Reverse Dictionary: NEW – NH


NEW – adjectives
– BRAND-FIRE-NEW completely new and unused …1825 Amer. dial.
– BRAND-SPANDY-NEW completely new …1905 Amer. dial.
– BRAND-SPANG-NEW completely new …1941 Amer. dial.
– BRAND SPANK-FIRE NEW new; novel …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– BRAND-SPANK-FIRING-NEW completely new …1952 Amer. dial.
– BRAND SPANKING new; novel …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– BRAND-SPANKING-NEW completely new …1905 Amer. dial.
– BRAND-SPAN-NEW completely new …1939 Amer. dial.
– BRAND SPICK-AND-SPAN NEW new; novel …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– BRAND SPIT-AND-SPANG NEW new; novel …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– BRAND SPLINTERFIRE NEW new; novel …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– BRAND-SPLINTER-NEW completely new …1942 Amer. dial.
– BRAN-FIRED NEW completely new and unused …1911 Amer. dial.
– BRAN-FIRE-NEW completely new and unused …1825 Amer. dial.
– BRAN FIRE NEW absolutely new …Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
– BRANK-NEW. quite new …Bk1911 Sc.
– BRAN-NEW completely new …1905 Amer. dial.
– BRAN-SPANKFIRE-NEW new; novel …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– BRAN-SPANKING new; novel …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– BRAN-SPANKING-NEW completely new …1905 Amer. dial.
– BRAN-SPAN-NEW completely new …1806 Amer. dial.
– BRAN SPICK-AND-SPAN NEW new; novel …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– BRAN-SPICK-SPAN-NEW completely new …1905 Amer. dial.
– BRAN-SPIT-AND-SPANG NEW new; novel …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– BRAN-SPLINDER-NEW completely new …1905 Amer. dial.
– BRAN-SPLINTER-CLEAN-NEW completely new …1905 Amer. dial.
– BRAN-SPLINTER-FIRED-NEW completely new …1905 Amer. dial.
– BRAN-SPLINTERFIRE NEW new; novel …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– BRAN-SPLINTER-NEW completely new …1919 Amer. dial.
– CHERRY virginal; new; in good condition; as good as new, said of merchandise, esp. used or secondhand merchandise …20C Amer. sl.
– ELSH new, fresh …1867 Eng. dial.
– FIRE-NEW brand-new …1790 Amer. dial.
– FIRING-NEW brand-new …1952 Amer. dial.
– FRESH AS PAINT new; novel …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– FRESH-NEW quite new …Shakespeare
– HOT OFF new; novel …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– HOT OFF THE FIRE new; novel …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– NEAP new …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– NEOTERIC recent, new, modern …1596
– NEOTERICAL recent, new, modern …1588
– NEW FANDANGLED new; novel …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– NEWFANGLE new-fashioned, novel …1773 Sc.
– NEWFANGLED 1. in a new and strange situation …1835 Sc.
  2. new; novel …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– NEWFANGLETY newfangled …1922 Amer. dial.
– NEW-FARRANT novel, new-fangled …1923 Sc. 
– NEW-ON new, fresh; esp. of clothes …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– NEWOUS newfangled; full of novelty; fond of what is new …1825 Sc.
– NEWOUSLIE in a newfangled way …Bk1905 Sc.
– NEW WRINKLED new; novel …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– NOVANTIQUE * new-old …a1688
– NOVITIOUS † newly invented, of recent origin, new …1659
– PIPING HOT new; novel …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– SKIN young, youthful; fresh, new …1989 UK Royal Navy sl.
– SPANDER-NEW completely new …E18 now Eng. dial.
– SPANDY NEW entirely new …M19 US colloq.
– SPANFIRED NEW brand new …Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
– SPANKFIRE NEW new; novel …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– SPANKING. new; novel …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– SPANKING NEW new; novel …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– SPAN-NEW absolutely new …14C archaic or Eng. dial.
– SPICK-AND-SPAN NEW new; novel …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– SPINKING-SPANKING-BRAN-NEW completely new …1905 Amer. dial.
– SPIT-AND-SPANG NEW new; novel …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– SPIT FIRE NEW brand new …Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
– SPITNEW new; novel …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– SPLINTER-FIRE NEW new; novel …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– SPLINTER NEW new; novel …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– SPLIT FIRE NEW brand new …Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
– SPLITNEW new; novel …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– YEW new …1879 Eng. dial.
new – nouns
– DIFFERENT BALLGAME a radically new situation …1930s sl., orig. US
– NEOPHOBIA fear or dislike of what is new …1886
– NEWANCE a new thing; a novelty; anything unusual …1875 Sc.
– NEWDICLE † something new …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– NEW-FANG anything new-fashioned; a new fancy; generally used satirically …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– NEW FANGLE a new fashion or crotchet; a novelty, a new invention; always used in a contemptuous sense …1548
– NEWIE anything new or hitherto unknown …1950s Aust. sl.
– NEWOUSNESS newfangledness …Bk1905 Sc.
– NEW PAIR OF BOOTS a whole new situation …L19 UK middle class usage
– NEWY anything new or hitherto unknown …1950s Aust. sl.
new – verbs
– HAVE ANOTHER BAND BY THE END to have a new pursuit in view …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
new – phrases 
– NEW OFF THE IRONS newly graduated from university; just left school; hence, inexperienced, brand new …L17 sl.
 
