Reverse Dictionary: TRE – TRH


TREACHEROUS, TREACHEROUSLY, TREACHERY – ADJECTIVES
 BREAK-FAITH perfidious, treacherous …Bk1911 Sc.
 CROCODILIAN making a hypocritical show of grief; cruel and treacherous; deceitful …1632 obs.
 FAITEROUS characterized by deceit; treacherous …1600 obs. rare
 FELL-LURKING cruel and treacherous, lurking to do mischief …Bk1908 
 GLIDDERY treacherous …1869 Eng. dial.
 LEWE treacherous …c1000 obs.
 HECTIC fairly treacherous …1988 US sl.
 NAR treacherous …1988 US sl.
 PRODITORIOUS treacherous, traitorous, perfidious; apt to betray or reveal what is hidden or in the mind; apt to disclose or make known …c1475 obs. or arch.
 SNAKY guileful, deceitful, treacherous …a1586
 TEPTIOUS snappish, captious; irritating; treacherous, changeable, not to be depended upon …1876 Eng. dial.
 UNDERMINDED sly, deceptive, double-faced; underhand, mean, treacherous …1902 Eng. & Amer. dial.
 UNDERNEAN deceitful, treacherous, underhand …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
 
TREACHEROUS etc. – ADVERBS
 SUBTLY with craft or guile; craftily, treacherously, deceitfully, insidiously …c1325 obs.
 
TREACHEROUS etc. – NOUNS
 BETRAY a treacherous giving up to an enemy; betrayal …1600 obs. rare
 CRAP treachery …Bk1914 criminals’ sl.
 DOG’S TRICK a low or despicable trick; a treacherous or spiteful act; a bad turn …1742 rare
 FALSE fraud, falsehood, treachery; in early use, counterfeiting of coin; forgery …c1000 obs.
 FALSEDOM treachery; untruth; a falsehood …1297 obs.
 FALSET falsehood, treachery, fraud …1375 obs., chiefly Sc.
 FALSITY false or treacherous conduct; treachery, fraud …c1330 obs.
 FELLNESS treachery, deceitfulness; craftiness …a1398 obs.
 HOOK, THE an instance of treachery; a double cross …1908 Amer. sl.
 SINONISM a trick, deception; a treacherous act …1864
 
TREACHEROUS etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
 ACHITOPHEL a treacherous friend and adviser an able but unprincipled counsellor …BK1903
 BAD MEMBER a doer of evil; a bad character; a treacherous fellow …Bk1910 Ireland
 BEYOTCH a malicious or treacherous woman; a ‘bitch’ …1986 US sl., derogatory & offensive
 BIATCH applied opprobriously to a woman; a malicious or treacherous woman; a bitch …1986 orig. & chiefly US sl., derogatory & offensive
 BITCH a term of abuse for a woman; strictly, a lewd or sensual woman; later, a malicious, treacherous, unpleasant, or otherwise despicable woman …a1400
 COPPERHEAD any treacherous person …US Civil War usage
 COPPER HEART a treacherous person …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
 DELILAH a temptress; a seductive and treacherous woman …L16
 DINGO a cowardly, treacherous, or despicable person …1869 Aust. sl.
– DOG a treacherous or brutal person …1966 US sl., esp. Black usage
 EEL an elusive, shrewd, sly, or deceptive person; a treacherous person …1933 Amer. dial., usually derogatory
 FELLOW TRAVELER a person working secretly for a foreign government; a treacherous person …World War II Amer. sl.
 GONSEL;  GONSIL a treacherous person …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
 GUNSIL a treacherous person …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
 GUNTZEL a treacherous person …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
 HIGH-GRADER a treacherous person …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
 MINK a treacherous person …Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
 MUZZLER a treacherous person …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
 NIGHT-WORM a treacherous comrade …1430-40 obs.
 NONTRUST a treacherous person …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
 SCALY-BACK a treacherous, untrustworthy person …20C Brit. sl.
 SCALY-BACKED REPTILE a treacherous, untrustworthy person …20C Brit. sl. 
 SPLIT CASE a treacherous person …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
 TIGRESS a treacherous person …Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
 TWO-WAY GUY a treacherous person …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
 WRONG GUY a treacherous person …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
 
TREACHEROUS etc. – VERBS
 BETRAISE;  BETRAISH to be a traitor to; to be treacherous; to deceive the trustful or innocent …c1374 obs.
 DECEIVE to be or prove false to, to play false, to deal treacherously with; to betray …a1300 obs.
 DINGO to behave in a treacherous or cowardly manner …1935 Aust. sl.


