Reverse Dictionary: WOR – WORK


WORD – ADJECTIVES
– CATACHRESTIC wrongly used, misapplied, as when one word is improperly put for another …1656
– CRICK-CRACK of words: not understood …19C Eng. dial.
– FAIR-SPOKEN of words: bland, civil …1649
– IDIOGLOTTIC using words of one’s own invention …1888
– LOGOFASCINATED fascinated by words …1652 nonce word
– MALAPROP given to ludicrous misuse of words …1840
– MALAPROPIAN given to ludicrous misuse of words …1860
– NEOLOGICAL dealing with or characterized by new words or phrases …1754 rare
– NEOLOGISTIC pert. to the use of new words or phrases …1827
– NEOLOGOUS pert. to the use of new words or phrases …1812 rare
– NEOTERISTIC pert. to the use of new words or phrases …1873
– OMNIVERBARIOUS using all sorts of words …B1900
– OMNIVERBIVOROUS capable of ‘swallowing’ all words …1858 humorous
– SESQUIPEDALIAN of words and expressions: of many syllables …1656
– SESQUIPEDALIAN given to using long words …1853
– TOGATED of words: Latinized; stately, majestic …1868
– VERBARIAN having to do with words …1830
– VERBATICAL verbal; pert. to words …1612 obs.
– WAFF of words: cheap, vulgar …1866 Sc.
 
WORD – ADVERBS
– ACYROLOGICALLY incorrectly as to use of words …1651 obs.
 
WORD – NOUNS
– ACYROLOGY incorrect use of language or words; improper speech …1656 obs.
– ADNOMINATION a play upon words; wordplay based on similar sounding words …1628 
– BOGGLE-WORDS hard words, words difficult to pronounce …19C Eng. dial.
– CATACHRESIS improper use of words; abuse or perversion of a metaphor …1589
– CRAMP-WORD a word difficult to pronounce or understand; any long, scientific, or uncommon word …1687
– CRICK-CRACK word not understood …1892 Eng. dial.
– DICKY (BIRD) a word; usually used in negative contexts …1893 rhyming sl.
– DICTION a word …1416 obs.
– DICTIONARY-WORDS big words used in talk …1912 Amer. dial.
– EARLY BIRD a word …1937 UK rhyming sl.
– ETYMOLOGICON a dictionary or work on the etymologies of the words in a language …1645
– HYPERDISYLLABLE a word of more than two syllables …1678
– JAW-BREAKER a word hard to pronounce; a word of many syllables …1839 colloq.
– JAWTWISTER a hard or many-syllabled word …Bk1896 sl.
– LOGODIARRHOEA an uncontrolled flow of words …1727 obs.
– LOGOLATRY worship of words; unreasonable regard for words or for verbal truth …a1834
– MALAPROP ludicrous misuse of words …1823
– MALAPROPISM ludicrous misuse of words; an instance of this …1849
– MALAPROPOISM ludicrous misuse of words …1834 nonce word
– MICRONYMY the use of shortened words for naming things, as in science (TNT); the use of short easy words instead of long hard ones …1889 nonce word
– MOCKINGBIRD a word …1960s UK & Aust. rhyming sl., orig. theatre
– NEOLOGISM a new word or expression …1803
– NEOLOGIZATION the use or formation of new words or phrases …1846 rare
– NEOLOGY the use of new words …1797
– NEOLOGY a new word or term …1846
– NEONISM the use or formation of new words or phrases …1846 rare
– NEOTERISM the use of new words or phrases; a new word or phrase …1873
– OLIGOSYLLABLE a word of less than four syllables …1830
– ONOMATOMANIA morbid dread of some word, intense mental anguish at the inability to recall some word, or to name a thing …1892
– PALABRA a word; speech, talk, palaver …1594
– PATER chatter, talk; a word …1838 Sc.
– PEEP a word …c1945 sl.
– PIGEONHOLE an excessively wide space between words …L17 sl. obs.
– QUADRILITERAL a word of four letters …1787
– QUADRISYLLABLE a word of four syllables …1827
– QUATCH a word, a sound …a1635 obs.
– RICHARD a word …L19 rhyming sl. (Richard the Third)
– RICHARD THE THIRD a word …L19 rhyming sl.
– SESQUIPEDALIAN a word of many syllables …1830
– SIGLE an initial or other character used to denote words …1614 obs. rare
– SPLANG sharp words …1970s African-American sl.
– VERB a word …a1716 obs. rare
– VERBAL a collection of words; a vocabulary or dictionary …1599 obs. rare
– VERBICIDE the act of destroying the sense or value of a word; perversion of a word from its proper meaning, as in punning … 1858
– VERBOCINATION expression of ideas by means of words …1653 obs. rare
– VOCABLE a word, a lexical item …1700 Sc. 
– VOCABLES vocabulary, word-lists …1700 Sc. 
– VOCABULATION the use or choice of words …1891 rare
– WEASEL WORD a word that is used in a deliberately misleading way …1900 sl., orig. US
 
WORD – NOUNS, PERSON
– HACKER one who mangles words or sense …a1603 obs.
– LOGODAEDALUS one who is cunning in, or clever with, words …1611 obs.
– NEOLOGIST one who invents or uses new words or forms …1785
– NEOTERIST one who uses or introduces new words or phrases …1873
– VERBALIST one who deals in, or directs his attention to, words only, apart from reality or meaning …c1609
– VERBALIST one who is skilled in the use or knowledge of words …1794
– VERBARIAN an inventor or coiner of words …1873
– VERBICIDE one who mutilates or destroys a word …1867
– VERBOMANIAC one who is crazy about words and their study; a dictionary-maker …1923
– VERBOTOMIST one who studies the anatomy of words …1802
– VERSUTILOQUENT a crafty talker; one using words craftily …1656
– VOCABULARIAN one who gives much or undue attention to words …1899
– WORDAHOLIC one obsessed with words …1978 
 
WORD – VERBS
– BLAST to use big words or strong language …Bk1911 Sc.
– HACK to mangle or ‘make a hash of’ words in utterance …1598 obs.
– NEOLOGIZE to use new words or phrases; to make linguistic innovations …1846
– NEOTERIZE to coin or use new words or phrases …1873
– VOCABULIZE to utter, speak, say; to put into words …1873 rare


WORD FOR WORD – ADVERBS
VERBATIMLY word for word …1597 obs.

