Reverse Dictionary: PEE – PEN


PEEKABOO – NOUNS
– a game at peep-bo (peekaboo) • TEET-BO a1600 Sc. obs.
– a game at peep-bo (peekaboo) • TEETIE-BO 1773 Sc.
– the game of ‘bo-peep’ • TIT-BORE a1600 Sc. obs.
– the game of peekaboo • PEEP-EYE 1887 Amer. dial.

PEEKABOO – VERBS
– to play peekaboo • PEEP-EYE 1986 Amer. dial.


PEEL – VERBS
– to peel entirely, to make bare of skin • TO-SHELL 1377 obs.
– to peel or flake because of brittleness • BRICKLE 1936 Amer. dial.
– to peel or strip off something, esp. skin • FLYPE Sc. ​
– to peel, to come off in pieces • HARL(E) 1785 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– to peel; to scrape • SCRIEVE Bk1904 Sc.
– to peel; to scrape • SCRIVE Bk1904 Sc. & Eng. dial.


PEEP, PEEPING – ADJECTIVES
– given to peeping • PEEPY 1898 colloq.
– peeping, prying, spying • TOOTING a1225 obs. exc. Eng. dial.

PEEP etc. – NOUNS
– a peep • KEEK 1773 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– a peep, a look • SHUFTI  SHUFTY 20C Brit. sl.
– a peep, a stolen glance • TEET 1819 Sc.
– a peeping, spying, looking • TOOTING 1553 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– a peep or glance • TOOT 1865 Eng. dial.

PEEP etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– a peeper, a gazer • KEEKER Bk1902 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– a peeper; one who gazes; a watchman • TOOTER 1382 obs.

PEEP etc. – VERBS
– to peep at; to poke about • PAKE 1893 Eng. dial.
– to peep; to look privily, as through a narrow aperture, or round a corner • KEEK c1440 obs. exc. Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– to peep; to peep or pry in a sly, clandestine manner • TEET 1785 Sc.
– to peep, to peer, to look narrowly or covertly • TWIRE 1602 arch.
– to peep, to peer, to look out; to gaze • TOOT a1225 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– to peep, to spy • KEEK-BO 1821 Sc.
– to peep, to squint, to look askance; to peer with partly closed eyes • SQUINNY 1605


PEEPHOLE – NOUNS
– a peephole • TOOTING-HOLE a1548 obs.
– a peephole • VIZZIE-HOLE 1850 Sc.
– a peephole; a hole for spying • TOTE-HOLE 1561-6 obs.
– a peephole; a place through which one looks furtively • SCOUK 1949 Sc.
– a peephole; a spy-hole in a door from which one could see who was seeking admittance • VIZZYING-HOLE 1825 Sc. obs.
– a peephole through which prying persons look • KEEK-HOLE 1825 Sc.


PEEPING TOM – NOUNS, PERSON
– a peeping Tom • MACO  MAKO 20C W. Indies sl.
– a peeping Tom; a man obsessed with looking at female genitals • BEAVER-SHOOTER 1967 Amer. sl. 
– a peeping Tom; a voyeur • KEEK 20C US sl. ​
– a peeping Tom; one who watches or pries; a surreptitious observer of others • KEEKER 1892 Sc.


PEEP-SHOW – NOUNS
– a peep-show • KEEK-SHOW 1920 Sc.
– a peep-show • PENNY KEEK 1830 Sc.
– a peep-show; a show contained or carried about in a box • RAREE-FINE SHOW 1736 obs. rare
– a peep-show; a show contained or carried about in a box • RAREE-SHOW a1704
– a peep-show; a show contained or carried about in a box • RARY-SHOW a1704 obs.


PEER – NOUNS, PERSON
– a peer, an equal • MAKE 1714 Sc.


PEER, PEERING – ADJECTIVES
– peering, squinting, looking askance • SQUINNY a1825

PEER etc. – VERBS
– to peer about • MEG 1878 Eng. dial.
– to peer furtively or slyly • LURK c1440 obs.
– to peer, to look at or glance • SQUIZ 1941 Aust. & NZ sl.
– to peer, to look intently; to stare insolently • GAAN  GAWN 1866 Sc.
– to peer, to look; to look shyly or askance; to squint • KAIN 1847 Eng. dial.
– to peer, to peep, to look narrowly or covertly• TWIRE 1602 arch.
– to peer, to peep, to look out; to gaze • TOOT a1225 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– to peer, to see an object dimly or from afar • SCRIME  SKRIME 1889 Sc.
– to peer with partly closed eyes, to peep • SQUINNY 1605
– to peer with screwed-up, half-closed eyes • SCRINK  SKRINK 1897 Eng. dial.


PEERLESS – ADJECTIVES
– peerless, matchless • PARAGONLESS 1590 rare
– peerless, matchless, without an equal • MAKELESS a1225 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– peerless, without equal • SANS-PEER a1400 obs.