NEWBORN – adjectives
– YEANLING young, or new-born, esp. of a lamb …1658 arch.
newborn – nouns 
– BRAID the cry of a newborn child …Bk1911 Sc.
– PADDOCK-HAIR the soft down or hair on unfledged birds and on new-born babies …1827 chiefly Eng. dial.
newborn – person 
– LITTLE STRANGER a newborn child …20C sl.
 
NEWCOMER – person
– BABE IN THE WOODS an inexperienced novice; a newcomer …Bk1988 Aust. sl.
– BIRD an outsider, a newcomer, an unconventional person …1931 sl., orig. US tramps’ usage
– CHEECHAKO a newcomer, a tenderfoot, a greenhorn, a very inexperienced person; a citified person …1897 Amer. dial.
– COME-O’-WILL a newcomer to a place who can show no ancient standing there …1815 Sc.
– GREENER a greenhorn; a very inexperienced person; a newcomer; a naive person …1877 Amer. dial.
– GRIFFIN a greenhorn; a newcomer …Bk1892 Anglo-Indian sl.
– INCOME a newcomer, an arrival …1804 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– INCOMER a newcomer, a stranger, an immigrant; one who is not a native of the district into which he comes to settle and who does not, in the eyes of the natives, from a natural part of the community; has a somewhat derogatory connotation and often implies an intruder …1736 Sc. 
– JOHNNIE NEWCOME, JOHNNY NEWCOME a new arrival; a fresh face; a freshman at college; a new baby, etc. …1823 sl.
– JOHNNY-COME-LATELY any newcomer …20C Aust. sl.
– MACCA, MACKER a new recruit; a newcomer …1944 Aust. military sl.
– MALIHINI a stranger, a newcomer; a visitor, a tourist …1914 Hawaii
– MOONEAS a newcomer, a greenhorn …1966 Can. West usage
– MOONIAS (derogatory) a newcomer, a tenderfoot …c1880 esp. among North American Indians in Canada
– NEWCOME a new arrival; a fresh face; a freshman at college; a new baby, etc. …1821 sl.
– NEWIE a new student, a newcomer …M19 US campus sl.
– NEW JACK a newcomer or novice, esp. to the fast life of the ghetto streets …1980s sl., chiefly US Black
– NEWK a newcomer, a novice …1970s US campus sl.
– PILGRIM an emigrant, a migrant, a visitor, a tourist; a newcomer, a greenhorn, a tenderfoot …1867 Amer. dial.
– TENDERFOOT an inexperienced newcomer or visitor in a frontier or rural area; a greenhorn; a naive or inexperienced person …1866 Amer. dial.
– UNCO BODY a stranger, an outsider, a newcomer …1811 Sc.
– YOUNG BLOOD a person new to an organization, field of activity, etc., who is regarded as an invigorating influence; usually in plural …1830
– YOUNGS young or newly initiated persons; newcomers; novices …1890 nonce use
 
NEW ENGLAND – nouns
– YANKEE the dialect of New England; loosely, American English generally …1824
– YANKEE-LAND the land of Yankees, New England; loosely, the United States …1803
New England – person 
– CHOG a person from New England …20C teen & high school sl.
– EEL a resident of New England …1838 Amer. dial.
– LEAF PEEPER in New England: a tourist who comes to view autumn foliage …c1965 Amer. dial.
– NUTMEG a White New Englander, esp. of Connecticut, Massachusetts, or Rhode Island …1821 sl.
– NUTMEG-MAKER a White New Englander, esp. of Connecticut, Massachusetts, or Rhode Island …1883 sl.
– SNOW DIGGER a man from the New England states …Amer. World War I sl.
– YANK (often derogatory) an American; orig. a New Englander or someone from the northern states of America …1778
– YANKEE, YANKEY, YANKY a nickname for a native or inhabitant of New England; or, more widely, of the northern States generally; during the War of Secession applied by the Confederates to the soldiers of the Federal army …1765 US
 
NEWFOUNDLAND – person
– COD-HAULER a ship, or a man, from Newfoundland …M19 nautical sl.
 
NEW GUINEA – person
– FUZZY-WUZZY a person indigenous to New Guinea …World War II Aust. sl.
– GINEE, GINNEE, GINNEY (derogatory) a native islander of New Guinea; a native of any South Pacific island; a Japanese …World War II Amer. sl., orig. Army usage
 
NEW JERSEY – nouns
– JEW NERSEY (usually derogatory) New Jersey, with reference to the Jewish population …20C US sl.
New Jersey – person 
– JACKSON WHITE a person of racially mixed ancestry in northeast New Jersey and adjacent parts of New York; also, a White person living in the mountains of the same region …1878 Amer. dial. 
– MOOR a member of a racially mixed people living in central Delaware and southern New Jersey …1888 Amer. dial.
– PINE RAT (occasionally derogatory) an inhabitant of New Jersey pine barrens …1913 Amer. dial.
– PINEY (occasionally derogatory) an inhabitant of New Jersey pine barrens …1913 Amer. dial.
– WOODJIN a native or resident of the Pine Barrens region of New Jersey …1937 Amer. dial.
 
