Reverse Dictionary: SCOP – SCQ


SCOPE – NOUNS
– scope, room, freedom, liberty to range SCOUTH;  SCOWTH 1742 Sc.


SCORCH, SCORCHED, SCORCHING – ADJECTIVES
– ADUST scorched, seared; burnt up; dried up with heat, parched …1550
– ADUSTED scorched, seared; burnt up; dried up with heat, parched …1550 obs.
– ADUSTIVE burning, scorching, fiery …1633 obs.
 BIRSLED dried, scorched by fire or sun …1822 Sc.
 
SCORCH etc. – NOUNS
– ABC scorch marks on one’s legs …1920s Irish sl.
– ADUSTION the state of being burnt, or scorched; parched dryness …1559 obs.
– ADUSTION the act of burning, scorching, heating to dryness, or parching …1594 obs.
– ADUSTNESS scorching heat, the state of being scorched …1652 obs. rare
– BIRSLIN’ a scorching …Bk1911 Sc. 
– SCAM a burn, singe, scorch, or the mark of such …1808 Sc.
– SCAUM a burn, scorch; a mark caused by burning or singeing …1813 Sc.
– SCOUDER;  SCOWDER a burn, scorch, singe; a hasty toasting …1773 Sc.
– SCOUTHER;  SCOWTHER a burn, scorch, singe; a hasty toasting …1773 Sc.
 
SCORCH etc. – VERBS
– ADURE to burn completely; to scorch, to parch …c1420 obs.
– ADUST to burn, to scorch, to scar; to dry up with heat …1550 obs.
– BIRSLE to scorch, to toast, to parch; to crackle with heat …Bk1911 Sc. 
– BYSWELT to burn, to scorch …c1420 obs. rare
– SCAM of cloth, skin, cakes, etc.: to burn slightly; to scorch, to singe with dry heat …1746 Sc.
– SCAUM to burn, to scorch, to singe …1838 Sc.
– SCOODER to burn, to scorch, to singe …1810 Sc.
– SCORGE to scorch …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– SCORKLE to scorch …c1374 obs. rare
– SCOTCH to scorch …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– SCOUDER, SCOWDER to burn, to scorch, to singe …1746 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– SCOUTHER, SCOWTHER to burn, to scorch, to singe …1810 Sc.
– SCRANT to scorch …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– SCRAP to burn, to scorch …1867 Eng. dial.
– SCRAWL to scorch, to cook anything too much …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– SCRENT to burn; to scorch; to singe …1825 Eng. dial.
– SCRIMPLE to shrivel with fierce heat, to scorch …a1572 obs. rare
– SCRINT to burn; to scorch; to singe …1825 Eng. dial.
– SCROACH to scorch …1720 Sc.
– SKOODER to burn, to scorch, to singe …1810 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– SKRENT to burn; to scorch; to singe …1825 Eng. dial.
– SKRINT to burn; to scorch; to singe …1825 Eng. dial.
SMITCH 1626 chiefly Eng. dial. – to blacken, esp. with smoke; to scorch; to make dirty; to mark
– SQUARKEN to burn or scorch; to burn in roasting …1530 obs. rare


SCORE – NOUNS
– a score, an account TAIL a1325 obs.

SCORE – VERBS
– to make a perfect score on a school or college test; to score an ‘A’ on an exam ACE;  ACE IT; ACE OUT 1950s US sl.


SCORED – ADJECTIVES
– scored, cut, marked TALLIED c1440 obs.


SCORN, SCORNED, SCORNFUL, SCORNFULLY – ADJECTIVES
ABAFELLED treated scornfully or indignantly …17C obs.
BABIST scoffed at, scorned …B1700 Sc.
DEIGNOUS disdainful, proud, haughty, scornful …c1330 obs.
FASTIDIOUS full of pride; disdainful; scornful …c1440 obs.
LUDIBRIOUS full of scorn, inclined to scoff; scornful, mocking …1641 rare
MOCKRIFE scornful, mocking …1818 Sc.
NARGIE jeering, scornful …1825 Sc.
REVURE having a look of calm scorn or contempt …Bk1904 Sc.
SARDONIC of laughter, a smile: bitter, scornful, mocking; hence of a person, personal attribute, etc.: exhibiting bitterness, scorn, mockery, or ironic ridicule …1638
SARDONICAL of laughter, a smile: bitter, scornful, mocking; hence of a person, personal attribute, etc.: exhibiting bitterness, scorn, mockery, or ironic ridicule …1859
SAUCY scornful, disdainful …1716 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
SCORNSUM scornful …Bk1904 Sc.
SCORNY scornful …1836 Eng. dial.
SNIFFY scornful, disdainful; haughtily fastidious; fault-finding …1871 sl.

