Reverse Dictionary: THI – THIM


THICK, THICKNESS – ADJECTIVES
– of a thick consistency; thickened SPISCIOUS 1655 obs.
– thick and short CHUNKED Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
– thick, bulky FALLOCH 1911 Sc.
– thick, clubbish BILTIE Bk1898 Sc.
– thick, viscous THICKY 1986 Amer. dial.

THICK etc. – NOUNS
– anything both thick and short PUDGE 1808 colloq. & Eng. dial.
– thickness THICKEDNESS Bk1905 Eng. dial.


THICKEN, THICKENED – ADJECTIVES
– thickened, of a thick consistency SPISCIOUS 1655 obs.

THICKEN etc. – VERBS
– to thicken, to swell THRUMP Bk1905 Eng. dial.


THICKET – ADJECTIVES
QUEACHY forming a dense growth or thicket …1565 obs.
RAMAGE full of thickets, rough …c1475

THICKET – NOUNS
CHAPARRAL a tangle, a thicket …1875 Amer. dial.
CRIPPLE a dense thicket, usually in marshy land …Amer. dial.
ELFIN FOREST a thicket, a scrub forest …1955 Amer. dial.
LOGAN a damp thicket …Bk1913 Amer. dial.
QUEACH a dense growth of bushes; a thicket …c1450 obs. exc. Eng. dial. 
THICK a thicket …1853 Amer. dial.
 TITI a dense thicket …1905 Amer. dial.


THICKHEAD, THICK-HEADED – ADJECTIVES
ADDLE-PATED confused, muddled, stupid, doltish, thick-headed …1630
BEEF-BRAINED thick-headed, stupid …1627 obs.
BEEF-WITTED thick-headed, stupid, dull in wits, doltish …1606
BONE-HEADED thick-headed; stupid …1903 US colloq.
BOTHER-HEADED stupid, thick-headed, muddled …1872
BOX-HEADED thick-headed …1918 Amer. sl.
CULVER-HEADED thick-headed, stupid …19C Eng. dial.
DUNDER-HEADED ponderously stupid, thick-headed …1825
FAT-WITTED of slow wit, dull, thick-headed, stupid …1596
GROUT-HEADED thick-headed, stupid …1578 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
RAM-HEADED stupid, thick-headed, dull …1813
ZAWKIN stupid, thick-headed …Bk1904 Eng. dial.

THICKHEAD, THICK-HEADED – NOUNS, PERSON
BATTLE-HEAD a stupid, thick-headed fellow …Bk1886 Eng. dial.
BEEFHEAD a thickhead, a blockhead, a fool …1775
CABBAGE-HEAD a brainless fellow; a thickhead …1682
 GROUT-HEAD  blockhead, a thickhead, a dunce, a stupid person …1550 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
GROUTNOLL a blockhead, a thickhead, a dunce …1578 obs.
HAZIE a stupid, thick-headed person …Bk1902 Sc.
 JOBBERNOWL a stupid, thick-headed person; a blockhead, a fool, a dunce, a dolt …1592 colloq.
PECKERHEAD a disparaging term for a person; a thick-headed or stupid person; a jerk, an oaf; a despised man …1955 Amer. dial.
PECKERWOOD a disparaging term for a person; a thick-headed or stupid person …1986 Amer. dial. 


THICKSET – ADJECTIVES
 BATTLE fat, thickset …Bk1898 Sc.
 BILTIE thickset; clubbish; clumsy …Bk1911 Sc. 
 BILTING moving like a short, thickset person …Bk1911 Sc. 
 BOTTREL thickset, dwarfish …Bk1911 Sc.
 BUSTIOUS thickset, corpulent, over-fat …1854 Eng. dial.
 COBBY of the nature of a cob (horse); short and thickset, stocky …1871
 FADGY corpulent, fat, unwieldy, short and thickset in person …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
 JUNKY thick; chunky; of a person: thickset, solidly built …1825 Eng. dial.
 KARR a strong, thickset man …1929 Sc.
 KNUR;  KNURR a thickset, stumpy person; a deformed dwarf …1691 Eng. dial.
 KNURL;  NURL a thickset, stumpy person; a deformed dwarf …1691 Eng. dial.
 KNURLIN;  KNURLING a thickset, stumpy person; a deformed dwarf …a1796 Sc.
 NUGGETY of people and animals: short, thickset, and strong; stocky …1856 Aust. & NZ
 PUNCHY short and stout, thickset, squat, stumpy; having a large paunch …1791
 SACKETY of a person: like a stuffed sack, short and thickset; dumpy …1825 Sc.
 SACKIE;  SACKY short and thick in physical build …1825 Sc.
 SAPPY lusty, thickset …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
 SHORT SHOULDERED thickset …c1405 obs.
 SPUDDY short and fat or plump; thickset …a1825
 STOCKY thickset; sturdy
 THROSSAN fat, bulky, thickset …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
 THROSSEN-UP fat, bulky, thickset …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
 
THICKSET – NOUNS, PERSON
 BARRELLIE a short, thick person …1910 Sc. 
 BILT a short thickset or dumpy person …Bk1876 Sc.
 BLUNKART a thickset person …Bk1911 Sc.
 BODSIE a nickname for a short, thickset person …Bk1911 Sc.
 BOOL a thickset man or boy …Bk1911 Sc.
 BOTTREL a thickset, dwarfish person …Bk1911 Sc.
 CLUMBUNGIE a big, thickset, clumsy person …1908 Sc.
 CUTTY a short, thickset girl …Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
 DURGAN;  DURGEN an undersized person or animal; a dwarf; a little, thickset person …1706 Eng. dial.
 FADGE a short, thickset person; a fat, clumsy woman …1750 Sc. & Eng. dial.
 FADGY a stout, thickset little person …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
 GARRON;  GERRON a strong, thickset or stoutly-built man or boy …1808 Sc.
 GRUB a short, thickset person (rarely a woman) …15C colloq.
 HODDY-DODDY a short and dumpy or thickset person …a1553 obs.
 LAIGHIE-BRAID a person having a short, thick body; any animal having short legs and a thick body …Bk1902 Sc.
 NUGGET a short, thickset or muscular person …c1890 Aust. colloq.
– PODGEL a strong, thickset person …1825 Sc.
 
THICKSET – VERBS
 FALL ABROAD to grow stouter, more sturdy, thickset …1867 Eng. dial.


THICK-SKINNED – ADJECTIVES
– thick-skinned THICK-PELTED Bk1905 Eng. dial.


