Reverse Dictionary: SNE – SNZ


SNEAK, SNEAKILY, SNEAKING, SNEAKY – ADJECTIVES
– CAGEY sneaky, shrewd …Bk2006 US sl.
– CHICKEN underhanded, sneaky; thoughtless or inconsiderate …20C Amer. sl.
– FLY furtive or sneaky …sl., chiefly Sc.
– MEECHING skulking, sneaking, creeping softly; cringing; self-deprecating, obsequious; contemptible, useless, good-for-nothing …1792 Eng. & Amer. dial.
– SCODGE a mean, sneaking fellow …1900 Sc.
– SNEAKBILL mean, paltry, sneaking …1611 obs.
– THEFTUOUS given to theft, thievish; dishonest; furtive, secret, sneaking …c1400 orig. Sc.
– UNDER-CREEPING underhand, sly, sneaking …1863 Eng. dial.
 
SNEAK etc. – ADVERBS
– ON THE FLY in secret; sneakily …chiefly Sc.
 
SNEAK etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– BOUCH a coward; a sneak …Bk1911 Sc.
– CHAPARRAL FOX a sneak, or a sly, tricky person …1932 Amer. dial.
– CHITTY-FACE a term of reproach or contempt; a pitiful, wretched, sneaking fellow …1601 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– CLAM a sneaking fellow …Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
– DARKISON a sneak, an eavesdropper …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– EGGSUCKER a sneaking or contemptible person, now esp. a toady or flatterer …1838 US sl.
– FACE-THE-CLARTS a low, plausible sneak; a mean, grovelling fellow …1868 Sc. obs.
– FEFNICUTE a hypocrite; a mean, sneaking fellow; a parasite, a hanger-on …1864 Eng. dial.
– HOG-GRUBBER a mean, stingy, sneaking fellow; a close-fisted fellow; a miser, a niggard …a1700 obs.
– JACK NASTY a term of contempt for a sneak or a sloven …1857
– JERRY-SNEAK a mean, sneaking fellow …1824
– MEECHER a sneak, a lurking thief …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– MOUDIEWARP an underhand person; a sneak, a plotter, a spy …1832 Sc.
– MOUDIEWORT an underhand person; a sneak, a plotter, a spy …1832 Sc.
– MOULDWARP an underhand person; a sneak, a plotter, a spy …1832 Sc.
– POLECAT a despicable, contemptible or deceitful person; a disreputable person; a sneaky person …1896 Amer. dial. 
– SCOUK a skulking, cowardly fellow; a sneak; one with a downcast or hangdog look …1882 Sc.
– SCOW-BANKER a sneak, a thief, a rascal …1863 Eng. dial.
– SKOOK a skulking, cowardly fellow; a sneak; one with a hangdog look …1882 Sc.
– SNAKE IN THE GRASS a term of contempt; a sneaky, despised, underhanded person; a lurking danger …17C colloq.
– SNEAKBILL a term of contempt; a mean, paltry, or sneaking fellow; a starved or thin-faced person …1562 obs.
– SNEAKSBY a mean-spirited person; a cowardly, creeping scoundrel; a paltry fellow; a sneak …1580 rare
– SNOKE-HORN a sneak; a devious rascal …M15
– WEASEL a mean, greedy or sneaking fellow …Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
– YAFFNER a dishonest, untrustworthy, sneaky person; a telltale …1935 US criminals’ sl. 
 
SNEAK etc. – VERBS
– ACHE;  AIK;  AKE to wander about aimlessly and idly; to loiter, to lounge; to hang about with intent to eavesdrop; to sneak …1785 Eng. dial.
– BINGE to sneak, to cringe; to fawn; to bow …Bk1911 Sc. 
– DO A FADE to leave; to sneak away …Bk2006 US sl.
– FAKE OUT to sneak away …1956 Amer. students’ sl.
– HAAK;  HAIK;  HAKE to wander about aimlessly and idly; to loiter, to lounge; to hang about with intent to eavesdrop; to sneak …1785 Eng. dial.
– HAIG to wander about aimlessly and idly; to loiter, to lounge; to hang about with intent to eavesdrop; to sneak …1785 Sc.
– INDIAN to roam or move about, esp. stealthily; to sneak up …1869 Amer. dial.
– INDIAN UP to roam or move about, esp. stealthily; to sneak up …1944 Amer. dial.
– MEECH to sneak, to slink, to skulk; to idle stealthily or shamefacedly about; to creep about softly; to cringe; to look ashamed …1746 Eng. & Amer. dial.
 MITCH to slink, to slouch, to sneak, to prowl about; to crouch, to huddle …1871 Eng. dial.
– MOOCH to go, to amble, to depart, to clear out; also, to sneak …1851 Amer. sl.
– PIMP to snoop, to sneak, to tattle, to inform on …1851 Amer. dial.
– RATCH to ransack, to ferret about; to sneak about like a ravenous dog; to ramble …1874 Eng. dial.
– RAT IN to sneak into without paying …20C W. Indies
– SCODGE to look sly; to pilfer; to sneak about idly …1824 Sc.
– SCOUK to skulk, to move in a stealthy, secretive way; to dodge or sneak about, to lurk; to conceal oneself, to hide; to seek shelter in hiding …1782 Sc.
– SHAB OUT to sneak away; to slink off; to go quickly …1902 Amer. dial.
– SHARK OFF to sneak off softly from shame or an apprehension of danger …1844 Eng. dial.
– SLENCH to creep or slink away, to sneak …c1330 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– SLY to sneak, to move stealthily …1851 Amer. dial.
– SNAKE to depart, esp. unobtrusively; to skulk or sneak …1818
– SNURGE to sneak off to avoid work or responsibilities …1930s US sl.


