Reverse Dictionary: PI – PIF


PIANO – nouns
– AGONY BOX a piano …1900s US sl.
– BOX a piano …1908 Amer. sl.
– COFFIN a piano …Bk1947 Amer. sl.
– EIGHTY-EIGHT, THE a piano (pianos have eighty-eight keys) …Bk1947 US sl.
– GOANNA a piano …Bk1999 Aust. rhyming sl.
– GOOLA a piano …Bk1947 US Black sl.
– GROAN a piano …Bk1947 Amer. sl.
– IVORIES, THE 1. a piano …M19 sl.
2. the keys of a piano or similar instrument …1818 colloq.
– TINKLING-BOX a pianoforte …Bk1905 Eng. dial. sl.
piano – person  (includes PIANIST) 
– BOX-BEATER a piano player …1915 Amer. sl.
– EIGHTY-EIGHTER a pianist …1911 US sl.
– FINGERS a jazz pianist …1930s US Black sl.
– IVORY-BENDER a piano player …a1924 US sl.
– IVORY-HAMMERER a pianist …c1860 sl.
– IVORY-HOUND a piano player …1935 US sl.
– IVORY-POUNDER a piano player …1887 US sl.
– IVORY-SPANKER a pianist …Bk1896 sl.
– IVORY-THUMPER a pianist …c1860 sl.
– IVORY-TICKLER a piano player …1905 US sl.
– PIANO KID in jazz: any teenage pianist working the rundown joints; teenage piano players were common in the brothels and cabarets in the 1900s-1930s …1900s US Black sl.
piano – verbs
– BANG THE BOX to play dance music on a piano …20C Amer. sl.
– BEAT THE BOX to play dance music on a piano …1915 Amer. sl.
– BLOW A BOX to eagerly play the piano …1965 Amer. sl.
– POUND THE BOX to eagerly play the piano …1920 Amer. sl.
– RATTLE THE IVORIES to play a piano …1895 sl.
– SPANK THE IVORIES to play a piano …1943 US Black sl.
– TICKLE THE IVORIES to play the piano …1920s sl.
 
PICK (tool) – nouns
– ANCHOR a pick (tool) …1926 Amer. sl.
– MAD MICK a pick (pickaxe) …1919 rhyming sl., orig. Aust.
– PADDY AND MICK a pickaxe…1998 UK rhyming sl.
 
PICK – verbs
– ELECT † to pick out, to choose …1513
– WALE to choose, to select, to pick out, to sort …a1310 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– WYLE to choose, to select; to pick or sort out; hence, to court, to woo …1737 Sc.
 
PICKED – adjectives
– HAND-WALED chosen or selected by hand; individually or carefully selected or picked …1671 Sc.
– WALE choice, chosen, picked …c1250 exc. Sc. & Eng. dial.
– WALED chosen, selected, picked …c1400 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
 
PICKLE – nouns
– ELEPHANT EARS pickles …1968 Amer. dial.
– SALAD pickles …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
 