SCORN etc. – ADVERBS
HATELY fiercely, bitterly; scornfully, hatefully …c1000 obs.

SCORN etc. – NOUNS
BISMER shame, disgrace, reproach, mockery, scorn …c893 obs.
BYSCORN contempt, scorn …1387 obs. rare
CUCKING-STOOL a seat where social offenders were placed in order to receive public scorn …14C
DEDIGNATION disdain, scorn, contempt …c1400 obs.
FASTIDIE scorn, disdain, contempt …1538 obs. rare
GECK a gesture of derision; an expression of scorn or contempt …1500-20 chiefly Sc. 
LAITH loathing, despite, scorn …1882 Sc.
SCAN scorn, disrespect …1877 Eng. dial.
SCAUM an appearance of scorn; scornfully abusive language …1877 Eng. dial.
SUBSANNATION mockery, derision, scorn …1620 obs.
UPBRIXLE reproach, scorn; an object of reproach …c1200 obs.

SCORN etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
BISMER a person worthy of scorn; a disgraceful or lewd person; a pander or bawd …a1300 obs. exc. Sc.
GABBER a liar; a deceiver; also, a scornful or mocking person …a1325 obs.
GECKER a mocker, a scorner …1916 Sc.
MOWER a person who makes a face; a jester, a mocker, a scorner …1440 obs.
TARGET a person who is the object of general abuse, scorn, derision, or the like …1757

SCORN etc. – VERBS
ARRIDE to smile at, to laugh at, to scorn …1612 obs.
BABISH to scoff at, to scorn; to treat with contempt as mere children …c1460 obs.
BISMER to treat with scorn, to mock, to deride, to insult …c1000 obs.
BYSCORN to cover with scorn …c1386 obs.
CATAMIDIATE to put one to open shame and punishment for some notorious offense; to scorn, to defame …1656 obs.
DECACHINNATE to scorn …1623 obs.
DEDIGNE to disdain, to scorn …1623 obs.
GECK to toss the head, as in scorn; to look proudly …1724 Sc. & Eng. dial.
GECK UP THE HEAD to toss the head, as in scorn; to look proudly …1728 Sc. & Eng. dial.
LOOK DOWN ONE’S NOSE to show disdain or scorn …1921
PISS ALL OVER to show great contempt or scorn towards; to humiliate …1986 sl.
PISS ON to show great contempt or scorn towards; to humiliate …1951 sl.
PISS ON FROM A GREAT HEIGHT to humiliate; to show great scorn towards …1987 sl.
PISS UPON to show great contempt or scorn towards; to humiliate …a1625 sl.
SCRAPE to express scorn and derision …Bk1904 Sc.
SHOOT OUT THE LIP to show scorn by protruding one’s lip; to treat with derision or contempt …1826
SNOUCH to snub; to treat scornfully …1761 obs.
SUBSANNATE to deride, to scorn, to mock …1656 obs.
SUBSANNE to deride, to scorn, to mock …a1619 obs.
THARN to mock, to scorn …Bk1905 Eng. dial. obs.
TURN UP ONE’S NOSE to show disdain or scorn …1721


SCORPION – NOUNS
ALACRAN a scorpion …1844 Amer. dial.
ALACRANY a scorpion …1844 Amer. dial.
ALICRAN a scorpion …1844 Amer. dial.
BITIES a collective term for spiders, snakes, scorpions, etc. …Bk1999 Aust. sl.
SANTAPEE a scorpion …1950 Amer. dial.
SCAR-BECK a rock-bound stream …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
SCORRIPIN a scorpion …1909 Amer. dial.
SCRONCHER a scorpion …1950 Amer. dial.
TEXAS STRONGBACK a scorpion …1984 Amer. dial.


SCOT, SCOTLAND, SCOTTISH – ADJECTIVES
– ABERDONIAN pert. to Aberdeen …19C
– CALEDONIAN of ancient Caledonia; of Scotland …1656
– GALLOVIDIAN belonging to Galloway …1824 Sc.
– GALLOWEGIAN belonging to Galloway …a1872 Sc. 
– GALWEGIAN belonging to Galloway …1870
– LALLAN belonging to the Lowlands of Scotland …1706 Sc.
– MCTAVISH Scottish …1967 Amer. dial.
– ORCADIAN pert. to Orkney …1821
– SCOTTO Scottish …2000 UK sl.
– SCOTTY Scottish, bred in Scotland …1751 Sc. obs.
– SCOTTY markedly or forthrightly Scottish in outlook or manner …1892 Sc.
 