WORD FOR WORD – VERBS
VERBATE to reproduce word for word …1512 obs.


WORDINESS, WORDY – ADJECTIVES
MATTERY wordy, loquacious …Bk1905 Eng. dial.

WORDINESS etc. – NOUNS
CLARK RUSSELL JAWING-MATCH wordy warfare …Bk1896 sl.
VERBAGE verbosity, excessive wordiness …1787 rare
VERBALITY the quality of being verbal; that which consists of mere words or verbiage …1645


WORD OF MOUTH – PHRASES
ON THE BLOB by word of mouth …1851 sl.


WORK, WORKING – ADJECTIVES (also see hard-working, job, and odd jobs)
– FULL OF THE OLD NICK feeling ambitious and eager to work …1965 Amer. dial.
– LABOURABLE capable of being laboured or worked …1481 obs.
– LABOURSOME given to labour; hard-working …1551 obs.
– NANTLING of work: light, trifling; done for amusement …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– OFF not performing or working well …1846 US sl.
– OMNIGERENT universally working. performing all kinds of work …1865
– OPERATIC engaged in production as a workman or artisan, working …1823-27 rare
– RAMSTOORIE of a vigorous but not meticulous worker: slapdash, rough and ready …1949 Sc.
– RAWHIDE exacting hard work …1950 Amer. dial.
– SAUNTERING given to dawdling over one’s work …1673 obs.
– SKIVING work-shy; shirking work …1959 UK sl.
– WALL-EYED of any work: badly done …M19 sl.
– WORK BRICKLE ready to work …Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
– WORKING A WELT dishonestly contriving a break from work …c1900 UK sl.
 
WORK etc. – ADVERBS
– AGREAT of work: done by the piece …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
 
WORK etc. – NOUNS
– ABRAHAM WORK sweated labour, ill-paid work …Bk1909 sl.
– BASHING arduous work, esp. of the specified sort …1940 Brit. services’ sl.
– BED-WORK work that is or can be done in bed or without toil, easy work …1606 obs.
– BINNER a quantity of work done …Bk1898 Sc.
– BUCKEYE one whose work is of low quality; the inferior work itself …1843 Amer. dial.
– BULLWORK manual labour; hard work …1944 Amer. dial.
– CA’ CANNY a deliberate reduction of working speed and production by workers, to express their discontent …1895 Sc.
– CHUMP JOB respectable, low-paying, regular work …1930s US sl.
– CLOCK WATCHING the act of working no harder, or for no longer, than is minimally required …1942 UK sl.
– COUNTRY WORK work that progresses very slowly …E19 sl.
– DADERY drudgery, exhausting work …1891 Sc.
– DAILY DOZEN one’s work, occupation …1930s sl.
– DAILY GRIND, THE one’s usual day’s work
– DARG a day’s work; the task of a day; a defined quantity or amount of work done in a certain time or at a certain rate of payment; a task …c1425 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– DARG-DAYS days of work done in lieu of rent or due to the feudal lord …19C Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– DARGING the work of a day labourer, esp. hard, plodding toil …1788 Sc.
– DARGUE a day’s work; the amount of work done in a day …1737 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– DARRACK a day’s work; the amount of work done in a day …1737 Eng. dial.
– DAY FOR A KING a day off; orig, when outdoor work was impossible, but used generally to cover any unofficial day off, as one that follows a night of over-enthusiastic enjoyment …1947 NZ sl.
– DAY FOR THE KING a day off; orig, when outdoor work was impossible, but used generally to cover any unofficial day off, as one that follows a night of over-enthusiastic enjoyment …1947 NZ sl.
– DAYLIGHTING working (usually illicitly) at a second job during daylight hours …20C sl.
– DAY ON THE KING a day off; orig, when outdoor work was impossible, but used generally to cover any unofficial day off, as one that follows a night of over-enthusiastic enjoyment …1947 NZ sl.
– DAY ON THE QUEEN a day off; orig, when outdoor work was impossible, but used generally to cover any unofficial day off, as one that follows a night of over-enthusiastic enjoyment …1947 NZ sl.
– DAYSIDE a day shift …1985 Amer. labourers’ usage
– DEAD HORSE work that ‘doesn’t pay’ but must be done …1969 Amer. dial.
– DEZ(Z)ICK a day’s work …1894 Eng. dial.
– DIDDLE slow and trifling working; trifling activity; one who is slow and dawdling in his work …Bk1900 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– DIDDLE-DADDLE slow and trifling working; trifling activity; one who is slow and dawdling in his work …Bk1900 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– DINKUM work; a due share of work …1888 Eng. dial.
– DOG’S WORK menial or unpleasant work …1847
– DOG WORK menial or unpleasant work …1850
– DORG a day’s work; the amount of work done in a day …1737 Eng. dial.
– EIDENCY diligence, hard work, assiduity …1834 Sc.
– ERGOPHOBIA fear of work; morbid aversion to labour …1881
– EYDENCE diligence, hard work, assiduity …1834 Sc. obs.