TREACLE – NOUNS
– treacle COCKY’S JOY Bk1945 Aust.
– treacle DIRTY DAN’L Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– treacle LABBER-GOB Bk1902 Eng. dial.


TREAD, TREADING – NOUNS
DECALCATION a treading or trampling down or hard …1827
OCCULCATION a trampling or treading on or spurning …1656 obs. rare

TREAD etc. – VERBS
BALTER to tread heavily and clumsily; to walk unsteadily, to stumble …1873 Eng. dial.
BLAD to take long steps, treading heavily …Bk1911 Sc. 
DECULCATE to tread or trample upon …1623 obs.
FAMP to tread heavily; to walk with a firm foot …1854 Eng. dial.
FARE to tread under foot …c1460 obs.
JAM to tread heavily; to tread down …1787 Eng. dial.
OFTREAD to tread or trample down; to injure or destroy by treading …c893 obs. rare
PAD to tread with a soft dull sound, as a person does in slippers or stockings …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
PADDER to tread; to trample down …1789 Sc. obs.
PADDLE to trample down by treading over; to mark with wet or muddy feet …1805 Eng. dial.
PAKE to stroll about; to move slowly; to tread …1847 Eng. dial.
PATTER to tread down; to trample under foot …Bk1903 Sc. & Eng. dial.  
WAFFLE to tread or trample …1970s US sl.


TREADMILL – NOUNS
(a device formerly used for driving machinery, consisting of a large wheel with steps fitted into its inner surface; it was turned by the weight of people or animals treading the steps)

CARE-GRINDER the treadmill …1883 thieves’ sl.
JACK-THE-SLIPPER the treadmill …Bk1896 sl.
UNIVERSAL STAIRCASE a prison treadmill …19C sl.
VERTICAL CARE-GRINDER the treadmill …1883 thieves’ sl.

TREADMILL – VERBS
DANCE THE MILL to walk on the prison treadmill …M19 W. Indies sl.


TREASON – NOUNS
– treason; any offense against the sovereign authority LESE-MAJESTY 1536


TREASURE – NOUNS
DEARWORTHINESSES valuables, treasures …c1325 obs.
DRUERY a beloved or precious thing; anything valuable or highly prized; a treasure …a1300 obs.
GARRISON store, treasure; donation, gift …1297 obs.
MADME a precious thing; a treasure; a valuable gift …a1000 obs.
TALENT treasure, riches, wealth, abundance …a1400-50 obs.

TREASURE – NOUNS, PERSON
MONEY-DIGGER a treasure hunter, esp. one who believes buried treasure can be located by divination or other mystical means …1769 US
MONEY-HUNTER a person who seeks to obtain money; spec., in early use, a treasure hunter, esp. one who believes buried treasure can be located by divination or other mystical means …1729


TREASURE CHEST – NOUNS
– a treasure chest or strongbox; the box in which offerings to the Temple were received GAZOPHILACE a1300 obs. rare
– a treasure chest or strongbox; the box in which offerings to the Temple were received GAZOPHYLACIUM 1377 obs.


TREASURER, TREASURY – NOUNS
– a treasury FEE-HOUSE c1000 obs.
– a treasury; a bank or money depository DAMPER 1932 criminals’ sl.
– a treasury, a storehouse GAZOPHILE 1549 obs. rare

TREASURER etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– a treasurer BOX-MASTER 1873 Sc.


TREAT – ADJECTIVES
SQUIRISH said of a person who acts like he can pay for anything, but is ‘not strong enough in the pocket’ …L17 sl.

TREAT – NOUNS
JAM AND FRITTERS a real treat …1897 sl.
REAL JAM a real treat …1885 sl.

