Reverse Dictionary: OUTM – OVERF


OUTMODED – nouns
– LAST YEAR’S BIRD’S NEST something utterly worthless, senseless, outmoded, or untidy …1905 Amer. dial.
– LAST YEAR’S CROW’S NEST something utterly worthless, senseless, outmoded, or untidy …1950 Amer. dial.
– LAST YEAR’S WASP NEST something utterly worthless, senseless, outmoded, or untidy …1986 Amer. dial.
 
OUT-OF-DATE – adjectives
– ANALOGUE unaware of or unaffected by computer technology or digital communications; outdated, old-fashioned …1993 colloq.
– BACK NUMBER out of date, old-fashioned; old and useless …1883 Amer. sl.
– CATHEDRAL antique, ancient, out-of-date …L17 sl.
– FOGRAM † antiquated, old-fashioned, out of date …1772
– FUSTY-RUSTY out of date; old-fashioned …1782
– MODEL-T cheap, outdated; obsolete …1938 Amer. sl.
– MOLDY worthless; unpleasant; outdated, out of style …1896 Amer. sl.
– MOSSY old or outdated; antiquated
– OFF out of date, no longer fashionable …1892 colloq.
– OLD FIDDLE ‘old hat; trite or outdated …1979 US sl.
– OLD HAT old-fashioned, out-of-date …1911 UK sl.
– OLD-SCHOOL old-fashioned; behind the times, out of date …1989 US sl.
– OLD-TIMESY old-fashioned, out-of-date …1850 Amer. dial.
– OLD-TIMEY old-fashioned, out-of-date, old …1850 Amer. dial.
out-of-date – nouns
– BACK NUMBER a thing which is behind the times or out of date …1890 colloq.
– HAS-BEEN an out-of-date thing …E17 colloq.
– OLD GLORY anything seen as unfashionable or out of date …1880s US Black sl.
out-of-date – person
– BACK NUMBER a person having out-of-date interests or ideas; an old-fashioned, or unsophisticated person …1882 Amer. sl.
– BUZZARD MEAT a dead or outdated person …Bk2006 US sl.
– HAS-BEEN an out-of-date person or thing …E17 colloq.
– MOLDY FIG a person having outdated or conservative ideas …1949 Amer. sl.
– MOSSBACK an out-of-date person; an old-fashioned person …1878 US colloq.
– RAG-HEAD anyone who is not absolutely up to date with current information, gossip, style, etc. …1980s US Black sl.
– YOUNG FOGEY – a young person with outdated ideas and values …2001 UK sl.
 
OUT OF ORDER – see ORDER, DISORDERED
 
OUT OF SORTS – adjectives
– ALL OUT out of sorts; having a feeling of general discomfort …1967 Amer. dial.
– AWFISH, AWVISH slightly unwell, out of sorts …1790 Eng. dial.
– CATTY-CORNER out of sorts, ill-tempered, annoyed, upset …1884 Amer. dial.
– CATTY-CORNERED out of sorts, ill-tempered, annoyed, upset …1954 Amer. dial.
– CROOK out of sorts, injured …E20 Aust. & NZ
– DICKY of persons, animals, etc.: poorly, out of sorts, in weak health, ill …1883 Eng. dial.
– DUSTY tetchy, irritable, out of sorts …1980s US college sl.
– OFF HIS SAUCER tired, not in the humour, out of sorts …Bk1892 Aust. sl.
– OOLIE ailing, ill, out-of-sorts …1929 Sc.
– OOLIE-LIKE ailing, ill, out-of-sorts …1929 Sc.
– OORLICK of persons: miserable-looking from cold, hunger, or illness; pinched, haggard, shivery, out-of-sorts …1768 Sc.
– OUT OF ONE’S GEARS † out of sorts; irritable, grouchy …a1700
– QUEER AS DICK’S HATBAND out of sorts, dispirited, ‘under the weather’ …L18 sl.
– QUISBY queer, out of sorts, unwell …1854 sl.
– QUISBY SNITCH of people: unwell; out of sorts …M19 sl.
– RAGGED nervy, out of sorts, under the weather, unwell, tired …L19 sl., orig. Aust.
– UNEVEN out of sorts, slightly unwell …Bk1905 Sc.
– UNKED, UNKID of a place: lonely, dreary, desolate; of a person: feeling lonely; dull, depressed, miserable; out of sorts …1777 Eng. dial.
– UNKY of a place: lonely, dreary, desolate; of a person: feeling lonely; dull, depressed, miserable; out of sorts …1777 Eng. dial.
out of sorts – nouns
– OORIECOORIE † a drowsy dull condition of body or sprits, a being sulky or out-of-sorts, a peevish, fretful mood; generally in plural …1893 S.
out of sorts – verbs 
– FEEL FLAT to be low-spirited, out of sorts …1838 Amer. sl.
– HAVE THE WOOLIES  to be nervous or out of sorts …1900 US college sl.
– LOOK LIKE ONE WAS SENT FOR AND COULDN’T COME to look indisposed, out of sorts, or exhausted …1843 Amer. dial.
 
