Reverse Dictionary: W – WALJ


WADDLE, WADDLING – ADVERBS
– in a waddling, shuffling manner • SCASHLE Bk1904 Sc.
– with a waddling, shuffling gait • SCASH Bk1904 Sc.
 
WADDLE etc. – VERBS
– to waddle • DATCHEL  • DATCHLE 1825 Sc.
– to waddle • QUADDLE  • QUODDLE 1662 obs.
– to waddle or bend in walking • WALLOP 1835 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– to waddle, to go with a rolling gait • WALTER 1399 obs.
– to waddle; to stagger • DAIDLE 1808 Sc.
– to waddle; to stagger along unsteadily • WAGGLE 1865 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– to waddle; to stagger along unsteadily • WUGGLE 1865 Sc.
– to waddle, to walk in a clumsy manner • FADLE  • FAIDLE 1808 Sc. obs.
– to walk in a waddling, shuffling manner • SCASHLE Bk1904 Sc.


WADE, WADING – NOUNS
– a wading place; a shallow pool at the head of a bay or creek • VADDLE Bk1905 Sc.
– a wading with short steps in water or mud • PADDLE Bk1905 Sc.

WADE etc. – VERBS
– to wade • LAIG 1802 Sc.
– to wade through mud or mire LAPE Bk1902 Eng. dial.
– to wade through or sink in mire; to make a splashing noise as when walking with shoes full of water, or when wading through mire • SLONK 1824 Sc. obs.
– to wade; to walk in the water with bare feet • LAGGEN Bk1902 Eng. dial.


WAFFLE – NOUNS
– waffles; pancakes • COLLISION MATS 1940s World War II Amer. sl.


WAG, WAGGING – NOUNS
– a wagging, a tremulous movement • JECTIGATION a1693 obs.

WAG etc. – VERBS
– to wag; to cause to move to and fro with a regular motion • WAFF 1807 Sc.


WAGER – see BET


WAGES – ADJECTIVES
– earning good wages • IN GOOD ADDLE Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– receiving good wages or a large salary • IN THE MONEY c1934 sl.
 
WAGES – NOUNS
– an advance payment of wages or salary • SUB 1866 Brit. sl.
– an increase in wages or salary • RAISE L19 sl.
– a weekly wage, 6 days at 3 shillings and 4 pence a day gives £1 for a 6-day week • SAME OLD THREE AND FOUR L19 sl.
– extra wages paid for night work • DARK MONEY 1970 UK railwaymen’s sl.
– extra wages paid for night work • DARK TIME 1970 UK railwaymen’s sl.
– high wages or salary • BIG MONEY 1888 orig. US
– high wages or salary • BIG PAY 1915 US
– money or goods earned on top of wages • D FOR DUNCE 20C Brit. rhyming sl. for ‘bunce’
– money paid beforehand for work • HANGMANS WAGES B1900 Eng. dial.
– one’s wages • DAILY 1900s sl.
– wages • FEES c1400 obs. exc. Sc.
– wages • GAGES 1562 Sc. obs.
– wages • GREENGAGES 1931 rhyming sl.
– wages • ONCES L19 sl.
– wages • PARKERING NINTY M19 sl.
– wages • ROCK OF AGES 1937 rhyming sl.
– wages • SCREW 1858 sl.
– wages • STAKE 1853 sl.
– wages • TAKE 1990s sl.
– wages due, esp. at the cessation of employment • TIME 1887 Amer. dial.
– wages, earnings • EDDLINS  • ETTLINS  1887 Sc.
– wages, earnings • SCRAN 1869 Eng. dial.
– wages, earnings, takings • FANGINGS 1846 Eng. dial.
– wages, earnings; savings • ADDLINGS Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– wages, money paid as the equivalent of labour  PRICE a1382 obs.
– wages or payment in advance; money paid on account to enable a person to proceed with an undertaking • PREST 1359 hist.
– wages paid by the day • DAY-TALE WAGES 1560
– wages paid in kind • BENEFIT Bk1898 Sc.
– weekly wages, pay, money for marketing • SATURDAY NIGHT 1896 Eng. dial.
– workmen’s wages, perquisites • BATTY Bk1898 sl.
 