SCOT etc. – NOUNS
– AULD REEKY a name given to Edinburgh because of the cloud of smoke that overhang the old town …1721 Sc.
– AULD REIKIE the old town and subsequently the whole town of Edinburgh …L18
– BACK-SHORE the west coast of Scotland on the North Channel …1905 Sc.
– BAWBEE a Scotch coin of base silver equivalent originally to three, and afterwards to six, pennies of Scotch money, about a halfpenny of English coin; hence, later, a halfpenny, a ‘copper’ …1542 Sc.
– BON-ACCORD the city of Aberdeen; that city’s motto …Bk1911 Sc.
– CALEDONIA the Roman name for Scotland
– CREENIE a name for a race of short, dark people living in the Rhinns of Galloway; used with an implication of contempt …1877 Sc. obs.
– FAIR CITY, THE Perth, Scotland …1827 Sc.
– GAELICALLY UTTER a Scottish accent, esp. when modified to move in snobbish English circles …L19 UK society sl.
– HAGGISLAND Scotland …L19 sl.
– ILL YEARS, THE a series of years of scarcity and hardship at the end of the 17th century …1699 Sc. obs.
– ITCHLAND Scotland …Bk1896 sl.
– LALLAN the Lowland Scotch dialect …1785 Sc.
– LALLANS the Lowlands of Scotland …1830 Sc.
– LAND OF CAKES Scotland, or the Scottish Lowlands, arising from the fact that oatcakes were an important item in the fare of the rural population …1669
– LAND OF KAIL Scotland, where broth is a national dish …1826 Sc.
– LAND OF THE THISTLE Scotland …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– LOUSE-LAND Scotland …1699 sl.
– MAIDEN TOWN Edinburgh …E18 sl.
– MARMALADE COUNTRY Scotland …L19 sl., orig. music hall usage
NORTH BRITAIN 1707 US – Scotland
– OLD DIRTY a nickname for the town of Greenock …1889 Sc. 
– OLD REEKIE the old town and subsequently the whole town of Edinburgh …L18
– REEKY a name given to Edinburgh because of the cloud of smoke that overhang the old town …1721 Sc.
 SCOTOPHOBIA an intense aversion or hostility towards Scotland, its people, or its culture …1828
– SCOTS the Scotch language …1790 Sc. obs.
– SCRATCHLAND Scotland …Bk1896 sl.
– TARTAN the Scottish Lowland or Highland dialect; Highland manners or customs …1827 Sc.
 
