Reverse Dictionary: STOP – STQ


STOP, STOPPAGE, STOPPED, STOPPING – ADJECTIVES
– CONKED stopped; killed …World War I Amer. sl.
– DEVALLING ceasing, stopping, halting …1894 Sc.
 
STOP etc. – INTERJECTIONS
– BAIL UP! stop! …M19 sl.
– BALE UP! stop! …M19 sl.
– CAN IT! int. stop doing that! …Bk1999 
– CHICKIE!;  CHICKY! a warning of the impending approach of authority, whether, policeman, parent, or teacher, and thus a command to stop whatever one is doing that might cause that authority to act against one …1910s US sl.
– CHUCK IT! stop it! …L19
– CHUCK IT IN! stop it! …M19
– CHUCK IT UP! stop it! …M19
– CUT THE ELASTIC quit fooling around …Bk1947 Amer. sl.
– HAVE DONE! cease, stop, be quiet …1842 Eng. dial.
– HOLD HARD! wait a moment! stop! …c1760
– HOLD ON! wait a moment! stop! …c1800
– ICE THAT! stop that! calm down!…1960s African-American sl.
– KAMERAD! stop! that’s enough! …1915 military usage
– KNOCK IT OFF stop …Bk1947 Amer. sl.
– LAY OFF! stop! …20C colloq.
– LAY THAT PISTOL DOWN stop …Bk1947 Amer. sl.
– MUD! stop! that’s enough! …1929 Amer. dial.
– NANTE!;  NANTY! no; nothing; none; stop; shut up; not ..1851 UK sl.
– NANTEE!;  NANTI! stop! beware! …M19 sl.
– NANTI THAT! stop that! don’t do that! …2002 UK sl.
– NITTO! be quiet!; also, stop! desist! …1959 criminals’ sl.
– PALL THAT! stop that! …M19 sl.
– PUT IT ON ICE stop …Bk1947 Amer. sl.
– STOP FOOLIN’ WITH THE FOOLIN’ quit fooling around …Bk1947 Amer. sl.
– TAKE A PULL ON YOURSELF!. stop it! …L19 sl., orig. US
– WHOAP! whoa! stop!; also used to express surprise or incredulity …1851 Amer. dial.
– WHOPE!;  WOPE! whoa! stop!; also used to express surprise or incredulity …1907 Amer. dial.
– WOAP-AH! whoa! stop!; also used to express surprise or incredulity …1898 Amer. dial.
– WUP! whoa! stop!; also used to express surprise or incredulity …1942 Amer. dial.
 
STOP etc. – NOUNS
– BIG HOLE in railroading: an emergency stop …1930 Amer. dial.
– CAESURA a break, a stop, an interruption …L16
– DEVALLING cessation, stop …1891 Sc.
– FETCH-UP a sudden stop; the halt which results from such a stop …1866 Amer. dial.
– HAG-STOP weariness; a stoppage, dilemma …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– SISTENCE stopping …1640 obs. rare
 
