Reverse Dictionary: SHIM – SHN


SHIMMMER, SHIMMERING – NOUNS
– the shimmering appearance of rising air on a hot day, esp. over the brow of a slope RACE 1929 Sc.

SHIMMMER etc. – VERBS
– to shimmer, to glitter, to gleam SKIMMER c1440


SHINE, SHINING, SHINY – ADJECTIVES
– BEAMISH shining brightly, radiant …1530 arch.
 BLICANT shining, bright …1873 Eng. dial.
 BLINKING shining intermittently …1876 Eng. dial.
– BREME brilliant, shining, bright; hence, clearly seen, evident, apparent, obvious …c1340 obs.
– EFFULGENT shining forth brilliantly; resplendent, radiant …1738
– EMICATIOUS that shines or glitters …1819 nonce word
– FAIR bright, light, shining …a1300 obs.
– GLIDDERY shiny, as if enamelled …B1900 Eng. dial.
– GLIMMEROUS shining unsteadily …1792 rare
– GLORING shining, glittering …a1400-50 obs.
– ILLUSTRATIVE shining, illuminative …1686 obs. rare
– ILLUSTRIOUS lighted up, having lustre or brilliancy;  luminous, shining, bright, lustrous …c1605 obs.
– LEAMING gleaming, flashing, shining …a1300 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
 LUCENT shining, bright, luminous …c1500
 LUCID bright, shining, luminous, resplendent …1591 now poetic usage
– LUCULENT full of light, bright, clear, shining …c1420 rare
– LUSTRING exhibiting a lustre; lustrous, shining …1582
– NITENT shining, lustrous …1616 obs. rare
– OMNILUCENT shining upon all or everywhere …1651
– SHEER bright; shining obs.
– SIDEREAN sidereal, starry; like stars, shining, bright …1656 rare
– SPUNKY sparkling; shining or burning brightly …1791 Sc. & Eng. dial.
 
SHINE etc. – NOUNS
 AFFULSION the act of shining; a shining upon …1730 obs. rare
– LAMBENCY the state of shining with a clear soft light like a flame …1817
– LEAMING shining, gleaming, flashing of light …1387 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– SUNNING shining like the sun; radiance …c1586 obs. rare
 
SHINE etc. – VERBS
 BEAM to shine radiantly …1641
– BLENK to shine; to glimmer; to wink …Bk1911 Sc.
– BLICK to shine …19C obs.
– BLICKEN to shine …19C Eng. dial.
 BLICKER to shine intermittently, to flicker, to glimmer …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– BLIKE to shine, to glisten, to glitter …a1000 obs.
– BLINK to shine, to gleam; to twinkle, to glimmer, to flicker …Bk1911 Sc.
– BLINTER to shine feebly or with an unsteady flame; to flicker …1888 Sc.
– EBLAZE to shine forth in bright colours …1610 obs. rare
– EBLAZON to shine forth in bright colours …1610 obs. rare
– EFFULGE to shine forth brilliantly …1735 poetic
– ELAMP to shine forth …1610 obs. rare
– GLIFF to flash, to gleam; to shine suddenly …a1400-50 obs. exc. Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– ILLUME to light up; to make shining or bright, to brighten …1602
– ILLUMINE to light up; to shed light upon; to shine upon; to light up n token of rejoicing or honour …1375
– LAMP to shine, to gleam, to glitter, as the stars on a frosty night, to twinkle …1609
– LEAM to shine, to gleam; to light up …a1300 obs. exc. Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– ONLIGHT to cause to shine …a1300 obs.
– RUTILATE to shine, to glitter; to emit rays of light; to appear bright …1623 obs. rare
– SCANCE to glitter, to shine; to make a great show …1773 Sc.
– SCANNACH to gleam, to shine …1814 Sc. obs.
– SCANSE to glitter, to shine; to make a great show …1773 Sc.
– SHINE LIKE A BABY’S ASS to shine brilliantly …1964 Amer. sl.
– UMBESHINE to shine about …a1300 obs.
– UMSHINE to shine about …a1400 obs.