– EYEBALLING the act of working extremely hard, esp. at a gruelling manual task; arduous physical labour …1846 Aust. colloq. obs.
– EYE-SERVICE work or service performed merely for outward show or when under observation …1526 rare
– FAFFLEMENT trifling and unnecessary work …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– FAG a bore; a chore; an unpleasant, tedious task; anything that causes weariness, hard work, toil, drudgery, fatigue; a wearisome thing…1780 colloq.
– FAGGING the act of working hard or wearying oneself at something; hard work; an exhausting experience …1777
– FAGGING ABOUT the act of working hard or wearying oneself at something; hard work …1850
– GAFF a legitimate job, work …1910s sl.
– GANG a turn or spell at any work or exercise …1879 Eng. dial.
– GANG a work crew …1989 US sl.
– GIG work; any job or occupation …1950s Amer. sl.
– GOLDEN HOURS in the entertainment industry: time worked at a premium overtime rate …1970 US sl.
– GOLDEN TIME in the entertainment industry: time worked at a premium overtime rate …1970 US sl.
– GRAFT hard work …1853
– GRUNT WORK work that is repetitious, often physically exhausting and boring …sl.
– HAMMER clumsy, noisy working or walking …1866 Sc.
– HANA work, labour …1951 Hawaii
– HANAHANA labour, hard work …1967 Hawaii
– HAND’S TURN a stroke of work …1828 colloq.
– HARD GRAFT hard work …1873 Aust. sl.
– HARD YAKKA hard work …1888 Aust. sl.
– HASHTER work ill-arranged or executed in a slovenly manner …Bk1902 Sc.
– HORSEFLESH work that is charged for before it is actually done …L17 sl.
– JACKETING a hard day’s work …Bk1902 Eng. dial.
– JACKLEGGING working inexpertly; fiddling …1918 Amer. dial.
– JIPPO part-time work …1920s Amer. sl.
– LABORATION working, work, labour …c1460 obs. rare
– LABOURAGE labouring, labour, work …1484 obs.
– LICK a work period …1868 US sl.
– LICK-OVER a quick once-over; a piece of work done quickly…1966 Amer. dial.
– LIVE HORSE work additional to that included in the (generally, week’s) bill …19C Brit. workmen’s sl.
– LOUNDER the act of showing energy at work …B1900 Sc.
– MACKING working hard …1990s African-American sl.
– MAIN hard work; a spell or turn at labour …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– MANUARY manual work, handicraft trade …1581 obs.
– MIKE a respite from work …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– MIMICKING WORK work made to look well for a time, but not to last; work done with bad material …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– MONKEY WORK unimportant, repetitive, or unsatisfying work …1830 US colloq.
– NANNICK light, irregular work …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– NANNIKIN-JOB a piece of work requiring neatness and delicacy …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– NANTLING petty, jobbing work …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– NIXER work undertaken outside normal work, usually without an employer’s knowledge …1994 Irish sl.
– OFFICE the place one works …L17 sl.
– OPERATION action, performance, work, deed …c1386 obs.
– OPERATION something made; a product, work …1616 obs.
– PAITER chatter, talk; a word …1838 Sc.
– QUATTING-TIME the time for ceasing work…1835 Sc.
– QUEERACH the act of working in a weak, trifling manner; the act of nursing in an over-dainty manner …Bk1905 Sc.
– QUEETER the act of working in a weak, half-hearted, trifling manner …1866 Sc.
– QUEETERAN the act of working lazily …1866 Sc.
– RAIK a quantity of work done quickly …1866 Sc.
– RANTER any piece of work badly done …BK1905 Sc.
– RINGER a complete workweek …1969 Amer. dial.
– SCAMP work done in a hurried, lazy manner …Bk1904 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– SCHLEP(P);  SHLEP(P) a troublesome business or a piece of hard work …1964 sl., chiefly US
– SCUTZ WORK menial or unpleasant work …1991 Amer. dial.
– SCUZZ WORK menial or unpleasant work …1991 Amer. dial.
– SHITWORK work considered esp. by feminists to be menial or routine, esp. housework; routine work  …1968 sl.
– SHOVELFUL O’ WORK a very little work …Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
– SHUTDOWN a stoppage of work; the temporary closing of a factory …Bk1974 Amer. sl.
– SLOG an act or period of hard work …1888 UK sl.
– THRIFT work, occupation, employment, business …1798 Sc.
– THRUT a through shift or turn of work more than usual length …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– TIE-UP a stoppage of work or business, esp. on account of a lock-out or strike …1889
– TILTH labour, work, or effort directed to use or profitable ends …a1023 obs.
– UMGANG a turn or spell of work …1538 obs. rare
– WALL-EYED JOB any work irregularly or ill done; also, any very irregular action …1847 sl.
– YACCA;  YACKA;  YACKER;  YAKKA;  YAKKER hard work …1888 Aust. sl.
 