OUTRAGE – nouns
– ABUSION † violation of law or right, outrage, wrong; anything opposed to propriety; bad or improper usage; corrupt or shameful fact or practice …c1374
outrage – phrases & interjections
– JUDAS PRIEST! used as an expression of surprise or outrage …1914 US sl.
 
OUTRAGEOUS – adjectives
– EGREGIOUS remarkable in a bad sense; gross, flagrant, outrageous, extravagant, excessive …1573
– HECTIC extreme, outrageous; good …2003 S. Afr. sl.
– IMMANSUETE †* ungentle, outrageous, wild, untractable …1656
– LUXURIOUS † outrageous, extravagant, excessive; also, passionately desirous after something …c1374
– MAROONJUS harsh, stern; outrageous; obstreperous, …1864 Sc.
– MORUNGEOUS harsh, stern; outrageous; obstreperous, …1864 Sc.
– NANA outrageous, indecent …L19 sl.
– NANA-ISH outrageous, indecent …L19 sl.
– OUTRAGEABLE outrageous …1952 Amer. dial.
– OUTRAIOUS † outrageous …1303
– OUTSTROPOLOUS † outrageous, unruly, obstreperous …1832 Sc.
– RADICAL extreme, outrageous, good …1967 US sl., orig. surfing usage
– RAGEOUS outrageous; angry, furious, violent with pain or anger …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– RAMPACIOUS lively, spirited, boisterous; wild, unruly, outrageous; rampageous …1837
– RAMPAGEOUS outrageous, obstreperous …1859 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– RAMPAGEROUS outrageous, obstreperous …1890 Eng. dial.
– RAMPAGINOUS furious, angry, violent, wild, unruly, obstreperous, boisterous, noisy, disorderly, outrageous …1822 Sc.
– RAMPAGIOUS glaring, outrageous …1889
– RAMPTIOUS violent and reckless in behaviour; wild, active, dangerous; outrageous, quarrelsome, passionate …1953 Amer. dial. 
– RAMSTUDIOUS violent and reckless in behaviour; outrageous, rambunctious, quarrelsome, passionate …1847 Amer. dial.
– RAMSTUGENOUS violent and reckless in behaviour; outrageous, quarrelsome, passionate …1847 Amer. dial.
– RAMSTUGINOUS violent and reckless in behaviour; rambunctious, outrageous, quarrelsome, passionate …1847 Amer. dial.
– RAMSTUGIOUS violent and reckless in behaviour; rough and strong, coarse, uncouth; rambunctious, outrageous, quarrelsome, passionate …1811 Sc. & Amer. dial.
– RAMSTUJOUS violent and reckless in behaviour; outrageous, rambunctious, quarrelsome, passionate …1847 Amer. dial.
– RAPTUROUS † outrageous …1838 Sc.
– RICH outrageous …c1350 colloq.
– RIDICULOUS indecent; outrageous …1832 Amer. dial.
– RUMBUSTICAL fond of rough play; careless of the comfort of others; boisterous, unruly, uproarious, noisy, obstreperous;  rude, overbearing, violent …1795 Eng. dial. & colloq.
– UNHOLY awful; outrageous …1842 UK
– VESANOUS mad, furious, raging, cruel, outrageous …1656 obs.
outrageous – person
– CHANCER someone who does outrageous or dishonest things at high risk of discovery …1884 Brit. sl.
– RIG an amusing sort of chap; a joker; a prankster; an outrageous person …1975 Amer. dial.
outrageous – verbs 
– CAMP to act ostentatiously and outrageously in a homosexual manner, although by no means restricted – verbally or physically – to the gay world …1920s sl.
– TAKE THE RAG OFF to surpass all others; to be outstanding or outrageous; to be the last straw …1837 Amer. dial.
– TAKE THE RAG OFF THE BUSH to surpass all others; to be outstanding or outrageous; to be the last straw …1810 Amer. dial.
 
OUTSET – nouns
– JUMP-OUT the outset, the beginning …20C Aust. sl.
– OFF-GANG a commencement, start, outset …1881 Eng. dial.
– OFF-GO start, beginning, outset, commencement …1886 Sc.
– OFF-GOING a commencement, start, outset …1885 Sc.
– OFF-SET a commencement, start, outset …1892 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– OFF-START a commencement, start, beginning, outset …1889 Eng. & Amer. dial.
– OUTSETTING * beginning, the act of setting out or starting on a journey, course of action, undertaking, etc.; a start, an outset …a1698 
– OUTSTART the outset …1906 Amer. dial.
 