THICK-WITTED – NOUNS, PERSON
– a thick-witted dull, obstinate person; a stupid person, a blockhead RAM-HEAD 1605 obs.
– a thick-witted, stubborn fellow GULPIN B1900 Irish
– a thick-witted, stubborn fellow; a stupid person GILPIN 1929 Sc. & US sl.


THIEF, THIEVING, THIEVISH – ADJECTIVES (also see THEFT)
 BORN ON NEWGATE-STEPS of thievish origin …Bk1902 sl.
 COLOUR-BLIND given to embezzlement or other thievery …1943 US sl.
 FLASH relating to thieves, their habits, customs, lingo, etc. …1782 sl.
 FURACIOUS inclined to steal; given to theft; thievish, pilfering …1676 humorous
 FURTIVE thievish, pilfering …1816
 FURTUOSE much given to theft or stealing …1727 obs. rare
 LIGHT-FINGERED inclined to thievery …1547 
 LONG-FINGERED thievish, given to stealing …1915 Amer. dial.
 ON THE CREEP used of a thief who is working …1996 UK sl.
 OUT ON THE NICK out thieving …Bk1902 sl
 SCADDLE wild, mischievous, unsteady; thievish, esp. used of a cat or dog …1691 Eng. dial.
 SCALY miserly, stingy, mean; thievish, dishonest, tricky …1851 Eng. dial.
 SCANDAL-PROOF applied to a professional thief hardened or past shame …L17 sl.
 SCATHY ravenous; mischievous; thievish …1691 Eng. dial.
 SKADDLE wild, mischievous, unsteady; thievish, esp. used of a cat or dog …1691 Eng. dial.
 TARRY thievish, inclined to steal …1822
 TARRY-FINGERED thievish, inclined to steal, dishonest …1825
 TARRY-FISTED thievish, inclined to steal, dishonest …1906
– THEFTUOUS given to theft, thievish; dishonest; furtive, secret, sneaking …c1400 orig. Sc.
 THEFTY thievish …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
 THIEFY thievish, thieving …1898 Sc.
 THIEVELY thievish, dishonest …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
 UNPALLED said of a thief whose gang has been arrested and is thus forced to work solo …E19 UK criminals’ sl.
 
THIEF etc. – ADVERBS
 AT THIEVES’ LAW after the manner of thieves …Bk1908 obs.

THIEF etc. – NOUNS
 ACADEMY a gang of thieves …Bk1921 sl.
– ACADEMY a rendezvous for thieves, harlots, or gamesters
– ACADEMY a thieves’ school or gang …18C Eng. sl.
 BOWMAN KEN a house occupied by thieves …L17 UK criminals’ sl.
 BUZZ NAPPER’S ACADEMY a school in which young thieves are trained to the art …Bk1890 sl.
 DARK LANTERN a thief’s candle or light, made so it is possible to shut out the light when not needed …M19 sl.
 FAKING thieving …M19 UK criminals’ sl.
 FAMILY the thieving fraternity …1749 sl.
 FAMILY, THE the underworld of thieves …L17 cant
 FAMILY PEOPLE the underworld of thieves, robbers …L18 cant
 FAM-RUST a lack of practice at thieving, esp. pickpocketing …M19 UK criminals’ sl.
 FLASH the lingo of thieves and their associates …1718 sl.
 FLASH-CASE a house frequented by thieves, as a tavern, lodging-house, fence …Bk1893 sl.
 FLASH-CRIB a house frequented by thieves, as a tavern, lodging-house, fence …1839 sl.
 FLASH-DRUM a house frequented by thieves, as a tavern, lodging-house, fence …Bk1893 sl.
 FLASH-GENTRY the swell mob or higher class of thieves … Bk1893 sl.
 FLASH-HOUSE a house frequented by thieves, as a tavern, lodging-house, fence …1828 sl.
 FLASH-KEN a house frequented by thieves, as a tavern, lodging-house, fence …1690 sl.
 FLASH-PANNY a house frequented by thieves, as a tavern, lodging-house, fence …Bk1893 sl.
 GUNNING thieving …1868 criminals’ sl.
 HIGH LIVING esp. of a thief, living in a garret or cockloft, i.e. a very small room immediately above the garret ….L18 sl.
 THIEVES’ LATIN the secret language or ‘cant’ of thieves …1821
 TREACLE PLASTER a sticky piece of brown paper used by a thief to remove glass carefully …1920s UK criminals’ sl.
 
