Reverse Dictionary: TRU – TT


TRUANCY, TRUANT – ADJECTIVES
 LAKING idling, taking a holiday; playing truant …Bk1902 Eng. dial.
 ON THE HOOK absenting oneself from school; playing hooky …1906 Amer. sl.
 
TRUANCY etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
 BEAKY LADY a truancy officer …20C Irish sl.
 BEAKY MAN a truancy officer …20C Irish sl.
 BERRY-MOUCHER a truant from school in blackberry season …Bk1893 Eng. dial.
 BLACKBERRY MOUCHER a boy who plays truant to pick blackberries …1825 Eng. dial.
 DEWBERRY SNAIL a truant from school …1810 Eng. dial.
 FAB a truant …1916 Sc.
 FABBER a truant …1916 Sc.
 MEECHER a truant …1825 Eng. dial.
– MICH a truant, one who stays away from school …1854 Eng. dial.
 MIKER a truant …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
 MINCHER a truant …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
 MOOCHER a child who plays truant from school; esp. one who plays truant in order to pick blackberries; a blackberry picker …1790 Eng. dial.
 MOUCHER a child who plays truant from school; esp. one who plays truant in order to pick blackberries; a blackberry picker …1870 Eng. dial.
 SCRIMATREE a boy who climbs trees; a truant, a ne’er-do-well …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
 TROANT a truant …1777 Eng. dial.
 WAG a truant …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
 WAGGER a truant …1895 UK sl.
 
TRUANCY etc. – VERBS
 BAG to fail to attend school or a class …1892 Amer. juvenile sl.
 BAG IT to play truant …1889 Amer. dial.
 BAG SCHOOL to play truant …1892 US sl.
 BAIL to leave, to depart, to go; to play truant; hence, to run out on, to renege on someone …1977 US sl.
 BUM to play hooky …1966 Amer. dial.
 BUNK to play hooky; to skip school …1924 Amer. dial.
 BUNK OFF to play truant …1877 Brit. sl.
 DITCH to leave or stay out of school without permission; to be truant …c1939 Amer. dial.
 FAB to play truant …1916 Sc.
 FADE to miss a class; to waste time rather than work …1960s US students’ sl.
 FAINAIGUE to fail of a promise, to play truant, to shirk work …1854 Eng. dial.
 FAN to absent oneself from a class; to play truant …1989 Amer. students’ sl.
 FENEAGUE to fail of a promise, to play truant, to shirk work …1854 Eng. dial.
 FERNIG to fail of a promise, to play truant, to shirk work …1854 Eng. dial.
– FLINK to play hooky, to cut class …1969 Amer. dial.
​- GIP;  GYP to stay away from school without an excuse, to play hookey …1967 Amer. dial.
 GYPSY to play truant from school …1970s sl.
 HOOK JACK to play truant …1877 Amer. sl.
 HOOK OFF to play truant from …1890 Amer. sl.
 HOOK SCHOOL to play truant …1946 Amer. sl.
 JIP to play truant from school …1970s sl.
 KIP to play truant …E19 sl.
 LAY OFF to stay away from work or school without an adequate excuse; to play hooky …1966 Amer. dial.
 LAY OUT to stay away from work, school, or other commitments, usually without permission; to loaf; to malinger …1896 Amer. dial.
 MEECH to play truant; to absent oneself without leave …1794 Eng. & Amer. dial.
 MINCH to play truant …1794 Eng. dial.
 MOKE to play truant …B1900 Eng. dial.
 PLAY HOOKEY; PLAY HOOKY to play truant …1848 sl., orig. US
 PLAY THE HOOK to play hooky …1988 Amer. sl.
 PLAY THE WAG to play truant …1851 Eng. dial.
 PLAY WAG to play truant …1851 sl.
 SAG to play truant ….c1930 Brit. sl.
 SAG OFF to play truant from school …1959 UK sl.
 SCHEME to play truant …1930s Irish sl.
 SHUCK AND JIVE to play truant …1970 Amer. dial.
 SKANK to play truant …1980 Black British sl.
 SKANK OFF to play truant …1997 UK sl.
 SKIP to stay away from school without permission …1900 US sl.
– TIB to slip out; to escape unobserved from school or house; to break bounds …1840 school sl.
 WAG to play truant …1841 sl.
 WAG IT to play truant …1841 sl.
 WAG OFF to play truant …M19 Aust. & NZ sl.


TRUCE – NOUNS
ABSTINENCE a truce, cessation of hostilities …1655 Sc. obs.
BARLA-FUMBLE a call for a truce by one who has fallen in wrestling or play; also used improperly for a fall or tumble …a1550 Sc. obs.
BARS peace, truce …Bk1898 Eng. dial.