SNEER, SNEERING – ADJECTIVES
IRRISORY having the character of deriding or mocking; addicted to laughing or sneering at others …1824 rare
SNIDEY sneering; disdainful; contemptuous …1964 UK sl.

SNEER etc. – NOUNS
DIRDUMS ridicule, scoffs, sneers, slanders …1825 Sc.
JAMF a mock, a jeer, a sneer …1868 Sc.
JAMPH a mock, a jeer, a sneer …1868 Sc.
JAUMPH a mock, a jeer, a sneer …1868 Sc.
SNIRTLE a suppressed laugh; a sneer …1834 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.

SNEER etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
GIBER one who utters jibes and taunts; one who ridicules or sneers at another; a scoffer …1563
GIRDER one who sneers or cavils; a jester or satirist …1584 obs. rare

SNEER etc. – VERBS
CHUCK OFF to speak sarcastically; to sneer …1901 Aust. & NZ sl. 
JAMF;  JAMPH;  JAUMPH to make game of; to mock at, to jeer, to sneer …1768 Sc.
JERK to aim satire; to sneer, to carp …a1643 obs.
SLING OFF to speak sarcastically; to sneer …1900 Aust. & NZ sl.
SNAG to carp, to cavil, to sneer, to nag …1554 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
SNIRTLE to laugh in a quiet, suppressed, or restrained manner; to snigger; to sneer …1785 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.


SNEEZE, SNEEZING – INTERJECTIONS/PHRASES
CATCH HIM! used as a response when someone sneezes …1950 Amer. dial.
CATCH IT! used as a response when someone sneezes …1950 Amer. dial.
CHEESE AND CRACKERS said when somebody sneezes …1967 Amer. dial.
HEART-SHOT an exclamation used after sneezing …Bk1902 Sc.  
I CATCH YOU! used as a response when someone sneezes …1950 Amer. dial.
SALUD! used when someone sneezes …1967 Amer. dial.
SCAT! said to a person when they have sneezed …1890 Amer. dial.
SCAT CAT. said to a person when they have sneezed …1965 Amer. dial.
SCAT CAT, GET YOUR TAIL OUT OF MY GRAVY! said to a person when they have sneezed …1997 Amer. dial.
SCAT CAT, YOUR TAIL’S ON FIRE! said to a person when they have sneezed …1965 Amer. dial.
SCAT KITTY! said to a person when they have sneezed …1965 Amer. dial.
SCAT THE CAT! said to a person when they have sneezed …1965 Amer. dial.
SCAT THERE! said to a person when they have sneezed …1965 Amer. dial.
SCAT THERE, YOUR SON BIT YOUR TAIL OFF! said to a person when they have sneezed …1965 Amer. dial.
SCAT TOM! said to a person when they have sneezed …1965 Amer. dial.
SCAT TOM, YOUR TAIL’S AFIRE! said to a person when they have sneezed …1965 Amer. dial.
SCAT TOM, YOUR TAIL’S IN THE GRAVY! said to a person when they have sneezed …1968 Amer. dial.
SCAT YOUR TAIL OUT OF THE BUTTER! said to a person when they have sneezed …1973 Amer. dial.
SHOO! used as a response when someone sneezes …1909 Amer. dial.

SNEEZE etc. – NOUNS
NEESHIN sneezing …Bk1905 Sc.
NEEZE a sneeze …c1340 obs. exc. Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
NEEZING sneezing, a sneeze …1382
NEEZING-BOUT a prolonged or violent fit of sneezing …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
SNICK-UP a sneeze, a sneezing fit …1692 obs. exc. Eng. dial.

SNEEZE etc. – VERBS
ATCH to sneeze …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
ATISSHA to sneeze …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
DESTERNUTE to sneeze …1623 obs. rare
NEAZLE to make the noise which accompanies a sneeze …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
NEEZE to sneeze …c1340 obs. exc. Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
SNICK-UP to sneeze …B1900 Eng. dial.


SNIDE – ADJECTIVES
– snide, sarcastic; irritable; touchy SNARKY 1906 Amer. sl.


SNIFF – NOUNS
– a sniff SCENT 1843 Sc.

SNIFF – NOUNS, PERSON
– a person who sniffs SNIBBLE-NOSE 1746 Eng. dial.
– a person who sniffs disdainfully, one who snuffs SNUFFER a1610

SNIFF – VERBS
– to sniff FUFF 19C Sc.
– to sniff, to inhale sharply and noisily; to smell, to scent SNUFT 1820 Eng. dial.


SNIFFLE – VERBS
– to sniffle; to whine NIFFLE Bk1886 Eng. dial.


SNIGGER, SNIGGERING – NOUNS
– a snigger; a soft suppressed laugh NICKER 1808 Sc. 
– a sniggering; a half-suppressed laugh SQUIRK 1882

SNIGGER etc. – VERBS
– to snigger in a smothered kind of way SNURCH Bk1875 Eng. dial.
– to snigger; to laugh in a quiet, suppressed, or restrained manner SNIRTLE 1785 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– to snigger, to laugh in a suppressed fashion NEESTER 1887 Sc. 
– to snigger, to laugh with a snickering sound, generally in a ridiculous manner NICKER 1808 Sc. 


SNIP – VERBS
– to snip, to nick, to clip; to cut slightly SNICK 1728


SNIPER – NOUNS, PERSON
– a sniper DINGER 1972 US sl.
– a sniper and scout working together DING TEAM 1991 US sl.
– a sniper hiding in a high place, such as on the roof of a building ANGEL Bk2006 Amer. sl.


SNIVEL, SNIVELLER – NOUNS, PERSON
– a sniveller; a stupid person; one not sharp of wits BLUNTIE 1768 obs. exc. Sc.