PEEVED, PEEVISH,  PEEVISHLY, PEEVISHNESS – ADJECTIVES
– given to peevish complaining; grumbling, querulous • QUERKETY Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– given to peevish complaining; grumbling, querulous • QUERKING;  QUIRKING 1746 Eng. dial.
– given to peevish complaining; grumbling, querulous • QUERKY Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– listless in a peevish, fretful way; esp. of a child • RAMISED  • RAMISHED a1838 Sc.
– peeved, irritated, annoyed • NARKED 1888 sl.
– peevish • MELANCHOLY Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– peevish • THRAW-GABBIT 1882 Sc.
– peevish, aggressive, contentious, short-tempered, tetchy • TESTIF 1526 obs.
– peevish, bad-tempered • ILL-TWINED Bk1893 Eng. dial.
– peevish, bad-tempered, cross-grained, perverse, fractious, morose • CRABBY 1776
– peevish, bad-tempered, spiteful, quarrelsome, angry, hot-headed • ATTERY 1742 Sc.
– peevish, cantankerous, crusty • ETTEN 1911 Sc.
– peevish, ​cavilling, prone to making objections; captious, complaining • EXCEPTIOUS 1602
– peevish, chattering; haggling over a bargain • NAFFING 1790 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– peevish, complaining • NATTERED 1853 Eng. dial.
– peevish, complaining, fretful, querulous • WHINY-PINY 1854 Eng. dial.
– peevish, crabbed, cantankerous, irascible, given to sharp caustic talk • GNATTERIE  • NATTERIE 1825 Sc.
– peevish, crabbed, cantankerous, irascible, given to sharp caustic talk • NITTERIE  • NITTERY 1825 Sc.
– peevish, crabbed, ill-tempered; perverse, contrarious • WRAWFUL c1386 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– peevish, crabbed, irritable; snappish; ill-natured, fractious • CAPERNOITED 1719 Sc.
– peevish, crabbed, peevish • CAPERNOITY 1769 Sc.
– peevish, crabbed, perverse • WRAW c1386 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– peevish, cross • CANKY 1850 Eng. dial.
– peevish, cross • NEPPERED Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– peevish, cross, angry, fretful, morose, unpleasant • ILL 1857 Amer. dial.
– peevish, cross-grained, angry • HACKLED Bk1905 Eng. & Amer. dial.
– peevish, cross, ill-natured, ill-tempered • TATTERY Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– peevish, cross, ill-tempered; complaining • MAUNGY 1865 Eng. dial.
– peevish, cross, ill-tempered, fractious • FRAB 19C Eng. dial.
– peevish, cross, ill-tempered, fractious • FRABBY 19C Eng. dial.
– peevish, cross, irritable, fretful • FEASY Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– peevish, cross; said of a child • MAWDY 1882 Eng. dial.
– peevish, discontented; proud, conceited • MAWKY 1854 Eng. dial.
– peevish, easily offended; irritable; captious, testy, cross-tempered; bad-tempered • TETTY 1621 obs. exc. Sc.
– peevish, fractious, fretful, cross, ill-humoured, ill-natured • TANKERSOME B1900 Eng. dial. obs.
– peevish, fractious, fretting, esp. of children; fussy, fastidious • FASHIOUS  • FASHOUS 1736 Sc.
– peevish, fretful • AVER Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– peevish, fretful; blaming, carping • VEAKING 1746 Eng. dial.
– peevish, fretful, downcast • OOLING 1928 Sc.
– peevish, fretful, fidgety • FRITCHETY 19C Eng. dial.
– peevish, fretful, fractious, complaining; said of children • PENSY a1812 obs. exc. Sc. & Eng. dial.
– peevish, fretful, fractious, cross; used esp. of children • TEATY  • TEEDY  • TEETY 1790 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– peevish, fretful, fractious, irritable, difficult to please; fidgety, restless • TADIOUS  • TAGEOUS  • TEDDIOUS  • TEDIOUS 1892 Eng. dial.
– peevish, fretful, whining • SANNOCKING 1893 Eng. dial.
– peevish, froward, fretful • FROPPISH 1659 obs.
– peevish, ill-disposed • ILL-THRIVEN 1843