STOP etc. – VERBS
– ACHECK to check, to bring to a sudden stop …c1384 obs.
– AIRLOCK to stop in one’s tracks …20C Irish sl.
– APPLY THE ACID to put a stop to …1910s sl.
– BAR BY AND MAIN to prevent entirely; to stop altogether …1567 obs.
– BEHAD to stop, to wait; to hold, to maintain, to hold as certain …1768 Sc.
– BEHOLD to ‘hold,’ to stop, to wait …a1670 obs.
– BELAY to stop, to wait; to cancel, to disregard …1931 Amer. dial.
– BIG HOLE in railroading, logging, and trucking: to stop quickly …1930 Amer. dial.
– BIG HOLE IT in trucking: to apply brakes for an emergency stop …1969 Amer. dial.
– BIG HOLE THE AIR in railroading, and logging: to stop quickly …1930 Amer. dial.
– BLIN to cease, to desist, to stop; to cause to stop …Bk1911 Sc.
– BRING UP SHORT to make stop suddenly
– BUNCH to quit a job; to leave something unfinished; to stop, to cease, to abandon …1927 Amer. dial.
– BUNG to stop, to close; to shut up …1589
– CALL A COP to stop …1990s rhyming sl.
– CALL IT A DAY to stop, to go no further; to express satisfaction with progress or acceptance that one cannot improve a situation …M19 sl.
– CALL IT A GO to stop, to go no further; to express satisfaction with progress or acceptance that one cannot improve a situation …M19 sl.
– CALL IT A NIGHT to stop, to go no further; to express satisfaction with progress or acceptance that one cannot improve a situation …M19 sl.
– CAN to stop or give up; to leave off …1906 Amer. sl.
– CATCH UP to interrupt, to stop …1840
– CHATHAM AND DOVER to stop, to cease …1900s rhyming sl. for ‘give over’ 
– CHOP OFF to stop or put a stop to; to quit work …1897 Amer. sl.
– CHUCK IT to stop, to desist …Bk1999 
– CLAP A GUY ON to put a stop to; to cease …1814 nautical sl. obs.
– CONK OUT to stop running or operating …WWI Royal Flying Corps
– CURB to stop or slow down …1953 US
– CUT DOWN to put a stop to …1577 obs.
– DAMPER to stop; to bring to an end …1970s African-American sl.
– DEVALL to halt, to stop, to desist, to cease …1823 Sc., N. Ireland, & Eng. dial.
– EAR to keep someone from moving; to pin down …1929 Amer. dial.
– EX to stop, to eliminate …1950s Aust. & US college sl.
– FAIL UP to stop doing something …1907 Amer. dial.
– FETCH UP to come or be brought to a sudden stop; to end up in some place or situation …1838 Amer. dial.
– GET THE CHOP to be dismissed or stopped …1945 Brit. sl.
– GO DEAD to cease to run, as an engine or automobile …Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
– HANKER to loiter, to linger about; to dally, to tarry, to stop …1791 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– HAP to stop; to keep back; to check, to balk …1777 Eng. dial.
– JACK IT to stop doing something; to give in; to abandon; to resign …L19 sl.
– KICK SOMETHING INTO TOUCH to finish an activity; to stop doing something or stop something happening …2000 UK sl.
– LAY to put a stop to an annoyance; to allay anxiety; to appease anger, appetite, etc. …a1300 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– LAY OUT to stop what one is doing. esp. suddenly …1920s African-American sl.
– LAY UP to make a forced stop in travelling or itinerant labour …1839 Amer. dial.
– LET ALL HOLTS GO to relax or lose one’s grip; to abandon one’s position; to suddenly interrupt or stop what one is doing …1894 Amer. dial.
– LET LOOSE ALL HOLTS to relax or lose one’s grip; to abandon one’s position; to suddenly interrupt or stop what one is doing …1943 Amer. dial.
– MULE DOWN to stop moving; to refuse to move …1962 Amer. dial.
– NAP to stop, to frustrate …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– NARK to cease, to desist, to stop …1889 sl.
– OBVARICATE to hinder, obstruct or stop one in his passage …1623 obs. rare
– OFF to discharge; to reject; hence, to eliminate, to stop …1908 US sl., chiefly African-American
– PACK IN to stop, to cease an activity or to function; to become useless; to give up; to retire; to die …1942 sl.
– PACK IT IN to stop doing something, usually used as a command …1930s sl.
– PACK IT UP to stop doing something, usually used as a command …1930s sl.
– PACK THE GAME IN to stop doing something …1920s sl.
– PALL to stop, to cease …M19 sl.
– PLY THE ACID to put a stop to …1910s sl.
– PULL THE PLUG to stop; to finish …1988 UK sl.
– PULL UP among travellers, to stop …Bk1905 Amer. dial.
– PULL UP to stop doing something …1972 US sl.
– PUT THE ACID ON to put a stop to …1910s sl.
– PUT THE GAS ON to put a stop to …1900s Aust. sl.
– PUT THE MOCKERS ON to put a stop to …E20 slang
– QUAT to cease work; to desist from, to stop …1790 Sc.
– QUIT to stop, to leave off …1678 Sc. & Ireland
– QUIT OFF to stop doing something; to cease from …1861 Amer. dial.
– QUIT OUT to leave abruptly or suddenly; to stop …1941 Amer. dial.
– RAISE to stop, to pause …1960s African-American sl.
– RAMBARRE to beat or force back; to drive away, to repel, to repulse; to stop, to restrain …1644 Sc. obs. rare
– REST to arrest, to stop; to distrain for debt …1821 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– SACK to abruptly stop any activity …2001 UK sl.
– SHITCAN to stop, to abandon a course of action; to toss away …1950s Aust. & NZ sl.
– SHUT UP SHOP to stop, usually talking …M16 sl.
– SIST to cease, to desist, to stop …a1676 obs.
– STOP ON A DIME to stop suddenly …Bk1995 US sl.
– STOP SOMEONE’S CLOCK to stop or defeat someone; hence, to kill someone …1947 Amer. sl.
– STUT to stop, cease; to stay, remain …B1900 obs.
– SUBSIST to cease, to stop at a certain point …a1637 obs.
– SWALLOW THE ANCHOR to change course; to stop doing something …L19 UK criminals’ sl.
– TAKE A PULL to stop, to desist …20C Aust. sl.
– TAKE OFF to turn off; to stop …Bk1905 Sc.
– TAKE UP to arrest the action or progress of; to check, to stop, to ‘pull up’ …1631 obs.
– TENT to stop, to stay, to delay …1884 Eng. dial.
– THROW A MONKEY WRENCH INTO SOMETHING to stop the process of something …Bk1995 US sl.
– TIE A CAN TO to get rid of or dismiss; to quit or stop …1899 US sl.
– TRY THE ACID to put a stop to …1910s sl.
– X to stop, to eliminate …1950s Aust. & US college sl.
 
STOPOVER – NOUNS
– a stopover, a layover LAYOFF 1942 Amer. dial.
– a stopover; a rest LAY-UP 1942 Amer. dial.
 
STOPPING PLACE – VERBS
– to reach a good stopping place REACH THE SEAM-NEEDLE 1944 Amer. dial.
 
STOP UP, STOPPED UP, STOPPING UP – ADJECTIVES
– OBTURATE stopped up, obstructed; fig. impervious …c1560 obs. rare
– OBTURATORY serving to close or stop up …1719 rare
 
STOP UP etc. – NOUNS
– OBSTIPATION the act of blocking or stopping up …1597 
– OBTURATION the act of stopping up; obstruction of an opening or channel …1610 
 
STOP UP etc. – VERBS
– OBSTIPATE to block or stop up; to stuff up …1656 obs. rare
– OBTURATE to stop up, to close, to obstruct …1657 
 
STORAGE, STORED – ADJECTIVES
– IN MOTHBALLS in disuse or in storage, esp. with reference to standby equipment
– IN SALT in store, laid by for future reference …1890 Sc.
– MOTHBALL inactive, unused; stored away
– stored up for future use LIE-BY B1900 Eng. dial.
 