WAGES – NOUNS, PERSON
– a man who works for wages • WAGES-MAN 1888 Aust.
– a person dependent on wages or a salary for a livelihood • WAGE-SLAVE 1886
– a person who receives wages • WAGES-FELLOW 1641 obs.
– a person who receives wages • WAGE-WORKER 1888
– a wage-earner; the working head of the family • DAILY-BREAD c1890 colloq.
 
WAGES – VERBS
– to earn as wages • FANG c1000 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– to earn as wages • KNOCK OUT 1871 sl.
– to live on uncertain wages • SCRAWL Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– to lower wages • BREAK Bk1911 Sc.
– to pay someone a ‘sub’, or advance on wages or salary • SUB 1874 Brit. sl.
– to pay wages • EAGLE FLY 1950s African-American sl.
– to pay wages to • WAGE 1393 now rare or obs.
– to reduce a workman’s wages; esp. to make deduction on account of careless work, etc. • BATE 1869 Eng. dial.


WAGGERY, WAGGISH – ADJECTIVES
– addicted to waggery; mischievous • WAGSOME 1869 nonce word
– waggish, joking • OFF-TAKING 1895 Sc.
– waggish, jovial, given to broad jesting • WANTON c1386 obs.

WAGGERY etc.  – NOUNS
– waggery, waggishness, mischief, practical joking • WAGSHIP 1607 obs.

WAGGERY etc.  – NOUNS, PERSON
– a waggish, false, deceitful, or dishonest fellow • NABS Bk1902 Eng. dial. 


WAGON – ADJECTIVES
– belonging to a wagon, coach, or any carriage • VECTARIOUS 1656 rare
 
WAGON – NOUNS
– a chuck wagon • GRUB WAGON 1917 Amer. sl.
– a horse-drawn wagon or sleigh used for transporting a large number of people • BARGE 1882 Amer. dial.
– an awning or cover for a wagon, usually of canvas or tarpaulin • TILT 1620
– a rickety wagon • QUILL-WHEEL 1892 Amer. dial.
– as much as a wain will hold; a wain-load • WAINFUL 1713 rare
– a spring wagon • AVALANCHE 1859 Amer. dial.
– a stage wagon for the conveyance of goods • HEAVY 1847
– a wagon • VARDO 1812 cant obs.
– a wagon, cart, carriage, chariot, etc.• CAR 1382
– a wagon drawn by horses or oxen, for carrying heavy loads, esp. of agricultural produce • WAIN c1250
– a wagon or sleigh with a removable hood • BOOBY HATCH Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– a wagon or truck that hauls the carcasses of dead farm stock • GUT TRUCK 1983 Amer. sl.
– a wagon or truck that hauls the carcasses of dead farm stock • GUT-WAGON 1925 Amer. sl.
– a wagon wheel • FARMER’S BOOTJACK 1942 Amer. dial.
– the canvas curtain hanging at the back of a wagon • AFTER-CLAP Bk1913 S. Afr. 
– the drawing of wagons • WAINAGE 1894 Eng. dial.
– the seats in a wagon • WAIN-THOFTS Bk1905 Eng. dial. obs.
 
WAGON – NOUNS, PERSON
– a wagon-builder • WAINWRIGHT c1000
– a wagoner • COUNTRY HARRY 18C sl.
– a wagoner • VARDO-GILL Bk1812 cant obs.
– a wagoner, carter, or driver of a teamer (a team of five horses) • TEAMERMAN Bk1855 Eng. dial.
– a wagoner or carter, who has the care of a team of horses • TEAMER 1778
– a wagoner, the driver of a wain • WAINER a1500
– a wagoner, the driver of a wain • WAINMAN 1392 obs.
 
WAGON – VERBS
– to carry goods in an ox wagon • KURVEY 1873 S. Afr.
– to pull or draw a wagon or carriage • FILL 1883 Amer. dial.
– to transport  in a wain or carriage • WAIN c1200 obs.


WAIF – NOUNS, PERSON
– a waif; a foundling • WAIF-CHILD 1681-2 Eng. dial. obs.
– a waif; a stray • WAIFINGER Bk1905 Eng. dial. obs.
– a waif, a vagabond, a vagrant • WAFF 1808 Sc.