OUTSHINE – verbs
– TAKE THE RAG OFF to beat, to surpass; to excel; to outshine …1833 Amer. dial.
 
OUTSIDE – adjectives
– EXTRA-FORANEOUS outdoor, outside …1781
outside – adverbs
– ABROAD out of doors, outside; neat at hand …1893 Ireland & Eng. dial.
– AROUT outside, out-of-doors …1790 Eng. dial.
– ATHOUT without, outside …Bk1898 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– THROUT out of doors …1801 Sc.
outside – nouns 
– BARK outer covering; outside, external part …c1374 arch.
outside – verbs 
– HIT THE AIR to go outside; to get out …1928 Amer. sl.
outside – phrases 
– AT THE SIGN OF THE MOON † in the open air by night …1613
 
OUTSIDER – person
– BALDHEAD an outsider …1980s NZ sl.
– BALLHEAD an outsider …1989 NZ sl.
– BIRD an outsider, a newcomer, an unconventional person …1931 sl., orig. US tramps’ usage
– BLOW-IN a stranger, an outsider …1967 Amer. dial.
– GAPPER an onlooker; an outsider …1939 US Black sl.
– GOOMBAH an outsider, a social outcast …1990s US sl.
– KNICK-KNACK, NICK-NACK, NIC-NAC one who does not fit in with the group; an outsider …2000s US prison sl.
– OFF-BREED one who is not from your community, and doesn’t belong; an outsider …1965 Amer. dial.
– OUTLAW a foreigner; a stranger, an outsider …1968 Amer. dial.
– RINDER an outsider …Bk1903 Queen’s University usage
– RINGER an outsider or intruder; a phoney person or thing; an impostor;  a person who attaches himself or herself to a political or other group to which he or she does not belong, or who votes in a district where he or she does not reside …1896 US
– UN an outsider, someone who does not fit in; an undesirable or unlikable person …1991 US college sl. 
– UNCO BODY a stranger, an outsider, a newcomer …1811 Sc.
 
OUTSMART – verbs
– NIP to get the better of in bargaining; to outsmart, to cheat …1964 Sc. 
– TAIGLE to confound or get the better of in an argument; to quiz; to bamboozle, to outsmart; to perplex …1874 Sc.
 
OUTSPOKEN – adjectives
– BROAD outspoken, obvious, unsubtle 
– BROAD-SPOKEN outspoken; using coarse language …1899 Amer. dial.
– NAKED free from concealment or reserve; plain, straightforward; outspoken, free …a1225
– OPEN-GOBBED talkative, loquacious, outspoken …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– OPEN-MOUTHED talkative, loquacious, outspoken …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
outspoken – person
– ARCHIE BUNKER (derogatory) a man whose background, outlook, and behaviour are likened to those of the television character Archie Bunker, esp. a blue-collar worker having (and vehemently expressing) views considered ignorant or bigoted; also, a person characterized as having ignorant or bigoted views and a vehement, outspoken manner …1971 US colloq.
– JACK BLUNT a blunt, outspoken person …L19 sl.
outspoken – phrases 
– MORE FRONT THAN BRIGHTON used of one who is very cheeky, daring, or outspoken …1980s sl.
– MORE FRONT THAN BRIGHTON BEACH used of one who is very cheeky, daring, or outspoken …1980s sl.
– MORE FRONT THAN BUCKINGHAM PALACE used of one who is very cheeky, daring, or outspoken …1980s sl.
– MORE FRONT THAN FOY AND GIBSON’S used of one who is very cheeky, daring, or outspoken …1950s Aust. sl.
– MORE FRONT THAN HARRODS used of one who is very cheeky, daring, or outspoken …1970s sl.
– MORE FRONT THAN MYERS used of one who is very cheeky, daring, or outspoken …1950s Aust. sl.
– NOT TO TAKE TEA FOR THE FEVER not to put up with any nonsense; not to allow oneself to be intimidated; to be independent and outspoken …a1940 Amer. dial.
 