TRUCE – INTERJECTIONS
BARLEY! a cry for truce in a game, used by children when a short rest or break is wanted …1814 Sc. & Eng. & Amer. dial.
BARLEY-FUMMEL! the call for a truce by one who has fallen in wrestling or fighting …1827 Sc. obs.
DIVVY! said when boys are fighting and the one who is losing wants to stop …1967 Amer. dial.
EX! an exclamation used to demand a pause, exemption, or truce during a fight or game …1968 Amer. dial.
FAIN I! a call for a playground truce; a statement of opposition …c1810 Brit. schoolboys’ sl.
FAIN IT! a call for a playground truce; a statement of opposition …c1810 Brit. schoolboys’ sl.
FAINITES! used to call a playground truce …1870 UK schoolchildren’s usage
FAINITS! a call for a playground truce; a statement of opposition …c1810 Brit. schoolboys’ sl.
FAINLIGHTS! a call for a truce during a game, or a statement that one is ineligible for a given duty or command …M19 juvenile usage
FAINS! a call for a truce during a game, or a statement that one is ineligible for a given duty or command …c1810 UK juvenile usage
FAINS I! a call for a truce during a game, or a statement that one is ineligible for a given duty or command …M19 UK juvenile usage
FAIX! a call for a truce during a game, or a statement that one is ineligible for a given duty or command …M19 juvenile usage
FAYNIGHTS! used to call a playground truce …1870 UK schoolchildren’s usage
FENSIES! used to demand a pause, exemption, or truce during a fight or game …1977 Amer. dial.
KING’S EX! used to demand a pause, exemption, or truce during a fight or game …1856 Amer. dial.
LOBS! a call for truce during a game …1910s UK juvenile sl.
QUITS! used to request a truce or respite in a fight or active game …1950 Amer. dial.
SAUTIES! a cry for a truce in a game …1967 Sc.

TRUCE – VERBS
FAIN to forbid, to refuse; to claim a truce …1870 Eng. dial.


TRUCKING – ADJECTIVES
GYPSY unlicensed, unregulated, usually owned by the operator; independent of any organization, legal or otherwise; generally applied to a taxicab or truck, although originally to a racehorse owner/jockey …1951 US sl.
NAKED of a truck: driving without a trailer …1976 US sl.
TACKED OUT in trucking: running at full speed …1971 US sl.

TRUCKING – ADVERBS
FULL SAILS in trucking: driving at top speed with the wind behind you …1976 US sl.

TRUCKING – NOUNS
AMAZER in trucking: a police radar unit used for measuring vehicle speed …1976 US sl.
AMAZER MACHINE in trucking: a police radar unit used for measuring vehicle speed …1976 US sl.
ANGEL BUGGY in trucking: a truck carrying explosive or highly flammable cargo …1977 Amer. sl.
ANNIE LAURIE a lorry …20C Eng. rhyming sl.
BACKSLIDE a return trip, as in a truck …1976 US sl., esp. Citizens’ Band usage
BONECRUSHER in trucking: a truck that rides very roughly …1971 US sl.
BOULEVARD in trucking: a major motorway …1986 US sl.
CACKLE CRATE in trucking: a truck hauling chickens …1942 US sl.
CHERRY PICKER in trucking: an extremely high cabover tractor …1971 US sl.
CONVOY a group of trucks driving as a group in communication with each other …1971 US sl.
EASY CHAIR in a group of three or more trucks travelling on a motorway: the middle truck …1976 US sl.
FUNNY BOOK in trucking: a driver’s daily log book …1976 US sl.
GANDY DANCER in trucking: a tractor trailer that weaves back and forth on the road …1971 US sl.
GIPSY in trucking: an independent migratory trucker who owns and operates usually only a single tractor-trailer; hence, a truck so operated …1953 Amer. sl.
GYPSY in trucking: an independent migratory trucker who owns and operates usually only a single tractor-trailer; hence, a truck so operated …1946 Amer. sl.
HORSE in trucking: a tractor truck …1942 Amer. sl.
HUSKY in trucking: a Brockway truck …1976 US sl.
LIE SHEET a truck driver’s log book …1971 US sl.
PAJAMA WAGON in trucking: a truck can with a factory-manufactured sleeping compartment …1971 US sl.
PEDDLE RUN in trucking: a job with frequent stops for deliveries …1971 US sl.
PENSION RUN in trucking: an easy, undemanding, regular route …1971 US sl.
PUG in trucking, a cabover tractor …1971 US sl.
PULLING GEAR in trucking: the gear best suited for climbing a hill …1971 US sl.
QUAD in trucking: a quadriplex transmission that provides twenty forward gears and four reverse …1971 US sl.
RANCH in trucking: anywhere a trucker spends the night …1976 US sl.
RUNNIN’ HOT a trucker term for running a truck without the right permits, overweight, or otherwise outside the law  …Bk1998 sl.
RUNNIN’ LEGAL the opposite of ‘runnin’ hot’ …Bk1998 sl.
SADDLE in trucking: the driver’s seat …1971 US sl.
SADDLE in trucking: the truck in the middle of a group of trucks travelling down the highway together …1976 US sl.
SAILBOAT FUEL trucker talk for the cargo in an empty trailer …Bk1998 sl.
SCOW in trucking: an especially large truck …1946 US sl.
SIDEWINDER in trucking: a U-model Mack truck with a slightly off-centre driver’s compartment …1971 US sl.
SINGER in trucking: a recapped tire …1971 US sl.
STACK in trucking: a smokestack from the truck engine …1971 US sl.
THIRTEENTH GEAR in trucking: neutral gear, used to coast down hills …1971 US sl.
WOBBLER in trucking: a spoke wheel …1971 US sl.
WOBBLY HOLE in trucking: the neutral gear …1971 US sl.