WAIL, WAILING – ADJECTIVES
– given to wailing, querulous • WAILISH c1550 obs.
– wailing, crying, squalling; said of infants • VAGIENT 1628 obs.
– wailing, crying with grief • YAMMERING 1536 obs. exc. Sc. & Eng. dial.
– wailing, howling • ULULATORY 1831
– wailing, lamenting • ULULATIVE 1490 obs.
– wailing, mournful • BEWAILFUL 1592 obs. rare
 
WAIL etc. – NOUNS
– a loud wail, a noisy lamentation, an outcry • LAMACHEELIE 1925 Sc.
– a loud wail, a noisy lamentation, an outcry • LAMACHREE 1925 Sc.
– a wail, a cry • YEI a1225 obs.
– a wail, a cry of lamentation; a funeral lament • ULLAGONE 1828 Anglo-Irish
– a wail, a cry of lamentation; a loud outcry, shout, yell; lamentation, querulous utterance • YAMMER 1500-20 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– a wail, cry, lamentation • VAGIT 1627 obs.
– a wailing, a cry of grief • YAMMERING 1705 obs. exc. Sc. & Eng. dial.
– a wailing cry; a wail of lamentation • ULULU 1854
– a wailing or howling • ULULATION 1799
– a wail or howl; a cry of lamentation • ULULATION 1599
– a wail, scream, or howl • WALLACH  • WALLOCH 1866 Sc. 
– wailing, lamentation • EJULATION a1619 obs.
– wailing, lamentation • WAILMENT 1593 obs.
 
WAIL etc. – VERBS
– to utter a wailing, whining cry; to cry bitterly • SANNICK  • SANNOCK   • SONNOCK Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– to utter a wailing, whining cry without apparent cause • SANNY Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– to wail or complain incessantly • RANE 1899 Sc.
– to wail or howl; to lament loudly • ULULATE 1623
– to wail or lament loudly • ULLAGONE 1828 Anglo-Irish
– to wail or lament with many tears • BLOWTER 16C obs.
– to wail, to cry, to shriek, to scream, to howl • WALLOCH 1808 Sc. 
– to wail, to howl, to utter a discordant or mournful cry • YARM c1000 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– to wail, to shed tears • PLORE 1373 obs. rare
– to wail, to utter a moaning sound; to complain, to bemoan to indicate pain • MEAN 1790 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– to wail, to utter cries of lamentation or distress • YAMMER 1481 obs. exc. Sc. & Eng. dial.


WAIST – NOUNS
– the waist • MIDDLE-BONES 1746 Eng. dial.
– the waist • THE THIN OF THE SIDE 1901 Sc.
– the waist, the middle part of the body • MIDDLE  1820 Sc. & Eng. dial.


WAIT, WAITING – ADJECTIVES
– waiting • ON A LEAN 1910s Aust. sl.
 
WAIT etc. – INTERJECTIONS/PHRASES
– wait! • HOLD YOUR HORSES! 1842 US sl.
– wait a bit, hang on • HALF A TICK 1910s sl.
– wait a moment, hang on • HALF A MO L19 sl.
– wait a moment! stop! • HOLD HARD! c1760
– wait for me! • WAIT UP! 1944 US sl.
– wait! stay in precisely that position • HOLD IT! c1910 colloq.
 
WAIT etc. – NOUNS
– a waiting; delay • ABODE a1250 obs.
– a waiting for something; a tarrying for the accomplishment of what is desired or expected • ON-WAITING c1610 Sc.
– waiting, abiding in expectation; awaiting • TARRIANCE 1561 obs.
 
WAIT etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– a person who waits, awaits, or tarries • ABIDER 1499 obs.
– a person who waits for something • ONWAITER c1610 Sc.
 