– peevish, ill-humoured, quarrelsome, exasperating • NETTLESOME 1895 Eng. dial.
– peevish, ill-humoured, quarrelsome, exasperating • NETTLIE 1825 Sc.
– peevish, ill-humoured, sulky, sarcastic • TAIRDIE  • TARDIE 1825 Sc.
– peevish, ill-natured • CAINJING Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– peevish, ill-natured • TOOTHY 1691 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– peevish, ill-natured • YAUPING 1825 Eng. dial.
– peevish, ill-tempered • UP-HEAD Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– peevish, ill-tempered • UP-HEADED Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– peevish, ill-tempered, cross; crabbed; pugnacious • TEETHY 1790 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– peevish, ill-tempered, cross, disagreeable, fretful, fractious, quarrelsome • FRAMPOLD 1598 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– peevish, ill-tempered, in a state • OFF THE HOOK(S) 1612 sl.
– peevish, ill-tempered, irritable, cross; low-spirited • NAZZY 1878 Eng. dial.
– peevish, ill-tempered, irritable; low-spirited • NAZY Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– peevish, ill-tempered, quarrelsome; contradictory • THRAWN-GABBIT 1897 Sc.
– peevish, irritable, angry • REEDEN  • REEDENT  • WREEDEN  • WRIDDEN 1781 Eng. dial.
– peevish, irritable, cross, ill-tempered • CAINGY 1778 Eng. dial.
– peevish, irritable, ill-tempered, cross, quarrelsome • FRATCHETY 19C Eng. dial.
– peevish, irritable, ill-tempered, morose, quarrelsome; apt to take offense • EAR-SORE 1594 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– peevish, irritable, irascible; testy, easily angered, ill-tempered • TETCHIOUS 1913 Amer. dial.
– peevish, irritable, irascible; testy, easily angered, ill-tempered • TOUCHOUS 1880 Amer. dial.
– peevish, of a snarling, scolding disposition • GUMMAGY  • GUMMIDGEY 1889 sl.
– peevish, perverse, stubborn, ill-tempered; unwilling, reluctant • THRAWART 1796 Sc.
– peevish, pettish; ready to take offense • TIFFISH 1855 colloq. rare
– peevish, pettish, snappish, surly • CRUP 1736 Eng. dial.
– peevish, petulant; proud, arrogant, impudent • PROTERVE 1382 obs. rare
– peevish, pining • PEAKING 1871 Eng. dial.  
– peevish, precise, pettish • SANSHACH 1882 Eng. dial.
– peevish, queer • AWVISH Bk1850 Eng. dial.
– peevish, querulous, bad-tempered; affected • VINNED 1834 Eng. dial.
– peevish, querulous, bad-tempered; affected • VINNIED 1834 Eng. dial.
– peevish, scolding, cross, ill-tempered, grumblingly discontented • TATTER Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– peevish, sour-tempered, ill-tempered, unamiable, morose, crabbed • VINAIGROUS 1837 rare
– peevish, splenetic; irritable, morose, ill-humoured, quick-tempered, testy • SPLENITIVE 1633 obs. rare
– peevish, spoiled, petted, over-indulged; pettish • MARDY Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– peevish, spoiled, petted, over-indulged; pettish • MARRED 1790 rare exc. Eng. dial.
– peevish, sulky, cross, surly, sullen, ill-tempered, ill-natured, crabbed, grumpy, irritable • GROUTY 1836 Eng. & Amer. dial.
– peevish, sullen, bad-tempered • MUSTY 1620 Eng. dial.
– peevish, surly • GRUMPISH 20C colloq.
– peevish, tetchy, irritable, short-tempered; easily offended or angered • TEECHY  • TITCHY 1691 Eng. dial.
– peevish, touchy, irritable, fretful, cross • TATCHY 1746 Eng. dial.
– peevish, touchy, irritable, fretful, short-tempered, easily offended, sensitive • TECHY 1815 Amer. dial.
– peevish, touchy, irritable, fretful, short-tempered, easily offended • TETCHY 1592
– peevish, weak, grumbling • TARLOCH 1811 Sc.
– peevish, whining • CANKING 1790 Eng. dial.
– rather peevish or cross • CROSSISH 1740 colloq., rare
– very peevish or annoyed • CROSS AS TWO STICKS c1830 colloq.
 
