dislike of home surroundings • ECOPHOBIA  • OECOPHOBIA Bk1991
 fear or dislike of home surroundings • OIKOPHOBIA Bk1991
– home • GATES OF ROME 1960 UK rhyming sl.
– home, where you live • HOME PLATE 1960s Amer. sl.
– one’s home • MAIN STASH 1940s African-American sl.
– one’s home • SACK 1980s African-American sl.
– one’s home; a house; an apartment • SHACK 1880s African-American sl.
– one’s home, one’s address • ANCHOR 1950s sl.
– one’s home; one’s house • CASTLE 1930s African-American sl.
– one’s home, one’s house • DOMI  • DOMIE  • DOMMIE  • DOMMY 1930s African-American sl.
– ones home, one’s house • PADHOUSE 1930s African-American sl.
– one’s home, the place where one sleeps • KIP L19 sl.
– the accompanying of a guest a part or all of the way back to his home • SCOTCH CONVOY 1896 Sc.
– the general concept of home • BACK-AH-YARD 1977 W. Indian and Black British usage
– the home • FIRE AND CANDLE 1696 US
– the home, a house • KIPSIE  • KIPSY 1916 Aust.
 
HOME – NOUNS, PERSON
– an adult who cannot afford to move away his or her parent’s home (Kids In Parents’ Pockets Eroding Retirement Savings) • KIPPER 21C colloq.
– an effeminate man who stays much at home • NESTCOCK 1674 obs.
– an idealized homemaker who shows selfless devotion to her husband and children • ANGEL IN THE HOUSE 1847
– a person always at home; especially applied to a woman • HOUSE-DOVE 1579-80
– a person attached to home life; one who goes out only on Sunday • SUNDAY MAN 1785
– a person who is fond of staying at home • NESTLE-BIRD Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– a person who is fond of staying at home • NESTLE-BUB Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– a person who is fond of staying at home • NESTLE-COCK 1691 Eng. dial.
– a person who stays at home and never goes out • SHUT-IN 1904 US colloq.
– a person who stays mainly at home • HOMEBOY L19 sl.
– a person who stays mainly at home • HOME-BUDDY L19 sl.
– a stay-at-home • MOREPORK 1874 NZ colloq.
 
HOME – VERBS
– to be absent from home • LACK 1746 Eng. dial.
– to come home after dark • COME DARK HOME Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– to get home, or to reach a place of refuge • GAIN IN 1828 obs.
– to go home, to move on • CARD 1952 Amer. dial.
– to leave home through disagreement; said of a man or wife • THRUM Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– to make oneself at home; to accustom or reconcile oneself to a place • HEAF 1873 Eng. dial.


HOME-BRED – ADJECTIVES
– home-bred • INGLE-BRED 1788 Sc.


HOME BREW – NOUNS
– home-brewed beer or liquor • MACOOLA  MAHKOOLAH MAKOOLA 1882 Amer. dial.


HOMELAND – NOUNS
– the place of one’s birth or early life • CALF-COUNTRY 1831 Sc.
– the place of one’s birth or early life • CALF-GROUND 1884 Sc.


HOMELESS – ADJECTIVES
– homeless, stray, wandering • WAIF c1730 Sc.
– homeless, vagabond • GANG-THERE-OUT 1815 Sc.
– homeless, vagrant, wandering, footloose • WAFF 1746 Sc.
 
HOMELESS – NOUNS
– a lodging house, night shelter, or similar refuge for homeless people • LEAN-TO 1940s sl.
 
HOMELESS – NOUNS, PERSON
– a homeless and jobless person; a person down on their luck • DEADBEAT M19 sl., orig. US
– a homeless child or young person living on the streets • ARAB 1847
– a homeless drifter who typically sleeps on the warm sidewalk air-vents from subways and other underground places • VENT MAN 1970s US sl.
– a homeless or destitute person • DOWN-AND-OUT 1889 Amer. sl.
– a homeless or destitute person • DOWN-AND-OUTER 1924 Amer. sl.
– a homeless person • VALGERER Bk1982 Jewish 
– a homeless person; a down-and-out • SCRUFF-BAG 1920s sl.
– a homeless person; a person turned out of his former place; a vagrant • JACK OUT OF DOORS 1543 obs.
– a homeless person, a tramp; used as an insult for someone in need of a wash • PARAFFIN (LAMP) 1997 UK rhyming sl.
– a homeless person; a vagabond, a vagrant, a tramp • VAG 1859 Aust. & Amer. sl.
– a homeless person, a vagrant • LAIRD OF WINDY-WAYS a1745 Sc.
– a homeless person, esp. one who carries his or her possessions in disposable shopping bags • BAG PERSON 1981 orig. & chiefly US
– a homeless person; one who sleeps without adequate shelter, esp. on the streets of a town or city • ROUGH SLEEPER 1925 UK usage
– a homeless person or derelict • SKELL 1982 US sl.
– a homeless person who roamed about the streets, and crept in to sleep on the stairs, in the passages and untenanted cellars of the lodging-houses with the doors open at night and day • HAPPY DOSSER 1893 UK sl.
– a homeless person with addiction problems; a derelict • DERRO 20C Aust. sl.
– a homeless, starving young person • MCDUMPSTER KID 2000s African-American sl.
– a homeless woman, often elderly, who carries her possession in shopping bags • BAG LADY 1964 orig. US
– a homeless woman who carries her personal possessions in bags • BAG WOMAN 1977
– a member of a group of homeless or vagrant young people, generally living by begging in cities, and characterized by rough clothes, matted, often dreadlocked hair, and an unkempt appearance • CRUSTIE;  CRUSTY 1990
– a person of no fixed abode • ALL-AROUNDER 1892 colloq. obs.
– a person who is without home or friends; one who lives uncared-for or without guidance • WAIF 1784
– homeless families who live temporarily with friends on their floors or couches • THE HIDDEN HOMELESS Bk2006 Amer. sl. 
 