TRUCKING – NOUNS, PERSON
AVIATOR in trucking: a driver who drives very fast …1971 US sl.
BEAN HAULER a trucker who transports fruits and vegetables or dry food products …1971 US trucking sl.
BEAR BAIT a driver without a Citizens’ Band radio; hence, one likely to be caught speeding by police who set up a speed trap …Bk1980 Amer. truckers’ sl.
BEDBUGGER the driver of a moving van or furniture van …1990 US trucking sl.
BEDBUG-HAULER the driver of a moving van or furniture van …1971 US trucking sl.
BEDSTEADER a sleepy truck driver …1942 US trucking sl.
CARDBOARD DRIVER in trucking: a new driver going through a trial period with a trucking company …1971 US sl.
COPPER-ARSE a driver who works long hours, esp. a trucker who breaks the law by driving more than eight hours in a day …Bk2002
COPPER-BOTTOM a driver who works long hours, esp. a trucker who breaks the law by driving more than eight hours in a day …Bk2002
DAY-AND-NIGHT MERCHANT a lorry driver who breaks the law by driving more than 11 hours in 24 to undercut other drivers …1964 UK sl.
GARBAGE HAULER a truck driver hauling fruit or vegetables …1971 US sl.
GATE JAW in trucking: a driver who monopolises conversation on the citizens’ band radio …1976 US sl.
GEAR JAMMER a truck driver who has a difficult time shifting gears, esp. one who is constantly clashing the gears as he shifts …1929 US sl.
GEORGIA NIGHT RIDER a trucker who drives at night in the hope of avoiding police …1976 US sl.
GIPSY in trucking: an independent migratory trucker who owns and operates usually only a single tractor-trailer; hence, a truck so operated …1953 Amer. sl.
GYPSY in trucking: an independent migratory trucker who owns and operates usually only a single tractor-trailer; hence, a truck so operated …1946 Amer. sl.
HACK HAND a commercial truck-driver …1940s US sl.
I-MAN in trucking: an investigator from the Interstate Commerce Commission …1938 Amer. sl.
SHEEPHERDER in trucking: a driver whose ability is questioned …1969 Amer. sl.
TEAMSTER the driver of a truck or lorry …1907
VAN DYKE a lesbian truck-driver …Bk1972 homosexual sl. 
VAN GOGH a trucker operating with a citizens’ band radio …1976 US sl.
YARDBIRD in trucking: a terminal employee who moves trucks around the yard …1971 US sl.

TRUCKING – PHRASES
WITHOUT EARS of a trucker: driving without a citizen’s band radio …1976 US sl.

TRUCKING – VERBS
BACK ‘EM ON DOWN in trucking: to slow down …1975 Amer. sl.
DEADHEAD in trucking: to drive a return trip without a load …1951 Amer. dial.
DYNAMITE THE BRAKES in trucking: to make a sudden emergency stop …1951 US sl.
HUMP in trucking: to drive fast …1976 US sl.
JACK UP in trucking: to wreck a truck or to make a sudden stop …1963 US trucking sl.
KICK in trucking: to shift gears …1971 US sl.
RAKE THE LEAVES to drive at the back of a group of trucks travelling on a motorway together, watching for police from the rear …1976 US sl.
SLOP THE HOGS in trucking: to fill a truck radiator with water …1971 US sl.


TRUDGE – VERBS
BADGE to walk heavily; to plod, to trudge …1923 Sc.
BOGUE to wander, to walk aimlessly; to trudge; to move slowly …1775 Amer. dial.
BROGUE to walk, to hike, to trudge; to wander or go about aimlessly …1883 Amer. dial.
DAD to plod, to trudge, to drudge …1914 Sc.
DAGE to trudge …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
DAGGLE to trudge about, to run like a child …1790 Sc. & Eng. dial.
EAT CONCRETE among truckers: to drive rapidly down a major highway …1971 US sl.
FADGE to make one’s way; to go at a pace between walking and trotting; to jog along; to trudge …1658 rare exc. Eng. dial.
FAUCHLE to walk with difficulty, or from lack of strength; to trudge, to plod; to move the feet awkwardly or heavily …1866 Sc.
HAKE to tramp, trudge, or wend one’s way …c1450 Sc. & Eng. dial.
HAKE ABOUT to drag or carry from one place to another with little purpose; to tramp, to trudge …19C Sc. & Eng. dial.
HAKE UP AND DOWN to drag or carry from one place to another with little purpose; to tramp, to trudge …19C Sc. & Eng. dial.
JAMPH to travel with extreme difficulty, as one trudging through mire; to trudge, to plod, to make way laboriously  …1813 Sc.
JAUMPH to travel with extreme difficulty, as one trudging through mire; to trudge, to plod, to make way laboriously  …1813 Sc.
JAUNT of a person: to trot or trudge about, with the notion of exertion or fatigue; to make one’s way toilsomely; to run to and fro …1575 obs.
MAGGLE to trudge laboriously through mud or snow …1929 Sc.
MOG(G) to move slowly or aimlessly; to trudge; to go …1890 Amer. sl.
PAD IT to travel on foot; to walk; to tramp or trudge along, esp. as a vagrant or person seeking work …1610
PALT to go with effort, to trudge …1560 obs.
TAIGLE;  TEAGLE to walk slowly or heavily, to drag oneself, to trudge …1886 Sc.
TRAMPOOSE to tramp, to trudge, to walk or wander about; to traverse …1725 Amer. dial.
VAMP to make one’s way on foot; to tramp or trudge …1654 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
VELTER to trudge laboriously and stumblingly through mud or snow …1908 Sc.


