Reverse Dictionary: TES – THH


TEST, TESTED, TESTING – ADJECTIVES
YFONDED attempted, tried, tested, tempted …c1175 obs.

TEST etc. – NOUNS
ACID TEST a very thorough or crucial test …Amer. sl.
BIRL;  BURL a try or attempt; a test …1917 Aust. & NZ colloq.
FANDING;  FONDING a testing or putting to the proof; a trial …a1300 obs.
FURNACE any severe test or trial …1340
POP QUIZ a surprise test …1960s US college sl.
POP TEST a surprise test …1960s US college sl.
QUERY a test or examination …1976 US sl.
SHOTGUN QUIZ a surprise test …1960s US college sl.

TEST etc. – VERBS
APPLY THE ACID to test out a person or a statement …1910s sl.
DIPSTICK to test the abstract qualities of someone or something …2003 UK sl.
FEEL OUT to test or discover by cautious trial …ME
HANDSEL to use for the first time; to be the first to test, try, prove, taste …1605
HANSEL to use for the first time; to be the first to test, try, prove, taste …1605
KICK THE TIRES to test, check, or research the condition or quality of a product, service, etc., before purchase or use …1964 orig. US
PUT THE GAS ON to test out a person or a statement …1900s Aust. sl.
SAY to assay, to test; to taste …1724 Sc. & Eng. dial.
SCANCE to make trial of; to put to the test …1804 Sc.


TESTAMENT – NOUNS
– a testament, a will REDD 1853 Eng. dial.
– a testament, a will TEST 1890 Sc.


TESTATOR – NOUNS, PERSON
– a testator; a person who gives something by will LEGATOR 1651


TESTICLES – see GENITALS


TESTIFY – VERBS
DEPONE to testify, to asseverate, to affirm; to give evidence as a witness …1726 Sc.
 INSTEFY; INSTIFY to show, to testify; to set forth …1899 Amer. dial.
QUALIFY to prove; to authenticate, to make good; to testify to …1746 Sc. & N. Eng. dial. obs.
QUALIFY to put one to an oath, to cause one to testify; to swear, to testify …1827 Amer. dial.
SUFFRAGATE to testify, to bear witness to …1620 obs.
 TESTY to testify …1890 Eng. dial.


TESTIMONIAL – NOUNS
– a testimonial, a certificate TESTIFICATE 1751 Sc. obs.
– a testimonial, a certificate TESTIFICATION 1822 Sc. obs.


TESTIMONY – ADJECTIVES
– of testimony: trustworthy LAUDABLE 1664 obs.

TESTIMONY – NOUNS
– testimonies, votes, opinions SUFFRAGIES 1587 obs.


TESTINESS, TESTY – ADJECTIVES
CUTTY testy, hasty, short of temper …1825 Sc.
NAGGY cross, snappish, querulous; shrewish; irritable; ill-natured, bad-tempered, testy; sarcastic …1825 Sc. & Eng. dial.
ON THE RAG irritated, irritable, testy, bad-tempered …1960s sl.
RAMSH brusque, testy …1871 Sc.
SPLENITIVE splenetic; irritable, morose, peevish, ill-humoured, quick-tempered, testy …1633 obs. rare
– TATTY testy, cross …B1900 Eng. dial.
TESSY angry, fractious, cross, testy …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
 TESTIF headstrong, obstinate, wilful, rash, testy …c1374 obs.
 TESTORN testy, quick to anger …1777 Eng. dial. obs.
TETCHIOUS tetchy, touchy, apt to take offense; irritable, irascible, peevish; testy, easily angered, ill-tempered …1913 Amer. dial.
TETCHY irritable; irascible; testy …1592 sl.
– TETTY easily offended; irritable, peevish; captious, testy, cross-tempered; bad-tempered …1621 obs. exc. Sc.
THRISSLY;  THRISTLY testy, crabbed …Bk1905 Sc.
TOUCHOUS tetchy, touchy, apt to take offense; irritable, irascible, peevish; testy, easily angered, ill-tempered …1880 Amer. dial.