OUTSTANDING – adjectives
– ACE expert; hence, outstanding, great …1930 Amer. sl.
– BIG-TIME outstanding; extravagant …Bk2006 US sl.
– BODACIOUS remarkable, exceptional, outstanding …1843 sl.
– DEF outstanding; terrific; common in rap music lyrics …20C teen & high school sl.
– JIM-DANDY excellent, outstanding …1888 Amer. dial.
– ONE MORE being a remarkable or outstanding example of a person or thing …1913 Amer. dial.
– SAD singular, remarkable, outstanding …1782 Sc.
– SHIT-HOT outstanding, excellent, skilful …1942 sl.
– SOLID trustworthy, dependable, exciting, outstanding …L19 orig. jazz usage
– TOP-FLIGHT of superior or excellent quality; outstanding
– WORLD-CLASS very superior; outstanding; super-excellent …1950 Amer. sl.
outstanding – nouns
– ALL-TIMER an outstanding example …1973 Amer. sl.
– BALL-BUSTER any thing seen as extraordinary or outstanding …1960s sl.
– BENDER a big or good specimen of its kind; a ‘whopper’; anything exceptional or outstanding …1842 Eng. dial.
– BOTTLER a thing or event of outstanding merit; an excellent thing …1855 Aust. & NZ sl.
– DEATH something excellent or outstanding …1960s US Black sl.
– DOOZER something that is extraordinary or outstanding of its kind …1925 Amer. colloq.
– DOOZIE something that is extraordinary or outstanding of its kind …1925 Amer. colloq.
– HOME COOKING anything outstanding, wonderful or first-rate …1930s US Black sl.
– HUMDINGER a remarkable, excellent, or outstanding person or thing; something exciting or thrilling; something or someone very fine or splendid; a stylish person …1905 sl., orig. US
– JIM-CRACK an extreme or outstanding example of its kind; something that is in the very best condition; an exceptionally skilful person …1834 Amer. dial.
– JIMCRACKER an extreme or outstanding example of its kind; something that is in the very best condition; an exceptionally skilful person …1937 Amer. dial.
– JIMCRACKY an extreme or outstanding example of its kind; something that is in the very best condition; an exceptionally skilful person …1970 Amer. dial.
– JOE DARTER an outstanding example of its kind …1900s US sl.
– LAD one of its kind; an outstanding or extreme example …1902 Sc.
– MASTER great, outstanding, large; greatest …1750 Eng. & Amer. dial.
– ONER a person or thing of a unique or very remarkable kind; a person preeminently addicted to or expert at something; an outstanding or excellent person or thing …1840 colloq.
– PALMER anything large or outstanding of its kind; a ‘whopper’ …1929 Sc.
– PANIC someone or something outstanding, exceptional, or excellent …1920s US Black sl.
outstanding – person
– ACE an important, influential person; someone of high quality or held in high esteem; an outstanding person …1899 sl., orig., US
– BALL-BUSTER an extraordinary or outstanding person …1975 sl.
– BEAST an expert; one who is exceptionally good at something; an outstanding person …2012 US college sl.
– BEAT an outstanding person, one who defeats all rivals; usually as ‘the beat of…’ …1855 US sl.
– BEAUT any outstanding or admirable person, whether physically attractive or not; a first-rate or excellent person; an adept person …1891 sl.
– BIG TOAST an outstanding person …1953 US Black sl.
– BIRD an outstanding person …1870 sl.
– BOTTLER an outstanding or excellent person …1855 Aust. & NZ sl.
– COOLER an expert; an outstanding individual …L19 US campus sl.
– HUMDINGER a remarkable, excellent, or outstanding person or thing; something exciting or thrilling; something or someone very fine or splendid; a stylish person …1905 sl., orig. US
– KING PIN the most important or outstanding person in an organization, enterprise, etc. …1861
– MONSTER an extraordinarily good or remarkably successful person; an outstanding or remarkable person …1958 orig. US
– ONER a person or thing of a unique or very remarkable kind; a person preeminently addicted to or expert at something; an outstanding or excellent person or thing …1840 colloq.
– PANIC someone or something outstanding, exceptional, or excellent …1920s US Black sl.
– RIP-SNORTER an excellent, splendid, or admirable person; an outstanding person …1842 colloq., orig. US
– VIRE a great beauty; a belle; an outstanding person, animal, or thing; the best in a class; a prize specimen, a good price, etc.; something well done …1908 Sc.
– WOPCACKER a superlative or outstanding person …1947 Aust. sl.
outstanding – verbs
– TAKE THE RAG OFF to surpass all others; to be outstanding or outrageous; to be the last straw …1837 Amer. dial.
– TAKE THE RAG OFF THE BUSH to surpass all others; to be outstanding or outrageous; to be the last straw …1810 Amer. dial.
 
OUTSTANDINGLY – adverbs
– SOLID trustworthily, dependably, excitingly, outstandingly …L19 orig. US Black usage
 
OUTSTAY – verbs
– TARRY † outstay, to stay over (a given time) …a1500
 
OUTSTRIP – verbs
– TINE to leave far behind, as in a race; to outstrip entirely; to get far ahead of …1871 chiefly Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
 
OUTWARD – adjectives
– OOTERIN outward, from without …Bk1905 Sc.
 