NEWLY – adverbs
– NEWLINS newly, recently …1829 Sc.
 
NEWLYWED – nouns
– SHIVAREE a noisy celebration or mock serenade for newlyweds …1843 Amer. dial.
– SKIMELTON a noisy celebration or mock serenade for newlyweds …1886 Amer. dial.
– SKIMMELTON a noisy celebration or mock serenade for newlyweds …1913 Amer. dial.
– SKIMMERTON a noisy celebration or mock serenade for newlyweds …1868 Amer. dial.
– SKIMMITON a noisy celebration or mock serenade for newlyweds …1941 Amer. dial.
newlywed – person 
– NEOGAM a newly-married person …1862 nonce word
– NEOGAMIST † a newly-married person …1656
newlywed – verbs 
– GO OFF TO THEMSELVES of newlyweds: to establish a separate residence (instead of with the bride’s parents) …c1960 Amer. dial.
– GO OUT TO THEMSELVES of newlyweds: to establish a separate residence (instead of with the bride’s parents) …1953 Amer. dial.
– SHIVAREE to serenade a newly-married couple with horns, bells, drums, etc. …1890 Amer. dial.
 
NEW MEXICO – person
– ACOMA a member of a Pueblo people, the founders and inhabitants of Acoma, a pueblo of west-central New Mexico, founded c1100-1250, it is regarded as the oldest continuously inhabited community in the United States …Bk2000 
 
NEWNESS – nouns
– MAIDENHEAD newness …16C
– MENSE neatness, tidiness, order; freshness, gloss, newness, bloom …1867 Eng. dial.
– VERD † verdancy, freshness, newness, originality …1603
 
NEW ORLEANS – nouns
– DISTRICT,THE the Storyville area of New Orleans, centre of the city’s jazz community …1940s US Black & jazz sl.
 