TREAT – NOUNS, PERSON
SIR TIMOTHY one that treats everybody and pays the reckoning everywhere …a1700 cant
SQUIRE, THE one who treats the rest of the company …L17 sl.
SQUIRE OF THE COMPANY one who treats the rest of the company …L17 sl.
TIPPET a generous person; someone who treats their companions …16C

TREAT – VERBS
BALL OFF to treat …1896 Amer. dial.
BLOW to treat …1903 Amer. dial.
CALL THEM ALL THROUGH ONE FORD vb. to treat all alike, irrespective of person or quality …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
CARESS to treat …1670 obs.
 CHARTER THE BAR to buy drinks for everyone in a bar or public house …L19 sl.
 CHARTER THE GROCERY to buy drinks for everyone in a bar or public house …L19 sl.
ENTREAT to treat, to use …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
FAKE THE RUBBER to stand treat …c1850 criminals’ sl.
JOLLY to treat someone in an agreeable manner, with the intention of keeping them happy and/or obtaining a favour from them …M19 sl.
JOLLY ALONG to treat someone in an agreeable manner, with the intention of keeping them happy and/or obtaining a favour from them …M19 sl.
JOLLY UP to treat someone in an agreeable manner, with the intention of keeping them happy and/or obtaining a favour from them …M19 sl.
POP;  POP FOR;  POP TO to pay for, to treat …1950s African-American sl.
SAIR to serve, to serve out; to treat …1785 Sc. & Eng. dial.
SHOUT to treat someone to a drink; to stand a drink …1855 NZ sl.
SPORT to treat, usually to food and/or to drink …E19 sl.
STAND SAM to pay expenses, esp. for refreshment or drink …1823 sl.
STAND SQUIRE to stand treat …18C sl.


TREATISE – NOUNS
– a treatise covering the whole of a subject; a complete treatise or digest PANDECT 1591

TREATISE – NOUNS, PERSON
– a writer of a small compendious treatise of a science; an abridger SUMMULIST 1652


TREATY – ADJECTIVES
– pert. to a treaty, covenant, or compact FEDERAL 1660 obs.

TREATY – NOUNS
a broken treaty, promise, or pledge SCRAP OF PAPER World War I Amer. sl.


TREBLE – ADJECTIVES
THREBBLE treble; threefold …Bk1905 Sc. & Eng. dial.
THREE-PLAIT treble, threefold; three-ply or plaited …1821 Sc.
THREEPLE treble; threefold …Bk1905 Sc. & Eng. dial.
THRIBBLE treble, triple, threefold …1765 Amer. dial.
THRIPLE treble, triple, threefold …1909 Amer. dial.
TRIBBLE treble …1669 Amer. dial.

TREBLE – VERBS
THREBBLE to treble, to triple …1935 Amer. dial.
THRIBBLE to treble, to triple …1765 Amer. dial.


TREE – ADJECTIVES
 ARBORICIDAL given to cutting down trees …1866
 BASTARD of trees: female …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
 CACUMINOUS of a tree: having a pyramidal top …1871 rare
 DENDROPHIL tree-loving …19C
 LAPPED of a tree: having the top or branches broken off …1951 Amer. dial.
 LIMBY having many limbs or branches …1953 Amer. dial.
 MAIDEN of trees: unfelled, unlopped, allowed to grow naturally …1877 Eng. dial.
 NEMOROUS full of woods, groves, or trees; woody …1623 rare
 PUTATORY belonging to cutting, dressing, or pruning of trees …1656 obs. rare
 RAGGED of fruit trees, etc.: covered with fruit; thickly laden …1661 Eng. dial.
 RAMPICK of a tree or bough: partially decayed or dead; bare of leaves or twigs …1593 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
 RANDLE-PIK’D of a tree: having the upper branches dead …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
 SAVAGE of a plant or tree: wild, uncultivated …1422 obs.
 SUBARBOREAL lying under a forest of trees …1886
 TANGED forked, as a tree …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
 