STORAGE etc. – NOUNS
– BEN a storage bin; the place where grain is kept in a barn …1965 Amer. dial.
– CABIN. a cubby or small storage space inside a house …1969 Amer. dial.
– DARK-HOLE an unlighted storage space in a house; a dark closet or corner under the stairs or around the chimney …1903 Amer. dial.
– GLORY a storage place, esp. one where odds and ends are cached; a pantry …1941 Amer. dial.
– GLORY HOLE a storage place, esp. one where odds and ends are cached; a pantry …1870 Amer. dial.
– LOCKER a closet, a wardrobe; a small storage area …1961 Amer. dial.
– MOUSE ROOM a small attic or storage space …1968 Amer. dial.
– MOUSE SHED a small attic or storage space …1968 Amer. dial.
– PACK ROOM a storage room …1956 Amer. dial.
– SALVATORY a repository for safe storage …a1677 rare
 
STORAGE etc. – VERBS
– MOTHBALL to put into storage or reserve; to inactivate
– to store, to put away SALT 20C sl.
– to store up to stow away; to place or deposit anywhere for storage, to store up BESTOW 1393 arch.
 
STORE – NOUNS
– ABRAHAM a cheap clothier’s; a secondhand store …Bk1909 sl.
– ALLSORTS SHOP a shop which sells miscellaneous goods; a general store …1853 rare
– BABBIE-SHOP;  BABI-SHOP an Indian-owned store …1970s S. Afr. sl.
– BOBBYSHOP an Indian-owned store …1970s S. Afr. sl.
– BODEGA a small neighbourhood grocery store or convenience stores, orig, and still commonly, a Hispanic one …1956 Amer. dial.
– CHOVEY a shop …Bk1890 sl.
– DIME STORE a store selling a variety of small items …1938 US sl.
– GEDUNK a place where sweets and snacks are sold …1956 US sl.
– HYPERMARKET a very large self-service store, usually situated outside a town, having an extensive car park, and selling a wide range of goods …1970
– ICEHOUSE a jewellery store …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– ICEHOUSE a convenience store …1967 Amer. dial.
– NEEDMORE a nickname for a ratty little country store …c1960 Amer. dial.
– RACKET STORE a variety store; a store that sells many kinds of goods, as shoes, clothing, cloth, curtain material, etc. …1832 Amer. dial.
– V AND X a corner store …1940s African-American sl. (Latin V, 5 + X, 10, i.e. a ‘5 and 10 cent’ store)
– V AND X STORE a corner store …1940s African-American sl. (Latin V, 5 + X, 10, i.e. a ‘5 and 10 cent’ store)
 
STORE – NOUNS, PERSON
– BALEBOSS the head of the house; a store owner; a manager; anyone in authority …Bk1998 Yiddish 
– CAPE MERCHANT the man who had charge of the general store or warehouse …Bk1899 Amer. dial.
– WULLIE A’THING a nickname for a general store-keeper, a shopman selling a miscellany of small merchandise …1876 Sc.
 
STORE, STORED (put away) – see STORAGE
 
STOREHOUSE – NOUNS
– a storehouse or repository for goods or merchandise; a warehouse MAGAZINE 1583 rare
 
STOREHOUSE – VERBS
– to lay up in or as in a storehouse or magazine MAGAZINE 1643 rare
 
STOREROOM – NOUNS
– a storeroom, wardrobe; a locked-up chamber in which articles of dress, stores, etc. are kept GARDEROBE 1333-4 now only Hist.
 
STORE UP – VERBS
– to store up INSTORE 1836 Sc. obs.
– to store up furtively, as food, etc. RAT-HOLE 20C Amer. sl.
 
STORM, STORMY – ADJECTIVES
– BANGY of weather: drizzling, overcast; misty; stormy …1790 Eng. dial.
– BLUSTERSOME of weather: rainy and stormy in fits and starts …19C Eng. dial.
– BLUTHRIE wet, stormy …Bk1911 Sc.
– BRASHY noisy; stormy; rugged …Bk1911 Sc.
– CADDLESOME of weather: stormy, uncertain …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– CADDLING of weather: uncertain, variable, stormy …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– CADDLY of weather: stormy, uncertain …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– DIRTY of the weather: wet, stormy …1887 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– ELECTRIC CLOUD a thunder cloud; an electrical storm …1969 Amer. dial.
– GALEY;  GALY boisterous, stormy …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– GURLY boisterous, stormy, rough …1718 Sc.
– HARRISHING cold and stormy …Bk1902 Eng. dial.
– ILL stormy …1892 Sc.
– INDUMIOUS of the weather: extraordinarily rough or stormy …1898 Sc.
– JABBLED agitated, stormy …1887 Sc.
– MAD of wind, a storm, the sea: wild, violent …1594
– MAIN of a fit, a storm: violent …a1300 obs.
– ORAGIOUS stormy, tempestuous …c1590 rare
– PROCELLOUS stormy, tempestuous …1650 obs.
– RACKY of clouds: stormy …1967 Sc.
– RAGEFUL of things: full of furious activity, as a storm …1597
– RAGGY misty, stormy and cold, with drizzling rain …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– RAISIGO of weather: rough, blustery, stormy …1828 Sc.
– RATY of the weather: cold, wet, stormy …1856 Eng. dial.
– REEK windy, stormy …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– RICK-RACK of the weather: stormy, boisterous …B1900 Eng. dial.
– ROBUSTIOUS of storms or climate: violent, severe …1612
– SAIR of the weather: inclement, stormy, severe …1813 Sc.
– TARLOCH of the weather: stormy …Bk1905 Sc.
– TEMPESTY stormy, blusterous …1868 Eng. dial.
– TROUBLY turbulent, tempestuous, stormy, violent ..1513
– UNKID betokening bad weather; stormy …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– VITIOUS of the weather: stormy …Bk1905 Sc.
– WHITE GALE a windstorm on the water with rough seas, a clear sky, and no precipitation …1986 Amer. dial.
– YARK of weather: wild, stormy …1891 Eng. dial.
– YEASTY gusty, stormy …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
 