WORK etc. – PHRASES
– ALL CHIEFS AND NO INDIANS all bosses and no workers; a situation at work where everyone wants to give orders and no one wishes to work …Bk2004 
– BACK TO THE SALT MINES back to the workplace …Bk2006 US sl.
– FLAT OUT LIKE A LIZARD DRINKING working non-stop …Bk1999 Aust. sl.
– FLAT TO THE BOARDS working non-stop …Bk1999 Aust. sl.
– NOT TO BUY CLOTHES FOR THE BABY not to be accomplishing one’s task or getting one’s work done …1946 Amer. dial.
– ON THE WALLABY wandering about looking for work …Aust. sl.
– ON THE WALLABY TRACK wandering about looking for work …Aust. sl.
– TRY TO WAKEN A DEAD HORSE said of one who is working in vain, or receiving no pay …1889 Eng. dial.
 
WORK etc. – VERBS
– AWM to waste time, to be idle; to move about aimlessly, to loiter, to lounge; to stand gaping and staring; to do work in a slovenly manner …1878 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– BALL THE JACK to move rapidly or swiftly; to make haste; to go fast (said esp. of a railroad train); to work swiftly or energetically …1913 Amer. sl.
– BASH AWAY to work vigorously …1881 Eng. dial.
– BATTLE to struggle for a living, to work hard despite troubles and exhibit courage in doing so …1895 Aust sl.
– BELABOUR to labour at, to work at; to exert one’s strength or ability upon …1604 obs.
– BEND ONE’S BACK to work hard …1920s Aust. sl.
– BESWINK to labour for, to work for …1377 obs.
– BETRAVAIL to work for; to earn by labour …1393 obs.
– BILDER to work hard …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
– BILL to work hard …1790 Eng. dial.
– BLUITER to work clumsily; to spoil work in the doing of it …Bk1911 Sc.
– BOMMEL to work confusedly …Bk1911 Sc.
– BRAISSIL;  BRASSLE to work hurriedly …Bk1911 Sc.
– BREAK ONE’S ARSE;  BREAK ONE’S ASS to work extremely hard; to put in a great effort …1930s sl.
– BREAK ONE’S TAIL to work extremely hard; to put in a great effort …1930s sl.
– BUCKLE TO IT to hurry; to work fast …1848 Amer. dial.
– BUD to work …Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
– BUD IN to work …Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
– BULLOCK to work strenuously without intermission …1888 Aust.
– BURK to avoid work …L19 sl., orig. NZ
– BURN UP ONE’S TAIL to work very hard …1954 Amer. dial.
– BUST A NUT to work hard to achieve something …Bk2006 US sl.
– BUST ONE’S ARSE;  BUST ONE’S ASS to work extremely hard; to put in a great effort …1941 sl.
– BUST ONE’S BANANAS to work to the limits of one’s ability and strength …1970s US sl.
– BUST ONE’S BUNS to work extremely hard; to put in a great effort …1930s sl.
– BUST ONE’S BUTT to work extremely hard; to put in a great effort …1930s sl.
– BUST ONE’S CHOPS to work hard …1950s US sl.
– BUST ONE’S CONK to work very hard …1930s African-American sl.
– BUST ONE’S PANTS to work extremely hard; to put in a great effort …1930s sl.
– BYSWENKE to work hard; to exert oneself, to labour …a1400 obs.
– CA’ CANNY to go easy; to proceed warily or cautiously; to go slow; deliberately to restrict output or effort …Sc.
– CHIPPY to work halfheartedly or without serious purpose …1974 Amer. sl.
– CHORE to work …Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
– CONK OFF to stop work; to rest when one should work …1950s Amer. sl.
– COO FOR MOO to work for money …Bk1947 Amer. sl.
– COP A SLAVE to work, to go out and find work …20C African-American sl.
– COP THE SLAVE to work, to go out and find work …20C African-American sl.
– DACKER to work in an irregular or pottering way …1703 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– DAFFLE to do odd jobs, any sort of light work …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– DAIDLE to mismanage; to do any work in a slovenly way …1808 Sc. obs.
– DAIGLE to proceed, act, or work laggardly; to idle …1827 Sc.
– DANCE ON THE CARPET to be called into a superior’s office for questioning about possible misconduct or poor work performance …1946 US sl.
– DARG to work by the day; to toil; generally applied to agricultural labour, as opening drains, trenching, etc. …1866 Sc.
– DAYLIGHT to work at a second job during the day …1970s Amer. sl.
– DELVE to work hard, to slave, to drudge …1888 Eng. dial.
– DIE, DOG, OR EAT THE HATCHET to work hard or suffer the consequences; to fend for oneself, to struggle for existence …1903 Amer. dial.
– DIG to work hard, esp. for an examination …US sl.
– DIG OUT to work cheerfully and with a will; to make a real effort …1987 UK military usage
– DILDER to trifle, to waste time, to work carelessly …Bk1900 Sc.
– DING to work hard …Bk1900 Sc.
– DO A MIKE to pretend to be working; to hang about …Bk1892 Aust. sl.
– DO A TAP OF WORK to do the smallest amount of work …1884 Amer. dial.
– DODGE THE COLUMN to shirk; to avoid work …Amer. World War I sl.
– DOG IT to work hard …20C teen & high school sl.
– DRAW THE DEAD HORSE to work at a job that doesn’t bring in any profits, but must be done …M19 sl.
– DROIL to drudge, to slave, to toil in mean work; to work sluggishly or slowly; to plod …1591 obs.
​​- DUFF IN to work energetically …Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
– EAT, PIG, OR DIE to work hard or suffer the consequences; to fend for oneself, to struggle for existence …1835 Amer. dial.
– ELT to work persistently or laboriously; to be occupied in working in the earth, to rake among dirt …1877 Sc.
– ENDEAVOUR FOR to work, to labour …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– EYEBALL to work extremely hard, esp. at a gruelling manual task; to exert oneself to the fullest extent …1848 Aust. colloq. obs.
– FAFFLE to saunter, to trifle; to fumble, to work dilatorily …Bk1900 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– FAG to do something that wearies one; to work hard; to labour, to strain, to toil …1772