TESTINESS etc. – NOUNS
CHICKEN testiness in discourse or behaviour …20C Amer. sl.

TESTINESS etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
CUTTIE;  CUTTY a testy or naughty girl or woman; often used playfully …1830
SNUFFY a nickname for a testy person …B1900 Eng. dial.


TETANUS – NOUNS
– tetanus JAWLOCK 1892 Amer. dial.


TETCHY – ADJECTIVES
– fretful, fractious; generally applied to children or infants TEETHY 1828 Eng. dial.
– tetchy, peevish, aggressive, contentious, short-tempered TESTIF 1526 obs.
– tetchy, peevish, irritable, short-tempered; easily offended or angered TEECHY;  TITCHY 1691 Eng. dial.


TEXAS – ADJECTIVES
TEX-MEX Texican-Mexican …Amer. sl.

TEXAS – NOUNS
BANNER STATE Texas …Bk1942 Amer. sl. 
BEEF STATE Texas …Bk1942 Amer. sl. 
BEEFHEAD STATE Texas …Bk1942 Amer. sl. 
BIG D Dallas, Texas …1930 US sl.
BIG D, THE Dallas, Texas …1978 US sl.
 BIG TEX Texas …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
 BLIZZARD STATE Texas …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
 BLUE BONNET STATE Texas …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
 BOLL-WEEVIL STATE Texas …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
H., THE Houston, Texas …1998 US sl.
JUMBO Texas …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
JUMBO STATE Texas …Bk1942 Amer. sl. 
LONE STAR STATE Texas …Bk1942 Amer. sl. 
LONGHORN STATE Texas …Bk1942 Amer. sl. 
OLD COFFINHEAD a giant rattlesnake of Texas folklore, pictured as ‘eight feet long and so ole he done got whiskers’ – used to frighten children with …1940 Amer. dial.
TEX Texas …Bk1942 Amer. sl.

TEXAS – NOUNS, PERSON
BEEF-HEAD a Texan …1866 Amer. dial.
BOLL WEEVIL a Texan …1932 Amer. dial.
LONGHORN a Texan or other Southwesterner, esp. a shrewd, knowing, tough old-timer …1896 Amer. dial.
SHORTHORN someone not from Texas or the Southwest; an outsider, a neophyte, a greenhorn …1885 Amer. dial.
TEXICAN a Texan of Mexican or mixed ancestry; hence used, often derogatorily, for a migrant worker from Texas or elsewhere in the Southwest …1916 Amer. dial.
TEX-MEX a native of the Texas-Mexico border region …1949 Amer. sl.


THANK – VERBS
– to thank BETHANK 1593 obs. rare
– to thank TA-TA c1977 Amer. dial.
– to thank, to express gratitude to AGGRATE 1633 obs.


THANKFULLY – ADVERBS
– thankfully THANKSOMELY Bk1905 Eng. dial.


THANKLESS – NOUNS
– a thankless task; a useless, foolish, or unprofitable activity MUG’S GAME 1900


THANKS – NOUNS
– a formal acknowledgement of thanks SADDY 1870 Amer. dial.
– a letter of thanks for hospitality written after a visit BREAD-AND-BUTTER LETTER 1901
– thanks, grateful return; pay, recompense, reward; kindness MENSE 1785 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– thanks, indebtedness, acknowledgement BETHANK 1826 Sc.