PICKLING – nouns
– SALITURE †* a salting, a pickling …1657
 
PICKPOCKET – adjectives
– ON THE BOTTLE engaged as a pickpocket …2003 UK sl.
– ON THE DIP engaged in pickpocketing …1949 US sl.
– ON THE DIPE engaged in picking pockets …1877 criminals’ sl.
– TAILING A WHOLE FRONT said of a pickpocket who ‘cleans a victim right out, watch, money, etc.’ …1929 US criminals’ sl.
pickpocket – nouns 
– BREECH-KICK a picking of pockets …1904 sl.
– BUZZING pocket-picking …1819 thieves’ sl.
– BUZZING ACADEMY a training school for pickpockets …Bk1921 sl.
– CANNON MOB a pickpocketing gang …20C sl.
– CHARIOT-BUZZING pocket-picking in an omnibus …c1850 sl.
– DIP pick-pocketing …1859 sl.
– DIPPING the act of picking pockets …1882 UK criminals’ sl.
– DIPPING GAG, THE picking pockets …c1905 criminals’ sl.
– DIP SQUAD a police unit that targets pickpockets …1977 UK sl.
– FAM-RUST a lack of practice at thieving, esp. pickpocketing …M19 UK criminals’ sl.
– FAN the preliminary touching of a targeted victim by a pickpocket …1958 US sl.
– FANNING a pickpocket’s preliminary running of their hands over a victim to find a wallet or bankroll …1900s US criminals’ sl.
– FILE LAY, THE pickpocketry …18C cant
– FILING-LAY pickpocketry …18C sl.
– GAGGING † theft of money by pickpocketry to which several men working together have cleverly led up by engaging a man in conversation, taking him to a public-house, and skilfully causing him to disclose how much money he has …1828 UK sl.
– GAMMON † the assistance rendered to a pickpocket by his accomplice(s) …1720 UK sl.
– MALTOOLING the practice of picking pockets in omnibuses …1851
– MOLL-BUZZING purse snatching; picking pockets …1900 Amer. sl.
– PALMISTRY the use of the hands in pocket-picking …1711
– SKINNY-DIPPING picking pockets on the London Underground; the idea being that the pickpocket has to be thin to work in the crowds …2000s sl.
– STRIKING a robbery, swindle, picking a pocket, or imposition …1591 sl.
– TAIL-BUZZING stealing a wallet from a tailcoat pocket …M19 UK criminals’ sl.
– TOOLING skilful pickpocketing …M19 sl.
– WHIZ the practice of picking pockets …1925 sl., orig. & chiefly US
– WHIZZ-MOB a gang of pickpockets …1929 sl.
pickpocket – person
– ABSTRACTIONIST a pickpocket …1841 US sl.
– ACADEMY BUZZ-NAPPER † an apprentice in the art of picking pockets; some schools use a dummy with bells in every pocket for practice picking …1890 criminals’ sl. 
– ADAM TILER, ADAM TYLER a pickpocket’s confederate who receives the stolen article, and runs off with it …1665 UK sl.
– ADEPT a pickpocket; a conjuror …1721 thieves sl.
– ANGLER * a thief who uses a hook attached to a long rod to steal from otherwise inaccessible places; also, a pickpocket …1567
– ANTHEM DIVER a pickpocket specializing in the robbery of church congregations …E18 sl.
– ARTIST a skilful pickpocket, sneak thief, confidence man, or other criminal …1859 Amer. sl.
– BACKSTOP in a pickpocket team, the one who works directly behind the victim …1950s US criminals’ sl. 
– BAGGAGE MAN the member of a pickpocketing team who carries off the stolen goods …1718 UK criminals’ sl.
– BAPTIST a pickpocket who has been caught and ducked or ‘baptized’ …1823 UK sl.
– BARNACLE a pickpocket …Bk1890 sl.
– BARTHOLOMEW-GENTLEMAN a man not to be trusted; a pickpocket …Bk1880
– BENNY WORKER a pickpocket or shoplifter who operates under the protection of an overcoat …1926 US criminals’ sl.
– BILLY BUZMAN a thief or pickpocket who confines his attention exclusively to silk handkerchiefs …1888 UK thieves’ sl.
– BOUNG-NAPPER, BUNG-NAPPER a cut-purse, a pickpocket …L17 sl.
– BOUNG-NIPPER, BUNG-NIPPER a cut-purse …L17 criminal sl.
– BULK † an assistant to a pickpocket who jostles a person up against the wall, while the other picks his pocket  …1673 sl.
– BULK AND FILE † the one jostles you whilst the other picks your pocket; the pickpocket and his mate …1665 criminals’ sl.
– BUNG † a pickpocket …1600 thieves’ cant
– BUZZER a pickpocket …1862 sl.
– BUZZGLOAK a pickpocket …1819 thieves sl.
– BUZZMAN a pickpocket …1832 thieves’ sl.
– BUZZ NAPPER a young pickpocket …Bk1890 sl.
– CADGER a shoplifter-cum-beggar; also, the lowest rank of pickpocket …M19 UK criminals’ sl.
– CANNON a pickpocket of indefinite order …Bk1914 pickpockets’ sl. 
– CLAW in a gang of pickpockets, the expert operator who lifts the money and valuable collateral from the victim’s person …Bk1914 criminals’ sl.
– CLY-FAKER a pickpocket …1823 criminals’ sl.
– CUTPURSE one who steals by the method of cutting purses, a common practice when men wore their purses at their girdles; hence, a pickpocket, a thief, a robber …1362
– DAME BUZZER a pickpocket or thief whose victims are mainly women …1935 sl.
– DIP a pickpocket …M19 sl.
– DIPPER a pickpocket …1889 criminals’ sl.
– DIPPING BLOKE a pickpocket …c1860 criminals’ sl.
– DIVER a pickpocket …1611 criminals’ sl.
– ELBOW a pickpocket’s assistant …1925 US criminals’ sl.
– FAG a pickpocket …M19 sl.