– FAKE FOR CAKE to work for a living …1958 Amer. dial.
– FALL TO WORK to being working …1551 obs.
– FASSIL to loiter, to waste time, to work lazily …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– FAUCH to work with speed; to toil, esp. with little result …1866 Sc.
– FAUCHLE to work lazily or listlessly, to work with difficulty, to work in a helpless, bungling fashion …1824 Sc.
– FLY THE FLAG to post a notice that workmen are needed …c1860 tailors’ sl.
– GET ONE’S NOSE DOWN to work hard and concentratedly …1962
– GOOF to dawdle, to waste time, to avoid work …1950s sl.
– GRAFT to work hard …1859 sl.
– GROUT to work or study hard …c1870 UK sl.
– GRUNT to do menial work …1930s US sl.
– HACK to work hard …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– HAG to overwork and underpay, to ‘sweat’ …1891
– HAGGLE to over-work, to fatigue, to tire out …Bk1905 Amer. dial.
– HAMMER to work or walk in a clumsy, noisy manner; to stumble …a1786 Sc.
– HANA to work, to make …1951 Hawaii
– HASHTER to work in a hurried, slovenly, and wasteful manner …Bk1902 Sc.
– HAWM to waste time, to be idle; to move about aimlessly, to loiter, to lounge; to stand gaping and staring; to do work in a slovenly manner …1878 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– HEAVE TO to hurry, to exert oneself energetically, to start working very hard …1967 Amer. dial.
– HIT THE BALL to work hard and effectively; to perform satisfactorily or well …1919 US sl.
– HOE ONE’S ROW to do one’s own work …Bk1905 Amer. dial.
– HUSSLE;  HUSTLE to work hard, to make an effort …L19 US sl.
– HUSSLE;  HUSTLE to urge someone to work harder …20C sl.
– INDUSTHER to work hard; to be industrious …1880 N. Ireland
– KEEGER to mix up messily, to mess about, to work in a slovenly, dirty, or ineffective way, to puddle, to potter …1903 Sc.
– KEEP A DOG AND BARK ONESELF to do the work for which one employs others; often in a negative context …1583
– KEEP BANKER’S HOURS to be tardy to work …Bk1942 Amer. sl.
– KEEP UP TO THE COLLAR to stay hard at work, or to make someone else stay hard at work …M19 sl.
– KEEP UP TO THE COLLAR to be overwhelmed by one’s work …1910s sl.
– KEEP YOUR NOSE TO THE GRINDSTONE to be studying hard, working hard …1828 UK
– KIGGER to mix up messily, to mess about, to work in a slovenly, dirty, or ineffective way, to puddle, to potter …1903 Sc.
– KWEECHER, QUEECHER to mix up messily, to mess about, to work in a slovenly, dirty, or ineffective way, to puddle, to potter …1903 Sc.
– LABOUR ONE’S NEEDS to work for one’s livelihood …c1400 obs.
– LAM ON to work fast …1848 Amer. dial.
– LAY IN to exert oneself, to work hard …1929 Amer. dial.
– LEATHER AWAY to work hard …1869
– LEATHER ON to work hard …1893
– LEVEL DOWN to work away …1928 Amer. dial.
– LIGHT IN to begin work vigorously …Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
– LINGE to work so violently as to cause exhaustion …Bk1902 Eng. dial.
– LINK IN to work as fast as possible …1902 Amer. dial.
– MANK to pretend to work, to gossip …1864 Eng. dial.
– MANURE to work upon with the hand; to work up …1431 obs.
– MARROW to be a partner or fellow-worker …1538 Sc. & N. Eng. dial.
– MEET THE MAN to go to work …1910s sl.
– MELT ONE’S GREASE to work very hard …M19 sl.
– MUCKLE AWAY to work hard, to slop …1916 Amer. dial.
– MUDGE (ALONG) to move along slowly; to work in a leisurely way …1950 Amer. dial.
– NAFF to work in a weak, trifling manner; to trifle, to be frivolous …Bk1892 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– NAG to work in a slow, laborious but assiduous manner; to toil …1866 Sc.
– NAGER to work hard; to work laboriously and clumsily …1863 Eng. dial.
– NANNICK to do light, irregular work; to change one’s employment frequently …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– NANTLE to work feebly, languidly, or imperfectly; to potter about; to move slowly and feebly …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– NATTER to work slowly and ineffectually; to potter …1908 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– NATTLE to work slowly, to dawdle, to trifle …1908 Sc.
– NESTLE to trifle; to do light work or odd jobs …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– OCCASION to do temporary or occasional work; to apply for such work …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– PACK GUTS TO A BEAR to work at dishonourable employment …1903  Amer. dial.
– PACK GUTS TO A GOOSE to work at dishonourable employment …1927 Amer. dial.
– PAN TO to begin to work, to set to work with energy …1790 Eng. dial.
– PAY UP to work with energy …Bk1903 Sc. 
– PICK AND MELL to set to work vigorously; to make use of all the means within one’s power …Bk1905 Sc.
– PILE OUT to get up and go to work …Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
– PLAY A DEAD HORSE to work for wages already paid …M17 sl.
– PLY THE LABOURING OAR to take a great or arduous share of the work …1894
– PULL A DEAD HORSE to work for wages already paid …M17 sl.
– PULL THE LABOURING OAR to take a great or arduous share of the work …1900
– PUT IN ONE’S BEST LICKS to work hard; to do one’s best …1851 Amer. dial.
– PUT IN ONE’S LICKS to work hard; to do one’s best …1847 Amer. dial.
– PUT (ONE) THROUGH A COURSE OF SPROUTS to subject to hard work; to make one do certain hard things; to subject to hard discipline …19C Amer. dial.
– PUT YOUR NOSE TO THE GRINDSTONE to start studying hard, working hard …1828 UK
– QUEECHER to work in a lazy, unsatisfactory way …Bk1905 Sc.
– QUEERACH to do any kind of work in a weak, trifling manner; to nurse in an over-dainty manner …Bk1905 Sc.