SNIVEL etc. – VERBS
– to snivel SNUFF 
– to snivel or blubber SNOTTER 
– to snivel; to shed tears; to cry and sob BIBBLE 19C Eng. dial.
– to snivel; to sniffle; to whine NIFFLE Bk1898
– to snivel; to weep, to blubber NAP A BIB Bk1903 sl.


SNOB, SNOBBERY, SNOBBILY, SNOBBISH, SNOBBISHNESS – ADJECTIVES
– COUNTY snobbish, pretentious …1921 Brit. sl.
– DICTY stylish, high-class; snobbish, haughty, conceited, uppity …1923 Amer. dial.
– FANCY-PANTS fancy or snobbish; used derisively …1949 Amer. sl.
– HIFALUTIN snobbish, pompous; stuck up …M19 sl., orig. US
– HIGH-FALLOOTIN’ snobbish, pompous …M19 sl., orig. US
– HIGHFALUTEN snobbish, pompous …M19 sl., orig. US
– HIGHFALUTIN absurdly pompous or pretentious; stuck-up, snobbish…1839 colloq.
– HIGHFALUTING snobbish, pompous …M19 sl., orig. US
– HIGH-HAT snobbish and arrogant …colloq.
– HIGH-HATTED snobbish, stuck up …1920s sl., orig. US
– HIGH-HATTY snobbish, stuck up …1920s sl., orig. US
– HIKI-FALLOOTIN’ snobbish, pompous …M19 sl., orig. US
 HINCTY;  HINKTY conceited, snobbish, stuck-up, pretentious; contentious, unpleasant …1924 US sl.
– HINKY snobbish; haughty; conceited; aloof; fastidious …1967 Amer. sl., orig. African-American
– HOITY-TOITY haughty, conceited, snobbish, pretentious …1713 sl.
– LAA-DEE-LAA stuck-up, arrogant, snobbish …L19 sl.
– LA-DEE-DA stuck-up, arrogant, snobbish …L19 sl.
– LA-DI-DA snobbish, pretentious …1895 sl.
– LA-DI-DAH stuck-up, arrogant, snobbish …M19 sl.
– LAH-DI-DAH stuck-up, arrogant, snobbish …L19 sl.
– MORE SIDE THAN A BILLIARD BALL very arrogant, snobbish …1910s Aust. sl.
– PERSNICKETY snobbish; vain …1959 Amer. dial.
– SADDITY arrogant, haughty, snobbish, conceited …1960s African-American sl.
– SCABBERT socially pretentious, snobbish, aspiring to gentility …1825 Sc.
– SEDDITY snobbish and pretentious …1960s African-American sl.
– SIDITTY arrogant, haughty, snobbish, conceited …1960s African-American sl.
– SIDITY arrogant, haughty, snobbish, conceited …1968 African-American sl.
– SNOOTY snobbish, arrogant, haughty and disdainful; supercilious; unpleasant …1919 Amer. sl.
– SNOTTY snobbish, conceited …1870 sl.
– SNOTTY-NOSED snobbish; conceited …colloq.
– STUCK-UP snobbish, pretentious, arrogant, reserved …1829 sl.
– STUCKUPPY arrogant, snobbish, reserved …M19
– TOFFEE-NOSED snobbish, pretentious, conceited ..1925 sl., chiefly Brit.
 
SNOB etc. – ADVERBS
– HIGH FALUTIN snobbily, pompously …1900s US sl.
 
SNOB etc. – NOUNS
– HIFALUTIN snobbery, pomposity …M19 Aust. sl.
– HIGHFALUTIN snobbery, pomposity …M19 Aust. sl.
– HIGH NOSE arrogance, snobbery …20C US sl.
– LA-DI-DAH snobbishness; upper-class and/or wealthy hedonism …L19 sl.
– LADIDAISM snobbishness; upper-class and/or wealthy hedonism …L19 sl.
– SNOB MOB a snobbish group …Bk1942 US sl.
 
SNOB etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– BLIG a snob, a cad …Bk1888 Eng. dial.
– CAD one who imitates the aristocracy; a snob …Bk1885
– DICTY a stuck-up, snobbish person; one who is conceited or uppity …1928 Amer. dial.
 DOWNSTART a person who pretends to be from a lower social background; an inverted snob …1960 rare
– FANCY-PANTS a dandy; a snob …1934 Amer. sl.
– FLUBDUB a snob, a pretender …1893 Amer. dial.
– HIGH-HAT a person who behaves arrogantly and snobbishly; a putatively important person …1925 US sl.
– HIGH-HATTER a person who behaves arrogantly and snobbishly; a putatively important person …1925 US sl.
 HINCHY a snobbish, pompous, or overbearing person; a prominent or important person ​..1970 US sl.
 HINCTY;  HINKTY a snobbish, pompous, or overbearing person; a prominent or important person ​..1970 US sl.
– KACK a snobbish person …1920s African-American sl.
– LACY-PANTS a dandy; a snob; a flashily dressed person  …1940 US sl.
– LA DE DAH a snob …1935 US sl.
– LA-DI-DAH a snob …M19 sl.
– LAUDY-DAW a snob …L19 sl.
– PURE MERINO a snob …1826 Aust. sl.
– SADDITY a stuck-up, conceited, snobbish person …1963 African-American sl.
– SADIT a stuck-up, conceited, snobbish person …1982 African-American sl.
– SEDDITY a stuck-up, conceited, snobbish person …1960s African-American sl.
– SIDITTY;  SIDITY a stuck-up, conceited, snobbish person …1960s African-American sl.
– SNOOT a snob; an arrogant person who ‘sticks their nose in the air’ …M19 sl.
– STUCK-UP an arrogant, snobbish, or reserved person …L19 sl.
– TAMPON a snobbish, stuck-up, or unpleasant person …2001 UK sl. 
– TOFFEE-NOSE a snob …1943 Brit. sl.
– TUFT-HUNTER a snob; a toady; a social climber …M19 sl.
– UPWAYS a snobbish, standoffish person …1970s African-American sl.
– VAGINA LITTLEFINGER a snob …Bk1972 US homosexual sl. 
– WINDOW LADY a snob who tells others how to conduct themselves properly …Bk1972 homosexual sl. 
 