NEWS – adjectives
– FAMIGEROUS † carrying news, tales, etc. …1730
– HOT of news, information, etc.: latest, novel; fresh …1908 Amer. sl.
– NEWS-GIZZENED empty of news, parched for want of news or gossip …1871 Sc.
– STRAIGHT FROM THE FEED BOX of news, information: absolutely reliable, from inside sources …1900s
– STRAIGHT FROM THE NOSEBAG of news, information: absolutely reliable, from inside sources …1900s
– WHAFFY full of news …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
news – nouns 
– ACCOUNTS news, details, information …1745 Sc.
– BIG NOISE the important current news; the current scandal …Bk2006 US sl.
– CADGER’S NEWS stale news …1890 Sc.
– CHEERFUL EARFUL 1. good news …Bk1942 US sl.
2. a bit of very unpleasant news …1947 US sl.
– DINKUM OIL inside or accurate information or news; the true facts …1915 Aust. sl.
– DOPE information, data, news …1899 sl., orig. horse-racing usage
– EVENING WHEEZE false news, rumours …L19 sl.
– FARAWAY SCREED foreign news, a letter from abroad …Bk1900 Sc.
– FAT a good piece of exclusive news …1890 newspaper usage
– GAFF news, gossip …1940s Irish sl.
– GOOD GUTS correct information; the true facts; the news …1957 Aust. sl.
– GRIFF a tip or piece of news or reliable information …1891 Brit. sl.
– HAWKER’S NEWS news known to all the world; stale news …1743
– HEARING something heard; information, a report, rumour, news; something to talk about …a1300 Eng. dial.
– HOT COPY a late news item …1942 Amer. sl.
– HOT DOPE the latest news or information …1942 Amer. sl.
– IDIOTICALS foolish things; nonsense; cheap, trashy news …1826 Sc.
– ILL-WEEN news …Bk1905 Sc.
– ITEM 1. a hint; a piece of news …Bk1896 sl.
2. a paragraph of news …Bk1896 Amer. journalist sl.
– JOHN TAMSON’S NEWS stale or unimportant news …1900 Eng. dial.
– KUBBER news …Bk1892 Anglo-Indian sl.
– LATRINE RUMOUR startling news, almost always incorrect; any rumour, esp. one which is alleged to spread at the latrine…Amer. World War I sl.
– MARVELS news; something wonderful to relate …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– MOCCASIN TELEGRAPH the informal means by which news is spread in American Indian communities …1927 Amer. dial.
– MONEY FROM HOME good news …Bk1942 US sl.
– MUKLUK TELEGRAPH news, word of mouth …1945 Amer. dial.
– MUKLUK WIRELESS news, word of mouth …1945 Amer. dial.
– NAILS AND SCREWS news …20C Aust. rhyming sl.
– NAUPER bad, disheartening news …1895 Eng. dial.
– NEWS-BELL n. a singing in the ears supposed to portend bad news …1874 Eng. dial.
– NEWSIE a newsagent’s …2000s sl.
– NOISE information, news …1942 Amer. sl.
– OCCURRENTS † news …a1577
– OIL, THE news, information …1915 Aust. & NZ sl.
– PEDLAR’S NEWS stale news …19C colloq.
– QUEERS † something odd or strange and surprising; news …1825 Sc.
– QUID-NUNC-ISM curiosity; love of news or gossip …1847 nonce word
– QUIDNUNCKERY curiosity; love of news or gossip …1804 nonce word
– RAPS news, esp. in phrase ‘what raps’ …1883 Eng. dial.
– SILLY SEASON in Great Britain, the months of August and September, when, owing to recess of Parliament and to other prominent persons being on holiday, there is a shortage of important news, the lack being supplied by trivialities …1871 colloq.
– SILLY-SEASONER a typical ‘silly-season’ article or story …1893 colloq.
– SILLY-SEASONING a typical ‘silly-season’ article or story …1893 colloq.
– TELL a talk, conversation; gossip, chat; tidings, news …1867 Sc. & Eng. & Amer. dial.
– TELLGENCE † tidings, news, ‘intelligence’ …B1900 Eng. dial.
– TELLING a story, narrative; talk, conversation; news; anything worth revealing or telling …1660 Scot & Eng. dial.
– THINK PIECE a story that is not news, but penetrating analysis, etc. …1980s Amer. journalism sl.
– THUMBSUCKER a story that is not news, but penetrating analysis, etc. …1980s Amer. journalism sl.
– TINKER’S NEWS stale news …1886 Eng. dial.
– UNCO a strange or unusual thing or tale; a novelty or piece of news; a wonder; a curiosity; generally plural …1785 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– UNCOUTHS things not commonly known; news …a1529
– UNKID news, esp. strange news; generally in plural …1790 Eng. dial.
– UNKIN news, tidings …1889 Sc.
– WORD, THE news or information …Aust. sl.
news – person
– GAZETTE a newsmonger; one who spreads rumours …1702
– GAZETTEER one who writes in a gazette; a journalist, a retailer of news …1611
– GAZETTIST †* the writer of an official gazette …1625
– NEWSAHOLIC a person who appears to be addicted to the news …1979
– NEWSIE a news broadcaster or journalist …1950s US sl.
– NEWSER a gossip, a retailer of news …1900 Sc.
– NEWS-HUGGER a news-carrier; a gossip; a newspaper seller …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– PAPER CRIER a street seller of newspapers; a news vendor …1711 Sc.
– ROARER a pushing news vendor …Bk1903 sl.
– SCAREMONGER a person who creates or spreads alarming news …1885
– TALESMAN † the teller of a tale; the author of a story; one who brings news or originates a statement; a relater, a narrator …a1568 obs. exc. Sc.
– TALES-MASTER † the teller of a tale; the author of a story; the authority for a statement, one who brings news or originates a statement; a relater, a narrator …1656 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
news – verbs
– CRY STALE FISH to tell stale or old news …1826 Eng. dial.
– HAVE ITCHING EARS to be eager to hear news or gossip …Bk1897
– NEWS to tell as news; to chat; to gossip …1898 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– PUT ONE’S EARS OUT to listen for news; to gather information …1990s sl.
– TAKE VENT † of news, etc.: to become known, to be divulged or let out …1611
news – phrases 
– MY LORD BALDWIN IS DEAD a retort on old news …c1670
– PASS THE GRAVEL, GERTIE what’s the news …Bk1947 Amer. sl.
– QUEEN ANNE IS DEAD a retort on old news …1722
– QUEEN ANNE IS DEAD AND HER BOTTOM’S COLD a retort on old news …c1870
– QUEEN ELIZABETH IS DEAD a retort on old news …18C
– WHAT’S BUZZIN’ COUSIN? what’s the latest news? …1941 Amer. jocular
 
NEWSMONGER – person
– GAD † a person who goes about spreading gossip; a busybody; a newsmonger; a talkative person …1756 exc. dial.
– GAZETTE a newsmonger; one who spreads rumours …1702 
– KEG-MEG a gossip, a newsmonger; a pert, meddling woman or girl …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– OCCURRENCER †* one who narrates occurrences; a newsmonger …c1680
– QUIDNUNC one who is constantly asking: ‘What now?’ ‘What’s the news?’; one who is curious to know everything;  one who pretends to know all that is going on; hence, an inquisitive person; a gossip, a newsmonger …1709
 