THANK YOU – INTERJECTIONS/PHRASES
ARIGATO Thank you …1947 Amer. dial. (Hawaii, Japanese)
‘ARRY’S GATORS thank  you …c1943 Aust. (‘arrigato’)
CHEERS thank you …1976 Brit.
DANKE SCHOEN! thank you! (pronounced to rhyme with ‘fern’) …1956 Amer. dial.
GRACIAS! thank you …1965 Amer. dial.
MAHALO! thank you, thanks …1938 Hawaii
MERCY BLOW THROUGH many thanks; ‘merci beaucoup’ …World War I Amer. sl.
MERCY BUCKETS “thanks” …Amer. sl.
MESSY BUCKET(S) many thanks; (French ‘merci beaucoup’) …World War I Amer. sl.
MUCH O’BRITCHES thank you …1966 Amer. dial.
SADDY! thank you! …1835 Amer. dial.
SAHDIE! thank you! …1882 Amer. dial.
– TA! int. thanks! …1772 colloq.
– TA EVER SO thank you …1914 Brit.
 TA MUCHLY! thank you very much …1970
TA-TA! thanks! …1884 Amer. dial.
 THANKS A BUNCH thank you; often used ironically …1981
 THANKS A BUNDLE thank you; often used ironically …1981
 THANKS A MILLION thank you …1936 orig. US
 THANKS AWFULLY thank you …1890 Brit.
 THANKS EVER SO thank you …1914 Brit.
THANKY! thank you! …1850 Amer. dial.
YOURS! you’re welcome! reply to ‘thank you’ for a favour …1936 Amer. dial.


THANKSGIVING – NOUNS
– Thanksgiving TURKEY DAY 1910s African-American sl.
– Thanksgiving eve or day when children dress up in old clothes and, armed with large paper bags, they tour the neighbourhoods, begging for candy, cookies, and other delicacies BEGGAR’S NIGHT 1938 Amer. dial.


THATCH, THATCHED, THATCHER – ADJECTIVES
CULVER-HEADED thatched with straw or stubble …19C Eng. dial.
THACK thatched, made of thatch …1815 Sc.
THACK-COVERED thatched …1895 Eng. dial.
THATCHEN thatched, made of thatch …1869 Eng. dial.

THATCH etc. – NOUNS
THACK a thatch; a roof or covering, esp. of straw; materials for thatching …1787 Sc. & Eng. dial.
THACKY a thatched cottage …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
THEAK thatch, thatching; grass, straw, etc., cut for thatching …1868 Sc. & Eng. dial.

THATCH etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
BANG-STRAW one who threshes with a flail; also, a thatcher or any farm-worker…1785
MOSER one employed in thatching with moss …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
THACKER a thatcher …1737 Sc. & Eng. dial.
THACKSTER a thatcher …1787 Eng. dial.
THEAKER a thatcher …1790 Sc. & Eng. dial.

THATCH etc. – VERBS
THACK to thatch, to roof; to cover; to lay on …1823 Sc. & Eng. dial.
THEAK to thatch …1785 Sc. & Eng. dial.


THAW, THAWING – ADJECTIVES
SAFT of weather: mild, not frosty, in a state of thaw …1825 Sc.

THAW etc. – NOUNS
SAFT a thaw; rain, moisture …1895 Sc.

THAW etc. – VERBS
DAGE to thaw …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
DAVE to thaw …1858 Eng. dial.
EVE to thaw …1790 Eng. dial.
SAFTEN to thaw …1825 Sc.
UNEAVE to show condensation; to thaw …1810 Eng. dial.
UNFREEZE to thaw …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
UNGIVE to relax, to give way, to loosen; to melt, to thaw …1889 Eng. dial.


THEATRE – ADJECTIVES
 LETTER-PERFECT knowing one’s part to the letter …1885 theatrical usage
 