SNOB etc. – VERBS
– FANCY-PANTS to act like a dandy or snob …1936 Amer. sl.
– HIGH-HAT to treat a person in a snobbish or offhand way …colloq., chiefly US and Can.


SNOOKER – NOUNS
– anything blue, as a snooker ball, a dirty joke, or a pornographic video DANNY LA RUE Bk2004 Brit. rhyming sl.
– in snooker: chalk LAMBETH WALK 1992 UK rhyming sl.


SNOOP, SNOOPING, SNOOPY – ADJECTIVES
NIBBY snoopy, inquisitive, nosy …1942 Amer. dial.

SNOOP etc. – NOUNS
NEBBY-NOSING snooping …1965 Amer. dial.

SNOOP etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
PIKE a nosy, snoopy, or inquisitive person, a prying person …1959 Amer. dial.
POKE-NOSE a prying, snoopy, or inquisitive person; a meddler …1915 Amer. dial. 

SNOOP etc. – VERBS
HAWKSHAW to snoop; to inquire …1946 US sl.
PIKE to be nosy, to snoop, to pry …1959 Amer. dial.
PILFER AROUND to meddle, to snoop …1953 Amer. dial.
PIMP to snoop, to sneak, to tattle, to inform on …1851 Amer. dial.
SNIPE to snoop; to spy on someone …1999 US sl.
STICKYBEAK to pry, to snoop, to be nosy …1921 Aust. & NZ colloq.


SNOOZE – NOUNS
– a snooze, a nap, a brief sleep ZIZ;  ZIZZ 1941 sl., orig. military usage

SNOOZE – VERBS
– to have a snooze or nap; to sleep lightly or briefly ZIZ;  ZIZZ 1930s sl.


SNORE, SNORER, SNORING – NOUNS
– LION’S ROAR a snore, snoring …1992 UK rhyming sl.
– RAINING (AND POURING) snoring …1992 UK rhyming sl.
– Z-ING snoring, sleeping …c1965 Amer. dial.
 
SNORE etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– SNORE-PIG a heavy snorer; one who grunts in his sleep …Brit. sl.
– WINDOW RATTLER someone who snores with great resonance …1964 UK sl.
 
SNORE etc. – VERBS
– BLOW Z’s to sleep or nap; to snore …1968 Amer. dial.
– BUZZ WOOD to snore …1965 Amer. dial.
– CALL HOGS to snore …1912 Amer. dial.
– CALL PIGS to snore …1965 Amer. dial.
– CALL SOME HOGS to snore …1946 Amer. dial.
– CALL THE COWS to snore …1965 Amer. dial.
– CALL THE DOGS to snore …1965 Amer. dial.
– CALL THE HOGS TO THE HILL to snore …Bk1898 Sc.
– COME FROM HOG’S NORTON to snore …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– CUT BIG TIMBER to snore …c1960 Amer. dial.
– CUT GOURDS to snore loudly …1965 Amer. dial.
– CUT LOGS to snore …1965 Amer. dial.
– CUT TIMBER to snore …1965 Amer. dial.
– CUT WOOD to snore …1965 Amer. dial.
– DRIVE PIGS to snore …1942 Amer. dial.
– DRIVE HOGS TO MARKET to snore …18C colloq.
– DRIVE PIGS to snore …1828 colloq.
– DRIVE PIGS TO MARKET to snore …1858 colloq.
– KNOCK THE SHINGLES to snore …1966 Amer. dial.
– LION’S ROAR to snore …1992 UK rhyming sl.
– MOW HAY to snore …1970 Amer. dial.
– RAIN to snore …1992 UK rhyming sl. (Rain and Pour)
– RAIN AND POUR to snore …1992 UK rhyming sl.
– RATTLE THE SHINGLES to snore …1966 Amer. dial.
– RIP OFF A HEAP OF SHINGLES to snore …1956 Amer. dial.
– RUTTLE to snore …1891 Eng. dial.
– SAW BOARDS to snore …1965 Amer. dial.
– SAW GOURDS to snore …1870 US sl.
– SAW LOGS AND STACK THEM to snore …1965 Amer. dial.
– SAW LOGS to snore …1949 Amer. dial.
– SAW LUMBER to snore …1965 Amer. dial.
– SAW ON GOURDS to snore …Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
– SAW ON ONE’S GOURDS to snore loudly …1915 Amer. dial.
– SAW THEM OFF to snore …1930s sl.
– SAW TIMBER to snore …1965 Amer. dial.
– SAW WOOD to snore …1858 Amer. dial.
– SNARK to make a snoring noise …Bk1895 Eng. dial.
– SOUND OFF THE BUGLE to snore …1966 Amer. dial.
– TAKE TWO ROWS AT A TIME to sleep very soundly; to snore …1939 Amer. dial.


SNORT, SNORTING – ADJECTIVES
– making a snorting noise RHONCHISONANT 1656 obs.
– snorting; given to snorting SNORTY B1900

SNORT etc. – ADVERBS
– with a snort, in a snorting manner SNORTY 1890 Eng. dial.