PEEVED etc. – ADVERBS
– peevishly; spitefully, malignantly • CANKEREDLY 1535
– peevishly; spitefully, malignantly • CANKERLY 1580 obs.
 
PEEVED etc. – NOUNS
– a fit of peevishness, a prank, a whim • CANKUM Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– a peevish, fretful mood; a drowsy dull condition of body or spirits, a being sulky or out-of-sorts, a peevish, fretful mood; generally in plural • OORIECOORIE  • URIKURI 1893 S. obs.
– peevishness • PEEVE c1930 colloq. ​
– peevishness, fitfulness • VINNIDNESS 1842 Eng. dial.
– peevishness, fretfulness; grumbling • HARMING Bk1902 Sc.
– peevishness, sullenness; the sulks; ill temper • MULLIGRUBS 1599
 
PEEVED etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– a peevish, bad-tempered person, esp. of a youngster • GIRNIE-GIB  • GIRNY-GIB 1872 Sc.
– a peevish, bad-tempered person, esp. of a youngster • GIRNY-GUB 1954 Sc.
– a peevish, cantankerous, or ill-natured boy • BISHOP 1825 Sc.
– a peevish child • SQUAWP B1900
– a peevish, complaining person • GIRNER 1924 Sc.
– a peevish, complaining person • IRP 1958 Sc.
– a peevish, complaining person • YELP 1916 Sc.
– a peevish, crabbed, cantankerous, diminutive person • WIRR 1825 Sc.
– a peevish, crabbed fellow; a vicious, ill-conditioned person • TEASTRIL Bk1869 Eng. dial.
– a peevish, crabbed, ill-tempered person • NIPSCART 1825 Sc. 
– a peevish, cross person • CAINGEL 1684 Eng. dial.
– a peevish, cross person • CAINJER Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– a peevish, cross person • YAP Bk1905 N. Ireland & Eng. dial.
– a peevish, discontented person; a confirmed grumbler • GRUMBLE-BELLY B1900 Eng. dial.
– a peevish, discontented person; a fretful, grumbling person • GENNY-GIBS Bk1877 Eng. dial.
– a peevish, disgruntled, dismal person or child • OOLET 1908 Sc.
– a peevish, fretful, bad-tempered person • GIRNIE 1825 Sc.
– a peevish, fretful, bad-tempered person • GIRNIE-GIBBIE  • GIRNY-GIBBIE 1890 Sc.
– a peevish, fretful, bad-tempered person • GIRNIGO-GASH 1825 Sc.
– a peevish, fretful, bad-tempered person • GIRNIGO-GIBBIE 1788 Sc.
– a peevish, fretful, bad-tempered person • GIRNY-GO-GABBY Bk1900 Sc.
– a peevish, fretful, grumbling, bad-tempered person • GIRNIGO 1825 Sc.
– a peevish, ill-humoured person • TARRAN Bk1905 Sc. obs.
– a peevish, ill-humoured person; a child who is habitually whimpering or fretting • GIRN-AGAIN 1706 Sc. obs.
– a peevish, ill-natured person; one of a malignant disposition • ATTERCOP c1505 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– a peevish, morose, or surly person • MOROSO 1592 obs. rare
– a peevish or crabbed person of a diminutive size • URF Bk1905 Sc.
– a peevish person • ANGASHORE  • ANGISHORE 1866 Irish sl.
– a peevish person • GIRNY-GOWL 1928 Sc., contemptuous usage
– a peevish person • SOURPUSS 1937 sl., orig. US
– a peevish person; a cross, ill-tempered person • CROSS-PATCH 1699 colloq.
– a peevish person; an ill-natured, petulant, malignant, captious person • NATTER-CROP Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– a peevish person; a rascal; a scoundrel; a good-for-nothing; a worthless or disorderly person • TAISTREL Bk1873 Eng. dial.
– a peevish, pessimistic person; the complaints of such a person • GUMMIDGE 1873
– a peevish, petted, spoiled child • MOTHER’S FOUT 1825 Sc.
– a peevish, puny, insignificant person • YAFF 1887 Sc.
– a peevish, wayward, mischievous child • AZZALD 1891 Eng. dial.
– a peevish, wayward, mischievous child • AZZARD Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– a peevish, wayward, mischievous child • NAZARD  • NAZART  • NAZZART  • NAZZET 1896 Eng. dial.
– a peevish weakling; a querulous, affected person, esp. a woman • PAEWAE 1927 Sc.
– a person with a peevish, sulky face • TORN FACE 1968 Sc.
 
PEEVED etc. – VERBS
– to become peevish, to fret; to put into a bad temper, to sour • CANKER 1873 Sc.
– to be peevish or discontented; to fret • NARR 1825 Sc.
– to be peevish or ill-tempered; to fret, to grumble • HARM Bk1902 Sc.
– to be peevish or out of temper • HAVE PISSED ON A NETTLE Bk1902 sl.
– to be peevish; to keep grumbling and finding fault; • NARG 1824 Sc.
– to make peevish or ill-tempered • CRAB 1662 obs. rare
– to render peevish • IMPEEVISH 1664 obs. rare
– to rise peevish or bad-tempered • GET UP ON THE WRONG SIDE 1801 colloq.
– to rise peevish or bad-tempered • GET UP ON THE WRONG SIDE OF THE BED 1801 colloq.
– to speak in a constant peevish, querulous manner; to nag, to chide, to carp, to scold, to fret, to grumble; to harp on about something • YATTER 1811 Sc.
– to speak in a peevish manner; to grumble; to fret; to scold • NATTER 1829 Eng. dial.
– to speak in a peevish, scolding way; to nark; to be querulous • YABBER 1825 Sc.
– to speak in a peevish, scolding way; to nark; to be querulous • YABBLE 1825 Sc.


PELICAN – NOUNS
– flocks of pelicans (around Gimli, Manitoba) • ICELANDIC AIR FORCE 1987 Can. sl.
– the pelican • ONOCROTAL 1382 obs.


PELLET – NOUNS
– pellets, small shot • HAIL 1697 Sc.


PELT, PELTING – NOUNS
– a pelting • BALLING Bk1898 Sc.
– a pelting with stones • COOL WASH  COUL WASH 2003 Dominica sl.

PELT etc. – VERBS
– to pelt with eggs • PATCH Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– to pelt with stones • BATTER Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– to pelt with stones; to attack with repeated strokes • BICKER 1827 Sc.
to pelt with stones; to mob • MOBBLE 1865 Eng. dial.
– to pelt; to beat a delinquent schoolboy with caps, etc. • MOB 1889 Eng. dial.
– to pelt, to beat severely, to thrash, to thump • TO-BONE  TO-BUNE a1250 obs. rare
– to pelt, to strike with a missile • POP 1894 Sc.
– to pelt, to thrash, to cudgel soundly • BETHWACK 1555
– to pelt, to throw at • BALL Bk1898 Sc.
– to pelt, to throw at; to throw stones at • SCALE  SKAIL 1777 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– to pelt, to throw dirt or stones at • SCOUT Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– to pelt, to throw stones; to strike with a stick • SCAGE 1897 Eng. dial.
– to pelt, to throw; to throw weakly • CAIL 1781 Eng. dial.