NEWSPAPER – adjectives
– NEWSED mentioned in the newspaper …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– NEWSPAPERACIOUS of a form or style usual in newspapers …1843
– YELLOW applied to newspaper (or writers of newspaper articles) of a recklessly or unscrupulously sensational character …1898 orig. US
newspaper – nouns 
– ABC AD a newspaper advertisement listing shows in alphabetical order …1973 US sl.
– AGONY COLUMN 1. the section of a newspaper dedicated to special advertisements, particularly those for missing relatives and friends, and thus filled with personal agony …L19
2. a regular newspaper or magazine feature containing readers’ questions about personal problems with replies from a columnist, usually female …1950s
– ART newspaper photographs of celebrities …20C Amer. sl.
– BALAAM temporary paragraphs reserved to fill up the columns of a newspaper or magazine …1826 journalistic sl.
– BLANKET SHEET a newspaper in folio form …1888
– BULLDOG EDITION the first edition of a newspaper edition to hit the streets …Bk2006 US sl.
– BUM-FODDER tabloid newspapers …1900s US sl.
– CALIFORNIA BLANKET newspapers used as bedding …1926 Amer. tramps’ sl.
– CAPTAIN GRIMES The Times …20C Brit. rhyming sl.
– CHIPS local items in newspapers; also applied to the reporter who collects them …1889 Amer. journalism sl.
– CURRANT BUN The Sun newspaper …20C Brit. rhyming sl.
– DAILY a daily newspaper …M19 colloq.
– DAILY EXAGGERATOR the Daily Express …c1912 jocular
– DAILY GETSMUCHWORSE the Daily Express (daily national tabloid newspaper in the UK launched in 1900) …1975 UK sl.
– DAILY LEVY, THE the Daily Telegraph (newspaper published in London, founded in 1855) …c1860 sl.
– DAILY LIAR a nickname for the Daily Mail …1984 UK jocular
– DAILY SUPPRESS the Daily Express …c1912 jocular
– DAILY-TELL-THE-TALE the Daily Mail …c1920 rhyming sl.
– DAILY TORYGRAPH the Daily Telegraph …2003 UK sl.
– DAILY WAIL, THE the Daily Mail …c1910 jocular
– DAILY WHALE, THE the Daily Mail …c1910 jocular
– FAKE a spurious or counterfeit document; later, anything of a spurious, counterfeit, or fraudulent nature; a false rumour or false story of any kind; an invented newspaper story …1851 sl., orig. criminals’ usage
– GAZETTEER † a newspaper, a gazette …1730-46
– HATCH, MATCH, AND DISPATCH COLUMN the birth, marriage, and death announcements in the press …1883 Amer. & journalistic sl.
– IRISH COMICS the obituary columns in a newspaper …20C sl.
– IRISH FUNNIES the obituary columns in a newspaper …20C sl.
– LA DI DA the Daily Star newspaper …1998 UK rhyming sl.
– MCPAPER the notoriously banal ‘USA Today’ …1980s US campus sl.
– MISLEADING PAPER, THE a nickname for ‘The Times’ …1876 Brit. sl.
– NEWS a newspaper ….Bk1905 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– NEWS OF THE SCREWS a nickname for the ‘News of the World’ (a Sunday paper in the UK) …1990s sl.
– NURSERY RHYMES the Times newspaper …Brit. rhyming sl.
– OLD LADY OF WESTMORELAND STREET the Irish Times …M19 Irish
– OLD SLOP The Times newspaper …M19 sl.
– PAP a newspaper …1900s US sl.
– PAPER NEWS a newspaper …1821 Sc.
– PARAGRAPHY the writing of newspaper paragraphs; newspaper paragraphs collectively or as a class …1896
– PENN’ORTH O’ TREASON an anonymous but presumably scandalous Sunday paper; “a notorious penny Sunday London paper which attacks every party and has no policy of its own” (Ware) …L19 sl.
– RAG a newspaper, esp. a disreputable one …1889 UK sl.  
– READER a newspaper, letter, etc. …c1840 sl.
– SAUSAGE WRAPPER. a newspaper …L19 Aust. sl.
​- SCAREHEAD 1. a headline in exceptionally large type …1885
2. a sensational newspaper headline; hence, any sensational writing …1910s US sl.
– SCREWS, THE a nickname for the ‘News of the World’ (a Sunday paper in the UK) …1990s sl.
– SNITCH-SHEET a newspaper …1930s US Black sl.
– TAB a tabloid newspaper …1930s sl.
– THINK-PIECE a newspaper or magazine article of intellectual virtue or pretension; a thoughtful essay …1947 Amer. sl.
– TUCSON BLANKET newspapers, when used by tramps as a substitute for blankets …1920s US sl.
– TWO MINUTES SILENCE a (local) newspaper, suggesting that it could be effectively read in a mere two minutes …1978 NZ sl.
– YELLOW a ‘yellow’ (see adj.) newspaper or newspaper writer …1898
newspaper – person
– ACE Assistant City Editor of a newspaper …Bk2006 Amer. journalists’ sl. 
– AGONY AUNT a problem-solving columnist of newspapers and magazines to whom the lovelorn and generally wretched can write and their letters will be answered in print or privately, usually female …1970s sl.
– AGONY UNCLE a problem-solving columnist of newspapers and magazines to whom the lovelorn and generally wretched can write and their letters will be answered in print or privately, usually male …1970s sl.
– BUTCH a vendor of newspapers on railroad trains …1919 US sl.
– BUTCHER 1. in journalism: a copy editor …1867 US sl.
2. a vendor of newspapers, peanuts, candy, etc., esp. aboard a passenger train or at a sporting event …1880 US sl.
– CHAUNTER COVE a newspaper reporter …c1840 cant
– CHIPS local items in newspapers; also applied to the reporter who collects them …1889 Amer. journalism sl.
– FILLER that member of the editorial staff of a newspaper who provides fill-up matter written by himself or supplied by agencies …c1910 journalistic colloq.
– HACKETTE a female journalist or staff newspaper writer …1984 Brit. sl. 
– LEG MAN a newspaper reporter who goes out to gather facts and may or may not write the story …1923 Amer. newspaper sl.
– NEWS BUTCHER a seller of newspapers, sweets, etc., on a train …L19 US sl.
– NEWS HAWK 1. a newspaper reporter …1910s sl. orig. US
2. a newspaper seller …1950s US sl.
– NEWSHOG 1. a newspaper reporter …1910s sl. orig. US
2. a newspaper seller …1950s US sl.
– NEWSHOUND 1. a newspaper reporter …1910s sl. orig. US
2. a newspaper seller …1950s US sl.
– NEWS-HUGGER a news-carrier; a gossip; a newspaper seller …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– NEWSIE a seller of newspapers in the street; orig. boys and girls only …L19 US sl.
– NEWS-LASSIE a newspaper girl …1870 Sc.
– NEWSPAPER-BILLY a reporter for the  Press …1886 Sc.
– NEWSPAPER-MAN a man who is a great reader of newspapers …1892 Sc.
– NEWSPAPER-WOMAN a woman who is a great reader of newspapers …1892 Sc.
– PACKETEER †* a writer of articles for (periodical) newspaper …1681-2 hist.
– PAPER CRIER a street seller of newspapers; a news vendor …1711 Sc.
– PEANUT BUTCHER a vendor of newspapers aboard a passenger train …1902 US sl.
– SNITCHER a newspaper reporter or columnist, a writer …1930s US Black sl.
– WORDSTER a writer, usually a newspaper columnist …Bk1975 Amer. sl. 
newspaper – verbs
– HUSTLE SHEETS to sell newspapers …L19 sl.
– PASS to deliver newspapers …1943 Amer. dial.
– PARAGRAPHIZE to write paragraphs for the newspapers …1826 nonce word
 