SNORT etc. – VERBS
– to snort SNORTLE Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.


SNOTTY – ADJECTIVES
– snotty; blubbering BIBBLIE Bk1911 Sc. 


SNOW, SNOWY – ADJECTIVES
 BLIZZY snowy …1996 Antarctica usage
– CALF-LEG-DEEP of water or snow: so deep as to reach up to the calf of the leg …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– EIDENT of rain, snow, etc.: steady, continuous, unceasing …1794 Sc.
– FEATHERY of snow: like a feather in appearance …1580
– NINGUID where much snow is …1656 obs. rare
– NIXIOUS white as snow, snowy …1623 obs.
– ROTTEN of snow: soft, yielding, esp. as forming a layer concealed beneath a firmer surface …1878
– SCOWTHERIE;  SCOWTHERY beginning or threatening to rain or snow …1825 Sc. 
– SUBNIVEAL existing or carried on under the snow …1885
– SUBNIVEAN existing or carried on under the snow …1845
 
SNOW etc. – NOUNS
 ALBINO GRASS – snow fallen on a Vancouver, British Columbia, lawn …2002 Can. sl.
– BILLOWS snowdrifts …1867 Eng. dial.
– BIRD SNOW late spring snow …1946 Amer. dial.  
– BLEFFART a squall, a storm, a hurricane; a sudden and violent snowstorm …Bk1911 Sc.
– BLIFFART a squall, a gust; a short and sudden fall of snow …Bk1911 Sc.
– BLIND-DRIFT heavily driving snow; a blinding, drifting snow …Bk1911 Sc.
– BLIRT a storm of wind and rain; a cold drift of snow …Bk1911 Sc.
– BLOUT the bursting of a storm; a sudden fall of rain, snow, or hail, with wind …Bk1911 Sc.
– BLOW-SNOW a combination of wind and snow …1944 Amer. dial.
– BLUE SNOW a light snowfall, when the wind’s blowing a few flakes …1967 Amer. dial.
 BLUNT a storm of snow or rain ...1873 Eng. dial.
– BRACK a sudden fall of earth or snow on a slope; a flood from a thaw; a sudden and heavy fall of rain …Bk1911 Sc.
– BREAK a heavy fall of rain or snow …Bk1911 Sc.
– BREAKUP the late spring melting of ice and snow …1868 Amer. dial.
– CAHOOZIN a dip-shaped hole in snow, worn down from sleighs …1968 Amer. dial.
– CAT’S TRACK a light fall of snow …1967 Amer. dial.
– CAT-TRACKER a light fall of snow …1967 Amer. dial.
– CAT-TRACKING SNOW a light fall of snow …1967 Amer. dial.
– COME snow …1992 UK rhyming sl. (Come and Go)
– COME AND GO snow …1992 UK rhyming sl.
– DAMN YANKEE COTTON snow …2008 Amer. dial.
– DANDRUFF snow …1976 US sl.
– DEAL OF WEATHER, A heavy rain or snow …1874 Eng. dial.  
– DIRT rain, snow, or sleet; ‘dirty’ or stormy weather …1887 Eng. dial.
– DRIBBLE a shower or snowstorm …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
 DRIFFLE a slight shower of rain or snow; a drizzle; a short spell of stormy weather; a gale …1824 Sc.
– ENDRIFT snow driven by the wind …1801 Sc.
– FALL a fall of rain or snow; a shower of rain, a snowstorm …1891 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– FALLING a downfall of snow, rain, or hail; a snowstorm; generally in plural …1892 Eng. dial.
– FALLING-WEATHER a rainy or snowy time …Bk1912 US
– FAN a drift of snow …1866 Sc.
– FANN a drift of snow …1866 Sc.
– FLADGES snowflakes …19C Eng. dial.
– FLOBBER snow which melts in falling before touching the ground …Bk1882 Eng. dial.
– FLUFF-STUFF snow …Bk2006 US sl.
– FRESHIES in snowboarding: the first tracks in virgin snow …1995 US sl.
– GIPSEN SNOW a slight snowfall …Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
– GOOSE DOWN a light fall of snow …1966 Amer. dial.
– GOOSE FEATHERS  large, soft flakes of snow …1965 Amer. dial.
– GOUT a lump of something semiliquid; a lump of clotted blood; a lump of snow …1899 Amer. dial.
– GRAUPEL soft hail or snow pellets …German
– HAP a heavy fall of snow …1891 Eng. dial.
– HOGAMADOG the huge ball of snow made by boys in rolling a snow ball over soft snow …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– KAAVIE a heavy fall of snow; a blizzard …1866 Sc.
– KATTY-CLEAN-DOORS a child’s name for snow …1844 Sc.
– LAMB-BLASTS passing showers of snow, rain, or hail accompanied by high wind, occurring about the time of young lambs …Bk1902 Eng. dial.
– LAMB-KILLER a heavy snow storm late in the spring …Bk1913 Amer. dial.
– LAMB-SHOWERS passing showers of snow, rain, or hail accompanied by high wind, occurring about the time of young lambs …Bk1902 Eng. dial.
– LAMB-STORMS passing showers of snow, rain, or hail accompanied by high wind, occurring about the time of young lambs …1790 Eng. dial.
– LAPPER snow in the act of melting; soft, slushy snow …1824 Sc.
– LAVANGE a great fall of snow from mountains; an avalanche …1806 rare
– LAYING-WEATHER when snow lays long on the ground …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– LORD’S FERTILIZER spring snow …1985 Amer. dial.
– LYING-STORM a snowstorm when the snow lies …1787 Sc.
– MIRK-DRIFE a fine driving snow or mist …Bk1903 Eng. dial.  
– MIST a very light snowfall …1965 Amer. dial.
– ONCOME a fall of rain or snow …Bk1909 Sc.
– ON-DING a persistent heavy fall of rain or snow …1776 Sc.
– ONFALL a fall of rain or snow …1821 Sc.
– ONION SNOW a light snowfall in the spring, usually after the onions have been set out …1930 Amer. dial.
– RAFF a short sharp shower of rain or snow, accompanied by gusts of wind; a driving shower …1790 Sc.
– RED ROBIN SNOW late spring snow …1954 Amer. dial.
– REEK a pile, a heap, esp. of snow; a drift …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– SCALVA snow in broad flakes, wet snow; heaps of snow …1898 Sc.
– SCOOCHER a slide down a snow-slope in a squatting position …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– SCOUTHER a slight quantity of fallen snow …Bk1904 Sc.
– SCOUTHERIN a slight quantity of fallen snow …Bk1904 Sc.
– SCOWTHER a sprinkling of snow …1866 Sc. 
– SCOWTHERIN’ a sprinkling of newly-fallen snow …1923 Sc. 
– SCUT a light dusting or flurry of snow …1968 Amer. dial.
– SCUTCH a light dusting or flurry of snow …1951 Amer. dial.
– SKID a light fall of snow or rain …1977 Amer. dial.
– SKIFF a thin coat or layer, as of snow …Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
– SKIFT a light fall of snow or rain; a thin layer of snow or frost on the ground, or of ice on water …1808 Amer. dial.
– SKIM a very light fall of snow …1908 Amer. dial.
– SKIMMER a very light fall of snow …1965 Amer. dial.
– SKIMP a thin coat of snow or ice ….1967 Amer. dial.
– SKIP a very light fall of snow …1967 Amer. dial.
– SKIPT a very light fall of snow …1967 Amer. dial.
– SKIRMISH a very light fall of snow …1984 Amer. dial.
– SKIRT a very light fall of snow …1968 Amer. dial.
– SKIT a slight shower of rain or snow …1847
– SLUSH-UP the slushy condition of country roads resulting from a sudden thaw …1910 Amer. dial.
– SNARD LUMPS snow and ice clumps that build up under the fender of the car …1987 Can. sl.
– SNIRT a stormy mixture of snow and dirt …1987 Can. sl.
– SNOW DEVIL a whirling column of snow …Can.
– SPITTER a shower or snowstorm …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– SPOSH a mixture of mud and water; slush, soft snow mixed with water in thawing weather; water partially frozen …1845 US
– ST. CAUSLAN’S FLAW a snowstorm in March …1850 Sc.
– TERMINATION DUST the first snow, which marks the end of the construction season and the termination of the job …1957 Amer. dial.
– TINDA fleecy wet snow …Bk1905 Sc.
– WAFF a slight amount of something blown about by the wind, as snow or smoke, a puff, a flurry …c1860 Sc.
– WAFFLE a slight fall or flurry of snow …1825 Sc.
– WAP a sudden storm of snow …1818 Sc.
– WEATHER FALL a period of rain, snow, hail, or heavy fog …1965 Amer. dial.
– YANKEE COTTON snow …1969 Amer. dial.
– YANKEE RAIN snow …1978 Amer. dial.
 