– QUEETER to work lazily and languidly, to trifle, to waste time …1866 Sc.
– RABBLE to work in a hurried slovenly manner; to do anything in a confused, hasty manner…1862 Eng. dial.
– RACK to work hard …1940s US students’ sl.
– RACK IT to work hard …1940s US students’ sl.
– RAIK to work energetically and speedily; to plough through a task …1866 Sc.
– RAM AWAY to work with vigour and energy …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– RAM INTO to work with vigour and energy …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– RATTLE to work or do anything with energy and speed …1861 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– RAWHIDE to overwork or mistreat workers or machinery …1930 Amer. dial.
– RIDE THE DEAD HORSE to work to pay off a debt …19C Aust., NZ, & US sl.
– RIBBLE to work hastily and carelessly; to do anything in a confused manner …Bk1904 Sc.
– RIDE A DEAD HORSE to work without profit …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– RIDE THE GRUB LINE to travel about looking for work, esp. odd jobs …1899 Amer. West usage
– SAUNTER to loiter over one’s work, to dawdle …1673 obs.
– SCAFFLE to work hard for a livelihood …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– SCAMBLE of work: to do carelessly and hurriedly …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– SCAMP to do carelessly; to do work badly, inefficiently, or with bad materials; to shirk work …1851 Sc. & Eng. & Amer. dial.
– SCHLEP(P);  SHLEP(P) to work hard …1963 sl., chiefly US
– SCLATCH to work in a dirty messy manner; to make or construct clumsily or untidily; to use in a slipshod or careless way; to botch …1808 Sc.
– SCODGE to do rough menial work; to act as a drudge; to do odd jobs …1808 Sc.
– SCOW to plunge; to set to work without delay …Bk1904 Eng. dial.
– SCRAFFLE to work hard with small success; to struggle for a living; to be industrious …1831 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– SCRATCH GRAVEL to hurry; to work hard; to exert oneself …1834 Amer. dial.
– SCRIM;  SKRIM to bustle about; to work with energy and success; to conduct a vigorous search for anything …Bk1904 Sc.
– SCROBBLE to struggle hard for a livelihood; to work hard with small success; to ‘rub along’ as best one can …1890 Eng. dial.
– SHOVEL SHIT to work in a menial job …Bk1999 Aust. sl.
– SLOG to work hard at something …1888 UK sl.
– SLOG IT OUT to work hard at some activity …1971 Aust. sl.
– SLOG YOUR GUTS OUT to work hard at something …1984 UK sl.
– SNATCH IT to quit work taking the wages due …1911 Aust. sl.
– SNATCH YOUR TIME to quit work taking the wages due …1916 Aust. sl.
– SPLIT A GUT to strain or work very hard; to exert maximum effort …1953 Amer. sl.
– STRAP to work …Bk1904 sl.
– SWEAT ONE’S GUTS OUT to work extremely hard; to make one’s maximum effort …1890 colloq.
– TACKLE TO to work vigorously on …1874 Sc.
– TAKE OFF to cease work …Bk1905 Eng. dial. 
– TAKE OUT to stop working, to take a break …1899 Amer. dial.
– TAKE THE DAY OFF TO CARRY BRICKS to take a day off to do some of one’s own work, e.g. do-it-yourself …1970s NZ sl.
– TAKE THE RAG OUT to hurry; to start working …1927 Amer. dial.
– TEAR to work hard and strenuously; to do anything with great speed and energy …1843 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– TEAR OUT THE BONE to make an extraordinary effort; to work very hard; to do anything thoroughly …1887 Amer. dial.
– TEAR THE BONE OUT to make an extraordinary effort; to work very hard; to do anything thoroughly …1887 Amer. dial.
– TEEM ON to work with great energy and speed …B1900 Sc.
– TEW to toil, to labour; to work hard; to pull, to struggle; to contend, to strive …1866 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– TILL to strive, to exert oneself, to labour, to work …c897 obs.
– TIRD to work energetically …1892 Sc.
– TUG THE LABOURING OAR to take a great or arduous share of the work …1697
– UNDERN to work in the after-part of the day …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– VARG to work in dirty conditions, to perform a messy task …1908 Sc.
– WARM IT TO ANYBODY OR ANYTHNG to strike or work hard …Bk1913-17 Amer. dial.
– WORK AT ARM’S LENGTH to work at a disadvantage or clumsily …19C sl.
– WORK BY THE HAG to do piece-work in contradistinction to day-work …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– WORK DOUBLE TIDES to work as hard as possible …1788
– WORK FOR A DEAD HORSE to work for wages already paid …M17 sl.
– WORK FOR THE QUEEN to work overtime without receiving extra pay …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– WORK LIKE A BEAVER vb. to work hard …a1775 US
– WORK LIKE DIGGORY to work hard …1892 Ireland
– WORK LIKE A DOG to work extremely hard …1666
– WORK OFF THE DEAD HORSE to work to pay off a debt …19C Aust., NZ, & US sl.
– WORK ONE’S ASS OFF to work hard …1924 Amer. sl.
– WORK ONE’S BUNS OFF to work very hard …1940s Amer. sl.
– WORK ONE’S EYEBALLS OUT to work extremely hard, esp. at a gruelling manual task; to exert oneself to the fullest extent …1835 Aust. colloq.
– WORK ONE’S FINGERS TO THE BONE to work very hard
– WORK ONE’S GUTS OUT to work extremely hard …colloq.
– WORK ONE’S OWN ASH-HOPPER to do one’s own work …1843 Amer. dial.
– WORK ONE’S TAIL OFF to work very hard …1940s Amer. sl.
– WORK WITH THE LEFT HAND to work inefficiently …1650 obs.
– WRITE UP to report a worker for inadequate work or a misdemeanor …1920s US sl.
– YAKKA to work hard, to labour …L19 Aust. sl.
– YAKKER to work hard, to labour …L19 Aust. sl.
– YARK;  YERK to move quickly or hastily; to push on; to do anything energetically; to work hard …1843 Sc. & Eng. dial.