TREE – NOUNS
 ABLAQUEATION the breaking up or removal of the soil around the roots of trees; the laying bare of roots …c1420 obs.
 ABNODATION the act of cutting away knots from trees; a gardening term …1678 obs.
 ALAMEDA a public park or walk lined with trees …1824 Amer. dial.
 BACKBREAKER a tree stump cut close to the ground …1931 Amer. dial.
 BAFF-END the partly decayed or root end of a tree or log …Bk1898 Sc.
 BASTARD an ill-thriven tree or shrub …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
 BATARDIER a plantation of young grafted trees intended to be transplanted into gardens …1725 obs.
 BEAM a tree …826 obs.
 BIFF the bough of a tree …1884 Eng. dial.
 BIG ‘UNS large trees …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
 BLACK-WOOD evergreen trees collectively …1871 US
 BLOW-DOWN a place encumbered with trees that have been blown down …1895 US
 BLUFF a clump or grove of trees growing in open country …1796 Amer. dial.
 BOSQUE a forest; a dense growth of trees and underbrush; a clump of trees …1771 Amer. dial.
 BUSH a clump of trees …1856 NZ obs.
 CHIN CHOPPER a tree that splits in falling …1969 Amer. dial.
 CUMBER-GROUND anything utterly worthless and in people’s way; a useless tree …1657
 DAG a small projecting stump of a tree …1851 Eng. dial.
 DODDARD a tree missing its top branches through rot or decay
 FAGGOT a bundle of sticks, twigs, or small branches of trees bound together, for use as fuel …a1300
 FAGOT a bundle of sticks, twigs, or small branches of trees bound together, for use as fuel …a1300
 FALL the roots and stumps of felled trees …1785 obs.
 FANG a fork or branch of a tree …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
 FATNESS of a tree: oiliness; juiciness …1382 obs.
 GALL a fault, an imperfection; a defect in a tree …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
 GARNITURE natural objects, as trees, etc., as ornaments of the landscape …1684
 GUT-GOUGER a knot high on the trunk of a tree …1963 Amer. logging usage
 HAG the stump of a tree left after felling …1615 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
 HAGSNARE the stump of a tree left after felling …1796 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
 HAT a small clump or ring of trees; any small irregular mass of trees …1894 Eng. dial.
 HAUTBOY a lofty tree, as distinguished from shrubs or underwood …1674 obs.
 ICKEN-BAUM an oak tree …1859 sl.
 IMP a young shoot of a plant or tree; a sapling …c897 obs.
 KNUR;  KNURR a knot or hardened excrescence on the trunk of a tree …1542
 LANCE a branch of a tree, a shoot …a1300 obs.
 LAP the top or branches of a tree, esp. a felled or fallen tree …1851 Amer. dial.
 LAPWOOD the top or branches of a tree, esp. a felled or fallen tree …1905  Amer. dial.
 MAST a collective name for the fruit of the beech, oak, chestnut, and other forest trees, esp. as food for swine …825
 MASTAGE the fruit of forest trees collectively …1610 obs.
 MAY-TREE the hawthorn tree …1899 Eng. dial.
 NAKED-MEN old, decayed, leafless trees …B1900 Eng. dial.
 PECKER POLE a small tree or sapling …1958 Amer. dial.
 PRONG a branch of either a tree or a river …Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
 QUEECH a small plantation of trees or bushes; a spinney …1804 Eng. dial.
 QUERDOOD the small upper branches and loppings of trees, etc., cut into lengths and stacked for sale as firewood …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
 QUIBOW the branch of a tree; a bough …1825 Sc.
 RAMAGE the collective branches of a tree or trees …1656 arch.
 RAME a branch of a tree or shrub …1578 rare
 RAMPIKE a decaying or dead tree; a spiky stump or stem of a tree …1865 Eng. & Amer. dial.
 RANPIKE an upright, dead tree trunk …1969 Amer. dial
 RAWNER a dead bough on a tree …B1900 Eng. dial.
 RAWN-PEG a dead bough on a tree …B1900 Eng. dial.
 RAWNY a dead bough on a growing tree …B1900 Eng. dial.
 RAWNY-BOUGH a dead bough on a growing tree …B1900 Eng. dial.
 RIDS boughs of trees …Bk1904 Eng. dial. obs.
 RUNDLE a pollard tree …a1697 Eng. dial.
 SAMPLARS young trees left in woods for timber …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
 SARMENT a twig; a cutting of a tree …1398 rare
 SAWYER a fallen tree, floating down stream …1848 Ireland
 SCHOOLMA’AM a forked tree or log …1930 Amer. dial.
 SCHOOLMARM a forked tree or log …1938 Amer. dial.
 SCHOOL MOM a forked tree or log …1939 Amer. dial.
 SCRAB a stunted or shrivelled tree or shrub …1790 Sc.
 SCRABBLE a stunted tree or shrub; thorns and briers …Bk1904 Sc. & Eng. dial.
 SCRAG a crooked, forked branch of a tree; a broken bough …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– SCRAG a stunted bush or tree; a standing dead tree …1975 Amer. dial.
 SCRATCH the natural fork of a tree or branch; a pole with a natural fork at the end of it …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
 SCREECH CAT a high stump, usually from a windfall, which has splinters that whistle or sing in the wind …1956 Amer. dial.
 SCROG a stunted or crooked tree, shrub, or branch; a stump of a tree-trunk; a thorn-bush; underwood, ‘scrub’ …1677 Sc. & Eng. dial.
 SHANK the trunk of a tree …Sc.
 SHAW a small grove of trees …1930 Amer. dial.
 SHIVES the needles of the juniper tree …Bk1913 Amer. dial.
 SNAG a standing dead tree …1901 Amer. dial.
 SUGAR BERTH a maple sugar grove …Bk1913 Amer. dial.
 TAG a catkin of a tree …1597 obs.
 TAGLET a catkin …1698
 TAN-FLAWING the business of stripping the bark off trees …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
 TANG a root or fang of a tooth; a root or branch of a tree …1715 chiefly Eng. dial.
 TANNER a small root of a tree …Bk1905 Sc. & Eng. dial.
 TAPPIN;  TAUPIN the root of a tree …1898 Sc.
 TERRIT a clump of trees …Bk1905 Eng. dial. obs.
 TILLER a young tree; a sapling; a stock-shoot rising from the stock or stool of a felled tree …1664 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
 TIMBER-FALL a mass of fallen trees …1897
 TIMBERLING a young timber-tree; a sapling …1787
 TINE a small branch or twig of a tree; the stalk of a fruit …1300s obs. rare
 TOFT a small grove of trees …1706 Eng. dial.
 TOLL a clump  of trees …1644 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
 TOOTHPICK TIMBER small trees …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
 UMERT a place shaded by trees …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
 UNDER-LOUT n. anything weak or inferior to the rest; used esp. of animals and trees …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
 VERGE a strip or belt of trees …1825 Sc.
 WIDOW-MAKER a tree or branch that has fallen on or is likely to fall on or snap back at a person; a dangerous hanging limb …1899 Amer. dial.
 WOLF TREE a larger tree that shades younger trees growing under it …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
 YEAR each of the annual rings in the wood of a tree …1708 rare
 