OUTWARDLY – adverbs
– FASHIONABLY † with respect to the fashion or external form; outwardly, superficially, in appearance …1614
 
OUTWIT – verbs
– ACE to outwit; to gain an advantage over …1960 Amer. sl.
– ACE OUT to outwit; to gain an advantage over …1960 Amer. sl.
– BEST to outwit, to outdo, to get the better of …1863 colloq.
– EAT ONE’S LUNCH to best someone; to defeat, to outwit or win against someone …Bk2006 US sl.
– EUCHRE to defeat; to outwit; to swindle; to cheat, to trick …1853 Amer. dial.
– EUCHRE OUT to defeat; to outwit; to cheat, to trick …1853 Amer. dial.
– FLUX to cozen, to cheat, to outwit …L18 sl.
– GET A RISE OUT OF ONE to mortify; to make ridiculous; to outwit …1600 sl.
– GREEN to tease, to make a fool of; to annoy with practical jokes; to outwit …1923 Amer. dial.
– GREEN ON to tease, to make a fool of; to annoy with practical jokes; to outwit …1887 Amer. dial.
– GREEN OUT to tease, to make a fool of; to annoy with practical jokes; to outwit …1887 Amer. dial.
– HAVE to get the better of, to outwit, to take in, to cheat or deceive …1805 sl.
– HAVE A RISE OUT OF ONE to mortify; to make ridiculous; to outwit …Bk1903 sl.
– HAVE THE LAUGH OF SOMEONE to outdo, to outwit someone …20C Brit. colloq.
– HEAD to surpass, to outdo, to excel; to outwit, to get the better of …1711
– MAKE A MAN’S BEARD † to outwit or delude him …1525
– OFREDE †* to outdo in counsel; to outwit …c1275
– OUT-DUGAN to outwit, to get the better of, to cheat …1923 Amer. dial.
– RAMP to outwit; to cheat …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– RAVEL to nonplus, to bamboozle, to outwit …1931 Sc.
– SHOW A TRICK to outwit, to fool, to deceive …1982 NZ sl.
– STONKER to render useless; to put of action, to thwart; also, to kill, to destroy; to defeat or outwit …1919 Aust. & NZ sl.
– TAFFLE to puzzle, to bamboozle, to outwit …1950 Sc.
– TAKE A RISE OUT OF ONE to mortify; to make ridiculous; to outwit …a1850 sl.
– TAKE SOMEONE TO THE CLEANERS to defraud, to outwit and otherwise remove all of a victim’s assets in a wager, by extortion, or by similar legal or illegal means …1920s sl.
– TRY IT ON to outwit or deceive someone …1811 sl.
– UPSTAGE to outwit, to win or be superior to another person …L19 US theatrical sl.
 
OUTWITTED – adjectives
– BEDONE outwitted …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– FLUMMOXED confused, let down, outwitted …M19 sl.
– FLUMMOXED UP confused, let down, outwitted …M19 sl.
outwitted – adjectives
– BE STONKERED to be outwitted …c1918 Aust. sl.
 
OVAL – adjectives
– AVELONG elliptical, oval; oblong …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– EAVELONG elliptical, oval, oblong; oblique, sidelong …1864 Eng. dial.
oval – adverbs 
– AVELINGS † in an oblong or oval shape …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
 
OVARY – nouns
– EGG-BAG an ovary …1774
– EGG-NEST † an ovary …1704
 
OVATION – nouns
– O an ovation …1984 US sl.
 
OVEN – adjectives
– RASH of an oven, etc.: hot …B1900 Eng. dial.
oven – nouns 
– APPARATUS a kitchen stove …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– BAKER a small pebble placed in an oven to indicate when it is sufficiently heated; the stone presents a floury-white appearance …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
 
OVER – prepositions
– ATHIRT of position or motion: across, over …1806 Eng. dial.
– ATHORT of position or motion: across, over …1806 Sc.
– ATHURT of position or motion: across, over …1806 Eng. dial.
– AT-OWER of position or motion: across, over …1724 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– OHEN over …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– OHERN over …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
 
OVERACT – verbs
– CAMP IT UP to act in an exaggeratedly camp manner, to overact …Bk1999 
– MUG to pull a face, esp. in front of an audience or camera; to grimace; to overact …1856 sl., orig. theatre usage
 
OVERAWE – verbs
– BUFFALO to overawe, to frighten, to intimidate, esp. by bluff; to confuse, to bamboozle, to tease …1891 Amer. dial.
 
OVERBALANCE – verbs
– KECK to upset; to overbalance …Bk1901 Eng. dial..
 