WORKER, WORKMAN – NOUNS (also see LABOURER)
– GANG a set of labourers or workmen …1819 Sc. & Eng. dial. 
 
WORKER etc. – NOUNS, PERSON
– AMBULANTER an itinerant worker or tramp who travels in a wagon with his family picking up odd jobs as he goes…1927 Amer. dial.
– ARSE-WIPER a workman that toadies to the boss; a servant to the mistress …20C colloq.
– ATE-THE-BOLTS one who is a glutton for work …20C Irish sl.
– AUGER an excessively hard worker …1980s US college sl.
– BAD COCK a bad workman …Bk1891 tailors’ sl.
– BANKSMAN a worker at a building site who guides or directs the use and movement of cranes, vehicles, etc., to ensure that it is conducted safely …1956 Brit.
– BEAVER one who works diligently; a hard-working, diligent, active man …c1850 Amer. colloq. 
– BEE a busy worker …1791
– BELL-HORSE a workman who finds it to his advantage to exert himself more than his fellow employees, in order to give grounds for the discharge of those who cannot keep up with the pace set by him …Bk1891 Eng. sl.
– BICYCLE BUM a seasonal worker who cycles between jobs …1945 Aust. sl.
– BINDLE MAN a tramp; an itinerant worker …1900 Amer. dial.
– BINDLE STIFF a tramp; an itinerant worker …1900 Amer. dial.
– BISCUIT GETTER a breadwinner; the husband …1966 Amer. jocular
– BLACKBIRD an itinerant or migratory worker …1980 US sl.
– BLACKSMITH a clumsy or slipshod worker; spec. an inept journalist, one who pounds out copy or news stories …1882 US sl.
– BLANKET MAN a tramp; an itinerant worker …1872 Amer. dial.
– BLANKET STIFF a tramp; an itinerant worker …1872 Amer. dial.
– BUCKEYE one whose work is of low quality; the inferior work itself …1843 Amer. dial.
– BUCK-PASSER one who evades or avoids work and responsibility …1933 Amer. dial.
– BUTTERFLY a person whose periods of work or occupation are transitory or seasonal …1890
– CACKLER a white-collared office worker – a clerk …1926 Amer. sl., orig. tramps’ usage 
– CAMPIE;  CAMPY one who strives, contends, or works vigorously …1923 Sc.
– CHUMP a person, esp., a regular working man …M19 sl.
– CLOCK-WATCHER someone who does no more work than is strictly necessary …1911 sl.
– DAB-HAND a clever workman; an expert in any business …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– DABSTER a clever workman; an expert in any business; one skilled at anything; an adept; a versatile person …1708 colloq.
– DÆDAL skilful artificer or fabricator; a skilled worker or craftsman …c1630 obs.
– DÆDALIST an imitator of Dædalus; a skilled worker or craftsman …1713 nonce-word
– DÆDALUS a skilful or cunning artificer; a skilled worker or craftsman …c1630
– DARGER a day labourer; one who works by the day …1802 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– DARGSMAN a workman, a labourer …1723 Sc. & N. Eng. dial. obs.
– DARKSMAN a workman, a labourer …1795 Sc. obs.
– DATALLER a day-labourer; a workman engaged and paid by the day …1881  Eng. dial.
– DAY-DARGER a day worker …1856 Eng. dial.
– DAYMAN one employed for the day, or for duty on a special day …1880
– DAYSMAN a worker by the day; a day-labourer …a1639
– DAYSTER a man who works by the day, and not by the piece …Bk1900 Eng. dial.
– DAYTALER a day labourer, a man who works by the day and not by the piece …1877 Eng. dial.
– DEACON a superior or head workman; an adept, a proficient, a master …1790 Sc.
– DIDDLE one who is slow and dawdling in his work …Bk1900 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– DIDDLE-DADDLE one who is slow and dawdling in his work …Bk1900 Sc. & Eng. dial.
– DOCK-WALLOPER a worker who loads and unloads freight at a loading dock …1971 US sl.
– EAGER BEAVER an enthusiast; a zealous person a person who is too eager for work …colloq.
– EYE-SERVANT one who works adequately only when watched …1967 Amer. dial.
– FACEY a workman facing another as he works …c1870 tailors’ sl.
– FACEY ON THE BIAS a workman not directly in front of another as he words …c1870 tailors’ sl.
– FACEY ON THE TWO THICK a workman just behind one’s vis-a-vis …c1870 tailors’ sl.
– FACTOTUM an odd-job man; a handyman; a man of all work …1584
– FAG a hard worker …M19 sl.
– FAGGER one who works hard …1885
– FAUCHLE a slow, inept worker; a bungler; a small, weak person unable to do his own turn and yet trying to do it …1866 Sc.
– GANGMAN a member of a gang of workers or labourers; a foreman or overseer of such a gang …1830
– GANGSTER a foreman or member of a gang of workers …1913 rare
– GEEZER a young manual worker who lives with his parents and spends his disposable income on leisure and pleasure …2003 UK sl.
– GHOST a carpenter, painter, or other workman wearing a white uniform …1961 US sl.
– GLASS ARM a weak, lazy, or otherwise poor worker …Bk1962 Amer. 
– GRAFTER a hard worker …1900 sl.
– GRINDER a person who works for another …E19 rare
– GRUNGE a person who works hard, usually for meagre rewards …1960 sl.
– GRUNT a common or unskilled worker; a labourer …sl.
– GUTTERER a dirty, unskilful worker …1866 Sc.
– GYPPO an itinerant worker or piece-worker …1920s Amer. sl.
– HACK a hard-working man …Bk1880 Eng. dial.
– HACK a worker of any type, inferring monotonous ‘grind’ …1990s sl.
– HACKWORKER a hired person doing the tedious jobs …Bk1988 Aust. sl. 
– HAGGLER a clumsy, awkward workman; a bungler …1577 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– HALF HAND a person who does, or is allotted, half the amount of work expected of an able-bodied adult …1856 Amer. dial.
– HANDICRAFT a handicraftsman, an artisan, a workman …1586 obs.
– HANDYWRIGHT a worker with his hands; a mechanic …1674 obs.
– HAWMERER a big, awkwardly built person with clumsy feet; one who works in a rough, noisy fashion …1866 Sc.
– HEAVY LIFTER the one who does the ‘heavy lifting’ or hardest work …1990s US sl.
– IDLEMAN one who has no occupation; formerly, in Ireland, a ‘gentleman’, as opposed to a working man …1331 rare
– INSPECTOR OF PAVEMENTS a man out of work …Bk1896 sl.
– JACK a young workman …Bk1902 Eng. dial.
– JACK-LEG an incompetent, unskilled, unscrupulous, or unprincipled worker or professional person, esp. a quack doctor, a crooked lawyer, or a hypocritical preacher; a bungling workman …1853 US sl. 
– JIPPO an itinerant worker or piece-worker; contract work, a sub-contractor…1920s US sl.
– JOBMONGER – a worker hired by the job …1900 
– KEMPER one who strives or contends; a fighter; a keen and vigorous worker, esp. one who strives to outdo his fellows …1721 Sc.
– LABORER;  LABOURER one who does work of any kind; a worker …a1420 
– LABOR FAKER a worker who loafs on the job; a malingerer; hence, a corrupt union leader …1907 US sl.