TREE – NOUNS, PERSON
 DENDROPHIL a lover of trees …1888
 HAGGER one who uses a hatchet; one employed to fell trees …Bk1905 Sc.
 HAGMAN one who gains his living by felling and selling wood; a woodcutter …1827 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
 SCRIMATREE a boy who climbs trees; a truant, a ne’er-do-well …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
 SHRAGGER a tree-trimmer 
 WOODPECKER one who fells trees …1905 Amer. dial., derogatory
 
TREE – VERBS
 ABLAQUEATE to loosen or remove the soil round the roots of trees, so as to let their fibres spread out; a term of Roman husbandry …c1420 obs. rare
 ABNODATE to prune trees, etc. …1721 obs.
 BEAR-CLIMB to shinny up a tree …1965 Amer. dial.
 BEAR-HUG to shinny up a tree …1965 Amer. dial.
 BEAR-LIFT to shinny up a tree …1965 Amer. dial.
 BEAR-WALK to shinny up a tree …1965 Amer. dial.
 BEAVER to hack a tree down …1942 Amer. loggers’ usage
 BEAVER DOWN to hack a tree down …1942 Amer. loggers’ usage
 BOOSTER to boost, to help someone up into a tree …1966 Amer. dial.
 CHINNY (UP) to climb the trunk of a tree by holding on with the legs while pulling oneself up with the hands …1966 Amer. dial.
 GARNISH of trees: to cover a wall, etc. …1693 obs.
 HAG to cut down trees, strip off, dry and stack the bark, saw up and sort the timber …1848 Sc.
 JACKKNIFE to climb the trunk of a tree by holding on with your legs while you pull yourself up with your hands …1966 Amer. dial.
 LIMB to cut the branches from a tree; rarely, to prune …1839 Amer. dial.
 MONKEY CLIMB to climb the trunk of a tree by holding on with your legs while you pull yourself up with your hands .,..1965 Amer. dial.
 MONKEY UP to climb the trunk of a tree by holding on with your legs while you pull yourself up with your hands .,..1965 Amer. dial.
 PALM to climb a tree or pole simply by the assistance of hands and feet; to swarm …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
 QUEEVE to twist; to bend slowly backwards and forwards as a tree-top …1809 Eng. dial.
 RAREFY vb. to reduce the number of trees; to thin a wood …1650 obs. rare
 REND to strip off bark …1893 Eng. dial.
 RENE to strip off bark; to rind …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
 SHIMMY to climb the trunk of a tree by holding on with your legs while you pull yourself up with our hands …1950 Amer. dial.
 SHIM UP to climb the trunk of a tree by holding on with your legs while you pull yourself up with our hands …1950 Amer. dial.
 SHIN to climb the trunk of a tree by holding on with your legs while you pull yourself up with our hands …1840 Amer. dial.
 SHIN UP to climb a tree by aid of hands and legs only …Bk1905 Amer. dial.
 SKINNY UP to climb the trunk of a tree by holding on with your legs while you pull yourself up with your hands …1965 Amer. dial.
 SKIN THE BARK to climb a tree …1965 Amer. dial.
 TENNEL of trees: to die away …B1900 Eng. dial. obs.
 TINNEL of trees: to die away …B1900 Eng. dial. obs.