STORM etc. – NOUNS
– APPLE SHAKER a storm …1905 Amer. dial.
– ARIZONA CLOUDBURST a sandstorm …1966 Amer. dial. jocular
– BAFFIN a severe drenching; usually applied to the drenching and buffeting one gets by being exposed to a storm of wind and rain …1929 Sc.
– BARBER in Canada: a storm accompanied by snow and spray which freezes upon the face; also, the vapour rising from the water on a frosty day …c1890
– BENSELL;  BENSIL violence of storm, etc. …Bk1911 Sc.
– BENSELL;  BENSIL a place exposed to the violence of the storm …Bk1898 Sc.
– BLACKBERRY RAIN a spring storm or cold snap …1947 Amer. dial.
– BLACKBERRY STORM a spring storm or cold snap …1906 Amer. dial.
– BLEFFART a squall, a storm, a hurricane; a sudden and violent snowstorm …Bk1911 Sc.
– BLIRT a storm of wind and rain; a cold drift of snow …Bk1911 Sc.
– BLOUT the bursting of a storm; a sudden fall of rain, snow, or hail, with wind …Bk1911 Sc.
– BOOGER a storm with rain and thunder and lightning …1956 Amer. dial.
– BOURKE SHOWER a dust storm …1945 Aust. sl.
– BOWDER a great squall, a heavy storm of wind and rain …Bk1911 Sc.
– BRATTLE a loud, clattering noise; the crash of thunder or of a storm; a noisy fray …Bk1911 Sc.
– ELEPHANT a name originally given by the Portuguese to violent storms occurring at the termination of the Monsoon …1616 obs.
– GANDAGUSTER a strong, sudden gust of wind; a strong, sweeping wind; a storm, esp. of short duration …1899 Sc.
– NORTHERN NANNY a cold storm of hail and wind from the north …1889 Eng. dial.
– PASSOVER an impending storm that fails to bring rain …1975 Amer. dial.
– POTATO WAGON a storm with rain and thunder and lightning …1936 Amer. dial.
– PUMPKIN WAGON a storm with rain and thunder and lightning …1985 Amer. dial.
– RACK a rush of wind; a gale, a storm …c1400 obs. rare
– RIPSNORTER a storm, a gale …M19 colloq. orig. US
– ROUGH a period of stormy weather …1633 obs. rare
– SCALE the sound of waves breaking upon the shore; a hurricane, a scattering wind or storm …1790 Sc.
– SICK-BIRD WINTER a late spring storm …1991 Amer. dial.
– SIROCCO a blighting influence; a fiery storm …1864
– SKAIL the sound of waves breaking upon the shore; a hurricane, a scattering wind or storm …1790 Sc.
– SKYLE the sound of waves breaking upon the shore; a hurricane, a scattering wind or storm …1790 Sc.
– TEMPEST a storm, esp. a thunderstorm, but without the accompaniment of high wind …1867 Eng. dial.
– TRAP SMASHER in lobstering: a severe storm …1978 US sl.
– TROBELLION a whirlwind; a whirling storm …a1500 obs.
​- WILLAWAW;  WILLIWAW a sudden violent wind or windstorm …1896 Amer. dial.
– WOOLLY a sudden violent wind or windstorm …1886 Amer. dial.
 
STORM etc. – PHRASES
– DAVY PUTTING ON THE COPPERS FOR THE PARSON(S) a comment on an approaching storm; the brewing of a storm …c1830 nautical usage
– SOUNDS LIKE POTATO WAGONS ROLLING AROUND THE HEAVENS said of thunder …1985 Amer. dial.
 
STORM etc. – VERBS
– BE MASKING of a storm: to be ‘brewing’ …1830
– CANKER of the weather: to become stormy …Bk1898 Sc.
– GUST to storm, to thunder …1939 Amer. dial.
– MILD of a wind or storm: to diminish or decrease …1956 Amer. dial.
– MILD DOWN of a wind or storm: to diminish or decrease …1970 Amer. dial.
– RANGE to storm, to rage …1864 Eng. dial.
– VAIL of a storm: to abate, to cease …1606 obs.
– WEATHER rain, to storm …1896 Amer. dial.
 
STORM CELLAR – see CELLAR
 
STORY, STORY-TELLER – ADJECTIVES
– HAIRY of a joke or story: old, out-of-date …1960 Amer. dial.
– SAUNTERING of a story: foolish, trumpery …1726 obs.
– TALEFUL full of tales; making a long story; talkative …1726-46
– TALISH of the nature of a tale or story; fabulous …1530 obs.
– VAMPED-UP of a story, etc.: invented, fabricated, trumped up …1802-12
– WAFF of a story, report, or rumour: floating, general, of unspecified origin …1753 Sc.
 