SHINGLES – NOUNS
– shingles BARNEY-GUN 1746 Eng. dial.
– shingles BARN-GUN 1746 Eng. dial.
– shingles; ringworm RING-AROUND 1909 Amer. dial.


SHIP – ADJECTIVES
– CHEWING HER OAKUM of a wooden ship: beginning to leak, the caulking being bad …M19 nautical sl.
– DEAD-EYES UNDER. of a ship: listing heavily …M19 nautical sl.
– LABOURSOME of a ship: subject to pitch and roll violently in a heavy sea …1691
– LOGGED of a ship: on her beam-ends …L19 Brit. nautical sl.
– LUSTY of a ship: sailing well …1660 obs.
 MUABLE of a ship: unsteady …a1393 obs.
– NAVAL of the nature of a ship …1646 obs. rare
– NAVIGAL navigable; affording passage for ships or boats …c1470 obs. rare
– NAVIGEROUS that will bear a vessel or ship …1656 obs. rare
– RACE of ships: lying lie in the water …1622 obs. rare
– SICK of a ship: in quarantine on suspicion of infectious disease …20C nautical colloq.
– WALT of a ship: unsteady, crank …1539 obs.
 
SHIP – ADVERBS
– BY NAVY by ship …c1400 obs.
 
SHIP – NOUNS
– ABORDAGE an attack upon a ship by boarding it …c1550 obs.
 AFORESHIP the front part of a ship …1495 obs. rare
– ‘ALFPENNY DIP a ship …M19 rhyming sl.
– ANDREW MILLER a warship …1849 US Navy sl., now hist
– ANDREW MILLAR’S LUGGER a ship, esp. of war; a king’s ship or vessel …1819 naval sl. obs.
– ARSE OF THE SHIP, THE the stern …M19 Royal Navy usage
– BASTIMENT a ship, a vessel …1740 obs.
– BEAM a ship, a bark; perhaps, orig. one made from a hollowed trunk …c1000 poetic usage, obs.
– BLACK GANG all the members of a ship’s engineering department …US Civil War usage
– BLACK SHEEP an unseaworthy ship …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– BODOM a ship …Bk1911 Sc.
– BOILING WATER a boat’s wake …1965 Amer. dial.
– BONE IN ITS TEETH the white water that splashes up around the bow of a fast-moving ship …1939 Amer. dial.
– BONE IN THE MOUTH the white water that splashes up around the bow of a fast-moving ship …1945 Amer. dial. nautical usage
– BONE IN THE TEETH the white water that splashes up around the bow of a fast-moving ship …1919 Amer. dial.
– BOX a ship, esp. if unseaworthy …1851 Amer. nautical sl.
– BOYS’ TOWN the junior officers’ quarters on shipboard …1979-88 Amer. sl.
– CABBOUZE a cook’s galley on a vessel …1747 Amer. dial.
– CABOOSE a cook’s galley on a vessel …1848 Amer. dial.
– CABOUSE a cook’s galley on a vessel …1766 Amer. dial.
– CALLABOOS a cook’s galley on a vessel …1805 Amer. dial.
– CAMBOOSE a cook’s galley on a vessel …1848 Amer. dial.
– CANOE a ship; used derisively …1859 US nautical sl.
– CARINE the keel or bottom of a ship …1656 obs.
– CARPOUSE a cook’s galley on a vessel …1747 Amer. dial.
– CAST-IRON BATHTUB a battleship …World War II Amer. sl.
– CASTLE a large ship, esp. a ship of war …1642
– CATASTRUM the deck of a ship …1623 obs.
– CATTLE BOAT a troop transport ship …1944 US military sl.
– COD-HAULER a ship, or a man, from Newfoundland …M19 nautical sl.
– COFFIN an unseaworthy ship …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– COFFIN BRIG an unseaworthy ship …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– DADDY ‘a lovely ship’ …20C trawlermen’s usage
– DAGO a South American or Spanish ship …1900s sl., derogatory
– DIVING BELL a ship which soaks easily and plunges badly …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– DRY DOCK a ship’s hospital or jail …World War II Amer. sl.
– FAIRLOCK a ship …Bk1900 Sc.
– FAN a ship’s propeller …c1918 Royal Navy usage