​SCOT etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– ABERDONIAN a native or inhabitant of Aberdeen …c1650
– ABTHANE in Scottish hist: a senior thane (a person holding lands of the king; the chief of a clan, who became one of the king’s barons) …a1525
– BACCALAUREAT at Glasgow University: a student in his third year …1927 Sc.
– BAIJAN;  BAIJEN a first-year student at a Scottish university; no only used in Aberdeen and St. Andrews …1708 Sc.
– BAJAN a freshman at the Scotch universities, where the term was adopted from the University of Paris …1642
– BEDELLUS a college janitor in St. Andrews and Glasgow …1927 Sc. 
– BEJAN a freshman at the Scotch universities, where the term was adopted from the University of Paris …1642
– BEJANELLA a first-year lady student at Aberdeen University …1894 Sc.
– BEJANTINA a first-year woman student in Arts at St. Andrews University …1912 Sc.
– BEJANTINE a first-year woman student in Arts at St. Andrews University …1934 Sc.
– BEJAUNE a first-year student at a Scottish university; no only used in Aberdeen and St. Andrews …1708 Sc.
– BEJAUNT a first-year student at a Scottish university; no only used in Aberdeen and St. Andrews …1708 Sc.
– BEJEANT a freshman at the Scotch universities, where the term was adopted from the University of Paris …1642
– BERE-BAG a native or inhabitant of Scotland …1352 obs.
– BIDELLUS a college janitor in St. Andrews and Glasgow …1927 Sc. 
– BIGENT a first-year student at a Scottish university; now only used in Aberdeen and St. Andrews …1708 Sc. 
– BLEEDY PUDDIN a nickname for an inhabitant of Stromness in Orkney …1903 Sc.
– BLOODY PUDDIN a nickname for an inhabitant of Stromness in Orkney …1903 Sc.
– BLUE-BONNET a Scotsman …Bk1911 Sc.
– BLUE MOGGANER a jocular term for a native of Peterhead, from the wearing of coarse blue stockings over boots …Bk1911 Sc.
– BRAE-LAIRD a landowner on the southern slope of the Grampians …Bk1911 Sc.
– BRAE-MAN a dweller on the southern slope of the Grampians …Bk1911 Sc.
 BUTTERY BENJIE a first-year student at some Scottish universities …1854 Sc. sl. obs.
– CAILLEACH an old Highland woman; a crone …E19 Sc.
– CALEDONIAN a native or inhabitant of Scotland …1768 now jocular or literary
 CANNYGOSHAN one who dwells in the Canongate, Edinburgh …1866 Sc. obs.
 DUINEWASSEL; DUNIWASSEL in the Scottish Highlands: a clansman of high rank, typically through having a familial connection to the chief; generally, a man of some status; a gentleman …c1600
– ELEMENTARIAN in Aberdeen Grammar School: a pupil in the beginners’ class …1710 Sc. obs.
– GABLE-ENDIE a local nickname for an inhabitant of Montrose …1889 Sc.
– GAEL a member of the Gaelic-speaking peoples inhabiting Scotland, and the Isle of Man; later also, a person of such heritage or descent …1684
– GALLOGLACH a personal attendant of a Highland chief, the armour-bearer …1703 Sc. obs.
– GALLOVIDIAN a native of Galloway …1824 Sc. 
– GALWEGIAN an inhabitant or native of Galloway …1774
– GEORDIE a native of Scotland; a Scot …1867 Aust. & NZ colloq.
– GET a first-year or junior boy at the Edinburgh Royal High School or Edinburgh Academy; now also applied to junior members of various boys’ organizations in Edinburgh …1824 Sc.
– GHILLIE an attendant on a Highland chief; also, a Highlander …1705 Sc. hist.
– GHILLIE a person who attends someone on a fishing or hunting expedition, esp. in the Scottish Highlands …1832
– GILLIE a male servant, esp. an attendant on a Highland chief; a Highlander …1705 Sc. obs.
– GILLIE a sportsman’s attendant in shooting or fishing, now generally in angling, in the Highlands …1823 Sc.
– GILLIE-CASFLUE a servant responsible for carrying a Highland chief across a ford, stream, etc. …1754 hist. rare
– GILLIE-CASFLUICH a servant responsible for carrying a Highland chief across a ford, stream, etc. …1754 hist. rare
– GILLIE-COIS a henchman, a chief’s attendant …1896 Sc. obs.
– GILLIE-COMSTRIAN an attendant to leads the chief’s horse in difficult places …Bk1900 Sc.
– GILLIE-MORE the servant who carried the Chief’s armour …1832 Sc. obs.
– GILLIE-WET-FOOT a term of contempt used by Lowlanders for a follower of a Highland chief, esp. a servant who carries the chief across a ford, stream, etc.; also, a worthless, contemptuous person …1681 Sc. obs.
– GILLIE-WET-FOOT a bare-footed Highland lad …Bk1900 Sc.
– GILLIE-WHITE-FOOT a term of contempt used by Lowlanders for a follower of Highland chief, esp. a servant who carries the chief across a ford, stream, etc.; also, a worthless, contemptuous person …1681 Sc. obs.