STORY etc. – NOUNS
– ACKAMARACKER;  ACKAMARAKA a fraudulent tale, a tall story, nonsense …1930s sl.
– ACKAMARACKUS a fraudulent tale, a tall story, pretentious nonsense, bluff …1933 Amer. sl.
– AMPLEFEYST unnecessary talk; long stories …B1900 Sc.
– ANANIASFEST an exchange of tall stories …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– ANTER;  AUNTER an adventure, a misadventure; a story of adventure, an unlikely story …1881 Eng. dial.
– AVERING obtaining money by hard-luck stories …B1912 Eng. sl.
– BABBLE an idle, foolish story; gossip …1855 Eng. dial.
– BACKSTAY the background of a story or event …1953 Amer. dial.
– BAG OF MOONSHINE nonsense; idle, untrue stories …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– BAM a story intended to impose upon the credulous; a hoax or imposition; a trick, a joke …1762 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– BEAR STORY an exaggerated account; a ‘tall tale’ …1856 Amer. dial.
– BEDTIME STORY an incredible story …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– BIG ONE an incredible story; a whopper …1915 Amer. dial.
– BUGHOUSE FABLE an incredible story …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– BULL-CON an incredible story …1896 Amer. sl.
– CANARD an extravagant, or absurd story circulated to impose on people’s credulity; a rumour, hoax, a false report …1864 
– CHERRY TREE TALE an incredible story …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– CHESTNUT a stale story or outworn jest …1886 colloq.
– CIRCUMBENDIBUS a roundabout or indirect way or method; a roundabout, long-winded story; circumlocution …1681
– COCK AND BULL STORY a silly, exaggerated story …Bk1999 
– COKE an incredible story …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– COKE STORY an incredible story …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– CON an incredible story …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– COOK’S GALLEY YARN an incredible story …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– CRACKER a lie; a very tall story …17C sl.
– CUFFER a lie; a tale; an exaggerated and improbable story …1891 Eng. dial.
– DEACON-SEATER a good tall story …1975 Amer. dial.
– DILDRAMS strange tales, improbable stories …1867 Eng. dial.
– DILDRUMS strange tales, improbable stories …1867 Eng. dial.
– EVERGREEN a story that is not news, but penetrating analysis, etc. …1980s Amer. journalism sl.
– FAIRY a fanciful tale, a ‘tall story’ …1900s Aust. sl.
– FAIRY STORY a ‘hard luck’ tale; any unlikely tale; a downright lie or excuse; an incredible story …20C colloq.
– FAIRY-TWISTER a fanciful tale, a ‘tall story’ …1900s Aust. sl.
– FAKE a spurious or counterfeit document; later, anything of a spurious, counterfeit, or fraudulent nature; a false rumour or false story of any kind; an invented newspaper story …1851 sl., orig. criminals’ usage
– FAKELOO a false rumour or false story; a yarn intended to deceive …1926 Amer. sl.
– FANFIC further stories and adventures for characters in familiar television programs and films written for pleasure by fans of the original, esp. widespread on the Internet …1998 US sl.
– FANNY any form of story designed to elicit money, sympathy, provide excuses, etc. …1920s sl.
– FISH STORY an incredible story …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– FURPHY a false report or rumour; an absurd story …1915 Aust. sl.
– GAG a falsehood, a lie, an invention, a story …1805 sl.
– GALLEY-PACKET a made-up story, a lie; an unfounded rumour …1867
– GALLEY YARN a rumour on which no reliance can be placed; an incredible story …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– GHOST STORY an incredible story …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– GIANT GOOSEBERRY an incredible story …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– GLURGE stories, often sent by email, that are supposed to be true and uplifting, but which are often fabricated and sentimental …20C
– GOOSEBERRY an incredible story …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– GOOSE’S GAZETTE a lying story; a flim-flam tale; a piece of reading for a ‘goose’ (simpleton) …1836
– HAIR-RAISER an exciting or terrifying adventure story or film …20C sl.
– HEAVY LARD a ‘sob story’ …Bk1947 Amer. sl.
– HOP STORY an incredible story …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– JACKANORY a children’s story …20C rhyming sl.
– KANGAROO FEATHERS an impossible thing, often an unlikely story …1910s Aust. sl.
– LAGAMACHIE a long-winded rambling story or discourse; a harangue, rigmarole …1826 Sc.
– LAME TALE an excuse; a false story; a misrepresentation …Bk1902 Eng. dial.
– LAMGAMASHY a long-winded rambling story or discourse; a harangue, rigmarole …1826 Sc.
– LAMGAMMERIE a long-winded rambling story or discourse; a harangue, rigmarole …1826 Sc.
– LARGE ORDER an incredible story …1930 colloq.
– LEGEND a story, history, account …c1385 obs.
– LETTRURE a writing, a written book, a story …a1300 obs.
– LOAD OF OLD TROT, A a dubious story …1940s sl.
– LOGAMOCHY a long-winded rambling story or discourse; a harangue, rigmarole …1826 Sc.
– MARVEL a wonderful story or legend …a1300 obs.
– MOTHER MCCREA a ‘sob story’ …Bk1947 Amer. sl.
– NANNY-GOAT an anecdote …1860 rhyming sl.
– NORATION an announcement, rumour, or a long, rambling account …1853 Amer. dial.
– NOVEL an elaborate story; a piece of information …1970s Black British sl.
– OLDIE any old thing or person; an old joke, story, song, or movie …20C US sl.
– OLD MOTHER HUBBARD an unbelievable story; a fantasy …L19 sl.
– OLD SAW an old joke or story …20C US sl.
– OLD SONG an old story or saying, a proverb, etc. …1707 Sc.
– OLD TROT a dubious story …1940s sl.
– OLDY any old thing or person; an old joke, story, song, or movie …20C US sl.
– PADDY a long, tedious rigmarole; a ‘cock-and-bull’ story …1865 Eng. dial.
– PADDY-NODDY;  PADINODDY a long, tedious tale; a roundabout story; silly matter for gossip …1865 Eng. dial.
– PARABLE a long, dreary, egotistical statement; an incredible story …L19 US sl.
– PIPE an incredible story …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– PIPE DREAM an incredible story …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– PISCATORIAL PREVARICATION an incredible story …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– PRESS AGENT’S YARN an incredible story …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– QUICKIE a quick, ‘dirty’ story, related at the end of a party or drinking session …1940s sl.
– RABBLE-ROTE a long rigmarole or roundabout story repeated by rote …Bk19C Eng. dial.
– RACKET a story, a ‘line’ …L19 sl.
– RAG CHEWER a story …1900s sl.
– RAGMAN ROLL a tedious story; twaddle; a rambling statement; rigmarole …a1529 colloq.
– RAMISON a long, tedious story; small talk …19C Eng. dial.
– RAMMAS a long, tedious story; small talk …19C Eng. dial.
– RANICKY a deceptive story or scheme; a prank, a racket, a scam …1916 Amer. dial.
– RANI-CUM-BOOGERIE a deceptive story or scheme; a prank, a racket, a scam …1945 Amer. dial.
– RANIKABOO a deceptive story or scheme; a caper, a prank; ‘monkeyshine’; nonsense; irrelevant, irritating activity …L19 Amer. sl.
– RANNIKABOO a deceptive story or scheme; a prank, a racket, a scam …1935 Amer. dial.
– RANNYGAZOO a deceptive story or scheme; a caper; a prank; a trick; horseplay; nonsense; irrelevant, irritating activity …L19 Amer. sl.
– RANT a lively story or song; a loud noise …1796 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– RAVE a vague report, an uncertain rumour; a story which is not very credible …1882 Sc.
– REINIKABOO a deceptive story or scheme; a prank, a racket, a scam …1901 Amer. dial.
– RENICKY a deceptive story or scheme; a prank, a racket, a scam …1916 Amer. dial.
– RENICKY-BOO a deceptive story or scheme; a prank, a racket, a scam …1916 Amer. dial.
– RIBBLE an unlikely story …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– RIDLESS a doggerel rhyme; an improbable story, a rigmarole …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– RIG-MY-ROLL a tedious story; twaddle; a rambling statement; rigmarole …1753 colloq.
– SAILOR’S YARN an incredible story …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– SCANCHUS a story, chat, discussion …Bk1904 Ireland
– SCLORE rubbishy talk; nonsense; rigmarole; a long, rambling story …1869 Sc.
– SCRIFT a recitation; a long-winded story; a written composition; a made-up tale; a falsehood …1766 Sc. obs.
– SCRIVE a piece of writing; a letter; a statement or story written; handwriting; a short sermon …1894 Sc.
– SKEALT story, talk, rumour …c1580 obs.
– SLEIGH RIDE an incredible story …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– SMUT SESSION a retailing of risqué stories …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– SNAPPER the point or risible climax of a story or joke …1857 Amer. sl.
– SNOWFALL an untrue but totally convincing story; a con-man’s patter …1940s US sl.
– SNOW JOB an untrue but totally convincing story; a con-man’s patter …1940s US sl.
– SPINE-TINGLER something pleasurably frightening, esp. an exciting story, etc. …1942
– TALE OF A ROASTED HORSE, A an invented story, an idle tale, a fiction, a falsehood…1570
– TALE IN A TUB, A a fable; an old wife’s tale …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
​- TALL ORDER an incredible story …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– TALL STORY an extravagant, boastful story; a lie …1846 colloq.
– TALL TALE an extravagant, boastful story; a lie …1846 colloq.
– TELL an account, a story – used to give the authority for a statement …1795 Amer. dial.
– TELLING a story, narrative; talk, conversation; news; anything worth revealing or telling …1660 Scot & Eng. dial.
– THITTING an unpleasant story concerning a person, not told but held over him as a threat …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– THREEN a story or tradition of a ghostly and generally superstitious nature …1720 Sc.
– THREN a song or story …1720 Sc.
– THRENE a song or story …1720 Sc.
– THRENE a story or tradition of a ghostly and generally superstitious nature …1720 Sc.
– TOUGH YARN an incredible story …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– TRAVELLER’S YARN an incredible story …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– UNCOUTH a quaint or novel anecdote …1790 Eng. dial.
– WHODUNIT;  WHODUNNIT a story about the solving of a mystery, esp. a murder …1930 sl.
– WHOLE MEGILLAH, A a long, complicated, or tedious story …1957 sl.
– WINDY an extravagantly exaggerated or boastful story; a tall tale, a lie …1911 Amer. dial.
– YARN a story, an adventure story, esp. a long, marvellous or incredible story; also, a mere tale …1812 orig. nautical
– YARN-SPINNING telling a story …1867
 