– FANAL a ship’s lantern …1632 obs. exc. arch.
– FLASH VESSEL a gaudy looking but undisciplined ship …Bk1893 sl.
– FLOATING COFFIN an unsafe ship …World War II Amer. sl.
– FLOATING PALACE a large and comfortable ship …World War II Amer. sl.
– GEDUNK ice-cream, sweets, potato crisps and other junk food; the ship store where junk food can be bought …1927 US Navy sl.
– GUTBUCKET an old or unseaworthy vessel …1989 US Navy sl.
– GYP JOINT a ship’s store …1942 Amer. navy sl.
– HABILIMENTS fittings, apparatus, furniture, gear, outfit, rigging, as of a ship …1483 obs.
– HACK an old, slow, or dilapidated motor vehicle, aircraft, or boat or ship …1916 Amer. sl.
– HEAD the toilet on a ship …19C colloq.
– HEAD-PIECE the figurehead of a ship …1807-8
– HELL BOX a galley stove …1929 Amer. nautical sl.
– HOOKER a sailing vessel; a ship …1821 sl.
– IRON MIKE the automatic steering device of a ship …1926 sl.
– KEEL a ship, a vessel …a1547 poetic
– KERF the furrow made by a ship’s keel …c1422 obs. rare
– LAME DUCK a severely damaged or defenseless ship or aircraft …1876 US
– LASTAGE the ballast of a ship …c1440 obs.
– LEVIATHAN a ship of huge size …a1801
– MACHINE a ship or other vessel …1637 obs.
– MADHOUSE a poorly run ship on which sailors are overworked or harshly disciplined …1905 Amer. nautical sl.
– MAGAZINE a ship laden with stores, a victualling ship …1624 obs.
– MAMMY CHAIR a slinglike device for raising or lowering passengers to and from ships anchored away from the shore in a heavy swell …1900 nautical sl.
– MASK the mast of a ship …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– MONKEY ISLAND the uppermost tier of a big ship’s bridge …L19 nautical sl.
– MONKEY-POOP the half deck of a flush decked ship …L19 nautical coll.
– NAUSCOPY the art of discovering the approach of ships or the neighbourhood of land at a considerable distance …1797 rare
– NAVEY ships, shipping …c1350 obs.
– NAVIN shipping, fleet, navy …1375 Sc. obs.
– NAVIRE ship; shipping …1442 obs. rare
– NAVY ships or shipping …c1330 obs.
– NAVY a single ship …a1400-50 obs. rare
– OCEAN GREYHOUND a swift ocean steamer …1891
– OCEAN-PALACE a sumptuously fitted and furnished ocean passenger-steamer …1900
– OIL-BURNER any old or dilapidated vehicle, esp. a car or ship …20C sl.
– OLD LADY a ship; used affectionately …1841 US nautical sl.
– OLD WAGON an old ship …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– ONERARY a ship of burden, transport …1728 rare
– PARISH RIG a badly-rigged ship; hence, an ill-dressed man …L19 sl., orig. nautical usage
– PIE WAGON a ship’s prison … World War I Amer. sl.
– RACK a wrecked ship …a1658 obs. rare
– RAG-WAGON a sailing ship, steam or turbine …c1910 sl.
– SACK SHIP a big ship used to carry supplies from Europe to the East Coast fisheries …1965 Can.
– SALLEE-MAN a Moorish pirate ship …1637 obs.
– SALLEE ROVER a Moorish pirate ship …1686 obs.
– SARDINE-TIN a clumsy steamer …L19 nautical sl.
– TAIL the stern of a ship or boat …1553 obs.
– TAIL-CASTLE the poop of a ship …1585 obs.
– TIMBER a ship …20C
– TIMON the rudder of a ship …1506 obs. rare
– TRICK a turn at the helm of a ship; a spell; a watch …US Civil War usage
– WAFTAGE conveyance across water by ship or boat …1590
– WAGON a ship …Bk1913-17 Amer. navy sl.
– WAR-MAN a man-of-war, a warship …1546 Sc. obs.
– WINGED WAIN a ship …1598 obs.
– WORKHOUSE a hard, ill-found ship …20C nautical usage
 