– FAKER a pickpocket …20C criminals’ sl
– FANNER a pickpocket …1950 US sl.
– FILE a pickpocket …1665 sl.
– FILE-CLOY a pickpocket …M17 sl.
– FILE-LIFTER a pickpocket …c1670 cant
– FILER a pickpocket …c1670 cant
– FINGER a pickpocket …1925 sl.
– FINGERS a pickpocket …1930s US sl.
– FISH-FAG a pickpocket …M19 sl.
– FLIMP a pickpocket …E19 US criminals’ sl.
– FORK a pickpocket …L17 UK criminals’ sl.
– FOYL-CLOY a pickpocket …M17 sl.
– FRISKER a pickpocket, a petty thief …1802 criminals’ sl.
– GALLOWS a thief or pickpocket, or one who associates with them …c1595 UK sl.
– GALLOWS-BIRD a thief or pickpocket, or one who associates with them …c1786 UK sl.
– GALLOWS-FACE a thief or pickpocket, or one who associates with them …1725 UK sl.
– GALLUS a thief or pickpocket or one who associates with them …c1595 sl.
– GAMMON  a thief’s or pickpocket’s accomplice who jostles the prospective victim that the actual thief can possess easily of his booty; a shoplifter’s accomplice …1717 sl. & colloq.
– GAMMONER  a thief’s or pickpocket’s accomplice who distracts the victim while a crime is committed …1795 sl. & colloq.
– GANEV, GANOF, GANOV a thief, a crook; an amateur pickpocket …1839 criminals’ sl.
– GEE WHIZ an armed pickpocket …Bk1975 Amer. criminals’ sl.
– GENNAUF a thief, swindler, gangster, or pickpocket …1839 criminals’ sl.
– GILLIE WHEESEL a gypsy pickpocket; a robber …1818 Sc.
– GON a professional thief, esp. a pickpocket …1858 Amer. sl.
– GRAFTER a small-time criminal, such as a pickpocket or thief …1866 US sl.
– GUN a professional thief, esp. a pickpocket …1858 Amer. sl.
– GUNSMITH an experienced pickpocket who trains novice pickpockets …1934 US sl.
– HEEL (derogatory) a sneak thief or pickpocket …1916 US criminals’ sl.
– HEISTER a housebreaker; a shoplifter, a pickpocket, a robber …1708 criminals’ sl.
– HOISTER a shoplifter or pickpocket …1790 sl.
– HOOK a thief or pickpocket; orig., someone who stole from a picket while the victim’s attention was distracted by someone else …1863 sl.
– HOOKER a thief or pilferer; a pickpocket; a stealer of pocket-watches …1567 sl.
– HUNTER a pickpocket …1949 US sl.
– HUSTLER one of a gang of pickpockets who takes part in hustling a person; also, a thief, a criminal; one who makes his living dishonestly or by begging; a pimp …1825 sl.
– INSIDER a pickpocket specializing in inside pockets…1931 US criminals’ sl.
– INSIDE WORKER a pickpocket specializing in inside pockets …1931 US criminals’ sl.
– INSTRUMENT the member of a gang who actually picks the pocket …1925 US criminals’ sl.
– IN THE BOOK a thief, esp. a pickpocket …20C US rhyming sl. for ‘hook’
– JACKROLLER a pickpocket; a mugger; a purse-snatcher …Bk2000 hipster sl. 
– JANIZARY a pickpocket …Bk1896 sl.
– JOSTLER the member of a pickpocketing team who jostles and distracts the victim …1929 Amer. criminal & police sl.
– KNUCK † a thief, a pickpocket …1819 sl.
– KNUCKLE † a pickpocket …1781 sl.
– KNUCKLER a pickpocket …1801 thieves’ sl.
– LEATHER-WORKER a pickpocket or purse-snatcher …1901 US sl.
– LEGSHAKE ARTIST a pickpocket …20C sl., orig. Aust.
– LONG-FINGERED GENT a thief; a pickpocket …1965 Amer. dial.
– LUSH-ROLLER a pickpocket operating on drunkards, half-wits, paralytics, etc. …19C Brit. sl.
– MAGSMAN an assistant for a street swindler or pickpocket …M19 sl.
– MARKER † the member of a pickpocketing team who takes the stolen item from the person that steals it …1591 sl.
– MOB OF CANNONS a pickpocket gang …1928 criminals’ sl.
– MOBSMAN a member of a gang of criminals; a dressy swindler or pickpocket, esp. formerly, one who operates in a crowd …1843 UK criminals’ sl.
– MOKE a pickpocket; a confidence trickster …1867 US criminals’ sl.
– MOLL a girlfriend; a sweetheart; spec. the girlfriend or female accomplice of a gangster or criminal; a female pickpocket or thief …1823
– MOLL BUZZ a female pickpocket …1925 criminals’ sl. 
– MOLL-BUZZARD a pickpocket who preys upon women …1899 criminals’ & police sl.
– MOLL-BUZZER 1. a pickpocket who preys upon women …1859 criminals’ & police sl.
2. a female pickpocket or beggar; a female thief …1866 Amer. sl.
– MOLLER 1. a thief specializing in pickpocketing women …1859 criminals’ sl. 
2. a female pickpocket …Bk1992 criminals’ sl.
– MOLLEY 1. a female pickpocket …1850 criminals’ sl.
2. a pickpocket who specializes in female targets; usually female …1850 UK criminals’ sl.
– MOLL HOOK † a female pickpocket …1866 criminals’ sl.
– MOLL-KNUCK a female pickpocket …1865 UK criminals’ sl.
– MOLL TOOL 1. a female pickpocket …1865 sl.
2. a pickpocket who specializes in female targets; usually female …1865 UK criminals’ sl.
– MOLL TOOLER 1. † a female pickpocket …Bk1859 sl.
2. a pickpocket who specializes in female targets; usually female …1850 UK criminals’ sl.
– MOLL WHIZ a female pickpocket …1933 US criminals’ sl.
– MOLL WIRE 1. a female pickpocket …1865 UK sl.
2. a pickpocket who specializes in robbing female victims …1909 US sl.