STORY etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– BISCUIT SHOOTER one who ‘cook’s or ‘serves up’ a story …1911 US sl.
– BLAGUEUR one who talks pretentiously; a joker or teller of stories …1883
– FABELLATOR an inventor of little tales; a fabulator; a story-teller …1604
– FABLE-MAKER a compiler of a marvellous story …1647
– FABLER one who invents fictitious stories; a dealer in feigned stories; chiefly in contemptuous use, a fiction-monger, a fabulous historian …1614
– FABRICATOR one who invents a false story; one who makes fictions …Bk1893
– FABRICATRESS a female fabricator; a female who invents a false story; one who makes fictions …1846
– FABULATOR one who fabulates or relates fables; a story-teller …1604
– FABULATOUR a story-teller; a narrator …1604 Sc.
– FABULIST a professional story-teller …1605 obs.
– FAIRY-TWISTER the teller of a fanciful tales …1900s Aust. sl.
– GALLOPING LIAR someone who tells stories big and fast …Bk1992 Amer. South
– GESTER;  GESTOUR a professional reciter or singer of romances or tales; a story-teller …c1380 obs.
– GLIMMER a teller of hard-luck stories …c1920 sl.
– JANGLER a story-teller, a jester …1377 obs.
– MAGSMAN a raconteur; a story-teller …1918 Aust. sl.
– RACONTEUR one skilled in relating anecdotes or stories …1829
– RACONTEUSE a female skilled in relating anecdotes or stories …1863
– REMBER a person who tells improbable stories …Bk1904 Sc.
– TALE-PITCHER one who tells a good story; a romancing talker or chattering malcontent…1898 sl. 
– TALESMAN the teller of a tale; the author of a story; one who brings news or originates a statement; a relater, a narrator …a1568 obs. exc. Sc.
– TALES-MASTER the teller of a tale; the author of a story; the authority for a statement, one who brings news or originates a statement; a relater, a narrator …1656 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– TALE-TELLER a teller of tales or stories; a narrator …1387
– TALE-TELLER one said to have been hired to tell wonderful stories of giants and fairies, to lull hearers to sleep …Bk1737 sl.
– TOM LONG one who takes a long time in coming, or in finishing his tale; a tiresome story-teller …1631
– WINDJAMMER one who tells fabricated stories …Bk1934 US Western sl.
– YARN-CHOPPER a fictional journalist; a story-teller, a chatterer, a long prosy talker …1890 UK sl.
– YARN-SLINGER one who writes tales in newspapers; a story-teller, a chatterer, a long, prosy talker …1890 sl.
– YARN-SPINNER one who ‘spins a yarn’; a story-teller …1865 colloq.
– YARN-TELLER a narrator, a storyteller …1891 sl.
 