THIEF etc. – NOUNS, PERSON  (also see PICKPOCKET, ROBBER)
 AARON the leader of a gang of thieves …Bk1921 sl.
 ABACTER;   ABACTOR one that feloniously drives away or steals a herd or numbers of cattle at once, in distinction from one who steals a single beast or two …1659 obs.
 ABADDON a treacherous thief; one who turns informer against his fellow-rogues …1810 criminals’ sl.
 ABANDANA a petty thief, esp. one who pickpockets bandannas …1930 criminals’ sl. obs.
 ABANDANAAD;  ABANDANAD;  ABANDANNAD a handkerchief or bandanna thief; hence, a petty thief …1864 cant
 ABAPTIST a thief …19C sl.
 ABIGEUS a thief who has stolen cattle; an abactor …Bk1775
 ABIGEVUS a thief who has stolen many cattle …Bk1726
 ABRAHAM COVE a mean, beggarly, despised thief, or sneak …Bk1892 thieves’ sl.
 ABRAM-COVE a thief specializing in pocketbooks …L18 sl.
 ABRAM-MAN a thief specializing in pocketbooks …a1790 UK sl.
 ABRAM-MORT a thief specializing in pocketbooks …L18 sl.
 ACADEMICIAN a thief …Bk1921 sl.
 ACKMAN a sailors name for a freshwater thief, or one who steals on navigable rivers ..1823 UK criminals’ sl.
 ACK-PIRATE a sailor’s term for a freshwater thief, or one who steals on navigable rivers …Bk1883
 ACK-RIFF a freshwater thief …1900 criminals’ sl.
 ACKRUFF a river thief who robs and kills victims …1900 criminals’ sl. obs.
 ACK RUFFIAN a thief who operates along the river …1900 criminals’ sl. obs.
 ACQUISITIVE COVE a thief …Bk1904 sl.
 ADAM a thief’s accomplice …1696 UK criminals’ sl.
 ADAM FILER a thief …Bk1909 sl.
 ANGLER a thief who uses a hook attached to a long rod to steal from otherwise inaccessible places; also, a pickpocket …1567 rare
– AREA SNEAK a petty thief who gets into the lower floors of a house unobserved in order to commit petty theft …1832 sl. rare
 ARK-MAN a river thief who specializes in robbing river traffic …E18 UK criminals’ sl.
 ARK-PIRATE a river thief …L18 UK criminals’ sl.
 ARK-RUFF a river thief …18C UK criminals’ sl.
 ARK-RUFFIAN a river thief …18C UK criminals’ sl.
 ARTFUL DODGER an expert thief …c1864 sl.
 BABE a thief …19C
 BABY BURGLAR a young thief …1996 Brit. sl.
 BACKER the accomplice of a woman who robs a client …c1920 Aust. cant
 BACK-JUMPER a thief who enters houses via a back door or window …L19 sl.
 BACKSTALL a member of a garrotting gang who keeps watch and provides physical assistance to the actual garrotter if necessary …1863 UK criminals’ sl.
– BACKSTALL a thief’s accomplice one who screens him from view, often the one who flees with the loot …a1904 UK criminals’ sl.
 BADGER a thief who specializes in robbery on the riverbank, after which he murders the victim and disposes of the corpse in the water …1725 UK criminals’ sl.
– BADGER a thief or blackmailer whose speciality is the badger game (a racket where a prostitute’s accomplice steals from or blackmails her customer, usually by posing as her wronged husband) …1858  criminals’ sl.
 BADGER WORKER a blackmailer who plays the badger game …Bk1945 criminals’ sl. 
 BAGGAGE SMASHER one who steals unguarded luggage from railway stations; a baggage thief …1841 sl.
 BAGGER a thief who specializes in stealing rings …1909 sl.
 BAGMAN a sneak-thief …1865 Aust. criminals’ sl.
 BAG-SNATCHER a thief who snatches bags …1908
 BAG-THIEF a thief who specializes in stealing rings …1909 sl.
 BALATRON;  BALLATRON a babbling, prating fellow; a vain talking fellow; a jester, a buffoon; a rascally base knave, a thief; a  contemptible fellow …1623 obs. rare
 BALDOVER a thief …Bk1891 sl.
 BALL-BUSTER a thief who grabs his victim by the testicles while his accomplice takes his wallet …1989 US criminals’ sl.
 BANDIT a derisory term for the small-time or unsuccessful thief …Bk2002 UK police sl.
 BANK SNEAK one of a gang of thieves who rob banks by stealth during business hours …1872 US criminals’ sl.
– BANK SNEAK a sneak thief who steals bonds or securities from banks …1872 police & criminals’ sl.
 BARABAS a thief …Bk1891 sl.
 BARBER a thief…1945 Aust. criminals’ sl.
 BASEMAN the member of a gang of thieves who is adept at finding the least risky position for himself …Bk1992 criminals’ sl.
 BASH BOY the member of a smash-and-grab gang who actually breaks the shop window …1935 UK criminals’ sl.
 BASHER the member of a smash-and-grab team who breaks the shop window …1941 UK criminals’ sl.
 BASTER a house thief …1881 Aust. & US sl.
 BEACHCOMBER a waterfront thief …1890 criminals’ sl.
 BEAKER-HAULER a poultry thief, who hawks booty from door to door …Bk1891 sl.
 BEAKER-HUNTER a poultry thief …1839 sl.
 BEAK-HUNTER a poultry thief …1860 sl.
 BEEFEATER a cattle poacher …1958 Amer. dial.
 BENDER a thief, a cheat …1931 US criminals’ sl.
 BENJAMIN an overcoat thief …1919 US sl.
 BEST HOLD CANNON an amateur thief …1920 criminals’ sl., derogatory
 BIBLIOKLEPT a book thief …1881
 BIBLIOKLEPTOMANIAC a book thief regarded as insane …1881
 BILK a thief …Bk1891 sl.
 BILKER a thief …Bk1891 sl.
 BILLY BUZMAN a thief or pickpocket who confines his attention exclusively to silk handkerchiefs …1888 UK thieves’ sl.
 BIPPER a thief who breaks into and robs houses while the occupants are asleep …1966 US sl.
 BIRDLIME a thief; one to whom other people’s property sticks …1705 UK sl.
 BITE a thief …Bk1891 sl.
 BITER a thief …Bk1995 Amer. sl.
 BITER OF PETERS one who specializes in stealing trunks and boxes from the back of stagecoaches or carts …c1698 UK criminals’ sl.
 BLACK CAP the member of a gang of thieves who slyly elicits information from household servants about the household where they work and passes it on; he usually does not take part in the crime itself but receives his cut for supplying the information ..1899 UK criminals’ sl. obs.
 BLACK CAP AND WHITE SHEEP the member of a gang of thieves who slyly elicits information from household servants about the household where they work and passes it on; he usually does not take part in the crime itself but receives his cut for supplying the information ..1920 criminals’ sl. obs.
 BLACKLEG a thief …Bk1891 sk,
 BLAGGER one who blags, or robs, esp. a bank robber; a thief …1938 sl.
 BLUEY-HUNTER a thief who specializes in stealing lead from the roofs of houses and other buildings …M19 sl.
 BOGART a thief …1970 Amer. dial.
 BOMAN-PRIG a first-rate thief …E18 sl.
 BOOSTER a shoplifter, a thief who operates in merchandise stores in day-time …Bk1914 criminals’ sl.
 BOWERBIRD a compulsive hoarder; a person who collects ornaments, odds and ends, etc.; a petty thief …1926
 BOWMAN a thief …E19 UK criminals’ sl.
 BOWMAN-PRIG a first-rate thief …E18 sl.