SHIP – NOUNS, PERSON
– AFTERBIRD a ship’s officer ..1884 US nautical sl.
– ASHCAT a member of a steamship’s engine room gang; a stoker …1899 US nautical sl.
– BARRATOR a ship’s master who commits ‘barratry’ …1847
– BEACH-RANGERS men hanging about sea-ports, who have been turned out of vessels for bad conduct …Bk1867 nautical usage
– BLOKE, THE the captain of a ship …1914 Brit. naval sl.
– CABIN BOY a boy whose duty is to wait on the officers and passengers in the cabin of a ship …1726
– CANARY a bosun’s mate …1821 nautical sl.
– CANTEEN MERCHANT one who serves in the ship’s canteen …20C sl.
– CHIEF the chief engineer, or lieutenant-commander in a ship …1895 sl.
– CHIPS a ship’s carpenter; usually used as a nickname …1805 nautical sl.
– DAVY-MAN the member of a crew of a ship captured by a privateer who was left on board in order to swear an ‘affidavit’ as to her nationality …19C naval colloq.
– DOCTOR a ship’s cook; a cook in a camp …1821 sl.
– DRIVER a captain notorious for crowding-on all possible sail …M19 nautical
– DUCK-FUCKER the man in charge of poultry aboard ship …L18 Brit. nautical sl.
– GIG one of the crew of a ship’s gig (a light, narrow, clinker-built ship’s boat, adapted either for rowing or sailing) …1833
– GIGSMAN one of the crew of a ship’s gig (a light, narrow, clinker-built ship’s boat, adapted either for rowing or sailing) …1833
– IDLER one aboard a ship-of-war who, from being liable to constant day duty, is not required to keep the night-watch …1794 nautical
– JACK DUSTY a ship’s steward’s assistant …c1931 nautical sl.
– JACK-IN-THE-DUST a ship’s steward’s mate or assistant …Bk1896 nautical sl.
– JACK-OF-THE-DUST a man on board a U.S. man-of-war appointed to assist the paymaster’s yeoman in serving out provisions and other stores …Bk1901
– JACK-OF-THE-DUST aboard ship: a storekeeper of cleaning supplies …1986 US sl. 
– JEMMY DUCKS the ship’s poulterer …1880 nautical sl.
– LIVE LUMBER soldiers or passengers on board ship …c1780 Brit. nautical sl.
– LONGSHORE OWNER a ship-owner that sent ill-found ships to sea …c1850 Brit. nautical sl.
– MAN-EATER a particularly tough officer …L19 Brit. sailing ships’ usage
– MARSHAL an official on board ship who superintends the carrying out of punishments …1627 nautical usage obs.
– MASTER KNOB, THE the ship’s captain …19C Brit. sl.
– MR. CHIPS a ship’s carpenter; usually used as a nickname …1805 nautical sl.
– OIL AND WATER KING aboard ship: the engineer controlling fresh water distillation …1986 US sl. 
– OLD MAN orig. a commanding officer or ship’s captain; hence, one’s employer or superior …1830 sl.
– OWNER, THE the captain of a ship, and also of an aircraft …1903 sl.
– PADRONE the master of a trading vessel in the Mediterranean …1804
– PALINURE a pilot (of a ship) …1631 obs.
– PALINURUS a pilot of a ship …1567 obs.
– PUG a ship’s boy …L16 colloq.
– PUTTY a ship’s painter …1946 naval sl.
– RAG-DRAGGER the captain of a sailing ship …20C nautical sl.
– SIN BOSUN, THE the ship’s chaplain …c1925 Royal Navy usage
– TIMONEER a helmsman, a steersman …1762-9 rare
– YOUNG MAN a junior member of a ship’s crew …1612 nautical colloq. obs.
– YOUNGSTER a boy or junior seaman on board ship; also, a junior officer in the army or navy; later also, in the US Navy: a midshipman in the second year of training to become an ensign …1608
– YOUNKER a boy or junior seaman on board ship …c1595 obs.
 