– MOLL WORKER a pickpocket or thief whose victims are mainly women …1925 criminals’ sl.
– MUSTARD CHUCKER a pickpocket who spills mustard on the victim as a diversion and excuse to approach …1989 US sl.
– NATTY-LAD a young thief or pickpocket …1785 thieves’ sl.
– NUXMAN an expert pickpocket …1856 criminals’ sl. 
– OPERATOR a pickpocket …E19 UK criminals’ sl.
– P.P. † a pickpocket …1887 UK criminals’ sl.
– PRAT-DIGGER a pickpocket …1908 US sl.
– PROP-GETTER a pickpocket …1901 sl.
– PROP-MAN a pickpocket …1901 sl.
– QUEER DIVER a bungling, incompetent pickpocket …L17 UK criminals’ sl.
– READER-HUNTER a pickpocket specializing in pocket-books …1812 thieves’ sl.
– READER-MERCHANT (generally in plural) pickpockets, chiefly among Jews, who ply about the bank to steal the pocket-books of persons who have just received their dividends there …L18 sl.
– REEFER a pickpocket or pickpocket’s accomplice …1935 sl.
– SACK-DIVER a pickpocket …1781 sl.
– SAFE in a pickpocketing team: the thief who takes the wallet or object stolen by the wire and leaves the scene with it …1954 US sl.
– SCARECROW a pickpocket’s young assistant, who is disposable and can be turned over to the police …M19 UK criminals’ sl.
– SHARK † a pickpocket …1707 sl.
– STALLER a pickpocket’s accomplice …1812 sl.
– STOOK BUZZER a pickpocket who specialized in stealing handkerchiefs …M19 sl.
– STOOK HAULER a pickpocket who specialized in stealing handkerchiefs …M19 sl.
– TAIL-BUZZER a pickpocket specializing in removing snuff-boxes, purses, pocketbooks, etc. from gentlemen’s coat pockets …1851 UK criminals’ sl.
– TAIL-DIP a thief who specializes in the picking of coat pockets …1851 UK criminals’ sl. 
– TAIL-DIVER a pickpocket specializing in removing snuff-boxes, purses, pocketbooks, etc. from gentlemen’s coat pockets …1859 UK criminals’ sl.
– TEAR-PLACKET † a cutpurse; a pickpocket or thief …c1600
– WHIZ(Z) a pickpocket …1931 sl., orig. US
– WHIZZ BOY a pickpocket …1931 sl., orig. US
– WHIZZER a pickpocket …1925 sl., orig. US
– WHIZZ MAN a pickpocket …1932 sl., orig. US
– WIPE-DRAWER † a pickpocket who steals handkerchiefs …1910 criminals’ sl.
– WIPE-HAULER a pickpocket who commits great depredations upon gentlemen’s pocket-handkerchiefs …1864 sl.
– WIPE-LIFTER one who pickpockets handkerchiefs, which is considered the least desirable type of theft by pickpockets …1886 US criminals’ sl.
– WIPE-NABBER † a pickpocket who steals handkerchiefs …1870 criminals’ sl.
– WIPER-DRAWER a handkerchief-stealer …Bk1737 sl.
– WIRE HOOK a pickpocket …1859 US criminals’ sl. 
– WIRER † a pickpocket …1930 criminals’ sl.
pickpocket – verbs
– ADEPT to pickpocket …1890 criminals’ sl.
– BOTTLE OF FIZZ to work as a pickpocket; to steal something quickly as an opportunity arises …1938 UK rhyming sl. for ‘The Whizz’
– BUZZ 1. to rob a person, as by pickpocketing or purse-snatching …1789 criminals’ sl.
2. to engage in theft, esp. pickpocketing …1866 Amer. criminals’ sl.
– DIP to pick the pocket of …E20 sl.
– DIP ON to pick-pocket a person …1946 S. Afr. sl.
– DIVE INTO A SACK to pick a pocket …L17 cant
– FAKE A CLY † to pick a pocket …c1810 sl.
– FAKE A POKE to pick a pocket …L19 UK criminals’ sl.
– FAN to pick pockets …1920s sl.
– FILE to pick pockets; to pick the pockets of …L17 sl.
– FORK to pick pockets, using the fore and middle fingers, extended like the tines of a fork, which are thrust into the pocket, then closed tight on any object within; this is then withdrawn between the ‘fork’ …L17 sl.
– GAMMON to render the assistance of an accomplice to a pickpocket …1753 UK sl.
– GIVE GAMMON to stand close to a person while another picks their pocket …1720 thieves’ sl.
– GIVE THE FAN to pick pockets …1920s sl.
– GO ON THE DIPE to pick pockets …1877 criminals’ sl.
– GUT A FOB to pick a pocket …c1815 criminals’ sl.
– INSIDE to pick an inside pocket …1925 US criminals’ sl. 
– JOSTLE to pick pockets …1969 Amer. criminal & police sl.
– KISS THE DOG of a pickpocket: to face his victim …1972 US criminals’ sl.
– LIFT to pick the pocket of someone; to rob …1915 Amer. sl.
– MAKE A RAISE to pick a pocket; to rob …19C US criminals’ sl.
– MANTICULATE †* to do a thing closely, as to pick a purse; to steal …1656
– PUT THE HIGH GAME ON to rob; to pick someone’s pocket …18C UK criminals’ sl.
– PUT UP THE DOOKS to thieve, esp. to pickpocket (dook = hand) …M19 sl.
– RAT to search for things to steal; to steal, to pilfer property; to pick a pocket …1906 Aust. & NZ sl.
– STALL to surround, decoy, jostle or distract someone whose pocket is being picked …1592 sl.
– TAKE THE WHOLE FRONT of a pickpocket: to steal everything the victim owns …,1929 US criminals’ sl.
– THROW THE MITT to pick pockets …1902 Amer. criminals’ sl.
– WORK THE TUBS to pick pockets on buses or at bus-stops …1929 sl.
– WRING to pick someone’s pocket …L19 US sl.
pickpocket – phrases
– ON THE DIP picking pockets …1859 sl.
– ON THE WHIZ(Z) engaged in picking pockets …1925 sl., orig. & chiefly US
 