 BUDGE a sneak thief, esp. one who specializes in entering houses and taking furs, cloaks, and coats …1673 sl. obs.
 BULKER a petty thief …1673 sl. obs.
 CABIN-CRACKER a thief breaking into a ship’s cabins …1887 nautical sl.
 CADDEE a thief’s assistant …E19 sl.
 CADGER a beggar, a tramp, a scrounger, a loafer, a petty thief …1737 Sc. & Eng. dial.
 CAFFREY a thief-catcher …M19 UK criminals’ sl.
 CANARY a thief’s female accomplice …M19 sl.
 CANARY-BIRD a thief’s female accomplice …M19 sl.
 CHICKEN-LIFTER a chicken thief; thus any petty thief …L19 US sl.
 CHICKEN SNATCHER a petty thief …1910s Aust. sl.
 CHICKEN THIEF a petty thief …1910s Aust. sl.
 CHOR a thief …1997 Fiji
 CLINK-RIGGER one who steals tankards from taverns …M19 UK criminals’ sl.
 CLIP ARTIST a petty thief or swindler …1941 US sl.
 CREEP a thief who operates in hotels, entering unlocked rooms as the guests sleep …1877 UK sl.
– CREEP a stealthy robber; a sneak thief; a prostitute who steals from her clients while they are asleep or unconscious …1914 sl., orig. US
 CREEPER a stealthy robber; a sneak thief; a prostitute who steals from her clients while they are asleep or unconscious …1906 sl., orig. US
 CROOK a dishonest person, esp. a swindler or thief …colloq.
 CROOKED MAN a thief; a burglar …1899 US tramps’ sl.
 CROW one who keeps watch while another steals …1862 thieves’ sl.
 CUTPURSE one who steals by the method of cutting purses, a common practice when men wore their purses at their girdles; hence, a pickpocket, a thief, a robber …1362
 DAME BUZZER a pickpocket or thief whose victims are mainly women …1935 sl.
 DAMPER-GETTER a robber of tills; a thief of money drawers …1904 US criminals’ sl.
 DAMPER-SNEAK a thief of safes …1872 US criminals’ sl.
 DANCER a cat burglar; a sneak thief …1864 UK sl.
 DANGLER a thief …1920s US sl.
 DEAD LURKER a thief specializing in theft from quiet or semi-dark places …M19 UK criminals’ sl.
 DROMEDARY a thief, esp. an incompetent or novice one …L17 UK criminals’ sl.
 DRUMMER a thief who robs an unoccupied house …1856 Brit. sl.
 DUNAKER a cattle thief …1668 cant obs.
 EGG-SUCKER a sneak-thief …1976 Amer. dial.
 EGG-SUCKING DOG a sneak-thief …c1960 Amer. dial.
– ELEVATOR a hold-up man; a thief …1914 US criminals’ sl.
 EVENING SNEAK a thief who works after dark …M18 UK criminals’ sl.
 EVESDROPPER a burglar who lurks outside a house waiting for the chance to break in while the owners are absent; thus, a petty thief …E18 sl.
 FACER a thief …Bk1891 sl.
 FAGGER a boy thief that, entering by a window, opens the door to his confederates or even hands the booty out to them …17C sl.
 FAGIN a leader of thieves; a person who trains young boys to be thieves …1905 sl.
 FAKE a thief; a swindler; a charlatan; a confidence trickster …1881 Amer. sl.
 FAKER a thief …1841 sl.
 FAKING-BOY a thief …M19 UK criminals’ sl.
 FAKING KID a thief …M19 UK criminals’ sl.
 FALL PARTNER one of a pair of thieves working together …1950s US criminals’ sl.
 FAMILY MAN a man who is a professional criminal or a trusted associate of criminals; a member of the criminal fraternity; a thief …1749 sl.
 FAMILY WOMAN a female member of the criminal fraternity; a thief …L18 sl.
 FANCY COVE a thief …19C sl.
 FIDLAM-BEN a petty thief; one who will grab anything, irrespective of its value …L18 UK crimnals’ sl.
 FIDLAM-COVE a petty thief; one who will grab anything, irrespective of its value …L18 UK crimnals’ sl.
 FIDLUM-BEN a petty thief; one who will grab anything, irrespective of its value …L18 UK crimnals’ sl.
 FIGGER;  FIGURE a boy thief that, entering by a window, opens the door to his confederates or even hands the booty out to them …1785 sl.
 FILCH a thief …c1770 sl.
 FILCHER a thief …M16 sl.
 FILCHING COVE a male thief …L17 sl.
 FILCHING MORT a female thief …L17 sl.
 FINDER a thief, esp. in a meat-market …c1850 cant
 FLASH-COMPANION a thief; a sharper …Bk1893 sl.
 FLASH-COVE a thief; a sharper …1825
 FLASH-MAN a rogue, a thief; the landlord of a ‘flash-case’ …1789 sl.
 FLY MAN an expert thief …20C cant
– FRISKER a pickpocket, a petty thief …1802 criminals’ sl.
 FUNK a sneak thief  …1920s US tramps’ sl.
– FUNKER a petty or unskilful thief …1797 criminals’ sl.
– FUR-TRAPPER a fur thief …1954 US police sl.
 GAFFLER a business person; a thief …2002 African-American sl.
 GALLEY-SHOVER a till-thief …1895 Aust. criminals’ sl.
 GALLOWS a thief or pickpocket, or one who associates with them …c1595 UK sl.
 GALLOWS-BIRD a thief or pickpocket, or one who associates with them …c1786 UK sl.
 GALLOWS-FACE a thief or pickpocket, or one who associates with them …1725 UK sl.
 GALLUS a thief or pickpocket or one who associates with them …c1595 sl. 
 GAME COVE an associate of thieves …19C sl.
 GAMMON a thief’s or pickpocket’s accomplice who jostles the prospective victim that the actual thief can possess easily of his booty; a shoplifter’s accomplice …1717 sl. & colloq. obs.
 GAMMONER a thief’s or pickpocket’s accomplice who distracts the victim while a crime is committed …1795 sl. & colloq. obs.
 GANEF; GANEV a thief, a crook; an amateur pickpocket …1839 criminals’ sl.
 GANK ARTIST a thief …2012 African-American & criminals’ sl.
 GANKER a thief …1987 African-American sl.
 GANOF;  GANOV a thief, swindler, gangster, or pickpocket …1839 criminals’ sl.
 GARRETEER;  GARRETER a thief who crawls over house-tops and breaks in through garret windows …Bk1864 UK criminals’ sl.
 GAS METER BANDIT a derisory term for a small-time thief; stealing from gas meters is considered a petty crime …1968 criminals’ sl.
 GAY CAT a thief who only works when he needs money …1926 US criminals’ sl.
 GAZLON a small-time thief, possible a timid one …1977 UK criminals’ sl.
 GEACH;  GEICH a thief …1821 Sc. thieves’ sl. obs.
 GEISTER an extra thief …1798 US criminals’ sl.
 GENNAUF a thief, swindler, gangster, or pickpocket …1839 criminals’ sl.
 GENTLEMAN OF THE SCAMP a highwayman; a thief …c1786 UK sl.
 GETABIT a thief …1900 UK sl.
 GETAWAY the member of a gang of thieves who carries off the stolen goods …1926 criminals’ sl.
 GETTER a thief …1512 criminals’ sl.
– GETTER one who steals cheques …1920 UK criminals’ sl.
– GETTER a criminal who steals letters for forgery gangs …1941 UK criminals’ sl.
 GIBBET-THIEF a thief who is hanged on a gibbet (a gallows) …1700
 GILT a person who picks locks; a burglar or thief …1620 sl. obs.
 GILT DUBBER a burglar or thief who is artful at picking locks …1785 criminals’ sl.
 GILTER a person who picks locks; a burglar or thief; a housebreaker who uses a skeleton key …1663 sl. obs. RARE
 GIP a thief …1853 sl.
 GLAMMER a thief …1925 US sl.