SHIP – NOUNS, PERSON, OTHER
– CABIN-CRACKER a thief breaking into a ship’s cabins …1887 nautical sl.
 
SHIP – PHRASES
– BONE IN THE MOUTH, A  water foaming before a ship’s bows …arch., nautical
– FEEDS LIKE A HOTEL said of a ship with a sumptuous bill of fare …World War II Amer. sl.
 
SHIP – VERBS
– CARRY A BONE IN THE TEETH to cut through the water making waves of foam about the bow …World War II Amer. sl.
– HOLD A GOOD WIND of a ship: to have good weatherly qualities …M19 nautical colloq.
– LOWER THE FLAG to relinquish command, esp. of a ship
– MANURE to manoeuvre a ship …1569 obs.
– SHANGHAI to force a person, esp. by underhand or unscrupulous means, to join a ship which is lacking a full crew …1871 nautical sl., orig. US
– SIGN THE COAL WARRANTS to have a parting drink on board a ship ready to sail …M19 nautical usage
– STRIKE THE FLAG to relinquish command, esp. of a ship
– WAG of a boat or ship: to rock …1377
– WALK of a vehicle, a ship, a stream: to go very slowly …1827
– WALTER of a ship: to roll or be tossed on the waves …a1300 obs.


SHIPBUILDING – ADJECTIVES
– pert. to ship-building NAUPEGICAL 1678 obs. rare

SHIPBUILDING – NOUNS
– ship-building NAUPEGICAL 1570 obs. rare

SHIPBUILDING – NOUNS, PERSON
– in shipbuilding: a person who shapes treenails by means of a moot (an implement used in block-making) MOOTER 1750 obs.


SHIPPING – NOUNS
– shipping business; trade carried on by sea or water NAVIGATION 1617 obs.
– shipping fleet, navy NAVIN 1375 Sc. obs.
– shipping or ships NAVY c1330 obs.
– shipping; ship NAVIRE 1442 obs. rare
– shipping, ships NAVEY c1350 obs.


SHIPWRECK, SHIPWRECKED – ADJECTIVES
NAUFRAGED shipwrecked …1490 obs. rare
NAUFRAGEOUS in danger of shipwreck …1694 obs. rare
NAUFRAGOUS causing shipwreck …1615 obs. rare

SHIPWRECK etc. – NOUNS
MOONCUSSING taking goods from wrecked ships …1937 Amer. dial.
NAUFRAGE shipwreck …1480 obs.
NAUFRAGIE shipwreck …c1380 obs. rare

SHIPWRECK etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
MOONCURSER one who causes ships to wreck in order to plunder them; one who plunders wrecked ships …1812 Amer. dial.
NAUFRAGUE a shipwrecked person …1681 obs. rare

SHIPWRECK etc. – VERBS
PALTER; PAULTER to wreck or pilfer stranded vessels and ill-use shipwrecked sailors …Bk1905 Eng. dial.


SHIRK, SHIRKING – ADJECTIVES
– FAINT avoiding exertion, shirking, lazy, sluggish …c1325 obs.
– PIKER mean, shirking, cowardly …1901 sl.
 
SHIRK etc. – NOUNS
– GYPPO an avoidance or shirking of a duty; a shirker …1978 S. Afr. sl.. orig. military
– MIKE a period of idleness or shirking …1825 Brit. sl.
 