THEATRE – NOUNS
 ARTFUL FOX a theatrical box …1882 music-hall rhyming sl.
 ATTIC the upper balcony in a theatre …1966 Amer. dial.
 BALDHEADED ROW in a theatre: the front row of seats at a stage performance, esp. a burlesque, presumably occupied by old men …1889 US
 BALDHEAD ROW in a theatre: the front row of seats at a stage performance, esp. a burlesque, presumably occupied by old men …1887 US sl.
 BUMPER a crowded house at a theatre …1839 theatrical sl.
 BUZZARD ROOST an upper balcony in a theatre …1920 Amer. sl.
 BUZZARD’S ROOST the upper balcony of a theatre …1965 Amer. dial.
 CACKLE the dialogue of a play …c1870 sl.
 CHARLES JAMES a theatrical box …L19 rhyming sl. (Charles James Fox)
 CHICKEN ROOST the upper balcony of a theatre …1905 US sl.
 COD VERSION a burlesque version of a well-known play …20C theatrical usage
 CONCERT a play; a show; any theatrical entertainment …1992 UK sl.
 DAMP BLANKET in the theatre: a bad review …1981 US sl.
 DARKY COX a box in a theatre auditorium; the seating area in a theatre  …1961 UK rhyming sl.
 D.C. the Dress Circle in the theatre …1900s Aust. sl.
 DECK the upper balcony of a theatre …1965 Amer. dial.
 ETHIOPIAN HEAVEN the top gallery in a theatre …20C US sl.
 ETHIOPIAN PARADISE the highest balcony in a segregated theatre …1900 Amer. dial.
 FACE-ENTRY freedom of access to a theatre …1874 theatrical usage obs.
 FACTORY, THE the theatre …1952 UK actors usage
 FAKE in the carnival and theatre: a performance …1885 Amer. sl.
– FAKE any unused or worn-out and worthless piece of property …1889 theatrical usage
 FAKEMENT small properties, accessories …c1875 theatrical usage
 FAKES AND SLUMBOES properties; accessories …c1880 theatrical usage obs.
 FAT a part with good lines and telling situations, which gives the player an opportunity of appearing to advantage …1883 theatrical usage
 FOOTS theatrical footlights …1919 US sl.
 GAFF a cheap music hall or theatre …L18 sl.
 GREEN (GAGE) the stage …1931 UK rhyming sl.
 HAYMOW the upper balcony in a theatre …1968 Amer. dial.
 HEAVEN the upper balcony in a theatre …1967 Amer. dial.
 HOUSE the audience at a theatre …1921 Amer. sl.
 JIGGER in a theatre: the curtain …Bk1896 theatrical sl.
 LAKING-HOUSE a playroom; a theatre; a gaming-house …Bk1902 Eng. dial.
 LEG SHOP a theatre devoted to burlesque, i.e. the display of women’s legs …L19 US sl.
 LOFT the upper balcony in a theatre …1965 Amer. dial.
 LOVER’S HEAVEN the upper balcony in a theatre …1967 Amer. dial.
 MAGOO in the theatre: a cream pie thrown in slapstick comedy …1926 Amer. theatrical sl.
 MAIN KICK the stage or theatre …1930s African-American sl.
 MONKEY ROOST the upper balcony in a theatre …1970 Amer. dial.
 MUCK stage makeup …1926 US sl.
 NABE a neighbourhood theatre …1935 sl.
 NECKERS’ HEAVEN the upper balcony in a theatre …1967 Amer. dial.
 NIGGER HEAVEN the highest balcony in a theatre …1878 Amer. dial., derogatory
 NIGGERS’ HEAVEN the highest balcony in a theatre …1878 Amer. dial., derogatory
 NUMBER a theatrical piece; a routine …Aust. sl.
 OAKLEY a free pass; orig. to a circus, but latterly to the theatre …1920s US sl.
 PARADISE the upper gallery of a theatre …M19 sl.
 PEANUT GALLERY the topmost rows of a theatre …1888 Amer. sl.
 PEANUT HEAVEN the upper balcony in a theatre …1897 Amer. dial.
 PEANUT ROOST the upper balcony in a theatre …1966 Amer. dial.
 PIGEON ROOST the balcony of a theatre …1905 Amer. dial.
 PIGEON’S ROOST the balcony of a theatre …1966 Amer. dial.
 RAG a theatre curtain …M19 sl.
 RAGS AND STICKS  a travelling outfit; a theatrical booth …c1870 showmen’s and theatrical usage
 SEVENTH HEAVEN the upper gallery in a theatre …1967 Amer. dial.
 SHELF a balcony in a theatre …1966 Amer. dial.
 SHOWCASE an audience many of whom were admitted on free tickets …Bk1974 Amer. theatre use
 SHOW-SHOP a theatre …Bk1974 Amer. sl.
 SPEELKEN a theatre …L18 sl.
 SPELL a theatre …M18 sl.
 SPELLKEN a theatre …L18 sl.
 STRAW-HAT a theatre operating in the summer only and presenting various productions or companies …US
 STRAW-HATTER a play presented in a straw-hat theatre …US
 TANK the top gallery of a theatre …1900 Amer. college sl.
 TIRE-HOUSE the wardrobe of a theatre …c1620 obs.
 TIRING-HOUSE a dressing-room; the room or place in which the actors dressed for the state …1590 arch.
 TIRING-ROOM a dressing-room; the dressing-room of a theatre …1623 arch.
 WOOD FAMILY used as a humorous description of empty seats in a theatre …1952 UK sl.
 WOW a theatrical success …1920s Amer. show business usage
 WROTH OF RESES a wreath of roses; said of a male singer who vocalizes too sentimentally …c1882 theatrical usage
 