PICK UP – verbs
– MANEUVRA to pick up a girl …2000s US Black sl.
– SAM to gather or scrape together; to collect; to pick up; generally used with ‘together’ or ‘up’ …1847 Eng. dial.
– SCRAP † to gather together; to pick up …1810 Sc.
 
PICNIC – nouns
– TUCKERNUCK a picnic …1887 Amer. dial.
picnic – person 
– PICKERNICKS picnickers …Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
 
PICTURE – adjectives
– PAINTY of a picture: overcharged with paint; having the paint too obtrusive …1870
– SIGNED ALL OVER of a picture: clearly characteristic of its creator …1909 artists’ usage
picture – nouns 
– BAB a child’s name for a picture of any kind …1856 Eng. dial.
– BABBY a child’s name for a picture …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– BABIES † pictures in books …1598
– CAD-CATCHER pictures painted to attract the undiscriminating …1882 artists’ usage
– CATAGRAPH † the first draught or delineation of a picture …1656
– FIGURE MAN the principal figure in a picture …c1830 sl.
– FLANDERS PIECES pictures that look fair at a distance, but coarser near at hand …1690 sl.
– GAY † a picture in a book …1646 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– GLOSSY a sexy picture of young women, esp. ones that are posted outside bars, clubs, etc., to allure customers; also later of men such as film actors …1970s US sl.
– ICONOCLASM the breaking or destroying of images; esp. the destruction of images and pictures set up as objects of veneration …1797
– ICONOPHILISM a taste for pictures, engravings, etc. …1888
– ICONOPHILY a taste for pictures, engravings, etc. …1894
– NIGHT-PIECE a painting or picture representing a night scene …1605
– PAINT †* a painting, a picture …c1710
– PAINTURE † that which is painted; painting, pictorial work; a painting, a picture …a1225
– SCENERY a picture, usually a photograph …1933 Amer. dial.
– SMUTS obscene pictures …E20 US criminals’ sl.
– TABLATURE † a painting; a picture …1711
picture – person
– ICONOPHILE a connoisseur of pictures, engravings, book illustrations, and the like …1881
– ICONOPHILIST a connoisseur of pictures, engravings, book illustrations, and the like …1884
picture – verbs 
– ADUMBRATE † to shade a picture, to represent with due light and shade so as to complete what has been sketched or delineated …1599
– EFFIGIES † to portray, to picture …1652 nonce word
 