SHIRK etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– BACKSEAT DRIVER a lazy person, a shirker …1998 rhyming sl. for ‘skiver’
– BEAT an idle, worthless, or shiftless fellow; a loafer; a layabout; a sponger; a shirker or malingerer …1865 US
– OFFICE WORKER a shirker …1992 UK rhyming sl. 
– OLD SOLDIER a lazy person; a shirker …1805 US military sl.
– PIKER orig. a cautious or timid gambler who makes only small bets; one who plays for small stakes; hence, a person who takes no chances; a cowardly or stingy person; a shirker …1859 colloq., orig. US, derogatory
– POLER a shirker …1938 Aust. sl.
– SACK RAT a lazy person, overly fond of sleep; a chronic idler; a shirker …1947 US sl. 
– SCONCER one who pretends to be ill in order to escape work, a shirker …Bk1904 N. Ireland
– SCRIMSHANK a malingerer or one who avoids duty …1890 sl., orig. & chiefly services’ usage
– SCRIMSHANKER a malingerer or one who avoids duty …1890 sl., orig. & chiefly services’ usage
– SKATE a mean, dishonest, or contemptible person …L19 US sl.
– SKIVER;  SKYVER a lazy person; a shirker …1941 sl., orig. services’ usage
– SKULK one who skulks or hides himself; a shirker …1847
– SLACK-ARSE a lazy, inefficient, negligent person; a shirker; an idler …1971 Aust. sl. 
– SLACKER someone who avoids work or exertion; a lazy person …1898 sl.
– SOONER an idler or shirker …1892 Aust. sl.
– TIN-POTTER an idler, one who shirks their duties by claiming to be ill …1867 nautical sl.
 