THEATRE – NOUNS, PERSON
 ABONNÉ a person who subscribes to a periodical; a season-ticket holder at the theatre …1858
 ACTOR-MAN a theatrical actor …1796
 ANGEL a financial backer of an enterprise, esp. one who supports a theatrical production …1894 sl., orig. US
 AUNT EDNA a typical theatre-goer of conservative taste …1953
 BALADINE;  BALLADINE a theatrical dancer; a mountebank, a buffoon …1599 obs.
 BOX-KEEPER an attendant at the boxes in a theatre …1728
 BOX RUSTLER in the 1870s (theatre), a woman who did her song and dance on the stage, and then, in a costume considered the extreme of indecency, mingled with the customers in the boxes, and encouraged the sale of liquors …1939 Amer. theatre usage
 CACKLE-CHUCKER in the theatre: a prompter …c1860 theatrical usage obs.
 CAGE GIRL a ticket seller in a theatre …1952 US sl.
 DADDY a stage-manager …c1850 theatrical sl.
 DEADHEAD a person given a ticket or tickets for having performed minor services in a theatrical production …1973 US sl.
 FLYMAN in the theatre: a stagehand who operates the scenery, curtains, etc. in the flies
 GAGAROOS barnstormers who often enlivened the dialogue with gag-filled impromptu dialogue …c1860 theatrical sl.
 GAIETY GIRL any of the Gaiety Theatre’s celebrated chorus girls (Gaiety Theatre – a former London theatre, famous for its musical comedies) …1886
 GALLERY GOD a theatre-goer who sits in the uppermost balcony …1853
 GALLERYITE one who occupies a seat in a gallery …1895
 GAS ENGINEER in the theatre: a person responsible for lighting the stage and creating effects with gaslight …1849 hist. rare
 GASMAN in the theatre: a man responsible for lighting the stage and creating effects with gas light …1835 hist.
 GATHERER a money-taker at a theatre …c1600 obs.
 GENTLEMAN SUPER a theatre-super of some position or standing …Bk1909 theatrical usage
 GEORGE a theatre usher …c1950 Amer. rock-and-roll sl.
 GHOST  paymaster or cashier; a company treasurer …1901 US theatre sl.
 GODS the occupants of the gallery in a theatre …M18 colloq.
 LITTLE DEERS young women who are involved in some way with the stage …L19 sl.
 MACHINIST one who constructs or manages the mechanical appliances used for the production of scenic effects …1739 theatre usage rare
 MOKE a performer who plays several different instruments …1890 theatre sl. obs. rare
 NAP-NIX an amateur player of minor parts for the sake of experience …Bk1902 theatrical sl.
 ORDINARY a stage prompter …1602 obs.
 QUEER CHECKER in the theatre: a swindling box-keeper …L18 theatrical sl.
 SCAFFOLDER an occupant of the gallery at a theatre …1597 obs.
 TIRE-MAN a man in charge of the costumes at a theatre …1599 obs.
 VENTILATOR a player that empties a house ..Bk1904 theatrical usage
 WALK-ON one who plays a walk-on part in a dramatic production …1902
 WRECKING CREW theatre insiders who watch a show’s early performances and spread negative comments about the show …1973 US sl. 
 