PEN – ADJECTIVES
– scratching, spluttering; said of a pen • SCRIGGY Bk1904 Eng. dial.

PEN – NOUNS
– a new pen • NAWPY Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– a pen • FEATHER c1000 obs. exc. Amer. dial.
– a pen • NEB c1696 colloq.
– a pen • SKEWER L19 sl.
– a stroke of a pen; a scrap of writing • SCART 1818 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– the nib of a pen • NEB 1599

PEN – VERBS
– to make a dash or stroke with a pen • LANCE 1588 obs.


PEN (enclose) – NOUNS
– a pen, cote, etc. for animals, as pigs, sheep, fowls • CREW 1681 Eng. dial.

PEN (enclose) – VERBS
– to pen; to enclose, to confine; to shut up in an enclosure • PAR(R) c1300 obs. exc. Eng. dial.


PENALTY – NOUNS
– the maximum penalty • THE BOOK 1908 sl., orig. US

PENALTY – VERBS
– to impose the maximum penalty on • THROW THE BOOK AT 1932 sl. ​
– to pay the penalty, to suffer for the wrongs one has done • PAY THE MAIL 1807 Sc.
– to pay the penalty, to suffer the consequences • PAY THE KAIN 1736 Sc.
– to suffer the maximum penalty • DO THE BOOK 1927 sl.
– to suffer the maximum penalty • GET THE BOOK 1927 sl.


PENANCE – NOUNS
– penance, repentance • SIN-BOOT c1175 obs.
– penance, repentance, amends-deed • DEEDBOTE c1000 obs.


PENCIL – NOUNS
– a cheap, eraserless lead pencil • PENNY PENCIL 1965 Amer. dial.
– an indelible pencil • PUCE PENCIL 1953 Irish sl.
– any mechanical pencil • EVERSHARP 1965 Amer. dial.
– the point or nib of a pencil or pen • NEB 1599


PENDANT – NOUNS
– a pendant • BOBANTILTER Bk1911 Sc.
– a pendant • HANGER 1488 obs.
– a pendant; a clasp; a buckle, ribbon, or fastening for clothes • TASH  TATCH 1772 Sc.
– a pendant; a dangling thing • TANKLING 1874 Eng. dial. ​
– a pendant; an earring; any article of jewellery which swings free at one end • DANGLER  Bk1914 criminals’ sl.
– a pendulous ornament; a projecting drooping part of an object • LAB 1814 Sc. obs.


PENDULOUS – ADJECTIVES
pendulous, dangling • PENDILATORY 1653 obs. rare


PENDULUM – NOUNS
– a pendulum • BALANCE 1647 obs. rare
– a pendulum • SWING 1696 obs.


PENETRATE – VERBS
– to penetrate, to go deep • DEEP a1225 obs.
– to penetrate, to pierce; to mangle • RIDDLE 1892 Eng. dial.


PENGUIN – NOUNS
– a gentoo penguin • JOHNNY M19 ​
– a penguin • ARSE-FOOT 16C nautical colloq.


PENINSULA – NOUNS
– a peninsula • BYLAND 1577 obs.
– a peninsula • CHERSONESE 1632 US
– a peninsula • HALF-ISLAND 1600 obs. or arch.
– a peninsula • HALF-ISLE 1618 obs. or arch.
– a peninsula • NEAR-ISLE 1625 obs.
– a small peninsula, in the form of a narrow, low isthmus, leading from a cliff to the shore • KAME 1905 Sc.


PENIS – see GENITALS


PENITENTIARY – see PRISON


PENMAN – NOUNS, PERSON
– a bad penman; a scribbler • SCRAWMER Bk1904 Eng. dial.


PENNANT – NOUNS
– a pennant, flag, banner • FANE a1000 obs.