– GILLON-A-NAILLIE literally, “the lads with the kilt”; Highlanders …1825 Sc.
– GILL-PIES tight girls, looking out for husbands …Bk1876 Sc.
– GILLY a male servant, esp. an attendant on a Highland chief; a Highlander …1705 Sc. obs.
– GLASGOWEGIAN an inhabitant or native of Glasgow …1833
– GLASWEGIAN a native or inhabitant of Glasgow …1817
– GLESCA KEELIE a term, generally contemptuous, applied to a male Glaswegian of the rougher sort …1933 Sc.
– GLUNE-AMIE a Lowland name for a Highlander …1737 Sc. obs.
– GLUNIMIE a Lowland name for a Highlander …1737 Sc. obs.
– GLUNYIEMAN a Lowland name for a Highlander …1737 Sc. obs.
– GYTE a contemptuous term for a child; a brat; a first-year pupil in the Edinburgh High School …1825 Sc.
– HADDIE a nickname for an Aberdonian …1920 Sc.
– HAGGIS a Scottish person …Bk2004 Brit. sl.
– HAIRY a young woman living in the slums of Glasgow who habitually goes about without a hat …1935 Sc. obs.
– ITCHLANDER a Scot …1785 sl.
– JOCK a Scotsman …1788 sl.
– KAIL-SIPPER one who is fond of broth; a nickname given to the people of Fife …1765 Sc.
– KAIL-SUPPER one who is fond of broth; a nickname given to the people of Fife …1765 Sc.
– KALE-SUPPER one who is fond of broth; a name given to the Fifeshire people from their noted love of broth …1816 Sc.
– KILLIN-KITE a nickname for an inhabitant of Colvend in Kirkcudbrightshire …1905 Sc.
LIBERTINE 1757 Sc. obs. – in King’s College, Aberdeen: a student who had no bursary or scholarship
 LOWLANDER a native or inhabitant of the Lowlands of Scotland …1621
– MAC an Irishman or Scotsman …1617 sl.
– MACK a Scottish man …18C sl. 
– MCTAVISH a person of Scottish background …1967 Amer. dial.
– MERRY DANCERS a nickname for the inhabitants of Stenness in Orkney …1931 Sc.
– MORAVE a native or inhabitant of Moray, in Scotland …a1600 Sc. obs. rare
– MORAVIAN a native or inhabitant of Moray, in Scotland …1577 rare
– MORMAOR in ancient Scotland: a high steward of a province …1807 Sc. hist.
– MOSSER a moss-trooper; a member of any of the marauding gangs which, in the mid 17th century, carried out raids across the ‘mosses’ of the Scottish Border; a Border pillager or freebooter …1651 Sc. rare
– MOSS-TROOPER a member of any of the marauding gangs which, in the mid 17th century, carried out raids across the ‘mosses’ of the Scottish Border; a Border pillager or freebooter …1645 orig. Sc.
– OATMEAL PARTY Scotsmen …L19 Royal Navy colloq.
– OATMEAL SAVAGE a Scotsman …1954 Can. sl.
– ORCADIAN a native or inhabitant of Orkney …1661
– PALANTINE a jocular term applied, after their return to Scotland, to the young men or boys kidnapped in the early 19th century, and shipped to America as slaves …1838 Sc. obs.
– PALATINE a jocular term applied, after their return to Scotland, to the young men or boys kidnapped in the early 19th century, and shipped to America as slaves …1838 Sc. obs.
– RED-SHANK a term of contempt for a Highlander; a bare-legged person …1817 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– SAND-CLEEK a nickname for an Aberdonian …1950 Sc.
– SANDIE;  SANDY a nickname for a Scotchman …1473
– SAWNEY a derisive name for a Scotchman …a1704 colloq.
– SCARF a nickname for an inhabitant of Eday in Orkney …1883 Sc.
– SCHEMIE a person who lives on a Scottish ‘scheme’ or council estate …20C sl.
– SCOT a Scotchman as distinguished from a Shetlander …1900 Sc.
– SCOTCHMAN a Scotsman …1998 UK sl.
– SCOTLING a young Scot, a Scottish child …1787 Sc.
– TAMMIE-FUD a nickname for a native of Freswick …1972 Sc.
– TARTAN a Highlander, one who wears tartan …1817
– TAY WATER WILLIE an inhabitant of Dundee …1927 Sc. 
– TERI a native of Hawick, Scotland …1892 Sc.
– TERTIAN at a Scottish university: a student of the third session …Bk1905 Sc.
– TORN-HATTIE a native of Brechin in Angus; generally used derisively by the people of the neighbouring town of Montrose …1931 Sc. 
– YACHIE a Highlander …1859 Sc.
– YANTER a local name given to a person living in Nether Buckie, on the west side of the Buckie Burn in Banffshire …1887 Sc.
– YELLOW-BEAK at some Scottish universities: a first-year student …1865 Sc. obs.
– YELLOW-NEB at some Scottish universities: a first-year student …1879 Sc. obs.
– YIRN a nickname for a native of Orphir parish in Orkney …1908 Sc.
– YOLTY a nickname for a first-year student at Aberdeen University …1833 Sc.
– YOULLIE a nickname for a native of Aukengill in Caithness …1972 Sc.
– YOUNG LAIRD the eldest son or heir of a ‘laird’ …1899 Sc.
– ZETLANDER a native or inhabitant of the Shetland Islands …1614
 