TRUE – ADJECTIVES
 DEAD SET quite true …20C Aust. sl.
 DINK genuine, true, honest …1980 Aust. sl.
 DINKI-DI real, genuine, true, honest …1962 Aust. sl.
 DINKUM honest, aboveboard; true; also, fair, just …1905 Aust. & NZ
 DINKY-DI(E) real, genuine, true, honest …1962 Aust. sl.
 EYES OF BLUE true …1992 UK rhyming sl.
 FAIR DINKUM true, genuine …1908 Aust. sl.
 HARD DOWN real, true; pure, unadulterated …1938 Amer. dial.
 I-TREOWE true, faithful …c1000 obs.
 LEAL true, genuine, real, actual, exact, accurate …a1300 obs. exc. Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– LEAL loyal, faithful, honest, true, upright, sincere …a1300 obs. exc. Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
 PUKKA certain, reliable; authentic, true; proper, socially acceptable …L18
 REAL eminently good in any way; true, staunch …Bk1904 Sc.
 RIGHT true, genuine …1903 Amer. dial.
 RIGHT AS MY LEG in good condition, in good order; correct, accurate, true …1636 obs.
– TRUEPENNY true, genuine …1523 colloq. arch.
– VERILY true, very …a1340 obs. rare
– VERIMENT veritable, true, correct …c1590 obs.
– VERISIMILAR having the appearance or semblance of truth or reality; appearing true or real; probable, likely …1681
– VERISIMILARY having the appearance or semblance of truth or reality; appearing true or real; probable, likely …1653 obs.
– VERISIMILOUS having the appearance or semblance of truth or reality; appearing true or real; probable, likely …1635 obs.
– VERITABLE of a statement, etc.: that is in accordance or conformity with the truth; true …1474
– VERITABLE genuine, real, true; not counterfeit, false, or spurious; correctly or properly so called …1483
 
TRUE – NOUNS
 NO-SHITTER an emphatically true statement …1970s US sl.
 VERISIMILITUDE the appearance of being true or real; likeness or resemblance to truth, reality, or fact; probability, likelihood …1603
 VERITABILITY a truth or verity; a true statement, correct account …1864 rare
 VERITY a true statement, a correct account, truth …1533
 WHERE IT’S AT the true state of affairs …1965 sl., orig. US
 
TRUE – PHRASES
 HONEST INJUN used as an assertion that what one has said, one believes to be true …1876 sl., orig. US
 NOW YOU’RE COOKING WITH GAS said to express the feeling that someone’s words are true or appropriate …Bk1942 US sl.
 NOW YOU’RE COOKING WITH HELIUM said to express the feeling that someone’s words are true or appropriate …Bk1942 US sl.
 NOW YOU’RE REALLY BUMPING YOUR GUMS said to express the feeling that someone’s words are true or appropriate …Bk1942 US sl.
 THAT’S NO FABLE, MABEL said to express the feeling that someone’s words are true or appropriate …Bk1942 US sl.
 YOU AIN’T JUST A-BIRDIN’ said to express the feeling that someone’s words are true or appropriate …Bk1942 US sl.
 YOU AIN’T JUST A-WHISTLING, DIXIE said to express the feeling that someone’s words are true or appropriate …Bk1942 US sl.
 YOU AIN’T JUST CLICKIN’ YOUR PICKETS said to express the feeling that someone’s words are true or appropriate …Bk1942 US sl.
 YOU AIN’T JUST CRACKIN’ YOUR CRACKERS said to express the feeling that someone’s words are true or appropriate …Bk1942 US sl.
 YOU SHREAD IT, WHEAT said to express the feeling that someone’s words are true or appropriate …Bk1942 US sl.
 YOU’RE IN THE GROOVE said to express the feeling that someone’s words are true or appropriate …Bk1942 US sl.
 YOU’RE ON THE BEAM said to express the feeling that someone’s words are true or appropriate …Bk1942 US sl.
 
TRUE – VERBS
 BUY to accept as satisfactory or true; to approve or believe …1926 sl.
 SAY A MOUTHFUL to say something important and true …1910s orig. US
 SAY AN ARMFUL to say something important and true …1910s orig. US
 SPEAK A MOUTHFUL to say something important and true …1910s orig. US
 VERIFICATE to prove a thing true …1721 obs.