OVERBEARING – adjectives
– ASSY uppity, overbearing, brash …E20 US
– BEGOTTY bumptious, overbearing, self-willed …1873 Eng. dial.
– BENSILING of persons: rough, awkward, overbearing …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– BIGASS pert. to someone who is self-important, overbearing, or arrogant …Bk2006 US sl.
– BIGOTTY bumptious, overbearing, self-willed …1873 Eng. dial.
– BIG-SHOT mighty; overbearing; overly important …Bk2006 US sl.
– BRICKETY arrogant, insolent, uppity; restless, aggressive; headstrong, stubborn, forward, restless; overbearing …1868 Amer. dial.
– BRIGATY arrogant, insolent, uppity; restless, aggressive; headstrong, stubborn, forward, restless; overbearing …1880 Amer. dial.
– BRIGETTY arrogant, insolent, uppity; restless, aggressive; headstrong, stubborn, forward, restless; overbearing …1895 Amer. dial.
– BRIGGITY arrogant, insolent, uppity; restless, aggressive; headstrong, stubborn, forward, restless; overbearing …1911 Amer. dial.
– BRIGGOTY arrogant, insolent, uppity; restless, aggressive; headstrong, stubborn, forward, restless; overbearing …1952 Amer. dial.
– BRIGITY arrogant, insolent, uppity; restless, aggressive; headstrong, stubborn, forward, restless; overbearing …1898 Amer. dial.
– CHEEKY AS A MAN ON THE TOWN overbearing, ‘nervy’ …Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
– HEAVY-HANDED oppressive; overbearing …1883
– MANNISH of a youth: aping manhood; overbearing; blustering …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– MASTERLY † characteristic of a master or lord; usually in a bad sense, arbitrary, despotic; imperious, overbearing, domineering …1531-2
– PROUD AS LUCIFER very haughty and overbearing …1793
– RAMPANTUS † overbearing …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– SNOUTY overbearing; insolent …1858 colloq.
– TOL-LOL overbearing …L19 Aust. sl.
overbearing – person
– BIG CHEW OF TOBACCO, A an overbearing, disliked person …20C Amer. sl.
– BIG DOG a consequential pompous individual; an overbearing person who will allow no one to differ from his views …1833 US sl.
– BIG STIFF a term of abuse; a fool; a rough, clumsy, stupid, or overbearing man; a mean, disagreeable or contemptible person; a disliked person; an uncouth, self-opinionated person …1896 sl., orig. US
– CHEW an overbearing, disliked person …20C Amer. sl.
– GRIMSIR † an austere, stern, morose, or overbearing person; a grim old man; a haughty or arrogant person in office …c1450 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– HALLION an overbearing, quarrelsome woman of vulgar manners …Bk1905 Sc.
– JACK-IN-OFFICE an overbearing petty official; an upstart …1690 sl.
– TARTAR a passionate, overbearing woman …1663
– TURK any cruel and overbearing man …L18 sl.
overbearing – verbs
– COME THE (OLD) ACID to behave in an unpleasant, aggressive, or overbearing manner; to speak in a sarcastic or caustic way …1917 UK sl.
– MOUNT THE HIGH HORSE said of a person affecting airs of superiority, or behaving pretentiously or arrogantly; to be overbearing or oppressive; to be proud; to take offense …1871
– PARRAGOAD to talk in a domineering or overbearing style …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
 
OVERBURDEN – verbs
– BREAK THE BACK OF to overburden, to crush a person; to finish the greatest or hardest part of a task
 
OVERBURDENED – adjectives
– SNOWED UNDER overburdened with work, commitments, responsibilities, etc. …1930s orig. US sl.
– SNOWED UP overburdened with work, commitments, responsibilities, etc. …1930s orig. US sl.
 
OVERCAST – adjectives
– BANGY of weather: drizzling, overcast; misty; stormy …1790 Eng. dial.
– BENGY cloudy, overcast …1851 Eng. dial.
– SMEARED adj. of the sky: overcast …1950 Amer. dial.
– SMURRY hazy, overcast, cloudy …1887 Amer. dial.
overcast – verbs
– MIRK to darken, overcast …1691 Sc. & Eng. dial.  
– SKEW † to become overcast …c1400
– SMEAR IN of the weather: to become overcast …1975 Amer. dial.
 
OVERCHARGE – nouns
– CLIP-JOINT a bar, club, etc. that charges exorbitant prices …1932 sl., orig. US
overcharge – person 
– BUNCER one who overcharges someone …20C market traders’ usage
overcharge – verbs 
– BUNCE to overcharge someone, esp. if obviously rich or eager …20C market traders’ usage
– CLIP to swindle by overcharging …1927 sl., orig. US
– COCK IT ON to exaggerate; to overcharge someone …1961 UK sl.
– COCK ON to exaggerate; to overcharge someone …1961 UK sl.
– FLEECE to swindle, to cheat, esp. to overcharge …1772 sl.
– HYPE orig. to short-change or overcharge; later, to deceive or con …1926 sl., orig. US
– NAIL to cheat or overcharge …1812 sl.
– RIP SOMEONE OFF to overcharge …1971 sl.
– ROOK to swindle, to cheat, esp. to overcharge …1590 sl.
– RUSH to overcharge …1887 Brit. sl.
– SAUCE † to overcharge …1598
– SOAK to overcharge; to make someone pay exorbitantly …1895 Amer. sl.
– STING to swindle, esp. by overcharging …1905 sl.
– STITCH SOMEONE UP to swindle, esp. by overcharging …1977 Brit. sl.
 