NEWT – nouns
– ASK a newt, a lizard …1788 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– ASKER a newt, a lizard …1755 Eng. dial.
– BATRACHOPHOBIA the fear of or morbid aversion to frogs, toads, and newts …1863
– EFFET a newt, eft, lizard …1790 Eng. dial.
– EFFOCK a newt, eft, lizard …1790 Eng. dial.
– EMMET a newt, eft, lizard …1790 Eng. dial.
– EVET a newt, eft, lizard …1790 Eng. dial.
– HARRIMAN a lizard, a newt …Bk1902 Eng. dial.
– JACK a newt …Bk1902 Eng. dial.
– PADGETTY-POW a lizard; an eft …1846 Eng. dial.
– PADGETY-POO a lizard; an eft …1846 Eng. dial.
– PADGEY-POW a lizard; an eft …1846 Eng. dial.
– WATER LIZARD a newt …1842 Amer. dial.
 
NEW YEAR – nouns
– DAFT DAYS, THE the festivity at Christmas and the New Year …1818 Sc.
– FADGING hospitality given at the season of the New Year …1879 Eng. dial.
– HANDSEL MONDAY the first Monday of the year, on which New Year’s handsel is given …1585 Sc.
– NEEVER-DAY New Year’s day …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– NEWERY-DAY New Year’s Day …1875 Eng. dial.
– NEWERY’S MORN New Year’s morning …1896 Eng. dial.
– NEW YEAR’S TIDE the beginning of the year …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– YEAR-DAY † the first day of the year, New Year’s Day …a1122
– YERESGIFT † a gift customarily given at the New Year, or at the beginning of a year of office …a1400
– YERESYEVE † a gift customarily given at the New Year, or at the beginning of a year of office …1194
New Year – person
– QUALTAGH the first person one meets after leaving home on some special occasion, as New Year’s Day; the first person entering a house on New Year’s Day; the first-foot …1891
New Year – verbs 
– EAT FADGE to partake of hospitality on New Year’s Day …1863 Eng. dial.
– FADGE to eat together, partake of hospitality given at the season of the New Year …1863 Eng. dial.
 
NEW YEAR’S EVE – nouns
– AMATEUR NIGHT New Year’s Eve …1977 US sl.
– CAKE NIGHT New Year’s Eve, ‘Hogmanay’ …1921 Sc.
– EVE DAY New Year’s Eve …1949 Amer. dial.
– JACK AND JILL PARTY n. a New Year’s Eve party …1968 Amer. dial.
– NEEVER-EVEN New Year’s eve …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– OLD NIGHT, THE New Year’s Eve …1966 Amer. dial.
– OLD-YEAR-GONE December 31st, New Year’s Eve …1967 Amer. dial.
– OLD-YEAR-OUT n. December 31st, New Year’s Eve …1967 Amer. dial.
– OLD YEAR’S DAY n. the last day of the old year …Bk1909
– OLD YEAR’S EVE New Year’s Eve …1966 Amer. dial.
– OLD YEAR’S EVENING New Year’s Eve …1966 Amer. dial.
– OLD YEAR’S NIGHT New Year’s Eve …1966 Amer. dial.
– SINGING-E’EN the last night of the year, New Year’s Eve, Hogmanay …1806 Sc.
 