TRUFFLE – NOUNS
– the truffle EARTH-NUT 1548
– truffles EARTH-BALLS Bk1897


TRULL – see PROSTITUTE


TRULY – ADVERBS
AFALDLY adv. with single-heartedness, sincerely, truly …1533 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
ATWEEL truly, indeed, assuredly, of course …1816 Sc. & Ireland
AWAT truly, indeed …1871 Sc.
BACK-ACTUALLY truly, absolutely …1928 Amer. dial.
BLACK-ACTUALLY truly, absolutely …1928 Amer. dial.
‘DEED AND ‘DEED to be sure; really and truly; used to emphasize an assertion …1916 Amer. dial.
‘DEED AND DOUBLE to be sure; really and truly; used to emphasize an assertion …1895 Amer. dial.
DINKUM really, truly, honestly …1915 Aust. sl.
FACK indeed, truly, really …1843 Sc.
FAIR truly, really, actually; used as an intensifier …1870 Eng. dial.
HAILUMLY;  HALUMLIE;  HELIMLY certainly, completely, actually, truly, undoubtedly …1768 Sc. obs.
HARD DOWN really, truly, genuinely …1959 Amer. dial.
INDEED AND DOUBLE to be sure; really and truly; used to emphasize an assertion …1890 Amer. dial.
IWIS certainly, assuredly, indeed, truly …c1160 arch.
I-WISLICHE certainly; truly …c1000 obs.
LEAL truly, exactly, accurately; perfectly, thoroughly …c1400 obs. exc. Sc.
LEALLY  loyally, faithfully, truly …a1300
LEALLY truly, really, actually …c1350 obs.
RIGHT-DOWN very, truly …1828 Amer. dial.
SINGLY sincerely, truly, honestly …1526 obs.
 VERAMENT really, truly …1303 obs.
 VERILIES verily, truly, really …1902 Sc.
 VERILY in truth or verity; as a matter of truth or fact; really, truly …a1300 now arch.
 VERIMENT in truth or verity; truly, really …a1300 obs.
VERITABLE truly, veritably …1490 obs.
VERITABLY with truth or verity; truly, truthfully; genuinely, really …1481
VERREMENT really, truly …1303 obs.

TRULY – INTERJECTIONS
AYE, MARRY! a term of asseveration; indeed! truly! …1833 Sc. & Eng. dial.
FAITH! a mild exclamation; indeed, truly, really …1746 Sc. & Eng. dial.
MARRY! a term of asseveration; indeed! truly! …1833 Sc. & Eng. dial.


TRUMPET – NOUNS
ARMSTRONG a high note or series of notes played on a trumpet, esp. in jazz …20C Amer. sl.
AX;  AXE a musical instrument, esp. an electric guitar; orig. used in jazz circles for any instrument, particularly a saxophone or trumpet, instruments on which ‘chops’ (musical figures) are played …1955 US jazz sl.
BEME a trumpet …a800 obs.
BEMING trumpeting ..1513 obs.
BUYSINE a trumpet …1340 obs.
GUGAG a bugle or trumpet …M19 US sl.
HEWGAG;  HUGAG a bugle or trumpet …M19 US sl.
MACHINE a trumpet …1983 UK sl.
 TANTARA a fanfare, or flourish of trumpets; hence, any similar sound …1584
 TANTARARA a fanfare, or flourish of trumpets; hence, any similar sound …1843
 TANTARARARA a fanfare, or flourish of trumpets; hence, any similar sound …1750
 TARANTARRATARA a word imitating, and hence denoting, the sound of a trumpet or bugle …1873
 TARATANTARA a word imitating, and hence denoting, the sound of a trumpet or bugle …1553

TRUMPET – NOUNS, PERSON
BEMARE a trumpeter …c950 obs.
BEMER a trumpeter …c950 obs.
GABRIEL a trumpet player …1944 Amer. jive usage
WAIT a player on the flute, trumpet, etc. …1510 obs.
WINDJAMMER a trumpeter; a bandsman …World War I Amer. sl.

TRUMPET – VERBS
ABUCCINATE to proclaim as with a trumpet …1569 obs. rare
BEME to blow on a trumpet …c1000 obs.
 BUCCINATE to blow a trumpet …1623 obs. rare
TARANTANTAR to sound, or imitate the sound of, a trumpet; to sound with a loud noise like the blare of a trumpet …1840
TARANTANTARIZE to sound, or imitate the sound of, a trumpet; to sound with a loud noise like the blare of a trumpet …1656


TRUNCHEON – NOUNS
BASTINADO a stick, staff, rod, cudgel, truncheon …1598
BASTON a staff or stick used as a weapon or a staff of office; a cudgel, a club, a truncheon …a1300 obs.
BATON a staff or stick used as a weapon, sometimes also of iron, or iron-tipped; a club, a cudgel, or truncheon …1548 obs.
BATOON a stout staff or stick used as a weapon; a cudgel, a club, a truncheon …a1625 arch.
MISTER WOOD; MR. WOOD a police truncheon …1998 UK sl.
SAG a policeman’s truncheon …1930s US tramps’ sl.

TRUNCHEON – VERBS
SAG to beat with a truncheon …1930s US tramps’ sl.