SNOW etc. – PHRASES
– AUNT DINAH’S PICKING HER GEESE it’s snowing; said when huge feathery snowflakes are falling, esp. in early winter and first snow falls …1969 Amer. dial.
– DEVIL IS BEATING HIS WIFE, THE it’s raining or snowing, used esp. when the sun is also shining …1930 Amer. dial.
– DEVIL IS FIGHTING WITH HIS WIFE, THE it’s raining or snowing, used esp. when the sun is also shining …1899 Amer. dial.
– DEVIL IS WHIPPING HIS WIFE, THE it’s raining or snowing, used esp. when the sun is also shining …1899 Amer. dial.
– MOTHER CAREY IS PLUCKING HER GEESE it is snowing …B1900
– OLD WOMAN IS A-LOSIN’ HER FEATHERS, THE large flakes of snow are falling fast …1942 Amer. dial.
– OLD WOMAN IS PICKING HER GEESE, THE. it is snowing …1899 Amer. dial.
– OLD WOMAN IS PLUCKING THE GEESE, THE it is snowing …1983 Amer. dial.
– TAKE A SCOOCHER to slide down a snow slope in a squatting position …Bk1896 Amer. dial.
 
SNOW etc. – VERBS
– BLIRT to rain or snow …Bk1911 Sc.
– BLUNK to snow …1746 Eng. dial.
– BREAK to clear deep snow from a path or road …1779 Amer. dial.
– BREAK OUT to clear deep snow from a path or road …1831 Amer. dial.
– DRIFFLE to drizzle; to rain or snow fitfully or in sparse drops, as at the ‘tail’ of a shower …1639 Sc.
– FAN;  FANN of snow: to form drifts …1929 Sc. rare
– KAAV to snow heavily …Bk1902 Sc.
– KAAVIE of snow: to fall heavily and in drifts …1866 Sc.
– MAFT to drift: of dust, snow, etc. …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– MUSH (ON) to proceed, to travel, usually on foot through snow …1902 Amer. dial.
– PANK to pack or tamp down; to flatten; to crush; often said of sand, snow, hair, etc. …1937 Amer. dial.
– POST-HOLE to walk in snow sinking deeply with each step …1999 Amer. dial.
– SAD of snow: to subside …1928 Sc.
– SCOUTHER to rain or snow slightly, to drizzle …Bk1904 Sc.
– SCOWDER to rain or snow slightly; to drizzle …1866 Sc. 
– SNOW-BLOCK to block or impede the passage of by snow …Bk1898 rare


SNOWBALL – NOUNS
– a snowball WINTER APPLE B1900 Eng. dial.
– the throwing of snowballs BALLING 1865


SNOWBOARDING – ADJECTIVES
UNDERAGE in snowboarding: used to describe the not-yet-perfected performance of a trick or manoeuvre …1995 US sl.