SHIRK etc. – VERBS
 ABROGATE to evade, neglect, or renounce an obligation or duty; to shirk a responsibility …1904
– BAG IT to feign illness in order to avoid one’s responsibilities …1967 Amer. dial.
– BLUDGE to shirk responsibility or hard work; to impose on; to cadge or scrounge …1919 sl.
– DINGO to back out of, to shirk …1952 Aust. sl.
– DO A MIKE to pretend to be working; to hang about …Bk1892 Aust. sl.
– DO A NEVER to shirk; to loaf …1946 nautical sl.
– DODGE THE COLUMN to shirk one’s duty or avoid work …1919 sl., orig. services’ usage
– DOG to shirk, to avoid a duty or responsibility …1930 US sl.
– DOG IT to act lazily or half-heartedly; to shirk or avoid responsibility, risk, etc. …1905 sl., orig. US
– DUCK AND DIVE to avoid or evade, esp. with regard to legality or responsibility; to dodge work; to shirk; hence, to avoid regular employment but make living nevertheless …1960 UK rhyming sl. for ‘skive’ (to avoid or evade)
– FAINAIGUE to fail of a promise, to play truant, to shirk work …1854 Eng. dial.
– FALL DOWN ON THE JOB to fail at one’s responsibilities; to shirk an obligation …1898 Amer. sl.
– FART OFF to fool around; to shirk one’s duties; to blunder through inattention; to procrastinate …1968 Amer. sl.
– FENEAGUE to fail of a promise, to play truant, to shirk work …1854 Eng. dial.
– FERNIG to fail of a promise, to play truant, to shirk work …1854 Eng. dial.
– FIDDLE-FART to fool around, to waste time. to loaf, to dawdle, to shirk responsibility …1975 Amer. dial.
– FIDDLE-FART AROUND to fool around, to waste time, to loaf, to dawdle, to shirk responsibility …1972 Amer. sl.
– FIDDLEFUCK AROUND to fool around, to waste time, to loaf, to dawdle, to shirk responsibility …1984 Amer. dial.
– FLINK  to behave in a cowardly manner; to shirk one’s duty …1887 Amer. dial.
​- FUNK to try to back out of anything; to fight shy of; to wish or try to shirk or evade an undertaking, duty, etc. …E19 sl.
– GOLDBRICK to evade duty; to shirk …World War I Amer. sl.
– GOOF to idle or waste time; to shirk one’s duties …1932 sl., chiefly US
– GOOF OFF to act lazily, to mess around instead of working; to idle or waste time; to shirk one’s duties …1932 sl., orig. military
– GYPPO to dodge an unpleasant responsibility; to shirk a duty; to avoid something …1971 S. Afr. sl.. orig. military
– HACK OFF to ignore one’s homework or other duties and do nothing …1960s Amer. sl.
– JACK THE DOG to loaf, to shirk work …1988 Amer. dial.
– JIB to shirk …1811 colloq.
– KNOCK DOWN to act lazily; to shirk one’s work …1950s Can. sl.
– LAG to shirk one’s duties …1990s sl.
– LAG OFF to shirk one’s duties …1990s sl.
– LIE DOWN ON THE JOB to do less than one could or should do; to shirk one’s obligations …colloq.
– LURK to shirk work; to idle …1551 obs.
– MIKE to loiter, to hang around idly or shirk work …1859 Brit. sl.
– RAT to idle about; to shirk work or school; to malinger …1929 Amer. dial.
– RAT AROUND to idle about; to shirk work or school; to malinger; to lounge around doing nothing in particular …1857 Amer. dial.
– SCAMP to do carelessly; to do work badly, inefficiently, or with bad materials; to shirk work …1851 Sc. & Eng. & Amer. dial.
– SCONCE to feign illness, so as to escape having to work, to shirk …Bk1904 N. Ireland
– SCOW to loiter, to idle, to shirk work …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– SCOW-BANK to loiter, to idle about; to shirk work …1868 Eng. dial.
– SCRIMSHANK to malinger or shirk one’s duty …1890 sl., orig. & chiefly services’ usage
– SHAG-BAG to loiter, to lounge about; to shirk work …B1900 Eng. dial.
– SKATE to avoid obligations; to shirk …1945 US sl.
– SKIVE;  SKYVE to shirk one’s duty or avoid work …1919 sl., orig. services’ usage
– SLACK to be lazy; to avoid work …1904 sl.
– SOJER to loiter, to lounge, to shirk work, to waste time …Bk1896 Amer. dial.
– SPRUCE to malinger or shirk one’s duty …1917 Brit. sl., orig. services’ usage
– SWING THE LEAD to malinger or shirk one’s duty …1917 Brit. sl.
– TAIGLE THE CLEEK to hold things up, to hinder progress; to shirk one’s work …1951 Sc.
– TAISTER to dodge work, to slack, to be lazy …1893 Sc. obs.
– THROW OFF to fail to exert oneself, to shirk …1867 Amer. dial.
– WHIP THE CAT to shirk work and enjoy oneself on Monday …Bk1897 sl.


SHIRT – ADJECTIVES
– FRIED starched, as a shirt …Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
 