THEATRE – PHRASES
 NOT A DRY SEAT IN THE HOUSE used of a theatre audience that is helpless with laughter or a male audience that is sexually aroused …1974 UK sl.
 
THEATRE – VERBS
 BE EGGED OFF to be pelted off state or platform with eggs, preferably rotten …1930s colloq.
 FAKE to adapt for the theatre …1887 theatrical usage
 FAKE UP to adapt for the theatre …1887 theatrical usage
 HOLD A SPEAR to take a very minor non-speaking part …1950 Aust. theatrical sl.
 HOLD UP THE BACKDROP to play a nonspeaking role, esp. as part of a group of bystanders …1929 Amer. theatrical sl.


THEATRICAL – ADJECTIVES
– theatrical GAMELY a1000 obs.
– theatrical, melodramatic HAMMY 1899 US sl.


THEFT – ADJECTIVES (also see THIEF)
 FURTUOSE much given to theft or stealing …1727 obs. rare
 KLEPTISTIC pert. to theft; related to or consisting in stealing …1742-3 rare
 LARCENISH disposed to larceny or small thefts …1862
 ON THE CHORIE engaged in thieving (as a regular occupation) …1990s Sc. sl.
 ON THE COP engaged in theft …L19 sl.
 ON THE MAKE engaged in theft or swindling …1868 US criminals’ sl.
– THEFTUOUS given to theft, thievish; dishonest; furtive, secret, sneaking …c1400 orig. Sc.
 
THEFT – ADVERBS
 ON THE HOOK by or engaging in theft …1865 Amer. sl.
 THEFTUOUSLY by theft …1898 Sc.
 
THEFT – NOUNS
 AREA SNEAK the practice of getting into the lower floors of a house unobserved via the area (a sunken court giving access to the basement of a house) in order to commit petty theft …1819 sl. obs. rare
 CABIN-CRACKING the act of breaking into a ship’s cabins …1887 nautical sl.
 CAT-SNEAKING the stealing of pewter tankards from public houses …L19 sl.
 CLINKING the stealing of tankards from taverns …M19 UK criminals’ sl.
 CLINK RIG the stealing of tankards from taverns …M19 UK criminals’ sl.
 COP a theft …1930s US tramps’ sl.
 CRIB a theft, esp. of another’s writing or thoughts …colloq.
 FILCHING theft, thieving, robbery …M16 sl.
 FRATCH a lie; a petty deception or theft …19C Eng. dial.
 FURACITY inclination or tendency to steal …1623
 GAGGING theft of money by pickpocketry to which several men working together have cleverly led up by engaging a man in conversation, taking him to a public-house, and skilfully causing him to disclose how much money he has …1828 UK sl. obs.
 GAME, THE thieving …19C sl. obs.
 LADY AND GENTLEMAN RACKET the theft of barnyard fowls …M19 sl.
 LARCENARY larceny …a1639 obs.
 LARCERY larceny …a1500 obs.
 LARCIN larceny …c1400 obs.
 LARCINRY larceny …a1639 obs.
 LARKING theft …c1920 Brit. sl.
 LATROCINATION theft, robbery …1656 obs.
 LIFT a theft or robbery …1845 Amer. sl.
 LOID a celluloid or plastic strip used by thieves to force locks …1958 sl.
 MAKE a successful theft or swindle …1860 sl.
 NAB a snatch, a seizure; theft; profit which is the result of sharp dealing; the proceeds of a theft …1884 Sc. & Amer. sl.
 NABBERY theft …Bk1902 Sc.
 PALMISTRY theft …E18 sl.
 PETER-HUNTING the stealing of baggage and boxes …19C UK criminals’ sl.
 PETER LAY the stealing of baggage and boxes …E18 UK criminals’ sl.
 PICK-UP stealing, theft …1928 sl.
 QUESTION LAY ‘to knock at a door early in the morning and ask for the master of the house, and if he’s a bed, to desire the servant not to disturb him. for you’ll wait till he rises. and so you take an opportunity of stealing something …18C UK criminals’ sl.
 QUID FISHING first-class, expert thieving …L19 UK criminals’ sl.
 RAP the theft of a purse …M18 sl.
 ROADWORK the work of a travelling thief …1925 sl.
 SKINNING the theft of cargo from ships by harbour thieves …M19 US criminals’ sl.
 STING a burglary or other act of theft, fraud, etc., esp. a complex and meticulously planned one carried out quickly …1930 sl., chiefly US
 SUPER-SCREWING watch-stealing …1859 thieves’ sl.
 TAIL-BUZZING stealing a wallet from a tailcoat pocket …M19 UK criminals’ sl.
 TAKE money acquired by theft or fraud …1888 sl., chiefly US
– TAKE a theft, a robbery …1930s Aust. & US sl.
 WALKAWAY a type of theft in which the thief walks away with a suitcase in a public place, leaving behind his suitcase as an alibi if apprehended …1954 US sl.
 