PENNILESS – ADJECTIVES
– absolutely penniless • TAPIOCA 1930s US sl.
– broke and borrowing money • ON THE TAP  Brit. sl.
– broke, destitute • ON THE NAIL 1914 Amer. sl.
– broke; bankrupt • ON ONE’S EAR 20C US sl.
– cleaned out, broke • BURSTED 1873 US colloq.
– completely broke; motherless broke • MOTHERLESS 1916 Aust. sl.
– depleted of funds • BEHIND THE SINK 1974 US sl.
– down to one’s last pennies • DOWN TO CASES 1940s US criminals’ sl.
– having no money • BORACIC 1959 Brit. rhyming sl. for ‘skint’ (Boracic lint)
– having no money • BROKE 1716 sl.
– having no money • BUST 1913 sl.
– having no money • DOWN ON ONE’S UPPERS 1895 sl.
– having no money • HARD UP 1821 sl.
– having no money • ON ONE’S UPPERS 1895 sl.
– having no money • SKINNED (OUT) 1935 sl.
– having no money • SKINT 1925 Brit. sl.
– having no money • SKINT AS A KIPPER’S BACKBONE 1956 UK sl.
– having no money • STONE-BROKE 1886 sl.
– having no money • STONEY;  STONY 1886 sl.
– having no money • STONY-BROKE 1886 sl.
– having no money • UPTIGHT 1967 sl.
– having no money • WIPED OUT 1977 sl.
– having no money; flat broke • FLAT 1833 US sl.
– having no more money • SPENT UP 1996 UK sl.
– having very little money; nearly broke • BENT Bk1975 US sl.
– impoverished, out of money • UP TO THE STUMP M19 US sl.
– insolvent, out of money, without money • UNFINANCIAL 1919 Amer. dial.
– not a penny in his pocket • NARE-A-FACE-BUT-HIS-OWN c1696 sl.
– not a penny, nothing at all • NOT A SOU M18
– nothing at all, esp. of money; absolutely penniless • NOT A BRASS RAZOO 1930s Aust. & NZ sl.
– out of funds • DOWN IN THE DIKE Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– penniless • AFTER EIGHT MINT 1990s Brit. rhyming sl. for ‘skint’
– penniless • ALL IN 1900s sl.
– penniless • BUTTON B 1930s sl.
– penniless • COAL(S) AND COKE 1937 UK rhyming sl. for ‘broke’
– penniless • DEAD 1960s African-American sl.
– penniless • FLY-BLOWN 1850s Aust. sl.
– penniless • NOT A RAG L16
– penniless • NOT A RAG LEFT L16
– penniless • NOT HAVE A BEAN Bk1999 Aust. sl.
– penniless • NOT HAVE A CRACKER c1920 Aust. sl.
– penniless • NOT HAVE AN OAT L19 sl.
– penniless • NOT HAVE A SPRAT 1923 rare
– penniless • NOT HAVE TWO BOB TO RUB TOGETHER Bk1999 Aust. sl.
– penniless • ON THE BACK OF YOUR ARSE 1961 Aust. sl.
– penniless • ON YOUR BACK 1937 UK sl.
– penniless • RAPLESS L19 sl.
– penniless • STUCK-UP L19 sl.
– penniless • WITHOUT A RAG L16
– penniless, absolutely impoverished • NOT A SIXPENCE TO SCRATCH ONE’S ARSE WITH M19 sl.
– penniless, bankrupt • STRAPPED 1857 sl.
– penniless, broke • ASS OUT Bk2006 US sl.
– penniless, broke • BEAT 1950s Amer. sl.
– penniless, broke • BEHIND THE EIGHT BALL Bk2006 US sl.
– penniless, broke • BUSTED 1836 US sl.
– penniless, broke • BUSTED UP c1862 US sl.
– penniless, broke • EMPTY 1940s US sl.
– penniless, broke • NOT HAVE A CRACKER 1954 Aust. sl.
– penniless, broke; down and out • ON ONE’S FEET 1967 Amer. dial.
– penniless, broke; financially destroyed • FLAT ON ONE’S ASS Bk2006 US sl.
– penniless, broke; in acute financial hardship • ON ONE’S ASS 1917
– penniless, broke, with no money • CLEANED OUT Bk2006 US sl.
– penniless, busted • BUST-OUT 1976 sl.
– penniless, completely broke, bankrupt, destitute • MOTHERLESS BROKE 1898 Aust. sl.
– penniless, ‘fleeced’ • RICH AS A NEW-SHORN SHEEP 1510
– penniless, having little or no money • SKINTO 1988 Glasgow sl.
– penniless, impoverished • BANG-UP M19 US sl.
– penniless, impoverished; temporarily without cash • GUTTED c1820 sl.
– penniless, no money • NOT A THIN DIME 1918 US sl.
– penniless, out of funds, impoverished, poor • BROKEN M17 sl.
– penniless, poor • ON THE RORY M19 sl.
– penniless, poor, impoverished • AS FULL OF MONEY AS A TOAD IS OF FEATHERS B1900
– penniless, ruined • NOT A FEATHER TO FLY WITH 1860 sl.
– penniless, ruined, bankrupt; destitute • DEAD BROKE 1842 Amer. colloq.
– penniless, ruined financially, bankrupt • BROKE TO THE WORLD 1918
– penniless, without funds • NOT HAVE A BEAN Bk1999 Aust. sl.
– penniless; broke • STUMPED UP Bk1999 Aust. sl.
– penniless; broke • TAPPED OUT 1940s US gambling sl.
– penniless; friendless • STRANDED 1897 colloq.
– penniless; ruined • CRACKED 1860 obs.
– poor, without money • BUSHED 1812 sl.
– short of funds • AT LOW WATER World War II Amer. sl.
– utterly broke • DEAD-ASS BROKE 1971 Amer. sl.
– utterly penniless; very poor, destitute; in want of money • PEBBLE-BEACHED 1886 sl.
– very short of money, or even entirely ‘broke’ • FAIR SKINT 20C
– virtually penniless • DOWN ON THE KNUCKLE M19 sl.
– virtually penniless • DOWN ON THE KNUCKLEBONE M19 sl.
– without cash, broke • COLD IN HAND 1942 Amer. dial.
– without funds • BEACHED World War II Amer. sl.
– without funds • WITHOUT A MINTIE 1930s Aust. sl.
– without funds; broke • STUMPED UP Bk1999 Aust. sl.
– without funds; completely broke • BLASTED Bk1975 US sl.
– without money • AGAINST THE CURB 1995 US sl.
– without money • DINGY Bk1970 US sl.
– without money • LOG 1997 US sl. (Low on Green)
– without money • NOT HAVE TWO BOB TO RUB TOGETHER Bk1999 Aust. sl.
– without money • RAGGED 1990 US sl.
– without money, and hence, desperate • MELTED OUT 1930s African-American sl.
– without money, broke • IN THE BARREL 1942 US sl.
– without money or means • HARDPAN 1928 Amer. dial.
 