NEW YORK – nouns
– ALPHABET CITY the Lower East Side of New York City in the vicinity of Avenues A, B, C, and D …1980 New York City usage
– APPLE, THE originally, Harlem; later, New York City …1939 US sl.
– AVENUE, THE Fifth Avenue in New York …1940s US homosexual sl.
– BIG A, THE New York City …1980 US sl.
– BIG APPLE, THE Broadway and the jazz and entertainment centres of New York City; hence, New York City itself …1909 US sl.
– BIG BOARD, THE the New York Stock Exchange Inc. …1984 US sl.
– BIG BURG, THE New York City …1918 US sl.
– B-WAY Broadway, a major avenue in New York City …1850 Amer. sl.
– CROOKLYN Brooklyn, New York City …1990s US Black sl.
– DEUCE, THE New York’s 42nd Street, between Seventh and Eighth Avenues …1980s sl.
– HARLEMESE a regional type of speech characteristic of the inhabitants of Harlem …E20
– LAND OF DARKNESS Harlem, New York City; hence, the Black district of any city …1930s US Black sl.
– MAIN BURG New York City …1910s US sl.
– MAIN STEM, (THE) the theatre district of Broadway, a principal thoroughfare in New York City …1927 Amer. sl.
– MAIN STROLL, THE Seventh Avenue in Harlem …1940s US Black sl.
– MAIN THRILL, THE the main street; Seventh Avenue in Harlem …1930s US Black sl.
– MEAT STREET West 14th Street, New York …1997 US sl.
– MEDINA a nickname for Brooklyn …1990s US Black sl.
– MET(T), THE the Metropolitan Opera House, New York …L19 US sl.
– SILK STOCKING DISTRICT the Upper East Side of Manhattan …US sl.
– TRACK, THE the Savoy ballroom, New York; a major night spot on Lenox Avenue between 140th and 141st Streets in New York from 1927 until the 50s …1946 US sl.
– VILLAGE, THE 1. the Lower East Side, New York City …L19 US sl.
2. Greenwich Village, New York City …1910s US sl.
– VILLE, THE Greenwich Village, New York City …2000s sl.
– YORK STATE the state of New York …1780 Amer. dial.
New York – person
– ADIRONDACKER a native or inhabitant of the Adirondack region in New York State …1870
– BEEP a New York City borough president …1952 Amer. political sl. 
– EEL a resident of New York …1848 Amer. dial.
– GETTY a street-corner organ grinder, usually one with a monkey trained to collect coins thrown by the audience (pronounced jet-ee) …Bk1998 New York sl. 
– HARLEMITE a person born in or residing in Harlem, New York …L19
– MOSE the generic name for a typical ‘Bowery b’hoy’, a proletarian New Yorker who might work as a fireman but whose main occupation was running with a gang, mixing street thuggery with life as a political mercenary …1849 US sl.
– MOUSE a New York City Police Department trainee …1988 New York Police sl.
– SACHEM a political leader; one of the leaders of New York’s Tammany Society …19C US sl.
– YORKER an inhabitant or a soldier of New York …1755
– YORKIE a New York yuppie …Bk2006 Amer. sl. 
 