SCOT etc. – VERBS
– SCOTIFY to translate into Scotch …1787 Sc. obs.


SCOTLAND YARD – NOUNS
– Scotland Yard KREMLIN 1966 UK sl.


SCOUNDREL, SCOUNDRELLY – ADJECTIVES
– SCOONERAL scoundrelly, rascally …1844 Sc.
 
SCOUNDREL etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– BADDIE;  BADDY a bad or wicked person; a scoundrel, a villain, esp. as a character in play, film, etc. …1934 colloq., orig. US
– BAD EGG a rogue, a villain, a scoundrel, a rascal, a worthless fellow …1847 sl., orig. US
– BAD HAT – a scoundrel, a ne’er-do-well; a rogue; an untrustworthy person; a troublemaker; a habitual brawler; a dangerous individual …1831 sl.
– BADLING a low scoundrel; a worthless fellow; a scamp; also, a naughty child …1818 Sc. obs.
– BADLYNG a low scoundrel; a wicked fellow …c1600 Sc.
– BADMASH one following evil courses; a bad, wicked, or disreputable fellow; a villainous man; a rascal, a scoundrel …1843 Anglo-Indian
– BARNARD the member of a gang of swindlers who acts as a decoy; a lurking scoundrel; a sharper …1532 obs.
– BERNARD the member of a gang of swindlers who acts as a decoy; a lurking scoundrel; a sharper …1532 obs.
– BEZONIAN a term of contempt: a needy beggar; a poor wretch; a base fellow; a mean, low person; a knave;  a rascal; a scoundrel …1611 obs.
– BLACK a scoundrel …Bk1825 Sc.
– BLACKGUARD a person, esp. a man, who behaves in a dishonourable or contemptible way; someone worthless or despicable; a villain; a rough;  an open scoundrel; a term of the utmost opprobrium …1732
– BLACK SHEEP a failure; a scoundrel; an outcast; a disreputable member of a family or group …1640
– BLAICK a scoundrel …Bk1911 Sc.
– BOINARD a fool, a simpleton; a rogue, a rascal, a scoundrel, a low person; a term of reproach …a1300 obs.
– BUDMASH a bad, worthless fellow; a scoundrel …1870 Anglo-Indian
– CATAIAN a rogue, a scoundrel, a rascal, a knave, a blackguard; a sharper …1598 obs.
– CAYNARD a lazy fellow, a sluggard; a worthless fellow, a rascal, a scoundrel; a term of reproach …1303 obs.
– CULLION a term of great contempt; a base, despicable, or vile fellow; a bad fellow; a mean wretch; a scoundrel, a rascal …1575 obs.
 CUSTRON an assistant to a chef or cook; a kitchen servant, a scullion; also, a term of abuse, a man of low birth or status; a knave, a rogue, a scoundrel …c1400 arch.
– DAGGA ROOKER a scoundrel; a wastrel …c1910 S. Afr. sl.
– DINGO a contemptuous term for a person; a cheat, a scoundrel, a traitor, a coward …1928 Aust. sl.
– FEATHERED SNAKE a clever scoundrel …1930 Amer. dial.
 FLABERGUDGION a dirty, mean fellow; a worthless, slovenly fellow; a base, foul, nasty wretch; a scoundrel …1611 obs.
 FLABERGULLION a dirty, mean fellow; a worthless, slovenly fellow; a base, foul, nasty wretch; a scoundrel …1611 obs.
– GRAND RASCAL a scoundrel; a cheat, a confidence man …1929 Amer. dial. 
– HOLOUR a fornicator, a whoremonger, an adulterer; a debauchee, rake, ribald, scoundrel …c1230 obs.
– HOUNDSFOOT a scoundrel; a rascal; a worthless fellow; a term of contempt …1710 obs.
– LIMMER a rogue, a rascal, a knave, a scoundrel …1456 obs. exc. Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– LOREL a worthless person; a dissolute person; a low, disreputable fellow; a rogue, a scoundrel …1362 obs.
– LOSEL a worthless person, a scoundrel, a cheat …1806 Amer. dial.
– MINK a scoundrel …1900 US sl.
– PALLIARD a person of bad character; a low or dissolute knave; a scoundrel; a lewd or lecherous person; a debauched person …1567 arch.
– PARDONER a term of reproach, a scoundrel, a villain, a cheat …c1700 obs.
– RACK-HELL a thorough scoundrel or rascal; an utterly immoral or dissolute person; a vile debauchee or rake …1554 now arch.