TRUNK – ADJECTIVES
– a large kind of trunk much used by ladies SARATOGA TRUNK 1893
– a travelling trunk GARDEVIANCE 1463 obs.
– a trunk; a bag for transporting one’s personal belongings; a haversack YANNIGAN 1925 Amer. dial.
– a trunk, a travelling-bag, a saddle-bag MAIL 1732 Sc.


TRUST, TRUSTED TRUSTING – ADJECTIVES
BETRUSTED trusted in, or confided in …a1461 obs.
 FIDIMPLICITARY putting full trust or faith in another’s views …1652 nonce word
 LEVEABLE that may be believed or trusted; credible, trustworthy …1382 obs. rare
SOLID WITH trusted …L19

TRUST etc. – ADVERBS
 AFFIANTLY confidently, with trust …a1641 obs. rare

TRUST etc. – NOUNS
AFFIANCE the act of confiding, or fact of having faith, in a person, quality, etc. faith, trust …1330
BETRUST an entrusting, a trust …1656 obs.
BETRUSTMENT an entrusting, a trust …Bk1888 obs.
FALSE TRUST a breach of trust …1649 obs. rare
HANDLING a position of trust; stewardship …1660 Sc.
MALVERSE a breach of trust, an act of duplicity, grave misconduct …1703 Sc. obs.
READSHIP;  REDESHIP confidence, trust; dependence, trustworthiness, reliability …1829 Eng. dial.

TRUST etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
DUCK an unrelentingly gullible and trusting person; an odd person …1848 US prison sl.
– WINCHELL a trusting, unsophisticated person …1972 US sl.

TRUST etc. – VERBS
BETROW to trust …1556 obs.
BETRUST to trust, to place confidence in a person …c1440 obs.
JAWBONE to trust; to lend …World War I Amer. sl.
 LAKE to give credit to, to trust …Bk1902 Sc.
 LEVE to believe in; to trust, to give credence to a person or thing …c1175 obs.
LIPPIN to trust, to have faith …1950 Amer. dial.
 RIDE ON THE RIDGE to talk about continually; to put implicit trust in …1885 Sc.
 RIDE ON THE RIGGIN to talk about continually; to put implicit trust in …1885 Sc.
 RIDE THE WATER WITH to trust, to depend upon …1822 Sc. & Eng. dial.
SICKER to put one’s trust in a person …a1300 now rare or obs.


TRUSTEE – NOUNS, PERSON
– a trustee; a steward; one to whom authority is given to manage estates, etc. for the legal owner during his minority, incapacity, etc. ADMINISTRATOR 1596


TRUSTWORTHILY, TRUSTWORTHINESS, TRUSTWORTHY – ADJECTIVES
ACE-HIGH of an inmate: loyal, trustworthy, popular among his peers …1930s sl., orig. US prison
ALL RIGHT of a person: decent, trustworthy …1841
ALL WOOL AND A YARD WIDE totally trustworthy; authentic; thoroughly honourable …1882
ALL WOOL, A YARD LONG AND A YARD WIDE totally trustworthy; authentic; thoroughly honourable …1913
 AXIOPISTICAL trustworthy …1611 obs.
EYE-SET set down by eyewitnesses; trustworthy …1632 obs. rare
FAST trustworthy, firm …1642 Sc. obs.
 LEVEABLE that may be believed or trusted; credible, trustworthy …1382 obs. rare
SOLID trustworthy, dependable, exciting, outstanding …L19 orig. jazz usage

TRUSTWORTHILY etc. – ADVERBS
SOLID trustworthily, dependably, excitingly, outstandingly …L19 orig. African-American usage

TRUSTWORTHILY etc. – NOUNS
FAITHWORTHINESS the quality of being trustworthy …1846
READSHIP; REDESHIP confidence, trust; dependence, trustworthiness, reliability …1829 Eng. dial.

TRUSTWORTHILY etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
ACE the finest, one who is completely trustworthy …Bk1992 prison sl. 
AIREDALE a trustworthy friend …1930s US criminals’ sl.
BEAUT a kind, friendly, or trustworthy person …1866 sl.
– CLEAN TATTIE, THE the right person, one who can be trusted or relied on …1895 Sc. 
FAIR-PLAY ARTIST an honest, trustworthy person …1950s sl.
GECO a good friend; a trustworthy companion or associate …1925 US criminals’ sl. obs.
NKALAKATHA a trustworthy person …2003 S. Afr. teen sl.
SAFE CARD a trustworthy person …1873 sl.
 SCHAINER YID; SHAYNER YID an honest and absolutely trustworthy Jewish man …1968 UK sl.
SQUARE JOHN an honest man; one who can be trusted; a gentleman …1934 Amer. sl.
SQUARE SHOOTER a trustworthy person …1914 Amer. sl. 
STEADY EDDIE a reliable, dependable, trustworthy person …2003 US sl.
SURE CARD a trusty person …Bk1690 cant
TATTIE, THE the right person, one who can be trusted or relied on …1895 Sc. 

TRUSTWORTHILY etc. – VERBS
MARK SOMEONE’S CARD to categorize, usually either as a good or trustworthy person, or a bad an untrustworthy person; to put someone in a specific position …1960s sl.