THEFT – NOUNS, PERSON
 SCORE the victim of a theft or swindle …colloq.
 
THEFT – VERBS
 AREA-SNEAK to get into the lower floors of a house unobserved in order to commit petty theft …1862 sl. obs. rare
 BLOW A SCORE to fail in an attempted theft …1937 criminals’ sl.
 BUZZ to engage in theft, esp. pickpocketing …1866 Amer. criminals’ sl.
 CADGE to commit petty thefts …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
 CRACK to break open or into for the purpose of theft; to burglarize …1725 Amer. sl., orig. criminals’
 CRACK A SHORT to break into cars …1965 Amer. sl.
 CRACK UP to break open or into for the purpose of theft; to burglarize …1725 Amer. sl., orig. criminals’
 GAME to wink at or encourage theft …1818 UK sl. obs.
 HUSSLE to practice swindling or petty theft …M19 sl.
 HUSTLE to practice swindling or petty theft …M19 sl.
 LOID to break open a lock or let oneself in using a ‘loid’ …1968 sl.
 THIEF to steal, to rob; to commit theft …1838 Amer. dial.


THEN – ADVERBS
– then, thereupon; afterwards, subsequently SITH a1000 arch.


THEORIST, THEORETICAL, THEORY – ADJECTIVES
FAR OUT very hard to understand; highly theoretical …Bk2006 US sl.

THEORIST etc. – NOUNS
RACKET a theory, an idea …L19 sl.

THEORIST etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
IDEOLOGIST a person occupied with an idea or ideas, esp. with such as are regarded as unpractical; a speculator; an idealist; a visionary; a mere theorist …1831
IDEOLOGUE a person occupied with an idea or ideas, esp. with such as are regarded as unpractical; a speculator; an idealist; a visionary; a mere theorist …1815
OPINATOR one who holds an opinion; a thinker; a theorist …1626 obs.
OPINIONATOR one who holds an opinion; a theorist …1677 obs. rare


THEREFORE – ADVERBS
– therefore, because THOFFER Bk1905 Eng. dial.

THEREFORE – CONJUNCTIONS
– therefore, because THOFFER Bk1905 Eng. dial.


THERMOMETER – NOUNS
– a thermometer FERNOMETER Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
– a thermometer TEMP STICK Bk1942 Amer. sl.