– RAGABASH an idle, worthless, or disreputable fellow; a low rascal; an idle vagabond; a scoundrel; a ragamuffin …1609 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– RAGGIL a rascal, a scoundrel; a worthless vagabond; a careless or mischievous person …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– RAKE-HELL a thorough scoundrel or rascal; an utterly immoral or dissolute person; a vile debauchee or rake …1554 now arch.
– RAKEHELLY a thorough scoundrel or rascal; an utterly immoral or dissolute person; a vile debauchee or rake …a1762
– RAKEL a rake-hell; a thorough scoundrel or rascal; an utterly immoral or dissolute person; a vile debauchee or rake …1622 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– RAMPALLIAN a ruffian, a scoundrel, a villain …L16
– RAMPALLION a ruffian, a villain, a scoundrel, a rogue, a knave, a rascal …1593 obs.
 ROTTEN EGG a rogue, a villain, a scoundrel, a rascal, a worthless fellow …1847 sl., orig. US
– SCAB a term of abuse; a mean, low scurvy fellow; an unpleasant or despicable man; a mean or contemptible person; a rascal, a scoundrel, a rogue …1590 
– SCANDAL a scoundrel, a rascal …1965 Amer. dial.
– SCAPEGALLOWS a dedicated villain who has (so far) escaped the gallows; a scoundrel; a rascal …1799
– SCELLUM;  SCHELLAM a rascal, a scamp, a rogue, a scoundrel, a villain …1611 arch.
– SCOUFF a male jilt; a low scoundrel …1898 Sc.
– SCRAPEGALLOWS a scoundrel, a rascal …1946 Amer. dial.
– SCROYLE a mean fellow; a rascal, a scoundrel, a wretch; a term of contempt …1595 obs.
– SCUDDER a scoundrel, a rascal, a mischievous person; a rowdy, mean person …1965 Amer. dial.
– SCUTTER a scoundrel, a rascal, a mischievous person; a rowdy, mean person …1934 Amer. dial.
– SKELLUM a rascal, a scamp, a rogue, a scoundrel, a villain …1611 arch.
– SKELM a rascal, a scamp, a rogue, a scoundrel, a villain …1611 arch.
– SNEAKSBY a mean-spirited person; a cowardly, creeping scoundrel; a paltry fellow; a sneak …1580 rare
– STRETCH-HALTER a scoundrel; one who badly needs a hanging …1604 sl.
– STRETCH-HEMP a scoundrel; one who badly needs a hanging …Bk1904 sl.
– SUCCUBUS a thieving hanger-on; a scoundrel …1700 sl.
– TAISTREL a rascal; a scoundrel; a good-for-nothing; a worthless or disorderly person; a peevish character; a contemptible person; a term of great contempt …Bk1873 Eng. dial.
– TITIVIL a term of reproach; a bad or vile character; a scoundrel, villain; a worthless knave …c1420 obs.
– TITIVILLER a bad or vile character, a scoundrel, a rogue, a rascal, a knave, a villain …1500 obs. rare
– TOWN SHIFT a scoundrel, esp. a card-sharp …M17 sl.
 TUTIVILLER a wicked, destructive, or difficult person, a scoundrel, a rogue, a knave; a person who gossips, spreads rumours, or tells tales, a tattler …1568 obs., derogatory
– VARLET a person of a low, mean, or knavish disposition; a worthless person, a scoundrel; a knave, a rogue, a rascal …1555
– VARMINT a bothersome person; a scoundrel; an annoying person …1773
– VILIACO a vile or contemptible person; a villain, a scoundrel, a coward …1599 obs.
– WARLO a wicked person; a scoundrel, a reprobate …a1508 Sc.
– WARLOCK a wicked person; a scoundrel, a reprobate; a general term of reproach or abuse …a1000 obs.
– WARLOT a rogue, a rascal, a scoundrel …1584 Sc.
– WIDDIEFOO;  WIDDIEFOW;  WIDDIEFU;  WIDDYFU one fit to fill a hangman’s noose; a gallows-bird; a scoundrel; a scamp, a rogue, a mischievous person, a romp; a person of small stature and short temper …1721 Sc.
 YELLOW DOG a contemptible person; a scoundrel; a term of disparagement …1881 US sl.
– YOUNG HEMP a young scoundrel; an ill-behaved young man or boy; an 18th century juvenile delinquent …1785 sl.
– ZHULIK a faker, a scoundrel …Bk1982 Jewish 