WAIT etc. – VERBS
– to be kept waiting • COOL ONE’S TOES 1665 obs.
– to be kept waiting • KICK ONE’S HEELS 1703 Brit.
– to have to wait • COOL ONE’S TOES c1660
– to keep a person waiting or in a state of uncertainty • STRING ALONG 20C colloq.
– to keep waiting • DANGLE 1960s sl.
– to keep waiting; to delay; to disappoint • LANT 1882 Eng. dial.
– to lie in wait for; to plan revenge against, to be out to get • LAY FOR 1865 Amer. dial.
– to lie in wait or in ambush • SIT c825 obs.
– to lie in wait; to be on the watch for an opportunity of catching or seizing something • LIE AT THE CATCH 1642 obs.
– to wait a minute; to delay • HOLD THE PHONE 1930s US sl.
– to wait apprehensively • SWEAT ON IT Bk1999 Aust. sl.
– to wait around, to idle • STOOGE 1940s sl.
– to wait for someone or something • WAIT ON 1817 Amer. dial.
– to wait for, to await • PRESTOLATE 1653 nonce word obs.
– to wait for, to await a coming event or person • KEEP c1000 obs.
– to wait impatiently, to champ the bit like a restless horse • BITE UPON THE BRIDLE c1530 obs.
– to wait patiently; to remain motionless • LAY CHILLY 1978 US sl.
– to wait patiently; to remain motionless • SIT CHILLY 1988 US sl.
– to wait, to be patient, not be hasty • HOLD ONE’S POTATO 1965 Amer. dial.
– to wait, to delay, to tarry • LET c1385 obs.
– to wait, to endure • THOOTLE Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– to wait, to lie in wait • HARKEN  • HEARKEN  1580 obs.
– to wait, to stay, to hold out; to defer or deny oneself of a requirement • THOLE 1691 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– to wait, to stop • BEHOLD a1670 obs.
– to wait, to stop; to cancel, to disregard • BELAY 1931 Amer. dial.
– to wait, to stop; to hold, to maintain, to hold as certain • BEHAD 1768 Sc.
– to wait, to take one’s time • TAKE ONE’S HURRY Bk1905 Eng. dial.


WAITER, WAITRESS – NOUNS, PERSON
– a waiter • APRONER c1600 colloq.
– a waiter • BAKED POTATO 1969 US rhyming sl. for ‘pertater’
– a waiter • BLACK COAT 1943 Aust. sl.
– a waiter • FINDER 19C Cambridge sl.
– a waiter • KNIGHT OF THE NAPKIN Bk1902 sl.
– a waiter • SKINK 1603 rare
– a waiter • TENDER 1865 Eng. dial.
– a waiter • TOM E18 sl.
– a waiter • WAITERESS Bk1972 homosexual sl.
– a waiter • WAITER-ON 1884 Eng. dial.
– a waiter; a lackey; a porter • PUNK Bk1974 Amer. sl.
– a waiter; a person who waits on tables • BEAN JOCKEY 1937 US military sl.
– a waiter, esp. a slow or inefficient one • COLD POTATO 1960 UK rhyming sl. (‘potater’)
– a waiter in a tavern • DASH c1660 sl.
– a waiter in mining and logging camps • FLUNKY Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
– a waiter; one who serves at table; a steward • DAPIFER 1636
– a waiter or waitress • BISCUIT-TOSSER 1877 US sl.
– a waiter or waitress • HASHER 1916 US sl.
– a waiter or waitress • HASH-SLINGER 1868 US sl.
– a waiter or waitress • WAITPERSON 1980 US
– a waiter or waitress • WAITRON 1980 US
– a waiter or waitress who serves beer • BEER-JERKER c1865 Amer. sl. 
– a waiter, serving-man, waiter; a waiter in a French hotel or restaurant • GARÇON 1788
– a waiter who hangs about to wait for gratuities • CADGER c1870 sl.
– a waitress • ABIGAIL 1906 Aust. sl.
– a waitress • BEANERY QUEEN 1932 Amer. dial.
– a waitress • COOKIE-PUSHER 1936 US sl.
– a waitress; a waiter in a logging camp • BISCUIT-SHOOTER 1893 US sl.
– a waitress in any of the restaurants of J. Lyons & Co. Ltd. London; later, any waitress • NIPPY 1925 Brit. sl.
– male and female waiters • WAITSTAFF Bk2006 Amer. sl. 
 
WAITER etc. – VERBS
– to wait at tables • DEAL THEM OFF THE ARM 1930s US sl.
– to wait at tables • SLING HASH 1906 US sl.
– to work as a waiter or waitress • HUSTLE HASH L19 sl.