OVERCLOUD – verbs
– OBNUBILATE to darken, dim, cover, or hide with or as with a cloud; to overcloud; to obscure …1583
 
OVERCLOUDED – adjectives
– OBNUBILATE † covered or darkened as with a cloud; overclouded; obscured …1560
– OBNUBILOUS †* overclouded; cloudy, indistinct …1432-50
 
OVERCOME – adjectives
– ALL STRUCK IN A HEAP entirely overcome …Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
– BATTERED tired, overcome by walking or labour …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– BEGLUED  overcome …c1430 
– BESTEAD circumstanced, situated, generally in an evil sense; hence, destitute, forlorn; overcome, oppressed …1790 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– HARROWED beaten, overcome, brought to a standstill; obstructed by an impediment or obstacle …1890 Eng. dial.
– MASHED-UP exhausted, overcome …1888 Eng. dial.
– OUTDONE put out, perplexed, exasperated, displeased; disappointed, overcome, beaten, humiliated, embarrassed …1816 Amer. dial.
– YDAUNTED † overcome …1581
overcome – person
– VANQUISHER one who overcomes, prevails or masters …1456
overcome – verbs
– BANG to defeat, to worst; to surpass, to excel, to outdo; to overcome, to overpower; to overwhelm…1604
– BASTE to conquer, to overcome …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– BELAY to overcome …Bk1911 Sc.
– BEWAVE to lay wait for; to overcome by mean stratagem …Bk1911 Sc.
– BLECK to baffle; to surpass; to nonplus or overcome in an argument; to puzzle …Bk1911 Sc.
– BLITZ to attack and defeat comprehensively; to crush, to overcome, to destroy …1940s sl., orig. US
– BOWL OUT to overcome, to get the better of; hence, to kill, to knock out of action …1805 Amer. military sl.
– BREAK THE HANK OF A THING to overcome the principal difficulty …B1900 Eng. dial.
– CANK to overcome, to conquer, to overpower …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– DANTON to subdue, to overcome, to vanquish; to tame; to intimidate …1535 Sc.
– DAUNT † to overcome, to subdue, to vanquish …c1300
– DAUNTON to subdue, to overcome, to vanquish; to tame; to intimidate …1535 Sc.
– DEBELL † to put down in fight, to subdue, to vanquish, to conquer, to overcome; to expel by force of arms …1555
– DEBELLATE † to overcome in war; to conquer, subdue, vanquish …1611
– DEFAIL † to overcome, to defeat …1608
– DING to overcome, to subdue; to excel, to surpass …1795 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– EAT FOR BREAKFAST to vanquish, to outdo, to overcome …1970 Aust. sl.
– EXFLUNCT to cause to fail, to render useless, to overcome completely …1831 Amer. dial.
– EXFLUNCTIFY to cause to fail, to render useless, to overcome completely …1840 Amer. dial.
– EXSUPERATE † to overtop, to surmount, to surpass, to exceed, to excel; to overcome …1559
– EXUPERATE † to surpass, to excel; to overcome, to surmount …1559
– FADE to surpass, to defeat, to overcome, to outdo, to overshadow …1894 Amer. sl.
– FALL OUT to be overcome with emotion …1938 US sl.
– FAN OUT to defeat or overcome in a fight …1879 Amer. dial.
– FLUMMOX to fool, to confuse, to overcome by trickery; to bewilder …1837 sl.
– FULYIE to trample, overcome, destroy …LME Sc.
– GUTSER to be beaten or overcome; to lose …1950s sl.
– IMPORT † to conquer, to overcome …1624
– I-WELDE † to overcome, to subdue someone or something …a1000
– LAY OUT to defeat, to overcome …E19 sl.
– LICK to overcome, to defeat, as in a fight, game, or contest …colloq.
– LOSE to be much superior to; to overcome; to defeat easily …20C colloq.
– MACK to use to one’s advantage; to exploit; broadly, to overcome …1993 Amer. sl., esp. Black usage
– MAKE A HARE OF A MAN vb. to get the better of; to overcome in argument, etc. …1843 Ireland
– MANN to manage; to overcome, to get the better of …1790 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– MASTER to defeat, to overcome, to best …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– OFHEAT †* to overcome with heat …c1205
– OVERFACE  to abash or overcome especially by boldness or effrontery …c1475 obs. exc. Eng. dial. 
– PAY to punish; to defeat, to overcome, to conquer …1812 Sc. & Eng. dial.  
– PLAY HORSE WITH to confuse; to confound; to defeat; to take advantage of; to overcome easily …1900 US sl.
– QUANK to overcome, to subdue; to quiet …1825 Eng. dial.
– RAMSQUADDLE to overcome, to use up …M19 US sl.
– SCRAUNCH to defeat in a game; to overcome an opponent, esp. in basketball  …1934 Amer. Black student sl.
– SEND TO THE SHOWERS to send off or eject someone from a match, race, or contest; to reject, overcome, or defeat decisively …1913 colloq.
– SETTLE ONE’S HASH to overcome a person completely; to ruin a person…1881
– SIT UPON to squash, to check, to snub; to overcome or rebuke; to express contempt for a man in a marked manner …1865 sl.
– SKUNK to utterly defeat; to outdo decisively; to vanquish completely; to overcome …1843 Amer. dial.
– SPIFLICATE to deal with in such a way as to confound or overcome completely; to astonish, to mystify, to surprise …1785 humorous or colloq.
– TAKE to overcome, to defeat, to kill …L19 sl.
– TAKE DOWN to challenge; to overcome; to surpass; to kill …M18 sl.
– TAKE THE KNOCK to be overcome by drink or drugs …2000s sl.
– TEW to exhaust; to fatigue; to tire; to trouble, to harass, to bother; to overcome …1824 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– TIP to excel, to exceed; to overcome …1825 Sc.
– UNDERFONG † to seduce, to entrap, to overcome …1579
– WAGGLE to get the better of; to overcome, to surpass …L19 US sl.
– WALK INTO to attack, to overcome, to demolish …M19 sl.
– WALLOP to overcome, to surpass, to defeat …L19 sl.
– WHIP to overcome, to vanquish, to defeat; to surpass, to outdo …1571
– WHITE-EYE to be overcome by heat or exhaustion while working; to faint from exhaustion; to quit working, to quit on one; to desert, to abandon …1911 Amer. dial.
– YAMP to grab. to catch, to overcome, to steal …1866 Amer. dial.
– ZONK to overcome; to knock out …1970s sl.
– ZONK OUT to overcome; to knock out …1970s sl.
 