SCOUR, SCOURING – NOUNS
– the act of scouring off OFFSCOURING 1896 rare

SCOUR etc. – VERBS
– to scour off OFFSCOUR 1578 rare
– to scour or rub with force and energy; to purge SCRINGE 1816 Sc. obs.
– to scour, to scrub SCURRIFUNGE 1789 Eng. dial.


SCOURGE, SCOURGING – ADJECTIVES
MASTIGOPHORIC that carries a scourge, scourge-bearing …1816
MASTIGOPHOROUS that carries a scourge, scourge-bearing …1812

SCOURGE etc. – NOUNS
VERBERATION the act of beating or striking so as to cause pain or hurt; esp. flogging or scourging; also, a blow or stroke …c1730

SCOURGE etc. – VERBS
BALEISE to beat, to flog, to whip, to scourge …1876 Eng. dial.
BELLISE to beat, to flog; to whip, to scourge …1865 Eng. dial.
DIGHT to beat, to thrash, to scourge …BK1900 Sc.
JERK to strike with, or as with a whip, switch, or wand; to scourge, to whip, to lash, to switch …1550 obs.
SCREEGE to scourge …1863 Sc.
SCRINGE to scourge, to flog …1790 Sc.


SCOURING PAD – NOUNS
CHAIN DISHCLOTH a scouring pad made of small interconnected links …1966 Amer. dial.
CHAIN DISHRAG a scouring pad made of small interconnected links …1966 Amer. dial.
CHAIN SCRATCHER a scouring pad …1965 Amer. dial.
CHAIN SCRUBBER a scouring pad made of small interconnected links …1966 Amer. dial.
DISH SCRATCHER a scouring pad …1965 Amer. dial.
IRON DISHCLOTH a metal scouring pad (of interlocking metal rings) used to scour pots …1967 Amer. dial.
IRON DISHRAG a metal scouring pad (of interlocking metal rings) used to scour pots …1955 Amer. dial.
METAL SCRATCHER a scouring pad …1965 Amer. dial.
METAL SPONGE the rough metal pad used to scour pots and pans …1965 Amer. dial.
PAN SCRATCHER a scouring pad …1965 Amer. dial.
POT SCRATCHER a scouring pad …1965 Amer. dial.
SCRATCHER a scouring pad …1965 Amer. dial.
SCRATCH PAD a scouring pad …1957 Amer. dial.
WASH SCRATCHER a scouring pad …1965 Amer. dial.


SCOUT, SCOUTING – NOUNS
OUT PARTY 1756 US – a scouting party

SCOUT etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
AFORERIDER the advance guard of an army, scouts …a1525 
BIRD DOG one who seeks, scouts, or spies for another; esp. a carrier of tales; one who runs errands or performs similar tasks; one paid to direct potential customers to a business …1929 US sl.
DING TEAM a scout and sniper working together …1991 US sl.
GIDDY (GOUT) a boy scout …Bk1919 Aust. rhyming sl. 
HARKENER;  HEARKENER an eavesdropper; a scout …1549 obs.
SHOWER a person who looks out or observes; an observer; a scout; a watchman; also, a person who makes an inspection or examination of something …a1225 obs.
VANQUERER a scout …1579 obs.
WAIT a military watchman, sentinel, or lookout; also, a scout, spy; a watchman in a camp, castle, or fortified place who was furnished with a born to trumpet to sound an alarm or to make a signal …a1300 obs.
WAITER an observer in secret; a scout, a spy …1471 obs.


SCOWL, SCOWLING, SCOWLINGLY – ADJECTIVES
BLONKY sulky, scowling …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
SCOOLY of the brow: scowling, frowning …1923 Sc. 

SCOWL etc. – ADVERBS
SCOUK with a gloomy, scowling countenance; sulkily …Bk1904 Sc.
SKOOK in a hidden manner, secretly, furtively, with a gloomy, scowling mien …1866 Sc.

SCOWL etc. – NOUNS
BLONK a scowl, frown …19C Eng. dial.
BLUNKa scowl, a frown …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
GANSEL an ill-natured, angry or sullen look; a scowl …1825 Sc. obs.
GLOUT a frown or scowl
SCOUK a furtive look, a glance from under the brows or from the tail of the eye; a squint; a frown; a scowl; a sour, gloomy aspect; an evil look …c1715 Sc.

SCOWL etc. – PHRASES
IF LOOKS COULD KILL, I’D BE DEAD referring to someone who is frowning, scowling or looking at you with disdain or anger …Bk1996 Aust. & NZ sl. 

SCOWL etc. – VERBS
BEETLE to look with beetle brows, to scowl …1602
BEND THE BROWS to winkle the brow; to frown, to scowl …1387
BLONK to put on a sulky or sour face; to scowl …19C Eng. dial.
BLUNKto scowl …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
GLAVER to frown, to scowl, to look with angry disfavour on …Bk1881 Eng. dial.
SCOUK;  SKOOK to scowl, to look from under the eyebrows balefully or furtively; to look angry, sulky, or furtive  …c1715 Sc.
VENNER to scowl; to snarl; to draw up the lips in a snarling manner …1890 Eng. dial.
WRINCH to scowl …1990s W. Indies