SHIRT – NOUNS
– AUSTRALIAN FLAG, THE the bottom of a shirt …Bk1892 Aust. sl.
– BALDFACED SHIRT a dress shirt with a starched front …1889 US sl.
– BLAZE-FACED SHIRT a starched white shirt …1909 Amer. dial.
– BOILED COLLAR a white dress shirt …1969 Amer. dial.
– BOILED SHIRT a man’s starched dress shirt …1853 Amer. dial.
– BOSOM the front of a shirt …1872 US
– CALF-TRINNELS the ruffles on a shirt or the flounces on a gown …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– CALF-TRUNDLE the ruffle of a shirt, or the flounces of a gown … Bk1888
– CAMESA a shirt …M17 sl.
– CARRION-CASE a shirt or chemise …M19 sl.
– CHEMMIE a shirt, a blouse …1999 UK sl.
– DICKY a worn-out shirt …1781 sl. obs. rare
– DICKY DIRT a shirt …1925 Brit. rhyming sl.
– FAG LOOP a loop on the back of a man’s shirt …2001 US sl.
– FANCY a man’s dress shirt with a coloured pattern …1986 US sl.
– FLAG OF DISTRESS a flying shirt-tail …Bk1893 sl.
– FLANNIE;  FLANNY a shirt made of flannel or flannelette …Aust. sl.
– FRIED SHIRT a man’s starched dress shirt …1853 Amer. dial.
– HAND-WRIST a cuff, as on a shirt …1707 obs. rare
– INTIMATE a shirt …Bk1896 Amer. thieves’ sl.
– JACK SHIRT a wool shirt …1950 Amer. dial.
– JACK WHITE a shirt tail …1909 Amer dial.
– JACOBITE a sham shirt; a dickey; a shirt collar …1690 sl.
– KEMESA a shirt …M17 sl.
– LABBIE;  LABEY;  LABIE the flap or skirt of a man’s coat or shirt …1808 Sc.
– LEBBIE the flap or skirt of a man’s coat or shirt …1808 Sc.
– MILLTAG;  MILLTOG;  MILLTUG a shirt …E19 sl.
– MILLY a shirt …20C sl.
– MISH a shirt; a chemise …c1670 Brit. sl.
– MOURNING SHIRT a flannel shirt …M17 sl.
– NARP a shirt …1857 Sc.
– NIVEBAND the cuff of a shirt …1701 Sc. 
– RAMP a shirt ..1845 Sc.
– SARK a garment worn next to the skin; a shirt or chemise; occasionally used for a nightshirt …a1100 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– SKIN in carnival and amusement park usage: a shirt …1982 US sl.
– THOUSAND-MILER a dark shirt that does not show the dirt …1929 nautical sl.
– UNCLE BERT a shirt …1961 UK rhyming sl.
– VENT the wrist of a shirt; any opening in a garment …1873 Eng. dial.
– VENT-HOLE a buttonhole in the wrist of a shirt …1873 Eng. dial.
 
SHIRT – PHRASES
– FLYING THE AUSSIE FLAG going around with your shirt tails hanging out …Bk1999 Aust. sl.
 
SHIRT – VERBS
– FLASH THE DICKEY to show the shirt front …Bk1893 sl.
– REEVE to draw into wrinkles; to pucker; to twist round; to shrivel up; to roll up the sleeves …1821 Eng. dial.
– SARK to clothe in a sark …1483 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.


SHIRTLESS – ADJECTIVES
– without a sark SARKLESS a1774 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.


SHIVER, SHIVERING, SHIVERS, SHIVERY – ADJECTIVES
BEVERY shivery, tremulous …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
DITHERY-DODDERY trembling, shivering, shaking …1876 Eng. dial.

SHIVER etc. – ADVERBS
AGRUE of a state in which one shivers with cold or shudders with fear or repulsion; a-shiver, shuddering …1856 Sc.

SHIVER etc. – NOUNS
BEVER;  BIVVER a shiver, a tremor; a state of trembling …1854 Eng. dial.
DANDER a fit of shivering …1877 Eng. dial.
DANDERS the shivers; a shivering fit …1889 Eng. dial.
HAWKESBURIES the shivers …Bk1999 Aust. rhyming sl. (Hawkesbury Rivers)
HAWKESBURY RIVERS the shivers …Bk1999 Aust. rhyming sl.
QUAKER a shake; a shiver …1861 Eng. dial.
RIGOR a chill; a shiver, tremor, or shake; a shivering with cold …1806 Amer. dial.
RIGORS, THE a chill; a shiver, tremor, or shake; a shivering with cold …1905 Amer. dial.
THRIDDLE a shiver, a convulsive movement …1889 Eng. dial.
WACKER a shake; a shiver …1861 Eng. dial.
WHACKER a shake; a shiver …1861 Eng. dial.

SHIVER etc. – VERBS
DADDER to quake, tremble, shiver, shake …1483 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
DATHER to shiver, to tremble, to shake either with cold or old age …1684 Eng. dial.
DUDDER to shudder, to shiver…c1640
MEEN to shiver slightly …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
NITHER to shrink or huddle, as with cold; to be shivery, to tremble …1896 Sc. 
WAMBLE to be in poor, uncertain health; to shake, to shiver …1923 Sc.