 GLASIER a thief who breaks into houses after removing an accessible window, or into shops by smashing the shop window …1661 UK criminals’ sl.
 GLAUMER a thief …1925 US sl.
 GLAZIER one who burgles houses by entering through a window; a thief who breaks into shops by smashing the shop window …1661 UK criminals’ sl. obs.
– GLAZIER one who smashes showcases and steals their contents …1785 criminals’ sl. obs.
 GLAZYER a thief who breaks into houses after removing an accessible window, or into shops by smashing the shop window …1661 UK criminals’ sl.
 GLEANER a thief …1841 UK sl.
 GLIMMERER a person, usually a woman, who gains entry to a house on the pretext of getting a light for the fire and, while inside, steals whatever she can …1665 UK sl.
– GLIMMERER one who deliberately sets fire to a house, hoping to take advantage of the confusion in order to steal …1688 UK sl.
 GLOMMER a purse-snatcher …1942 Amer. sl.
 GON a professional thief, esp. a pickpocket …1858 Amer. sl.
 GONIF;  GONNIF a thief, a crook …1839 UK sl.
 GOPHER a boy thief …Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
– GRABBER a thief …1846 US criminals’ & police sl.
 GRAFTER a small-time criminal, such as a pickpocket or thief …1866 US sl.
 GUN a professional thief, esp. a pickpocket …1858 Amer. sl.
 GUN MOLL an armed female thief or other criminal; the female companion of a male gunman or gangster …1908 US sl.
 GUNNER a thief …1889 sl. obs.
 GUNNIF a thief, a crook …2000 UK sl.
 GUNSMITH a thief …1869 sl.
 GUTTER-PROWLER a street thief; a small-time thief …c1840 sl.
 GYP a thief or a swindler; one who charges an exorbitant price for goods or services; a cheat; a crook …1728 sl., orig. criminals’ usage, sometimes offensive
 HAND-THIEF one who steals with the hands …1899 Sc.
 HEALER one who hides or conceals anything; a receiver of stolen goods; a thief’s confederate …1825 Eng. dial.
 HEDGE-CREEPER a vagrant; a thief; a peeping tom …rare or obs.
 HEEL a sneak thief or pickpocket …1914 US criminals’ sl., derogatory
 HEIST MAN a professional thief or hold-up man …1930s US criminals’ sl.
 HEVETHEE a thief …L19 centre slang, created by rearranging the syllables or constituent parts of a word 
 HOLE-CREEPER a sneaking thief …1462
 HOOK a thief or pickpocket; orig., someone who stole from a picket while the victim’s attention was distracted by someone else …1863 sl.
 HOOKER a thief or pilferer; a pickpocket; a stealer of pocket-watches …1567 sl.
 HOT SHORT HUSTLER an automobile thief …Bk1934 sl.
 HOT-STUFFER a thief …Amer. World War I sl.
 HUSTLER one of a gang of pickpockets who takes part in hustling a person; also, a thief, a criminal; one who makes his living dishonestly or by begging; a pimp …1825 sl.
 ICEMAN a thief specializing in the theft of diamonds …1931 US criminals’ sl.
 IMPUDENT STEALER one who cuts out the back of a coach and takes things out of it …c1700 UK criminals’ sl.
 IN-AND-OUT MAN an opportunist thief or burglar …1957 UK sl.
 INGLER a horse thief who toured country fairs looking for victims …1825 thieves’ sl.
 IN THE BOOK a thief, esp. a pickpocket …20C US rhyming sl. for ‘hook’ 
 JACK a mugger; a thief …1920s US sl.
 JACKAL a steamboat thief, the thief who actually removes the booty …19C US criminals’ sl.
 JACKER a street robber, a thief …2000s sl.
 JACK-IN-A-BOX a sharper or cheat; a thief who deceived tradesmen by substituting empty boxes for others full of money …1612 obs.
 JACK-IN-THE-BOX a sharper or cheat; a thief who deceived tradesmen by substituting empty boxes for others full of money …1570 obs.
 JACOB a housebreaker or thief carrying a ladder …1712 sl. obs.
 JANUSMUG a go-between; an intermediary between a thief and a receiver …1859 Amer. thieves’ sl.
 JERRY-SNEAK a watch thief …Bk1896 thieves’ sl.
 JILTER a thief who uses a crowbar to break in …1863 sl.
 KAE;  KAY a thievish, mischievous person …1789 Sc.
 KEDGER a beggar, a tramp, a loafer, a petty thief …1835 Eng. dial.
 KEY PICKER a thief who operates in hotels, stealing keys left at the front desk for safekeeping by guests before they are retrieved by a hotel clerk …1954 US sl.
 KIDDY a flashy young man who is usually a rake or a thief …1778 Amer. sl., orig. criminals’ usage
 KIN a thief …18C UK criminals’ sl.
 KINK a thief, esp. an expert in stealing automobiles …1914 Amer. sl.
 KLEPTO a kleptomaniac …1958 sl.
 KNOCKER-OFF a thief …1926 criminals’ sl.
 KNUCK a thief, a pickpocket …1819 sl. obs.
 KWAY a general thief, with no real specialty …1940s Aust. sl.
 LADRONE a highwayman, pirate, robber, thief (main usage in books on Spain or Spanish America) …1832
 LADS OF THE VILLAGE thieves …E19 sl.
 LAND-PIRATE a highwayman; a wandering thief; a gypsy …1609 sl.
 LARCENER one who commits larceny …1634-5
 LARCENIST a larcener …1803
 LARCIN one who commits larceny …1596 obs.
 LASSONER a larcener, one who commits larceny …1634-5
 LATCH-DRAWER one who draws or lifts the latch to enter for an unlawful purpose …1393 obs.
 LIGHT HORSEMAN a thief operating as one of a gang on the Thames …19C Brit. sl.
 LOB-CRAWLER a till-thief …1887 thieves’ sl.
 LOBO CROOK a thief who steals alone …1926 criminals’ sl. 
 LOB-SNEAK a thief who steals from cash registers …1859 criminals’ sl. 
 LONE HAND a thief or criminal who works alone …1926 US sl.
 LONG-FINGERED GENT a thief; a pickpocket …1965 Amer. dial.
 LURKER a petty thief; a begging impostor …1841
 LUSH-ROLLER a thief who robs drunken or unconscious persons …1919 criminal & police sl.
 LUSH-TOUCHER a thief who robs drunken or unconscious persons …1904 criminal & police sl.
 LUSH-WORKER a thief who robs drunken or unconscious persons …1908 Amer. criminal & police sl.
 MACER a thief; a villain …L19 sl.
 MAG a street swindler or thief, esp. one who preys on gullible countrymen …M19 sl.
 MAGPIE a person who collects or hoards objects, information, esp., esp. indiscriminately; an acquisitive person; also, a petty pilferer …1903
 MAGSMAN a street swindler or thief, esp. one who preys on gullible countrymen …M19 sl.
 MEECHER a sneak, a lurking thief …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
 MICHAAR;  MICHEAR;  MICHEER a thief …1663 Ireland
 MIDNIGHT AUTO SERVICE car thieves …1960s Amer. sl.
– MISSION-STIFF a petty thief …Bk1992 criminals’ sl. 
 MOCHER a petty thief …1896 sl.
 MOKER;  MOKKER an amateur thief who spoils the market for the experienced pickpocket …1926 criminals’ sl.
 MOLE someone who tunnels into a bank to rob it …1931 US prison sl.
 MOLL a girlfriend; a sweetheart; spec. the girlfriend or female accomplice of a gangster or criminal; a female pickpocket or thief …1823