STORY etc. – PHRASES
– GIVE THE CAT A CANARY ‘tell it to the marines,’ said of an improbable story …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– MOTHER OF THAT WAS A WHISKER, THE a retort to an utterly implausible story …M19 sl.
 
STORY etc. – VERBS
– BEAT THE DEVIL ROUND THE GOOSEBERRY BUSH to tell a long story without much point …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– BELLWAVER to tell a story incoherently …Bk1911 Sc.
– CANT to tell merry old stories …1788 Sc.
– CHEW THE FAT to spin a yarn …20C
– EFFABULE to fable, to invent a story, etc. …c1600 obs. rare
– EMPTY THE BAG to tell the whole story; to tell or disclose the whole truth; to wind up an argument or discussion …1893
– FLY A KITE to tell a tall story …20C Aust. sl.
– GO INTO ONE’S DANCE to ‘tell a line’ …20C Amer. sl.
– NEVEN to tell a story, the truth …c1350 obs.
– PITCH A FAIRY to tell a ‘tall story’ …1900s Aust. sl.
– RAISE THE WIND to create a rumour; to make up stories …L19 sl.
– RAME to talk nonsense; to rave; to exaggerate, to tell tall stories or lies …1847 Sc.
– RAVE to rake up a story against anyone …1847 Eng. dial.
– RAVEL to tell a story, etc. volubly; to pour out in words …1929 Sc.
– SPIN A YARN to tell a story, usually a long one; to pitch a tale; to tell lies …1812 orig. nautical sl.
– TALE to gossip; to chatter; to tell a tale …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– TALE-TELL to tell stories …1940 Amer. dial.
– TELL DILDRAMS to tell strange tales or improbably stories …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– THREEN to tell ghost stories or superstitious tales …1898 Sc.
– THRENE to tell ghost stories or superstitious tales …1898 Sc.
– THROW THE HATCHET to exaggerate; to tell fabulous stories or lies …1893
– YARN to tell a story, to tell tales, probably implausible or far-fetched ones …1812 UK
 
STOUT, STOUTLY (sturdy, vigorous) – ADJECTIVES
– BARDACH stout, fearless …1768 Sc.
– BAWF well-grown, robust, fine, stout …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– BLOCKY of a person or animal: of solid build, stocky; short and stout …1879
– BRAW stout, able-bodied …Bk1911 Sc.
– COBBY stout, hearty, brisk, lively, pert, saucy, in good spirits, merry, cheerful, well in health …1691 Eng. dial.
– DERF strong, sturdy, stout, robust …c1340 obs.
– GALLIARD valiant, hardy, stout, sturdy …a1400 arch.
– GNARY stout and strong …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– NARY stout and strong …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– ORPED bold, brave, valiant, stout, strenuous …a1000 obs.
– RACKLE strong, firm, stout …Bk19C Sc.
– RANK stout and strong; formidable …c1122 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– ROBUSTIOUS of persons: robust, vigorous, violent; stout and strong or healthy-looking …a1548
– ROID stout, strong; violent, rough …a1400 obs exc. Eng. dial.
– RUSKIE healthy, stout, vigorous …B1900 Sc.
– SCRONCHOUS fleshy, stout …1947 Amer. dial.
– SCRONTIOUS fleshy, stout …1947 Amer. dial.
– STALWORTH of persons and animals: strong and stoutly built; sturdy, robust …c1175 obs. exc. arch.
– TALL good at arms; stout or strong in combat; doughty, brave, bold, valiant …c1400 obs.
– TIGHT of a person: lively, vigorous, stout …1598 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– VADY stout, stalwart …1793 Sc.
– VALIANT stout, well-built …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– VAUDIE great, strong, powerful, stout …1793 Sc.
– VAUDY stout, stalwart …1793 Sc.
– VIKKEND stout, sturdy, robust, well-made; usually of a young man or boy …1929 Sc.
– WIGHT strongly built or constructed, stout …ME, now arch., Sc., & Eng. dial.
 
STOUT etc. (sturdy, vigorous) – ADVERBS
– stoutly, strongly, vigorously; expressing vigour in action FAST 1297 obs.
 