WAKE, WAKEFUL, WAKEFULLY, WAKEFULNESS – ADJECTIVES
– soon waked, watchful; light-sleeping • LEVISOMNOUS 1656 obs. rare
– wakeful • WAKRONG 1340-70 obs. rare
– wakeful • WAKY a1541 obs.
– wakeful, easily awakened • WACKER  • WHACKER 1790 Eng. dial.
– wakeful, watchful • WAKERLY c1400 obs.
– wakeful, watchful, indisposed to sleep • WAKERIFE c1480 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– wakeful, wide-awake • WACKERSOME 1858 Eng. dial.
 
WAKE etc. – ADVERBS
– wakefully • WAKERIFELIE Bk1905 Sc.
 
WAKE etc. – INTERJECTIONS
– used for calling someone from sleep to breakfast • WAKEY, WAKEY, EGGS AND BAKEY! 2000 US sl.
– used for humorously waking up a male • WAKEY, WAKEY, HANDS OFF SNAKIE! 1985 Aust. sl.
 
WAKE etc. – NOUNS
– the state of wakefulness, esp. during normal hours of sleep • WAKE a1250 obs.
– the state of wakefulness; sleeplessness • WAKERIFENESS 1891 Sc.
 
WAKE etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– a man employed by workpeople to wake them in the morning • UP-KNOCKER 1899 Eng. dial. 
– a person who goes round the streets in the early morning to awaken people • KNOCKER-UP 1861 Eng. dial.
 
WAKE etc. – VERBS
– to awake from sleep, to arouse • DAW c1314 obs. exc. Sc.
– to awaken, to rouse • RAISE Bk1905 Sc.
– to be wakeful or sleepless • VIGILATE 1758 obs. rare
– to wake • I-WAKE c1275 obs.
– to wake a person, to rouse • RALLY Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– to wake or rouse up a person that is asleep or dying • DARE UP 1873 Eng. dial.
– to wake someone • CALL ONE OUT 1954 Amer. dial.
– to wake someone by knocking on their door or window • KNOCK UP 1663 Brit. sl.
– to wake someone up; to wake up, to regain consciousness • AWECCHE a1000 obs.
– to wake up, get up or leave one’s room in the morning • SURFACE 1963 sl.
– to wake up, to awake, from sleep, swoon, etc. • ADAW c1300 obs.
– to wake up, to bestir oneself • SHAKE ONE’S EARS 1580


WAKE (water) – NOUNS
– a boat’s wake • BOILING WATER 1965 Amer. dial.


WAKE (for dead person) – NOUNS
– a wake • COLD MEAT PARTY 1908 US sl.
– a wake • DEATHWATCH 1968 Amer. dial.
– a wake, a funeral watch • COFFEE-DRINK 1945 Amer. dial.


WAKE-UP – INTERJECTIONS
– wake up!; addressed to sleepers in a forecastle or barracks • DROP YOUR COCKS AND GRAB YOUR SOCKS! 1942 US nautical & military sl.

WAKE-UP – NOUNS
– a wake-up call • WAKEY-WAKEY 2001 UK sl.


WALES – ADJECTIVES (also see WELSH)
– pert. to North Wales • VENEDOTIAN 1841
– pert. to Wales; Welsh • CAMBRIAN 1656
– relating to the Welsh people and language • CYMRIC 1656
 
WALES – NOUNS
– Wales • ITCHLAND 1690 sl.
– Wales • TAFFYLAND E17 sl.
 
WALES – NOUNS, PERSON
– a Welshman • CAMBRIAN 1780
– a Welshman • LEEK c1700 cant obs.
– a Welshman • MOUNTAIN-PECKER 1880 UK sl.
– a Welshman • WALESMAN 1591 obs.
– a Welshman • WALSCHE 1382 obs.
– a Welshman, or a nickname for a Welshman • TAFEE  • TAFFIE  • TAFFY 1615 sl.
– a Welsh person • WELSHIE  • WELSHY 1951 sl.
– a Welsh person • WOOLLY BACK 2003 US sl.
– a Welsh person; often used as a nickname • TAFF 1929 sl., often derogatory
– a Welsh woman • COUSIN ANNE 1968 Amer. dial.
– the chief officer in a Welsh commot; a sheriff or constable • RAGLER 1408 obs.
 
WALES – VERBS
– to make Welsh • CYMRICIZE 1888



Updated: September 29, 2022