TRUSTY – NOUNS, PERSON
– a trusty person; an honest fellow TRUEPENNY 1595 colloq. arch.


TRUTH, TRUTHFUL, TRUTHFULLY, TRUTHFULNESS – ADJECTIVES
 SINGLE-TONGUED truthful …1897 Sc.
 VERIDICAL speaking, telling, or relating the truth; truthful, veracious …1653
 VERIDICOUS truthful, veracious …1817
 VERIFICAL speaking the truth, truthful, veracious …a1660 obs.
– VERILOQUOUS speaking the truth; truthful, veracious …1672 obs.
 VERITABLE of persons: speaking the truth; truthful, veracious …1489 obs.
 
TRUTH etc. – ADVERBS
 FAIR DINKUM honestly; really; seriously; truthfully …1894 Aust. sl.
 FAITHLY with fidelity; faithfully, loyally, steadfastly, truthfully …c1325 obs.
 ON THE DEAD in earnest; sincerely; straightforwardly; honestly, truthfully  …1888 sl.
 STRAIGHT-UP speaking truthfully …1936 sl.
 VERIDICALLY truthfully …1836
 VERITABLY with truth or verity; truly, truthfully; genuinely, really …1481
 
TRUTH etc. – INTERJECTIONS/PHRASES
 CLOSE TO HOME uncomfortably close to the truth …Bk1999 Idioms Fergusson 1999
 CROSS MY HEART used as an assertion that one is telling the truth …1908 sl.
 CROSS MY HEART AND HOPE TO DIE used as an assertion that one is telling the truth …1908 sl.
 I’LL TOW THAT ONE ALONGSIDE FOR A BIT BEFORE I BRING IT ABOARD among Nova Scotia fishermen: used for expressing doubt about the truth or reliability of an idea or project …1992 Can. sl.
 ON MY LIFE! an affirmation of absolute truth in the face of an audience’s scepticism …19C
 SCHOOL IS OUT the truth has come out and the consequences must be over; the time for restraint is over …1858 Amer. dial.
 SCOUT’S HONOUR used as a mocking pledge or oath to tell the truth …1984 US sl.
 T’AINT NO CRACK, BUT A SOLID FACT what I am saying is the truth …1973 US sl.
 WARTS AND ALL without concealment of the (unattractive) truth …1930 sl.
 
TRUTH etc. – NOUNS
 BABE RUTH the truth …1970s NZ prison rhyming sl.
 BEN the truth …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
 BIBLE the truth …1920s African-American sl.
 BIBLE-TRUTH God’s truth …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
 CHALK, THE something that is genuine; truth …1843 US sl.
 CHAT the truth, the apposite thing, the subject under discussion …E19 sl.
 DEAD NUTS, THE the truth; a certainty …1970s sl.
 DINKUM the truth …1915 Aust. sl.
 DINKUM OIL the honest truth; reliable information …E20 Aust. & NZ colloq.
 FACK fact, truth, reality …1836 Sc.
 FAT MEAT the truth …1940s African-American sl.
 GOOD OIL, THE the truth, reliable information …20C Aust. & NZ sl.
 GOSPEL the truth …a1250
 LEAL truth …B1900 Sc.
– LOGOLATRY worship of words; unreasonable regard for words or for verbal truth …a1834
​- MARROW-TRUTH the simple truth, the very truth …1888 Eng. dial.
 NITTY-GRITTY the core of truth …1960s Amer. sl.
 PLAIN DUNSTABLE, THE the unvarnished truth …1747 obs.
 RIDGIE-DIDGE the truth …Bk1999 Aust. sl.
 SKINNY the truth …1970s sl.
 STRAIGHT, THE the truth …1866 US sl.
 STRAIGHT GOODS the truth …1892 US sl.
 STRONG OF, THE refers to the truth about something or the point or meaning of something …1915 Aust. sl.
 VARIANCE divergence from the truth …c1450 obs.
 VERIDICALITY truthfulness …a1901
 VERIDICALNESS truth-speaking or the quality of speaking the truth …1727 obs.
 VERIMENT truth; verity …1518 obs.
 VERINESS actuality, reality, truth …1574 obs.
 VERISIMILITUDE an apparent truth …1783
 VERITABILITY a truth or verity; a true statement, correct account …1864 rare
 VERITABLENESS truth, veracity …1664 rare
 VERITY truth, either in general or with reference to a particular fart; conformity to fact or reality …c1375
– VERITY a true statement, a correct account, truth …1533
 VERITY truthfulness, veracity, sincerity …c1555
 WORD FROM THE BIRD, THE the genuine truth …1950s Amer. sl.
 
TRUTH etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
 SQUARE SHOOTER a truthful, direct, honourable person …1914 US sl.
 TOM TELLTRUTH a truthful person …1600
 TRUTH-MOUTH one who speaks only the truth …1922 Amer. dial. 
 