PENNILESS – NOUNS
– a penniless or financially grim condition • THE TIGHTS 1970s US sl.
– a situation in which one is without money or means • HARDPAN 1870 Amer. dial.
– no money • A SKINNER 1943 NZ sl.
– no money • NUPPENCE Brit. rhyming sl.
– no money; nothing at all; a derisory amount  • NOT A SAUSAGE 1938 UK sl.
– the condition of having no money • SKINTITIS Brit. jocular usage
 
PENNILESS – NOUNS, PERSON
– a man at the end of his resources • BARE POLES Bk1922
– a penniless person • SANS DENER 1469 obs.
– a penniless person • STOOMER  • STUMER  • STUMOR 1898 Aust. sl.
– a penniless person; a poor person regarded as a parasite • SCHLEPPER  • SHLEPPER 1949 sl., chiefly US
– a person who is dead broke; one who is not able to pay his way or meet debts • LAME DUCK 1875 US sl.
– a person without money, manners, and wit; variation: one out of pocket, out of elbows, and out of credit • GENTLEMAN OF THREE OUTS 1785 sl.
 
PENNILESS – PHRASES
– not a penny in his pocket • NEVER-A-FACE-BUT-HIS-OWN c1696 sl.
– not have any money • NOT HAVE A BRASS RAZOO Bk1999 Aust. sl.
 
PENNILESS – VERBS
– to be penniless • HAVE NE’ER A FACE BUT ONE’S OWN c1698 sl.
– to be penniless • NOT HAVE AN OAT c1870 sl.
– to be penniless • NOT TO HAVE A CRACKER c1920 Aust. sl.
– to be penniless • SKATE 1996 Trinidad and Tobago
– to be penniless, out of luck • BE ON ONE’S BACK-SEAM B1890 Eng. tailors’ sl.
– to go broke, to go out of business, etc. • GO DOWN THE GURGLER Bk1999 Aust. sl.


PENNSYLVANIA – NOUNS
– Pennsylvania • ARCH-STONE STATE 1840 US
– Pennsylvania; the Pennsylvania rail route • PENNSY 1920s sl.
– Philadelphia • CITY OF BROTHERLY LOVE 1799 US 
– Philadelphia • ILLADELPHIA 2000s African-American sl.
– Philadelphia • PHIL Amer. sl.
– Philadelphia • PHILLY Amer. sl.
– Philadelphia • QUAKERTOWN Amer. sl.
– Philadelphia • SLEEPY TOWN Amer. sl.
– Philadelphia • THE BIG PRETZEL Amer. sl.

PENNSYLVANIA – NOUNS, PERSON
– a band of Philadelphia rowdies; at another time they were called shifflers • MOYA MENSINGS Bk1889 US
– a Pennsylvanian • LOGGERHEAD 1888 US sl.
– a person from northeast Philadelphia • NEPPY 1996 US sl.
– a person who lives in or near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, esp. one who has characteristic local dialect features • YINZER  YUNZER 1994 Amer. dial.
– a resident of the anthracite coal region of northeastern Pennsylvania • COAL CRACKER 1997 US sl.