HOMELESS – VERBS
– to have no settled abode • WALK AT ROVERS 1518 obs.
– to live without a fixed abode • CARRY THE STICK 1978 US sl.


HOMELY – ADJECTIVES
– extremely homely; very ugly • BUGLY 1986 Amer. sl.
– extremely homely; very ugly • BUTTLY 1996 UK rhyming sl. for ‘bent’
– extremely homely; very ugly • BUTT-UGLY 1986 Amer. sl.
– homely, coarse, rough • RAPLOCH 1724 Sc.
– homely, domestic, household • HAMMAL 1776 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– homely, motherly, conventional • MUMSY 1961 colloq.
– homely, of a kindly disposition; benevolent • NATURABLE 1877 Eng. dial.
– homely; ordinary • BROWN-BREAD 1606 obs.
– homely, plain • FAMILIAR 1529 obs.
 homely, rustic; simple • RUSSET 1598
 homely, rustic; unsophisticated • RUSSET-COATED 1683
– homely, ugly • TIRED Bk1970 US sl.
– homely, unattractive in appearance; very plain  • PLAIN AS PARRITCH 1899 Sc. (parritch = porridge)
– homely, vernacular; unpolished • HAMALD a1400 Sc.
– very homely • HOMELY AS A MUD FENCE 1989 US
 
HOMELY – NOUNS, PERSON
– a homely girl or woman • SCAG 1962 US sl. 
– a homely or dowdy woman • MOPSY 1699 sl. & Eng. dial. rare
– a homely or sad-looking person • PRUNEFACE Bk1974 Amer. sl.
– a homely or unsophisticated person • RUSSET-COAT 1568 rare
– a homely, plain man • INDIA 1950s homosexual sl.
– a homely, strong housewife; a home-keeping woman • HAUSFRAU 1798 occasionally derogatory
– a homely, unattractive, ugly, or slovenly woman, esp. if sexually passionate or promiscuous • BEAST 1946 US sl., chiefly college usage
– a homely woman • GILL c1698 UK sl.
– a homely woman • MONTGOMERY WARD WOMAN SENT WEST ON APPROVAL Bk1936 US cowboy usage
– a homely woman, a maid-servant • JUG 1569 rare
– a homely young woman • HAG Bk1975 Amer. sl.
– a very homely young man • DOG 1952 US sl.
– a very homely young woman • DOG 1937 US sl.
 
HOMELY – PHRASES
– said of somebody who is homely or ugly • YOU’D SCARE A DOG OFF A GUT WAGON 1966 Amer. sl.
 
HOMELY – VERBS
– to be very homely or plain-looking; said of girls or women • HAVE A FACE LIKE THE BACK OF A BUS 1940s sl.
– to be very homely or plain-looking; said of girls or women • HAVE A FACE LIKE THE BACK OF A TRAM 1940s sl.
– to be very homely or plain-looking; said of girls or women • HAVE A FACE LIKE THE REAR END OF A COW 1940s sl.
– to be very homely or plain-looking; said of girls or women • HAVE A FACE LIKE THE SIDE OF A HOUSE 1940s sl.
– to be very homely or plain-looking; said of girls or women HAVE A FACE THAT WOULD STOP A BUS 1940s sl.


HOMEMADE – ADJECTIVES
– homemade • FARMER 1950 Amer. dial.
– homemade • MAMMY-MADE 1953 African-American
– homemade, home-grown • HAMALD  • HAMEL  • HAMELT a1400 Sc.
– homemade, home-grown • HAMERT 1794 Sc. & Eng. dial.


HOMESICK, HOMESICKNESS – NOUNS
an abnormal homesickness or nostalgia • NOSTOMANIA Bk1991
– homesickness • LANG Bk1902 Sc.
– homesickness • LANGUOR Bk1902 Sc.
homesickness • PHILOPATRIDOMANIA Bk1991

HOMESICK, HOMESICKNESS – VERBS
– to be very homesick • DIE OF LANG Bk1902 Sc.


HOMESTEAD – NOUNS
– homestead • HEARTH-STEAD c1475


HOMETOWN – NOUNS, PERSON
– a person from the same hometown • HOME 1970s US campus sl.


HOMEWORK – NOUNS
– homework • ECCER 1910s Aust. & Irish sl.

HOMEWORK – VERBS
– to do one’s homework • PLEASE THE PROF Bk1947 Amer. sl.
– to ignore one’s homework and do nothing • HACK OFF 1960s Amer. sl.


HOMICIDE – ADJECTIVES (also see MURDER)
– pert. to homicide; tending to or resulting in homicide; man-slaying; murderous • HOMICIDIOUS 1632 rare

HOMICIDE – NOUNS
– a homicidal mania • ANDROPHONOMANIA. Bk1991
– homicide, manslaughter, murder • MANQUELLING c1380 obs.
– homicide, manslaughter, murder • MANSLAUGHT c897 obs.
– homicide, murder, the act of killing a man • MAN-SLAYING c1380

HOMICIDE – NOUNS, PERSON
– a homicide; a murderer • MANSLAYER a1300



Updated: October 1, 2022