SNOWBOARDING – NOUNS
AIR a jump while snowboarding …1996 US sl.
ALLEY-OOP in snowboarding: a 360-degree turn in the direction of the back of the board …1996 Can. sl.
CRUD in skiing and snowboarding: wet or heavy snow on which it is difficult to ski, esp. characterized by a breakable surface curst overlying a deep layer of soft snow …1961
FACE-PLANT a face-first fall; in snowboarding: a face-first fall into the snow …1984 US sl.
FRESHIES in snowboarding: the first tracks in virgin snow …1995 US sl.
OLLIE in skateboarding and snowboarding: a manoeuvre in which one drives the board up into the air off a flat surface without holding the board, often in order to perform a jump over an obstacle …1979 Aust. sl.

SNOWBOARDING – NOUNS, PERSON
GAPER in snowboarding: a person lacking skill or coordination, esp. a skier …Bk1997 
NOOB in snowboarding: a beginner …2005 UK sl.

SNOWBOARDING – VERBS
BONE OUT in snowboarding: to hold your leg straight during a manoeuvre in the air …1990 US sl.
PACK in snowboarding: to hit the snow hard …1990 US sl.
SKID in snowboarding: to slide down a slope sideways …1993 US sl.


SNOWCAP – NOUNS
– a snowcap; an ice-cap CALOTTE L19


SNOWFLAKE – NOUNS
– a snowflake BLOSSOM Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– a snowflake BLUNK 1896 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– a snowflake BLUNT Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– a snowflake SNOW-BLOSSOM 1676 obs.
– large, soft flakes of snow GOOSE FEATHERS 1965 Amer. dial.
– snowflakes FLADGES 19C Eng. dial.


SNOWMOBILE – NOUNS
– a snowmobile IRON DOG 1960 Alaska usage
– a snowmobile SKIDOO 1961 Can.
– a snowmobile SNO-GO 1961 US sl.

SNOWMOBILE – NOUNS, PERSON
– the driver of a snowmobile MOTOR MUSHER 1966 Alaska

SNOWMOBILE – VERBS
– to travel by skidoo SKIDOO 1986 Can.


SNOWSHOE – NOUNS
– a snowshoe WEB 1902 Amer. dial.
– a snowshoe, or similar device for traversing snow or soft ground RACKET 1626
– a snowshoe, or similar device for traversing snow or soft ground RACKETT 1704
– a snowshoe, or similar device for traversing snow or soft ground RACQUET 1949 Amer. dial.
– a snowshoe, or similar device for traversing snow or soft ground RACQUETTE 1897 Can.

SNOWSHOE – NOUNS, PERSON
– a person who walks on ‘rackets’ or snowshoes RACKETER 1893 rare

SNOWSHOE – VERBS
– to make one’s way on snowshoes WEB 1959 Amer. dial.


SNUB – NOUNS
BACK-CA’ a retort, a snub …1894 Sc.
BACK DOOR a snub; a ‘cold shoulder’ …1966 Amer. dial.
BACKDOOR CHUTE a snub; a ‘cold shoulder’ …1966 Amer. dial.
BACKDOOR TREATMENT a snub; a ‘cold shoulder’ …1966 Amer. dial.
BACK-HANDER a sarcastic retort or snub …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
COOLER a chilly glance; a snub; rejection …20C Aust. sl.
ICE a cool reception; a brush-off; a snub; an act of rejection …L19 US sl.
ICE MITT a rejection or refusal; a snub; a cold or hostile reception …1935 Amer. dial.
ICE PITCHER ‘the cold shoulder’; a snub; refusal to recognize and acquaintance …1900 Amer. dial.
ICY MITT a rejection or refusal; a snub; a cold or hostile reception …1968  Amer. dial.
ICY MITTEN a rejection or refusal; a snub; a cold or hostile reception …1897   Amer. dial.
IG(G) a rebuff, a snub …1963 Amer. dial.
PUTDOWN a snub or humiliation …sl.
SCORN a snub, a brusque rejection, esp. of an offer of marriage; a slight in love …c1746 Sc.

SNUB – VERBS
DUST OFF to reject, to snub …1940s US sl.
FREEZE to treat someone with deliberate coldness; to snub …1861 Amer. sl.
GIVE ONE THE BUM’S RUSH to eject or dismiss forcibly; to snub …1926 Amer. dial.
GIVE THE IG to ignore a person deliberately, to snub …1930s sl., orig. African-American
HIGH-HAT to act in a superior manner towards others; to snub …1920s colloq., orig. US
HI-HAT to act in a superior manner towards others; to snub …1920s sl., orig. US
ICE to snub, to treat coldly …1930s US sl.
ICE OUT to snub, to treat coldly …1930s US sl.
IG(G) to ignore; to snub; to reject …1946 Amer. dial.
KEEP AT THE STICK’S END to snub, to keep ‘at arm’s length’ …L19 sl.
PUT DOWN to snub, humiliate or belittle …1960s sl.
PUT ON THE CHILL to act coldly toward a person; to snub …20C Amer. sl.
PUT THE IG ON to ignore somebody; to snub …1977 Amer. dial.
RAP ON THE KNUCKLES to snub; to control sharply …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
SALT to snub; to put down; to check; to have revenge upon …1863 Sc.
SIT ON to squash, to snub …M19 sl.
SIT UPON to squash, to check, to snub; to overcome or rebuke; to express contempt for a man in a marked manner …1865 sl.
SNOOT to behave haughtily toward; to disdain; to snub …1928 sl.
SNOUCH to snub; to treat scornfully …1761