PICTURESQUE – adjectives
– ANCIENT of scenery: picturesque …Bk1997 Irish sl.
– PICTURE-ASKEW picturesque …c1870 colloq.
– PICTURES-QUEUE picturesque …20C colloq.
 
PIE – nouns
– AMMUNITION pies and pastry, as doled out by the Salvation Army …Amer. World War I sl.
– BAKE-MEAT † pastry; a pie …c1386
– BARK any outer layer, as a potato peel, or pie crust …1925 Amer. logging usage
– BOGGY TOP a pie with no top crust …1968 Amer. West. sl.
– CALF-SLOBBER meringue, as on pies; a meringue topping …L19 US sl.
– DOG’S EYE pie …Bk1999 Aust. rhyming sl.
– DOZZLE an ornamental piece of pastry on the top of a pie crust …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– FAKE-PIE a pie containing leftovers …1880 UK society sl.
– FALL-DOWNS fragments from a pie that fall from the larger piece or slice when it is being cut up; plates of such fragments were sold at a halfpenny a plate in cook-shops …L19 sl.
– FARMER’S ALLIANCE pumpkin pie …L19 US sl.
– IRON-BOUND a hard-baked pie …Bk1896 sl.
– LENTEN PIE a pie containing no meat …1592
– MAGGOT BAG a meat pie …2003 Aust. sl.
– NEDDY-RACK egg and bacon pie …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– NELLIE a meat pie …1910s Aust. rhyming sl. (Nellie Bligh)
– NELLIE BLIGH a meat pie …1910s Aust. rhyming sl.
– NELLY a meat pie …1910s Aust. rhyming sl. (Nelly Bligh)
– NELLY BLIGH a meat pie …1910s Aust. rhyming sl.
– NELLY BLY a meat pie …1910s Aust. sl. rhyming
– SATURDAY PIE a pie made of odds and ends …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– SCABBY EYE a pie …Brit. rhyming sl.
– SINKER a meat pie …Bk1999 Aust. sl.
– SMACK IN THE EYE a pie …1992 UK rhyming sl.
– TANTARROW a pie made of meat, apples, etc.; something similar to a ‘squab-pie’ …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
 