TREMBLE, TREMBLING – ADJECTIVES
ALL OF A TWITTER trembling …1848 Eng. dial.
BEVERING trembling, quivering …1863 Eng. dial.
BIBBERING quaking, trembling …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
DANDERY trembling, infirm, tottery …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
DARING staring, trembling, or crouching with fear, etc. …1333 obs.
DAWTHERING shaky, tottering, trembling …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
DAWTHERY shaky, tottering, trembling …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
DINLING trembling, vibrating, rattling …1808 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
DITHERY-DODDERY trembling, shivering, shaking …1876 Eng. dial.
MERVIL nervous, trembling …Bk1905 Sc.
NITHERTY-NOTHERTY all of a tremble …1895 Eng. dial.
QUIVERISH trembling, shaking …1582
QUIVERY trembling, shaking …1877 rare
TREMEBUND inclined to tremble, fearful, trembling much; timorous, timid …c1560 Sc. obs.

TREMBLE etc. – ADVERBS
A-GOGGLE trembling, shaking with palsy …Bk1898 Eng. dial.

TREMBLE etc. – NOUNS
BEVER a shiver, a tremor; a state of trembling …1854 Eng. dial.
BEVERING trembling, shaking, quivering …1398 obs.
BIBBER a tremor, a state of trembling …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
BIVVER a shiver, a tremor; a state of trembling …1854 Eng. dial.
– JIMMY-SWIVER a state of trembling …Bk1893 Eng. dial.
QUAG a shake, a state of trembling …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
QUAVE a shake, a tremble …1382 obs.
QUITHER a shake, tremble, shudder, quiver …1899 Eng. dial.
QUIVERATION a quivering; a trembling motion or condition …1812 nonce word
SHAKES, THE trembling; delirium tremens …1782 sl.
THRIMBLE a tremor, a fit of trembling …1889 Ireland & Eng. dial.
THRUMMLE a trembling, a tremor …Bk1905 Sc.
– TREMEFACTION a shaking, a trembling …1597 obs. rare
– TWITTERATION tremulous excitement, as from desire, fear, etc.; a state of agitation; a shaking, a quiver, a tremble …1835-40 obs. rare
YIPS, THE nervous trembling which causes a golfer to miss an easy putt …1963 sl.

TREMBLE etc. – VERBS
ACKER to tremble with passion …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
BEVER to tremble, to shake, to quiver …1470 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
BIBBER to tremble, to shake …1790 Eng. dial.
BIVER to shake, to quiver, to tremble, esp. with cold or fear …1790 Sc. & Eng. dial.
BIVVER to shake, to quiver, to tremble, esp. with cold or fear …1790 Sc. & Eng. dial.
DADDER to quake, tremble, shiver, shake …1483 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
DANDER to tremble, to vibrate; also applied to the rolling sound of a drum …a1724 Eng. dial.
DATHER to shiver, to tremble, to shake either with cold or old age …1684 Eng. dial.
DAVER to tremble; to waver …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
DAWTHER to tremble, to shake; to move in an infirm, shaky manner, to totter …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
DINDLE to shake, to vibrate; to stagger from a blow; to tremble …1776 Sc. & Eng. dial.
DINGLE to vibrate, to resound, to tremble …1787 Sc.
DODDER to shake or tremble, as from age
FUNK to cower or tremble with fear; to back out of something; to surrender in a cowardly fashion …1746 sl.
HACKER to shake or tremble with anger, fear, cold, etc.; to chatter with cold …Bk1905
MIRR to tremble, to thrill; to vibrate …1900 Sc.  
NITHER to shrink or huddle, as with cold; to be shivery, to tremble …1896 Sc. 
PALSY to shake or tremble as if palsied …1582 nonce use
QUAKER to tremble, to shake with cold, fear, etc. …1703 Eng. dial.
QUAVE to quake, to shake, to tremble; to vibrate …a1225 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
QUETCH;  QUITCH of things: to shake, to tremble …c1205 obs.
SAY AN APE’S PATERNOSTER to chatter with cold; to shake, to tremble …1611
THRIMBLE;  THRIMMEL; THRUMMLE  to tremble, to shake, to quiver …1842 Ireland & Eng. dial.
– TREPIDATE to tremble with fear or agitation …1623 rare
VERBERATE to vibrate, to tremble, to quiver …1755 rare
VIMMER to quiver, to tremble …B1900 Sc.
WACKER;  WHACKER;  WHAKER to tremble, to shake with cold, fear, etc. …1703 Eng. dial.