SNUFF – NOUNS
– AMBEER saliva coloured by chewing tobacco or snuff …1848 Amer. dial.
– AMBER JUICE saliva coloured by chewing tobacco or snuff …1968 Amer. dial.
– BEGGAR’S BROWN light brown snuff which is made of the stem of tobacco …1879 Sc. colloq.
– BROTH moisture in the mouth, coloured brown by snuff or chewing tobacco …1968 Amer. dial.
– DIGGING taking snuff …1860 Amer. dial. arch.
– DIP a pinch or helping of snuff …Bk2006 US sl.
– ELBOW GREASE snuff …1808 Sc. obs.
– GOOP moisture in the mouth, coloured brown by snuff or chewing tobacco …1965 Amer. dial.
– HAM GRAVY saliva coloured by chewing tobacco or snuff …1966 Amer. dial.
– HEIFER DUST snuff; tobacco …1935 Amer. dial.
– LAL BROUGH snuff …20C rhyming sl.
– LALLY snuff …20C rhyming sl. (Lal Brough)
– MACCOBOY a kind of snuff, usually scented with attar of roses …1740
– MERRY-GO-UP snuff …1821 sl.
– MILL a snuff-box; a small box, generally made of horn …1720 Sc.
– MOLASSES SPIT saliva coloured brown by snuff or chewing tobacco …1950 Amer. dial.
– MORNING’S MORNING an early-morning chew of snuff …1925 Amer. dial.
– NACKET a quantity of snuff made up in a ball-shaped or cylindrical form; a small roll of tobacco …1825 Sc.
– NEESHIN snuff …Bk1905 Sc.
– NOSE GUNPOWDER snuff …1706 obs.
– QUID BOX a snuff-box …L18 sl.
– REAR an amount of snuff taken at one time …1925 Amer. dial.
– REST POWDER snuff …1927 Amer. dial.
– SCANDIHOOVIAN DYNAMITE snuff …1942 Amer. dial.
– SNEEZE old term for snuff …Brit. sl.
– SNEEZE-HORN a snuff-box made of the tip of a horn …1806 Eng. dial.
– SNEEZER a snuffbox …Brit. sl.
– SNISHEEN snuff …Bk1867 Ireland
– SNOOSE damp, grated, snuff; a strong moist kind of snuff …1912 Can. sl.
– SNUSH snuff; a pinch of snuff obs.
– TADDY a certain kind of snuff, so called from the name of its makers, Messrs. Taddy and Co., London …1869 Sc.
– TADDY-BOX a snuff-box …1907 Sc.
– TOOTHBRUSH a twig chewed on one end until frayed and used for applying snuff to the inside of the mouth …1853 Amer. dial.
– WAKKEN-BEGGAR snuff …Bk1905 Eng. dial. jocular usage
 
SNUFF – NOUNS, PERSON
– DIGGER one who uses snuff …1860 Amer. dial. arch.
– LIPPER a person who uses snuff …1966 Amer. dial.
– SNOOSEBUG a person who uses snuff …1965 Amer. dial.
– SNUFFER one who takes snuff …1889
– TOBACCO-WORM one who chews or smokes tobacco to excess; one who uses snuff …1906 Amer. dial.
 
SNUFF – VERBS
– DIG to use snuff …1860 Amer. dial.
– LIP to place snuff between the lip and gums …1938 Amer. dial.
– SNUFT to take snuff …B1900 Eng. dial.
– SNUSH to take snuff …obs.


SNUG, SNUGLY – ADJECTIVES
BIELDY snug, sheltered; affording shelter or warmth …1789 Sc. & Eng. dial.
BIELY furnishing shelter; snug …Bk1911 Sc. 
BIEN snug, comfortable, cosy …1725 Sc.
CANNY quiet, easy, snug, comfortable, pleasant, cosy …a1758 Sc.
COBBY neat, symmetrical; snug, comfortable …19C Eng. dial.
LOWN of a place: sheltered; cosy, snug …a1522 chiefly Sc.
QUEEM close-fitting or well-fitting, snug, neat …1820 Sc.
SCOWB AND SCRAW all snug …1824 Sc.
SNOD comfortable, snug, cosy …1695 Sc. & Eng. dial.

SNUG etc. – ADVERBS
LOWN so as to be sheltered or protected; cosily, snugly …1724 chiefly Sc.
LOWNLY so as to be sheltered or protected; cosily, snugly …1788 Sc. rare
QUEEM exactly, neatly, snugly …1710 Sc.

SNUG etc. – NOUNS
NEST a lodging, shelter, home, bed, etc., esp. of a secluded or comfortable nature; a snug retreat …a1000
SNUGGERY a snug, cosy, or comfortable room, house, etc., esp. a room of small size into which a person retires for seclusion or quiet  …1815

SNUG etc. – VERBS
NEEZLE to nestle; to insinuate oneself into some good situation or snug position …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
SNUDGE to lie quietly and snugly …Eng. dial.
SNUGIFY to make snug or comfortable …1796


SNUGGLE – VERBS
– to snuggle YALLOP Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– to snuggle; to cuddle; to kiss and caress SNOGGLE M20 US sl.
– to snuggle; to cuddle; to kiss and caress SNOOGLE M20 US sl.
– to snuggle; to cuddle; to lie close and still; to remain snug and quiet; to nestle SNUDGE 1633 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– to snuggle up; to dance extremely close to someone SCROOCH 1920s African-American sl.
– to snuggle up; to dance extremely close to someone SCRUNCH 1920s African-American sl.