 MOLL-BUZZER a female pickpocket or beggar; a female thief …1866 Amer. sl.
 MOLLER a thief specializing in pickpocketing women …1859 criminals’ sl.
 MOLL WORKER a pickpocket or thief whose victims are mainly women …1925 criminals’ sl.
 MONDAY BOY a neighbourhood thief who steals laundry from clotheslines on the traditional Monday wash day …Bk1992 US criminals’ sl.
 MONDAY GIRL a neighbourhood thief who steals laundry from clotheslines on the traditional Monday wash day …Bk1988 US criminals’ sl.
 MONDAY MAN a neighbourhood thief who steals laundry from clotheslines on the traditional Monday wash day …Bk1975 US criminals’ sl.
 MONDAY WORKER a thief who steals from clotheslines …c1925 US criminals’ sl.
 MOOCH a street thief who specializes in snatching (drunken) men’s jewellery …1950 US criminals’ sl.
 MOOCHER a person who loiters aimlessly; a loafer; also, an opportunist poacher or pilferer; a petty thief …a1425 chiefly colloq.
 MOONLIGHTER a thief or burglar who operates at night; in Ireland, usually a cattle thief …1883 UK criminals’ sl.
 MOONMAN a person, esp. a criminal, who works at night; a robber, thief or highwayman who follows his vocation chiefly by moonlight …1632 obs. rare
 MOON’S MAN a person, esp. a criminal, who works at night; a thief or highwayman …1907 obs.
 MOOTCHER an opportunist poacher or pilferer; a petty thief …1911 sl.
 MORNING SNEAK one who specializes in thieving early in the morning; one who stalks about the neighbourhood in the early morning hours …1777 UK criminals’ sl. obs.
 MORNING-SNEAK COVE a male who practices ‘the morning sneak’ (thieving early in the morning) …1821 UK criminals’ sl.
 MORNING-SNEAK COVESS a female who practices ‘the morning sneak’ (thieving early in the morning) …1821 UK criminals’ sl.
 MOUCHARD a petty thief …1877 UK sl.
 MOUCHER a person who loiters aimlessly; a loafer; also, an opportunist poacher or pilferer; a petty thief …a1425 chiefly colloq.
 MUSH a thief’s girlfriend …L18 US criminals’ sl.
 MUTTON-MONGER a sheep-stealer …a1700 sl. obs.
 NABBER a thief …1859 Amer. sl.
 NABBLER a thief …Bk1889 Sc. & Amer.
 NAILER a thief …Bk1902 sl.
 NAP a sheep-stealer …a1700 sl. obs.
 NAPKIN-SNATCHER a thief of handkerchiefs …19C sl.
 NAPPER a cheat, or thief …a1700 sl. obs.
 NATTY-LAD a young thief or pickpocket …1785 thieves’ sl.
 NEEDLE a sharper; a thief …1821 sl.
 NEWGATE-BIRD a thief, a sharper, a jailbird …1607 sl.
 NEWGATE-NIGHTINGALE a thief, a sharper, a jailbird …c1531 sl.
 NIBBING-CULL a petty thief or fraudulent dealer …1775 sl.
 NIBBLER a petty thief or fraudulent dealer …1823 sl.
 NICKER a thief, a cheat, a confidence trickster …L17 sl.
 NICK-POT a stealer of publican’s pots …1602 sl.
 NIGHTCAP a thief who prefers to work at night …19C sl.
 NIGHT SNEAK a thief who works after dark …M18 UK criminals’ sl.
 OBSERVATIONIST one who spies out likely boot for thieves, generally a peddler, hawker, etc. …L19 cant
 OFFICE SNEAK one who enters and steals from an office or business, as coats, umbrellas, etc.
 OLD BIRD an experienced thief …1877 cant
 OPERATOR a thief or swindler …E18 sl.
 PACK RAT a petty thief; a stranger; one who cannot be trusted …Bk1975 Amer. sl.
 PACKY a sneak thief who interrupts the work of people legitimately unloading goods and manages to steal some of the goods without being caught in the act …Bk1992 criminals’ sl. 
 PAD-BORROWER a horse thief …1785 UK sl.
 PAD-PRIGGER a horse thief …1848 UK criminals’ sl.
 PALMER a thief that adroitly slips jewellery from the top of a showcase  into his pocket …1859 US sl. 
 PANEL a thief, usually the accomplice of a prostitute, who takes advantage of her client’s preoccupation to rob him, using a special panel to enter the room …M19 sl.
 PANEL DODGER a thief, usually the accomplice of a prostitute, who takes advantage of her client’s preoccupation to rob him, using a special panel to enter the room …M19 sl.
 PANEL-THIEF a thief, usually the accomplice of a prostitute, who takes advantage of her client’s preoccupation to rob him, using a special panel to enter the room …1860 sl.
 PANEL WORKER a thief, usually the accomplice of a prostitute, who takes advantage of her client’s preoccupation to rob him, using a special panel to enter the room …M19 sl.
– PARLOUR-JUMPER a common housebreaker …1860 sl. 
 PATA-KYAT a thief …1940s W. Indies sl. 
 PENNYWEIGHTER a jewellery thief …1899 US sl.
 PICK-UP MAN someone who steals luggage …1928 sl.
 PIKER a petty thief …14C sl.
 PODDY DODGER one who steals unbranded cattle; a cattle rustler …1910s Aust. sl.
 POLECAT a thief …1966 Amer. dial. 
 POSSUM a thief …1945 Aust. sl. rare
 PUGGARD a thief …17C cant
 PULLER a sneak thief …1984 US sl.
 QUEER PRANCER a cowardly horse thief …18C sl.
 QUEER THIEF OF THE WORLD, THE a thief, a rogue …1896 Ireland
 RACKET DUDE a thief; a racketeer …Bk1992 criminals’ sl.
 RACKET MAN a thief, usually of noisy items such as chickens …c1850 criminals’ sl. obs.
 RADAR a petty thief; someone who will ‘pick up anything’ …1989 Aust. sl.
 RAFFLES a gentleman or society thief, esp. a burglar …19C sl.
 RAILBIRD in American casinos: a thief who steals chips from inattentive gamblers …1985 US sl.
 RAILFIELD a thief who simply grabs shop merchandise and runs from the shop …1960 US sl.
 RAMRAIDER one who steals from shops by smashing a stolen car into the shop-front, then driving away with the car filled with loot …1991 sl.
 RAMRODDER one who steals from shops by smashing a stolen car into the shop-front, then driving away with the car filled with loot …1990s sl.
 RANDY a thief …1811 Sc. & Eng. dial.
 RATTLER GRAB a thief specializing in freight wagons …1920 US criminals’ sl.
 READER a small-time thief who follows postmen or delivery men to their destination, having sneaked a look at the label, then claims to be the official recipient …1920s US criminals’ sl.
 REAVER a robber, a plunderer; esp. a border thief …1678 Sc. & Eng. dial.
 RIFLER a horse-stealer …L16 sl.
 RIVER-RAT a riverside thief; one who robs the corpses of drowned men …Bk1903 sl.
 SAFE in a pickpocketing team: the thief who takes the wallet or object stolen by the wire and leaves the scene with it …1954 US sl.
 SAINT GILES BUZZMAN a petty thief who goes after men’s and women’s handkerchiefs …Bk1992 Brit. & US criminals’ sl. obs.
 SAINT PETER’S SON a thief …Bk1903 sl.
 SANDBAGGER a street robber, a ‘mugger’ …L19 US sl.
 SANDBAG MAN a common thief employing a bag of sand to knock down and disable his victim …1919 Aust. criminals’ sl. 
 SANDMAN a footpad, a ‘mugger’ …1910s Aust. sl.
 SANTAR the member of a team of parcel thieves who actually removes the stolen goods and takes them to a hideout …L16 sl.