PENNY – NOUNS (also see halfpenny, sixpence, threepence, etc.)
– a coin (originally) made of copper, such as a penny or US cent • COPPER 1788 sl.
– a double-headed penny • JACK 20C Aust. sl.
– a farthing (1/4d) • COVENT-GARDEN Bk1903 sl.
– a farthing (1/4d) • FADGE Bk1903 sl.
– a farthing (1/4d) • FARDEN Bk1903 sl.
– a farthing (1/4d) • FIDDLER Bk1903 sl.
– a farthing (1/4d) • GENNITRAF Bk1903 sl.
– a farthing (1/4d) • GRIG Bk1903 sl.
– a farthing (1/4d) • HARRINGTON Bk1903 sl.
– a farthing (1/4d) • JIG Bk1903 sl.
– a farthing (1/4d) • QUARTEREEN Bk1903 sl.
– a farthing (1/4d) • SCROPE Bk1903 sl.
– a fourpenny piece • JOEY M19 sl. obs.
– a penny • ABERGAVENNY 19C Brit. rhyming sl.
– a penny • BOSTON DOLLAR 1902 Amer. West. jocular usage
– a penny • BROWN ABE 1944 Amer. sl.
– a penny • BROWNIE 1928 Amer. dial.
– a penny • CAMDEN TOWN 1920 rhyming sl. for ‘brown’
– a penny • D   DEE c1870 UK colloq. (pre-decimalisation 1971)
– a penny • DEBBLISH Bk1892 S. Afr. sl.
– a penny • DIBBLISH Bk1903 sl.
– a penny • GEORGE Bk1903 sl.
– a penny • HARPER Bk1903 sl.
– a penny • JIG 1930s rhyming sl.
– a penny • POLLARD Bk1903 sl.
– a penny • SALTEE  • SALTY  • SAULTY 1859 UK sl.
– a penny • SALTER 1859 UK sl.
– a penny • SOLDI 1999 UK sl.
– a penny • WIN  Bk1903 sl.
– a penny • WING L19 Aust. & Irish sl. (pre-decimalization)
– a penny • YENNEP  Bk1903 back sl.
– a penny, a cent • MAG E19 sl.
– a penny, a cent • RED M19 US sl.
– a penny; a copper coin • BROWN 1812 Brit. sl.
– a penny; a halfpenny; the smallest amount of money • OAT L19 sl.
– a small coin, orig. a silver threepenny piece; later a silver fivepenny piece • DADDLER 20C Brit. sl.
– a threepenny bit • JOEY M20 obs. exc. hist.
– elevenpence • DACHA-ONE M19 sl.
– elevenpence • NEVELE YANNEPS Bk1902 back-slang
– fivepence • CINQUA SOLDI Bk1903 sl.
– fivepence • EVIF YENNEPS  • EWIF YENEPS  • EWIF YENNEPS M19 back-slang
– fivepence • KID’S-EYE Bk1903 sl.
– fourpence • CASTLE-RAG Bk1903 sl.
– fourpence • FLAG Bk1903 sl.
– fourpence • GROAT Bk1903 sl.
– fourpence • JOE Bk1903 sl.
– fourpence • ROAF-YANNEPS Bk1903 back-slang
– halfpence • POST Bk1903 sl.
– halfpence • RAP  Bk1903 sl.
– ninepence • NOBBA SALTEE M19 sl.
– ninepence • PICTURE OF ILL-LUCK Bk1903 sl.
– sevenpence • NEVIS-YANNEPS Bk1902 back-slang
– tenpence • DACHA-SALTEE 1850 sl.
– tenpence • ILL-FORTUNE Bk1903 sl.
– tenpence • JUMPER Bk1903 sl.
– threepence • CURRANTS-AND-PLUMS Bk1903 sl.
– twopence • DACE  • DEUCE  • DUCE Bk1903 sl.


PENSIVE – ADJECTIVES
– pensive, full of thought; anxious • PENSATIVE 1574 obs.
– pensive, quiet, thoughtful • PENSY a1400-50 obs. exc. Sc. & Eng. dial.
– pensive, thoughtful; absorbed in meditation • MEDITABUND 1681 obs. rare
– pensive, thoughtful; absorbed in thought • MUSEFUL a1618
– pensive, thoughtful, meditative; anxious, brooding; melancholy, sorrowful • PENSIFUL a1450 obs. exc. Sc. & N. Eng. dial.


PENTAGON – NOUNS
– a pentagon • QUINQUANGLE 1668 obs. rare


PENURIOUS, PENURIOUSNESS, PENURY – ADJECTIVES
– of penurious habits, saving KATIN’ AND SAVIN’ Bk1902 Eng. dial.
– penurious, close-fisted, grasping, miserly HARD 1703 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– penurious, frugal, parsimonious INHOLDING 1897 Sc.
– penurious, miserly; desirous of having or possessing; greedy, covetous, grasping HAVING 1591 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– penurious, not having a sufficiency; scant, too small SCUDDY B1900 Sc.

PENURIOUS etc. – NOUNS
– penuriousness, thrift, economy • HAINING 1871 Sc.
– penury, want of means, indigence, poverty • ORCOST a1225 obs. rare

PENURIOUS etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– a penurious, niggardly person • SCRAPPER Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– a penurious or avaricious person; one who gathers and hoards money in trifling sums • SCRAPE-PENNY 1584 obs.
– a penurious person • NEVER-SWEAT B1900 Eng. dial.
– a penurious person; a covetous, miserable wretch • NANNY PINCH-POT 1893 Eng. dial.
– a penurious person; a stingy, miserly person; one who makes a sharp bargain • CHEAP-SCREW • SCREW 1899 Amer. dial.

PENURIOUS etc. – VERBS
– to be penurious or miserly • HAVE THE HARD DROP IN ONE 1848 Ireland



Updated: September 12, 2022