STOUT (of size) – ADJECTIVES
– BEEFY fleshy; unduly stout or fat, obese; stolid …1853
– BILSHIE short and stout; plump and thriving …19C Sc.
– BOOZY bulky; plump; stout …Bk1911 Sc.
– BUNCHY chubby, short and stout …1942 Amer. dial.
– CORSIOUS corpulent, big-bodied, stout …1430 obs.
– CORSY corpulent, fat, plump, big-bodied, stout …c1440 obs.
– DUMPTY short and stout …1857
– DUMPY short and stout; deficient in length or stature …1750
– FALL-ABROAD stout, flabby, fat …1867 Eng. dial.
– HODDY-DODDY short and dumpy or clumsy; disproportionately stout; squat …1824
– MAWSIE of persons, esp. women: stout, well-made …1880 Sc.
– NIBSY of a boy: stout, lumpy, vigorous-looking …1929 Sc. 
– NUNTY stout or chubby, combined with shortness …1876 Eng. dial.
– PAUNCHY stout; having a large belly …Bk1903 Eng. dial.  
– PODDY corpulent, obese, stout; round in the belly …1844 colloq.
– PUNCHY short and stout, thickset, squat, stumpy; having a large paunch …1791
– PUSSY stout, fat …Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
– SKELPING big, large, stout, lusty …1785 Eng. dial.
– SLENDER IN THE MIDDLE AS A COW IN THE WAIST, AS said of a very stout or very fat person …1857 Eng. dial.
– TOCK-BELLIED having a pot-belly; stout …1777 Eng. dial. obs.
 
STOUT (of size) – NOUNS, PERSON
– BALL a stout fellow …Bk1881
– BAS a stout, fat, clumsy person …1908 Sc.
– BEEF-EATER a stout, hearty, fat fellow; a large, fleshy person …Bk1867 sl.
– BEEF TRUST an obese or fat person …1933 US sl.
– BEEFY a nickname for a short and stout person …1905 Sc.
– BEER BOTTLE a stout, red-faced man …Bk1909 UK sl.
– BEFF a stout, stupid person …Bk1866 Sc.
– BEFFAN;  BEFFIN a very stout, stupid person …Bk1866 Sc.
– BELCH a stout or fat person …1767 Sc.
– BERGEL a stout, dumpy person …1929 Sc.
– BIG BELL a stout person …Bk1937 
– BIG BOY a stout fellow …1942 Amer. dial.
– BILSH a short, plump person; a thriving, stout person or animal …Bk1911 Sc. 
– BOUFFIN a big, stout person; used rather contemptuously …Bk1911 Sc.
– BIRK a stout, well-built boy or lad, or one big for his age …1911 Sc.
– BIVVAL a stoutly-built, sturdy person …1929 Sc.
– BLACK-SILK BARGE a stout woman that, frequenting dances, dresses to minimize her amplitude …Bk1909 ballroom usage
– CHUNK a fat or stout person …Bk2006 US sl.
– DASHER a showily dressed person; someone of extraordinary appearance, as a remarkably stout person …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– DUMP a short, stout person …1840
– DUMPLING a little fat child or person; a short, stout person …1617
– DUMPTY a short, stout person …1847
– DUMPY a short, stout person …1808 
– ELT a stout, awkwardly-built woman; a slovenly female …1907 Sc.
– FADGY a stout, thickset little person …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– GARPAL a big, stout person …1929 Sc.
– GARRON;  GERRON a strong, thickset or stoutly-built man or boy …1808 Sc.
– GIMP a short, stout, well-built girl …1949 Sc.
– GIMPIE a short, stout, well-built girl …1915 Sc.
– GINCH a stoutly-built person …1920 Sc.
– HEFTY a stout or obese person …1871 US sl.
– KEMPLE a stout person …1919 Sc.
– LACATAN a short, stoutish person …1950s W. Indies
– MAWSIE a stout person, esp. a woman; a stupid, slovenly, worthless woman …1790 Sc.
– MOTHER-BUNCH a stout, untidy, or awkward-looking woman or girl …1847
– MUCKLE ELT a stout, clumsy woman …Bk1900 Sc.
– POD-KITE a person with a protuberant stomach, a stout person; a glutton …Bk1893 Eng. dial.
– RIBS a stout person …Bk1903 sl.
– RUSKIE a very stout woman …B1900 Sc.
– SAB a stout, heavily-built person …1826 Sc. obs.
– STRAMMER a tall, stout woman …B1900 Eng. dial.
– WIDDERER a big, stout, powerful person …1781 Eng. dial.
– WITHERER a big, stout, powerful person; a person of surpassing size …1781 Eng. dial.
 
STOUT (of size) – PHRASES
– THERE IS A VIXTER UPON ONE one has grown stout …Bk1905 Sc.
 
STOUT (of size) – VERBS
– BELLY to become corpulent or stout …1641 obs.
– FALL ABROAD to grow stouter, more sturdy, thickset …1867 Eng. dial.
– MEND to grow stout …Bk1905 Ireland
 
STOUT (drink) – see BEER
 
STOUT-HEARTED – ADJECTIVES
– stout-hearted; fearless and resolute; stout-hearted DOUGHTY a1000 now arch. or jocular
 
STOVE – NOUNS
– a cooking stove KITCHENER 1829
– a kitchen stove APPARATUS Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– a rough and ready ‘bush’ stove CACTUS STOVE 1944 NZ sl.
– a small stove; a heater CALEFACTOR 1831
 
STOW – VERBS
– to stow away; to place or deposit anywhere for storage, to store up BESTOW 1393 arch.
– to stow with care; to pack full THRACK Bk1905 Eng. dial.
 
ST. PATRICK’S DAY – NOUNS
– St. Patrick Day PADDY’S DAY 2003 Ireland