 SATYR ‘Men living wild in the Fields, that keep their Holds and Dwellings in the Country and forsaken Places, stealing Horses, Kine, Sheep, and all other sort of Cattle’; a cattle-thief; a horse thief …1714 criminals’ sl. obs.
 SAWNEY-HUNTER;  SAWNY-HUNTER one who steals bacon or cheese from grocers’ shops; a bacon thief…1856 sl. 
 SCAB a thief …2003 UK teen sl. 
 SCALER a thief, a fraud, a swindler; in NZ, esp. one who decamps with his mates’ share of the loot …c1920 Aust. & NZ colloq.
 SCAMP a thief …1818 UK criminals’ sl.
 SCOW-BANKER a sneak, a thief, a rascal …1863 Eng. dial.
 SCREWER a thief or housebreaker …1932 sl.
 SCREWSMAN a thief or housebreaker …1812 sl.
 SCRUMPER one who steals apples from orchards …1946 UK sl.
 SENTER the member of a team of parcel thieves who actually removes the stolen goods and takes them to a hideout …L16 sl.
 SHITTER a thief who likes to excrete inside the places he robs …1970s UK criminals’ sl.
 SILKO a thug; a thief …2000s Irish sl.
 SILK-SNATCHER a thief who grabs the bonnets and hats from pedestrians …E18 sl.
– SILK-SNATCHER a thief who specialized in stealing cloaks by twitching them from the wearer’s back …M18 UK criminals’ sl.
 SKIN a thief …1967 Amer. dial.
 SNAPHANCE an armed robber or marauder; a freebooter or highwayman; a thief or desperate fellow …1538 obs.
 SNATCHER a thief …1965 US sl.
 SNITCHER a petty thief …1930s sl.
 SNUDGE a thief who first enters a house, then hides, and emerges when the coast is clear to effect the robbery …1676 cant obs.
 SPARK GRAFTER a jewel thief …1902 US criminals’ sl.
 SQUAREHEAD a sham thief …Bk1892 Aust. sl.
 STAIR DANCER a thief who steals from open buildings …1958 sl.
 ST. PETER’S CHILDREN petty thieves who take anything they can lay their hands on …18C sl.
 ST. PETER’S SONS petty thieves who take anything they can lay their hands on …18C sl.
 SUCK-EGG DOG a sneak-thief …c1960 Amer. dial.
 TAIL-BUZZER a thief who specializes in the picking of coat pockets …M19 UK criminals’ sl.
 TAIL-DIP a thief who specializes in the picking of coat pockets …1851 UK criminals’ sl.
 TAIL-DIVER a pickpocket specializing in removing snuff-boxes, purses, pocketbooks, etc. from gentlemen’s coat pockets …1859 UK criminals’ sl.
 TAIL DRAWER a sword-stealer, one who takes gentlemen’s swords from their sides …1698 UK criminals’ sl. obs.
 TAKE a thief; a villain, esp. a cheat at cards …1968 Aust. sl.
 TAKE-DOWN a deceiver or cheat; a thief; a swindler; a confidence man …1926 Aust. sl.  
 TAKE-OFF ARTIST a thief …Bk1995 Amer. criminals’ sl.
 TAKER one who takes something from another by force or wrongfully; a robber, a thief, a plunderer, a pilferer …1500-20
 TANK MAN a person who specializes in stealing from safes …Bk2002 Aust. prison sl.
 TAR a thief, a ‘tar finger’ …Bk1992 sl.
 TAR-FINGERS a petty pilferer …Bk1903 sl.
 TAR-HEEL a thief, esp. a sneak thief …1925 US criminals’ sl.
 TARRY-FINGERS a person given to stealing, a petty thief …1808 Sc.
 TARRY-NEIVE a person given to stealing, a petty thief …1810 Sc. 
 TARTAR a strolling vagabond, a tramp, a thief, beggar …1598 cant obs.
 TARTARIAN a thief …1608 cant
 TAYLE DRAWERS sword stealers …Bk1737 criminals’ sl.
 TEA-LEAF a small-time thief …1890 criminals’ rhyming sl.
 TEA-POT SOAK a thief who sells teapots and other related items …1930 UK criminals’ sl. obs.
 TEAR-PLACKET a cutpurse; a pickpocket or thief …c1600 obs.
 THIEF-ANIMAL a term of opprobrium for a thievish person …1897 Sc.
 THIEF-LOON a thief, a thievish rascal …1898 Sc.
 THIEF-RIEVER a thief, a thievish rascal …Bk1905 Sc.
 TIER-RANGER a (Thames) river thief …1858
 TILE an audacious thief; a mischievous person, esp. applied to young people …Bk1905 Eng. dial. 
 TILL-TAPPER one who steals from a till …1893
 TINKER a vagabond, a tramp; a reputed thief …1561 obs.
 TINNY a thief …1930s US criminals’ sl.
 TINNY-HUNTER a thief who robs people whose homes are burning down, while pretending to give assistance …L18 sl.
 TOLLER a horse-stealer …L16 sl.
 TOSHER a man who steals copper sheathing from ships’ bottoms or from dockyard stores …Bk1892 nautical sl.
 UNICORN two men and one woman, or two women and one man banded together to steal …1859 US criminals’ sl.
 UPRIGHT SNEAK one who steals pewter pots from the boys employed by taverns to collect them …1781 UK criminals’ sl. obs.
 VALENTINO a thief who victimizes women …Bk1992 criminals’ sl. obs.
 VAMPER a thief’s accomplice who starts a saloon brawl with a victim who has a valuable watch or ring; during the fight, the thief removes the watch from the distracted owner …1836 criminals’ sl. obs.
 VAMPIRE a thief, esp. one who deliberately starts fights between others in order to rob them in the confusion ..1864 sl.
 VAN-DRAGGER a thief who steals goods from the back of carts, vans, or trucks …1926 criminals’ sl.
 VARLETS thieves …18C Brit. criminals’ sl. obs.
 VILLAGE BUTLER ‘old thieves, that would rather steal a dishclout than discontinue the practice of thieving’ …L18 sl.
 WADDIE;  WADDY a cattle rustler …1897 US sl.
 WAGON LAYER a thief who commits the wagon lay (the nighttime practice of lying in wait for passing wagons from which to steal goods or merchandise) …1708 UK criminals’ sl. 
 WALKING POULTERER a thief who steals chickens and then sells them door-to-door …1788 criminals’ sl.
 WANDEROO the member of a gang of thieves that cases or studies the layout of the bank to be burglarized before the crime is committed …1925 US criminals’ sl. 
 WARP, WARPE the member of a curbing team who acts as lookout while the ‘curber’ or hooker, steals items of clothing from open windows; he also conceals the stolen merchandise under his coat while the ‘curber’ seeks additional items …1592 criminals’ sl.
 WARPER the member of a curbing team who acts as lookout while the ‘curber’ or hooker, steals items of clothing from open windows; he also conceals the stolen merchandise under his coat while the ‘curber’ seeks additional items …1592 criminals’ sl.
 WELL-FAKED CLAW an experienced thief who is successful in grabbing and stealing items by hand …1839 literary usage 
 WESTERN GUY an out-of-town thief …1930s US criminals’ sl.
 WHARF-RAT anyone who hangs about wharfs, looking out for an opportunity to steal from a cargo …M19 sl. orig. US
– WINDOW-CRASHER a thief who utilized the smash-and-grab robbery technique …Bk1992 US criminals’ sl.
 WIPER-DRAWER a handkerchief-stealer …Bk1737 sl.
 YEGG a thief, a burglar or safe-breaker …1903 US
 YEGGMAN a thief, a burglar or safe-breaker …1906 US
 ZIFF a juvenile thief …1846 UK criminals’ sl.
 