TREMENDOUS – ADJECTIVES
– tremendous MENJUS 1890 Eng. dial.
– tremendous TREMENDIOUS 1803 Amer. dial.
– tremendous, first-rate, excellent; used to emphasize something enjoyable or positive AWFUL 1843 colloq.
– tremendous, great; said of something pleasant SAIR 1877 Sc. rare
– tremendous, huge, vast, enormous IMMANE 1615 arch.
– tremendous, successful BOFFO 1940s sl.


TREMOR – NOUNS
BEVER a shiver, a tremor; a state of trembling …1854 Eng. dial.
BIBBER a tremor, a state of trembling …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
BIVVER a shiver, a tremor; a state of trembling …1854 Eng. dial.
MIRR a vibration, tremor; the waving of the air upon a very hot day …1899 Sc.  
PALSY any influence which destroys, or seriously impairs activity or sensibility; a condition of utter powerlessness; an irresistible tremor …1433
RIGOR a chill; a shiver, tremor, or shake; a shivering with cold …1806 Amer. dial.
RIGORS, THE a chill; a shiver, tremor, or shake; a shivering with cold …1905 Amer. dial.
THRIMBLE a tremor, a fit of trembling …1889 Ireland & Eng. dial.
THRUMMLE a trembling, a tremor …Bk1905 Sc.
TIRL a thrill, a vibration; a tremor …1825 Sc.
VIMMER a tremor …1899 Sc.


TREMULOUS, TREMULOUSLY – ADJECTIVES
BEVERY shivery, tremulous …Bk1898 Eng. dial.

TREMULOUS etc. – ADVERBS
REEMLE with a sharp, tremulous sound …Bk1904 Sc.
WABBLE with a weak tottering step, tremulously …1866 Sc.

TREMULOUS etc. – NOUNS
DIRL a tremulous motion; the sensation felt on striking the elbow-bone …1733 Sc. & Eng. dial.
JECTIGATION a wagging, a tremulous movement …a1693 obs.
REEMLE a continuous sharp, tremulous motion or sound …Bk1904 Sc.

TREMULOUS etc. – VERBS
REEMLE to cause in any way a sharp, tremulous noise; to give a sharp, tremulous noise …Bk1904 Sc.
WAPPER to blink the eyes; also, to move tremulously …1575 obs.


TREND, TRENDY – ADJECTIVES
A-GO-GO in the newest style; faddish, trendy …Amer. sl.
EDGY leading a trend …1976 US sl.
MICKEY MOUSE out of touch with styles and trends …1960s Amer. sl.

TREND, TRENDY – NOUNS
SCENE the current trend; the in thing …1960s Brit. sl.

TREND, TRENDY – NOUNS, PERSON
FASHIONISTA someone who dictates, or is in the vanguard of, trendiness …2001 UK sl.
FUNKSTER a fashionable, trendy, or cool person …1982 sl.
PACEMAKER a person who sets the rate of working for others; generally, any person whose performance sets or represents a standard; a trendsetter …1905
PACESETTER a person who sets the pace, rate, or standard to be achieved by others; the leader in a particular field; a trendsetter …1895


TREPIDATION – PHRASES
– you are full of trepidation; you are nervous YOUR ARSE IS NIPPING BUTTONS 1988 Sc. sl.


TRESPASS, TRESPASSER – NOUNS, PERSON
– a trespasser; a jumper of fences FENCE-LOUPER 1822 Sc.

TRESPASS etc. – VERBS
– to trespass, to break bounds BREAK BANDS 1861 Eng. dial.