OVER-CONFIDENCE – nouns
– COCKINESS a personal quality of smug over-confidence …1864
 
OVER-CONFIDENT – adjectives
– COCK-HAPPY over-confident …1959 UK sl.
 
OVERCROWDED – adjectives
– OVER-THRANGED overcrowded …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– OVER-THRONG overcrowded …Bk1905 N. Ireland
 
OVERDO – verbs
– CUT IT FAT to overdo something; to go too far …1838 Amer. dial.
– CUT IT TOO FAT to ‘come it strong’; to overdo a thing …1836 sl.
 
OVERDRESSED – see DRESSED
 
OVERDUE – adjectives
– BACK-HAN’ overdue …1915 Sc.
– OLD overdue, late in payment …1873 Eng. dial.
 
OVERFED – adjectives
– PAMPERED † over-fed …a1529
 
OVERFILL – verbs
– ACCLOY to overfill, to overload, to burden, to oppress …1611
 
OVERFLOW – nouns
– EXUNDANCE † a flowing forth in waves; an overflow …a1654
– EXUNDANCY † a flowing forth in waves; an overflow …1686
– EXUNDATION * overflow of a body of water …1577
overflow – verbs
– DEBORD † of a body of water: to pass beyond its borders or banks; to overflow …1632
– EXUBERATE to be in great abundance; to be plentiful; to abound; to overflow …1623
– EXUNDATE to overflow …1721
– REAM to foam, to froth; to bubble; to overflow …1773 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– SCALE to spill, to upset; to overflow …1641 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– SKAIL to pour out; to shed; to spill, to upset; to overflow …1513 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– TEEM to overflow …1685 Sc.
– TO-WALT † to overflow …a1300
 
OVERFLOWED – adjectives
– YFLOWN † overflowed …1576
 
OVERFLOWING – adjectives
– ABOUND † overflowing; plentiful; abundant …c1400
– BEAMFULL full or overflowing …Bk1898 Sc.
– EFFUSE † wide-spreading, overflowing, unrestrained, extravagant, marked by squandering …1742 obs. or arch.
– ERGANE overflowing …1863 Sc.
– EXUBERATE † overflowing, superabundant …1638
– EXUNDANT flowing forth in waves; overflowing, superabundant …a1661
– HEAP AND THRATCH filled to overflowing …1887 Eng. dial.
– REAMING foaming, frothing; brimful, overflowing …1787 Sc. & Eng. dial.
overflowing – nouns
– ABUNDARY †* an overflowing source; a fountain-head …1622