TRUTH etc. – VERBS
 BEHIGHT to assure one of the truth of a statement; to warrant …c1386 obs.
 CALL SOMEONE’S BLUFF to force someone to justify or validate a pretense; to require the truth …1870s Amer. sl.
 CALL SOMEONE’S CARD to call someone’s bluff …1980s US sl.
 CALL SOMEONE’S GAME to call someone’s bluff …1980s US sl.
 CALL SOMEONE’S HAND to issue a challenge, to call someone’s bluff …M19 US sl.
 COME CLEAN to tell the truth …1919 sl., orig. US
 CROSS THE HASSAYAMPA RIVER to become unable to tell the truth …1927 Amer. dial.
 EMPTY THE BAG to tell the whole story; to tell or disclose the whole truth; to wind up an argument or discussion …1893
 FACK to tell the truth; to utter facts …1940s African-American usage
 FACT to speak frankly and truthfully …1942 African-American sl.
 GET THE STRAIGHT to get the truth …1866 US sl.
 LEVEL WITH to tell the truth …1920 sl., orig. US
 NEVEN to tell a story, the truth …c1350 obs.
 OWN UP to admit truth or responsibility; to confess …1853 colloq.
 POP OFF to confess, to tell the truth …1920s sl.
 POP OFF AT THE MOUTH to confess, to tell the truth …1920s sl.
 SHOOT THE WORKS to tell the truth; to reveal all …1922 US sl.
 SING LIKE A CANARY to tell the truth; to inform to the police; to tell everything …20C sl.
 SPLIT FAIR to tell the truth …M19 sl.
 SWEAR BLIND to make a strong assertion that one is telling the truth (often with the implication that one is not) …1937 sl.
 TELL IT LIKE IT IS to tell the complete, unadulterated truth; to be forthright …1964 sl., orig. African-American usage
 TELL THE TRUTH AND SHAME THE DEVIL to boldly tell the truth in defiance of temptation to the contrary; to reveal all at any cost …1793
 VARY to depart from the truth …c1430 obs.


TRY, TRYING – ADVERBS
ABOUTWARD orig. striving, trying, contriving, tending towards; later being about to, going …c1400 obs.

TRY etc. – NOUNS
BIRL, BURL a try or attempt; a test …1917 Aust. & NZ colloq.
CRACK a try, that may or may not succeed …Bk2006 US sl.
DAB a try; a crack …1861 US sl.
DART a try, a ‘go’; a last-minute effort …L19 Aust. sl.
DEVER duty, best endeavour or try …B1900 Eng. dial.
FAND;  FOND the act of trying; trial, proof, experience …c1250 obs.
FONDING a trying to do or find out something; an attempt, an experiment …a1000 obs.
HACK an attempt, a try …1836 Amer.
TAKE a try or attempt …colloq.
WALLOP a try …1910s sl.

TRY etc. – PHRASES
GIVE IT A WHIRL! give it a try or go …Bk1999 Aust. sl.

TRY etc. – VERBS
– AFFORCE to endeavour, attempt, or try …c1487 obs.
BREAK ONE’S BALLS to exert oneself to the limit of endurance; to work or try one’s hardest …1966 US sl.
DEVER to try, to attempt, to endeavour …1879 Eng. dial.
FAND; FOND to put to the proof, to try, to test a person or thing; to make trial of one’s strength or skill; to taste food, etc. …c893 obs.
FAND; FOND to attempt, to try …a1225 obs.
GIVE IT A BURL to make an attempt, to try …1933 Aust. & NZ colloq.
HANDSEL; HANSEL to use for the first time; to be the first to test, try, prove, taste …1605
HAUSE to prepare; to attempt, to try; to offer …1851 Eng. dial.
HAVE A DAB IN to have a ‘go’; to try …L19 sl.
HAVE A DASH AT to make an attempt; to try …1923 Aust. sl.
HAWSE to prepare; to attempt, to try; to offer …1851 Eng. dial.
MAKE to attempt; to try; to offer …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
OFFER to attempt, to try; to make an effort or start; to show intention or promise of …1790 Sc. & Eng. & Amer. dial.
SHOOT ONE’S BEST SHOT to do the best one can; to try one’s hardest …1960s sl., orig. US
SIFT to search; to try …1611 obs.
TAKE A POKE AT to have a try, to attempt …1930s sl.
TAKE A PUNT to have a try at something …1940s sl., orig. Aust.
TAKE A SHOT to try, to make an attempt …1970s
TAKE A SHOT AT to try, to make an attempt …1878
TAKE ONE’S BEST SHOT to do the best one can; to try one’s hardest …1960s sl., orig. US
TEMPT to attempt, to try …B1900 Eng. dial.


TRYING (difficult) – NOUNS
– that which is bitterly trying or unpleasant, esp. an agonizing or arduous task, experience, etc.; a bitter disappointment ASS-BREAKER 1961 Amer. sl.;  BALLBREAKER 1942 US sl.;  BALL-CRUSHER 1970 US sl.


TRYST – NOUNS
– a trysting place; any place of assignation SADDLING PADDOCK L19 Aust. sl.

TRYST – VERBS
– to make a tryst with, to appoint a meeting-place with EIN 1894 Sc.


TSAR – NOUNS, PERSON
– the wife of a tsar, a Russian empress CZARIN 1716 obs.