PIECE – adjectives
– ALL-A-BITS in pieces or rags, broken …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– ALL PULLED TO SHUCKS pulled to pieces …1901 Amer. dial.
piece – nouns 
– BAT † a lump, a piece, a bit …c1340
– BLAUD a large piece or fragment …Bk1911 Sc.
– BRASH broken bits, fragments, pieces …Bk1911 Sc.
– BROLL † a part, a piece …18C
– CANTON † a quarter; a division of anything; a piece, or part …1601
– DADGE a large piece …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– DAGGEN a large piece of anything, as wood, meat, etc.; a lump; a thick slice …c1836 Sc.
– DAP † a small piece of anything …c1850 Sc.
– DARG a big piece; a large portion of anything; used ironically to denote something of little value, or when one has received less than was expected …1908 Sc.
– DEWGS † scraps, rags, shreds, small pieces …1693 Sc.
– DICE a lump or piece …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– DUNT a lump or large piece of something; later, also a large quantity of something …1813 Sc.
– EACHER a small quantity; a drop; a very small piece …1916 Sc.
– ECHNIE a small quantity; a small piece …1911 Sc.
– EYCHER a small quantity; a drop; a very small piece …1916 Sc.
– FALLOCH a lump, heap, large piece of anything; generally used of edibles …Bk1900 Sc.
– FANG a slice, a large piece cut off from something, usually of food, and esp. of cheese; a chunk …1742 Sc.
– FARDEL a large slice or piece, a lump, esp. of eatables …1866 Sc.
– FARTHING † a very small piece of anything …c1386
– GABBER a fragment, a broken piece …Bk1900 Sc.
– GABER a fragment, a broken piece …Bk1900 Sc.
– GANSH a piece cut or riven roughly out of anything …1900 Sc.
– GOBBET a piece, portion, a fragment …ME
– GOBBON † a piece, a slice; a gob of slimy material …LME
– HALFPENNY † a small fragment, bit, or piece …1599
– HAME a small piece …1883 Eng. dial.
– INCH-MUCKLE a piece as small as in inch …1866 Sc.
– JUNT a lump or large piece, esp. of meat or bread; a chunk; also, a large quantity of a liquid …1718 Sc.
– KERF a piece or quantity cut off; a cutting of anything …1678
– LAB a lump or large piece of anything; a portion, a fragment, a bit; a shred or piece, as of skin or cloth torn away and hanging loose …1808 Sc.& Ireland
– LABIE a large irregular piece …1815 Eng. dial.
– LOB a lump, a large piece; a nugget of gold …1825 Eng. dial.
– LOUNDER a thick slice; a large piece …B1900 Eng. dial.
– MALHAVELINS small matters, bits and pieces; odds and ends; articles supplementary to the ordinary fare; typically used of food or small change …1865 sl.
– MANABLINS small matters, odds and ends; articles supplementary to the ordinary fare; bits and pieces, typically of food or small change …1865 sl.
– MANAROLINS small matters, odds and ends; articles supplementary to the ordinary fare; bits and pieces, typically of food or small change …1865 sl.
– MANAVILINS small matters, odds and ends; articles supplementary to the ordinary fare; bits and pieces, typically of food or small change …1865 sl.
– MANAVLINS small matters, odds and ends; articles supplementary to the ordinary fare; bits and pieces, typically of food or small change …1865 sl.
– MEISLE a small piece …Bk1905 Sc.
– MEISLEN a very small piece …Bk1905 Sc.
– MIDGET a very small piece of anything; a scrap, a fragment …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– MINCH a small piece of anything; a crumb …Bk1905 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– MINCHICK a very small piece …Bk1905 Sc.
– MINCHICKIE a very small piece indeed …Bk1905 Sc.
– MUMMICK a fragment, a scrap; a broken piece, esp. of food; a slice …1816 Eng. dial.
– NATTLE a small piece of anything; a morsel …1908 Sc.
– NICK a broken-off fragment; a small piece; a scrap …1880 Sc. 
– NIMSH a very small piece, the slightest bit, a fragment …1910 Sc. 
– NIMSHIE a very small piece, the slightest bit, a fragment …1919 Sc. 
– OFFE †* a small piece, a morsel, a crumb …c1420
– PALLION a small piece or pellet …1727
– PANEL † a small piece of anything …1628
– PARCEL † a piece; a portion of a whole; a part; an instalment …1631-54 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– PIGS AND WHISTLES fragments; odds and ends; pieces; knickknacks; trivial things …1681
– QUIPS a tiny piece or amount …1950s W. Indies Rasta
– REEF a broad piece …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– SCHINCH a small piece …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– SCHNIBBLE a scrap; a small piece …1965 Amer. dial.
– SCHNIPFEL a scrap; a small piece …1965 Amer. dial.
– SCHNIPPLE a scrap; a small piece …1950 Amer. dial.
– SCHNIVVLE a scrap; a small piece …1995 Amer. dial.
– SCHNUFFEL a scrap; a small piece …1998 Amer. dial.
– SCIMPTION a trivial matter; a very small piece, amount, or quantity; a bit, a scrap …1919 Amer. dial.
– SCLIMPET a small thin piece of anything, as of rock …1825 Sc.
– SCOW a fragment, a bit, pieces, smithereens, shattered particles …1882 Sc. 
– SCRID a piece, a scrap, a bit …1860 Amer. dial.
– SCRIMMOCK a very small piece …B1900 Eng. dial.
– SCRIMP a very small piece of anything; very small measure; a tiny object …1841 Eng. dial.
– SCRIMPTION a very small piece; a miserable pittance …1867 Eng. & Amer. dial.
– SCRIMPTOM a very small piece or quantity; a bit, a scrap …1904 Amer. dial.
– SCRIMSHUN a very small piece or quantity; a bit, a scrap …1867 Amer. dial.
– SCRIPTION a very small piece or quantity; a bit, a scrap …1867 Amer. dial.
– SCRUMPTION a very small piece or quantity; a bit, a scrap …1867 Amer. dial.
– SHNIBBEL n. a scrap; a small piece …1948 Amer. dial.
– SIPPET a small piece of something; a mere fragment …1613
– SKILFER †* a small piece; a splinter …1597
– SKIMPTION a trivial matter; a very small piece, amount, or quantity; a bit, a scrap …1942 Amer. dial.
– SKIMPTUM a very small piece or quantity; a bit, a scrap …1904 Amer. dial.
– SKRID a small piece, a scrap, a bit; a lump …1860 Amer. dial.
– SLENCH a big piece or lump of anything …B1900 Eng. dial.
– SNIBBLE a scrap; a small piece …1950 Amer. dial.
– SNICKET a very small piece of anything; anything small and insignificant …1887 Eng. dial.
– SNIPPLE a scrap; a small piece …1948 Amer. dial.
– SNIPSLE a scrap; a small piece …1950 Amer. dial.
– SNOUL a thick piece …Bk1886 Eng. dial.
– SQUID a piece, a scrap, a bit; a lump …1914 Amer. dial.
– TAILYE † a cut piece, a cut or slice of meat …c1470 Sc.
– TAILZIE † a cut piece, a cut or slice of meat …c1470 Sc.
– TAM a piece; a bite, a morsel of food …1913 Sc.
– TAURD a large piece …Bk1905 Sc.
– THWANG a large piece of anything …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– TIDDY BIT a little piece …Bk1882 Eng. dial.
– UMMIT a large piece …1892 Eng. dial.
– WADDIOCK a large piece …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– WHANG a large piece, a portion, share …1910s sl.
– WIBBET a little piece, a wee bit …Bk1869 Eng. dial.
 