NEW ZEALAND – nouns
– CABBAGE, THE the overnight Picton-Christchurch express goods train carrying vegetables for the Christchurch market …1972 NZ sl.
– CABBAGE BOAT a boat formerly used to transport vegetables to market …1987 NZ sl.
– CABBAGE TRAIN the overnight Picton-Christchurch express goods train carrying vegetables for the Christchurch market …1972 NZ sl.
– CAKE TIN the Wellington, New Zealand, sports stadium …2001 NZ sl.
– DARTH VADER’S PENCIL BOX the Bank of New Zealand Head Office building in Wellington …1984 NZ sl.
– ENZED New Zealand …1918 Aust. & NZ sl.
– KIWI LAND New Zealand …Bk1999 Aust. sl.
– LAND OF THE LONG WHITE SHROUD New Zealand …Bk1999 Aust. sl.
– MAINLAND the South Island …1940s NZ sl.
– PARRY the Paremoremo maximum security prison …1982 NZ sl.
– PIG ISLAND(S) New Zealand …Aust. & NZ slang
– QUAKY ISLES New Zealand …Bk1999 Aust. sl.
– SHAKY ISLES, THE New Zealand, from the number of earthquakes …Aust. & NZ colloq.
– WOW the psychiatric hospital in Auckland, NZ …1998 NZ sl.
New Zealand – person
– BACKBLOCKER a resident of a remote area, esp. the area beyond the river gorges in Canterbury and Otago, New Zealand …1910 NZ sl.
– BANANA (disparaging) a New Zealand-born Chinese, used by immigrants about local Chinese …Bk1998 NZ sl.
– BEACHER a retired whaler or sailor in the earliest Otago days …Bk1998 NZ sl.
– BIODEGRADABLE POMS Kiwis, as described by Australians …Bk1998 NZ sl.
– BLACKSANDER in New Zealand: a miner who pans black sand for gold …1897
– DAGO (derogatory) a Maori …1900s NZ sl.
– DALLIE, DALLY a Dalmatian, esp. an immigrant to New Zealand from that area or the Balkans in general …1940 NZ sl.
– DINKUM an Australian or New Zealand soldier in the First World War; an Anzac; generally, an Australian or New Zealander …1916
– ENZED New Zealand …1918 Aust. & NZ sl.
– ENZEDDER a New Zealander …1941 Aust. & NZ sl.
– FOB a Pacific Islander who has newly arrived in New Zealand (Fresh Off the Boat) …20C NZ sl.
– GEORGE a generic name for a Maori; hence, any ‘native’ …1918 Aust. & NZ sl.
– JOHNNY-COME-LATELY a nickname for a farm hand recently arrived from England …c1910 NZ sl.
– KIWI a New Zealander …1918 sl.
– KOOKIE, KOOKY, KUKI a slave of a Maori chieftain …1832 NZ
– MAORILANDER a New Zealander …colloq. chiefly Aust.
– MOA HUNTER a person who hunts moas; spec. a member of an early Maori culture in New Zealand, characterized by hunting moas …1870 NZ
– MOALANDER a New Zealander …1930 Aust. sl.
– MOLESKIN SQUATTER * a person engaged in sheep farming, etc., on a small scale …1941 NZ sl.
– MOMO BOY a member of the Mongrel Mob gang …1977 NZ sl.
– MONGIE, MONGY a member of the Mongrel Mob gang …1982 NZ sl.
– MONGO a member of the Mongrel Mob gang …1977 NZ sl.
– MORIORI a member of the original Polynesian people of the Chatham Islands of New Zealand; a descendant of this people …1865 chiefly NZ usage
– MOWREE a New Zealand seaman …L19 Brit. sl.
– PACKEAH a White person …1832 NZ
– PACKIE a sheep station handyman whose principal duties are cooking and conveying goods by pack animal from camp to camp …1945 NZ colloq.
– PACKMAN a sheep station handyman whose principal duties are cooking and conveying goods by pack animal from camp to camp …1910 NZ
– PAKEHA a person who does not identify as Maori; spec. a New Zealander of European descent …1817 NZ
– PAKEHA MAORI * a person of European descent who has adopted a Maori lifestyle …1832 hist.
– PIG ISLANDER a New Zealander …Aust. & NZ sl.
– QUEEN STREET YANK a New Zealander who apes American styles, etc. …1950s NZ sl.
– RANGITOTO YANK (derogatory) an Aucklander …1980s NZ sl.
– RANGITOTO YANKEE (derogatory) an Aucklander …1980s NZ sl.
– SANDY HOOKERS residents of Nelson, NZ; spec. local musterers, from living near Farewell Spit …Bk1998 NZ sl. 
– SHAGROON an early settler in Canterbury, New Zealand, from anywhere except Britain, esp. one from Australia …M19 NZ sl.
– SILVER FERN a member of the NZ national representative net ball team 
– SUNBURNT NEW ZEALANDER a Maori …Bk1998 NZ sl. 
– TANGATA MAORI someone of Maori origin …20C NZ
– TANGATA TIRITI a Maori term for non-Maori people …20C NZ
– TAR BABY (derogatory) a Maori …1981 NZ sl.
– TAR-POT (derogatory) a Maori …1963 NZ sl.
– WAIOURU BLONDE a Maori woman …1997 NZ sl.
– WAKA BLONDE (derogatory) a Maori woman …1980s NZ sl.
– WELLINGMONIAN a resident of Wellington, NZ …Bk1998 NZ sl. 
– ZEALANDER * a native or inhabitant of New Zealand; orig. a Maori …1773
New Zealand – verbs
– DO THE PACIFIC SLOPE to flee New Zealand when accused of a crime in order to find refuge in one of the countries of the Pacific Rim …L19 NZ sl.
– HIT THE TARPOT to pursue a Maori woman …1940s NZ sl.
– TAKE THE BURNT CHOPS to take up work as a musterer or drover …L19 NZ sl.
 
NEXT – adjectives
– NEIST nearest, nighest, next …1783 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– NEISTMOST next …Bk1905 Sc.
– NETHER nearer, next …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
next – adverbs 
– NEIST next …1787 Sc.
– SITH † next in succession, order, or place …c1275
 
NEXT TO – prepositions
– UPSIDE next to, up against …1966 Amer. dial.
next to – verbs 
– VICINATE †* to lie near to, to be next to, to adjoin …1638