THIEF etc. – NOUNS, PERSON, OTHER
 BIRD DOG a contact man for stock and bond thieves …1931 US criminals’ sl.
– BIRD DOG a reconnoiterer of thieves; a locater of thieves …Bk1945 criminals’ sl. 
 DABBLER one who associates with thieves …M19 US criminals’ sl.
 DARKMAN’S BUDGE a thief’s accomplice, who climbs into a house through a window and opens a door to admit the rest of the gang …L17 UK criminals’ sl.
 MOLLISHER a thief’s mistress; a wife …1812 sl.
 MONISHER;  MONNISHER a girl, a woman; esp. a prostitute; later, also, the girlfriend of a thief or criminal …1765 sl. rare
 
THIEF etc. – PHRASES
 HE’S SUCH AN OLD THIEF, HE’D ROB JESUS CHRIST OF HIS SHOE-STRINGS said of a notorious thief …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
 
THIEF etc. – VERBS
 CHAUNT THE PLAY to expose and/or explain the ways and tricks of thieves …c1845 cant
 CREEP to work as a sneak-thief …1928 US sl.
 LATROCINATE to rob, to play the thief …1623 obs.
 PAD to travel as tramp, thief, vagrant, or prostitute …E17 sl.
 PAD IT to travel as tramp, thief, vagrant, or prostitute …E17 sl.
 PATTER FLASH to talk in thieves’ lingo …1827 sl.
 PUT UP THE DOOKS to thieve, esp. to pickpocket (dook = hand) …M19 sl.
 WORK THE RATTLE to operate, as a professional thief, on the trains …c1890 UK sl.


THIGH – NOUNS
– a leg, thigh of a person GAMMON 1756 Sc. obs.
– a thigh THEE 1685 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– excess flesh around the upper thighs, or occasionally, a portly stomach HEAP 1960s sl.
– the female thighs HAMMERS 1980 US sl.
– the knee or thigh HAMBONE 1908 Amer. dial.
– the thigh HEAP Bk1902 Eng. dial.
– thick, heavy female thighs GUNSACK 2003 Trinidad and Tobago sl.


THIMBLE – NOUNS
– a tailor’s thimble BUSHEL 1889 US