PIECEMEAL – adjectives/adverbs
– BY HABS AND NABS at odd moments, or in intervals of leisure; piecemeal …Bk1903 Eng. dial.
– BY ODDS AND BOBS piecemeal, at odd times …1805 Eng. dial.
– CANTLE-MEAL † piecemeal …c1479
– PARCELMEAL † in small portions at a time, bit by bit, piecemeal …1362
– PARCEL-WISE bit by bit, piecemeal …1647
– RANDING piecemeal; in small parts …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
 
PIECES – adverbs
– A-PIECES in pieces, to pieces …1796 Eng. dial.
– SUNDRY † in or into pieces …1533 obs. exc. Sc.
 
PIED – adjectives
– PIEDID pied, spotted, mottled …1757 Amer. dial.
– PIEDIDY pied, spotted, mottled …1963 Amer. dial.
– PIEDY pied, spotted, mottled …1895 Amer. dial.
 
PIERCE – nouns
– IMPUNCTION †* making holes by pricking or piercing with a sharp-pointed instrument …1712 
pierce – verbs
– ACCLOY to pierce, to stab …1470
– BEAR † to thrust, pierce, stab a person through the body, or his body through, with a spear, etc. …a1300
– BEGOUGE to stab, to pierce …1953 Amer. dial.
– DAB to pierce slightly, to stab …1806 Sc.
– DAG † to pierce or stab, with or as with a pointed weapon …a1400
– DIRL to pierce, to drill; to tingle, to thrill; to cause to vibrate by a blow, or thrill with the sensation of pain or pleasure; to scold …1733 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– FEATHER † to decorate a person with the projecting feather of an arrow; hence, to pierce, to wound …1415
– JAG † to pierce with a sharp instrument; to stab …a1400
– LANCINATE to pierce, to tear …1603
– LAUNCH † to pierce, to wound; to cut, to slit; to make a wound by piercing …c1400
– OFSTING † to kill by a thrust; to pierce, to gore, to stab to death …c893
– PICK to prick; to pierce …1890 Amer. dial.
– RIDDLE to pierce, to penetrate; to mangle …1892 Eng. dial.
– TANG † to pierce, to prick …a1400
– THIRL to pierce, to drill, to perforate; to vibrate or cause to vibrate; to thrill; to shudder; to tingle …1691 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– THRING † to make way through something by pressure; to pierce, to penetrate; to burst out …a1300
– TO-PIERCE † to pierce entirely …c1470.
 
PIERCING – nouns
– LABRET in body piercing: a stud through the bottom lip …1990s sl.
– MADISON any form of neck piercing …1990s sl.
– MADONNA in body piercing: a beauty spot stud in the upper lip …1990s sl.
piercing – person
– MODERN PRIMITIVE a member of a contemporary tribal culture; also, a person who adorns his or her body in a manner usually associated with certain tribal cultures, by tattooing, piercing, scarification, etc. …1926