– LEG MAN any person who works actively and outside, rather than in, an office …1950s Amer. sl.
– LUNCHPAIL a blue-collar worker …1950s sl., orig. US
– LUNCHPAILER a blue-collar worker …1950s sl., orig. US
– MAISTRY a master workman, a foreman; applied also to a skilled workman, e.g. a cook, a tailor …1798 Indian
– MANUALIST one who works or labours with the hands …1592 obs.
– MANUARY one who works with his hands …1581 obs.
– MARROW a companion, a fellow-worker, a partner, a mate …c1440 obs. exc. Eng. dial.
– MASTER HAND a highly skilled worker …1709
– MECHANICKER a mechanic, a workman …1861 Eng. dial.
– MIG a migratory worker …c1935 Amer. sl. 
– MISS GRIND a very hard worker …17C
– MOILER a person who moils or labours; a hard worker; a drudge; a toiler …1563
– MOKUS a working man; an ‘average joe’ …1914 US sl.
– NAP-HAND a clever workman; one expert at any business or at a game of skill …1887 Eng. dial.
– NEEGER a hard, unremitting worker; a toiler …1899 Sc. 
– OKIE a migratory worker …c1935 US sl.
– OPERANT a workman …1831 rare
– OPERATIST a worker …1651 obs. rare
– OPERATRESS a female worker …1841 rare
– OPERATRICE a female worker …1531 obs. rare
– OPERATRIX a female worker …1792 rare
– OPIFEX  a worker, a maker, a manufacturer …1649 obs.
– OPIFICER one who makes or constructs a work; a maker, a fabricator; a workman …1548 obs.
– PANNER a worker; one who sets to work well …Bk1905 Eng. dial.
– PASHER a clumsy workman …Bk1905 Eng. dial. 
– PEYL-AWAY an energetic person; a hard worker …1896 Eng. dial.
– PLODDALL a dull or commonplace person; a plodder, a person who works slowly and laboriously …1618 obs. rare
– POTTERMENT a bungler; an inexperienced workman …Bk1828 Eng. dial. obs.
​- QUARTER HAND a person who does, or is allotted, one-fourth the amount of work expected of an able-bodied adult …1856 Amer. dial.
– QUEER one who works hard …1960s US college sl.
– QUILL-BOY a term of reproach for a person incapable of much work …1853 Ireland
– RABBLE a careless, hurried worker …1866 Sc.
– RABBLER a careless, hurried worker …1866 Sc.
– RACEHORSE a person who works or acts speedily, often carelessly …Bk1980 Amer. sl. 
– RAIK one who work speedily but in a slapdash manner …1904 Sc.
– RAKE one who works with much fuss and effort but with little skill or care …Bk1905 Sc.
– RAKER a superior person or thing; a hard worker …Bk1905 Sc.
– REESHLER a person who works with noise and flurry …1892 Sc.
– RETREAD orig. a retired soldier recalled to service; hence, a worker undergoing retraining …1941 sl., chiefly Aust., NZ & US
– RODNEY an idler; a loafer; a casual worker; a disreputable character …M19 Eng. dial. & colloq.
– SCAMPER one who works hastily or with bad materials …1851 Eng. dial.
– SCARTER one who is not working in earnest …1812 Sc.
– SCHLEP an ordinary working person …1930s sl., orig. US
– SCLATCH a bungling, clumsy workman, a botcher; a big, lubberly fellow …1808 Sc.
– SCUFFLER a person who does hard but honest work to make a living …1890s African-American sl.
– SELF-STARTER one who acts, esp. when employed, on their own initiative rather than await instructions or orders …1960s sl.
– SHOEMAKER a poor lawyer; an inept worker or professional …1936 Amer. dial.
– SHUFFLER a worker who is out of a job …Bk1974 Amer. sl.
– SHUFFLER a migratory worker …Bk1974 Amer. sl.
– SKATE a lazy and/or incompetent worker …1998 US Army usage
– SKLATCH a bungling, clumsy workman, a botcher; a big, lubberly fellow …1808 Sc.
– SLUFFER one who fails to do his work …Bk1913-17 Amer. college sl.
– SPALPEEN a common workman or labourer; a farm worker or harvester; a migratory agricultural labourer …1780 Irish
– STIFF a migratory worker …1899 sl.
– TEAR-AWAY one who works or plays with great energy and violence when gentler methods would be more efficacious …B1900 Eng. dial.
– TEAR-EM-ROUGH one who works or plays with great energy and violence when gentler methods would be more efficacious … B1900 Eng. dial.
– TEWER a hard worker; an industrious, energetic person …1878 Eng. dial.
– THREE-QUARTER MAN a boy or man not equal to full work owing to age, infirmity, etc. …1901 Eng. dial.
– TINKER an unskilful or clumsy worker; a bungler
– TINKER any itinerant worker …Sc., Irish
– TOGETHER-WORKER a co-worker; a collaborator …1581 nonce word obs.
– TOILER a hard-working person …1549
– TRAMP a worker who moves from job to job, city, to city …1808 UK sl.
– TUTTLE a worker …B1900 Eng. dial.
– WAGELING a hireling; a person employed to do menial work …a1547 obs. rare
– WAGE-PLUG a worker for wages …1918 Aust. sl.
– WARB a low-paid manual worker …1959 Aust. sl. 
– WHEELHORSE one who does the hard work in some enterprise or cause; a trusted assistant; a hard-working or powerful person …1845 Amer. dial.
– WICK a worker who lacks class consciousness; a scissorbill …1926
– WILLIAM EARS a worker who lacks class consciousness …Bk1975 Amer. I.W.W. usage obs.
– WILLING HORSE a person who is a willing and capable worker …Bk1988 Aust. sl. 
– WORKAHOLIC a person whose primary and obsessive interest is work; a compulsive worker …1968 Amer. sl.
– WORKING STIFF a common working man; an ordinary worker …1930s Amer. sl.
– WORKOHOLIC a workaholic …1970s sl.
– YACKER-MAN a hard worker …1908 Aust. sl.
– YARDBIRD a worker in a yard …1963 US sl.
– YEARMAN a man hired by the year …1481-90
– YOCKFELLOW a person ‘yoked’ or associated with another, esp. in some work or occupation; a fellow-worker; an associate or partner, esp. in a task …1526
– YOKEFELLOW a person ‘yoked’ or associated with another, esp. in some work or occupation; a fellow-worker; an associate or partner, esp. in a task …1526
– YOKE-MATE a person ‘yoked’ or associated with another, esp. in some work or occupation; a fellow-worker; an associate or partner, esp. in a task …1567
 
WORKER etc. – NOUNS, PERSON, OTHER
– RAWHIDER one who overworks or mistreats workers or machinery …1931 Amer. dial.


WORKHOUSE – NOUNS
BASTIL(L)E the workhouse …1859 Eng. dial.
BEAD-HOUSE a workhouse …Bk1898 Eng. dial.
BIG-HOUSE the workhouse …1868 Eng. dial.
FACTORY the parish workhouse …Bk1900 Eng. dial. obs.
LARGE HOUSE the workhouse …M19 sl.
UNION, THE the workhouse …L19 sl.
WORKUS, THE the workhouse …19C

WORKHOUSE – NOUNS, PERSON
BUTTONS a person appointed to oversee work in a workhouse …1885 sl. obs. rare


WORKING-CLASS – ADJECTIVES
LUNCHBUCKET working-class, blue-collar …1950s US sl.
PROLE of the working-class …1965 US sl.

WORKING-CLASS – NOUNS, PERSON
PROLE a member of the proletariat (working class); a lower-class person …1887 US sl.
WACKIE; WACKY a stereotypical member of the working-class; a conformist …1982 UK teen sl.
WOOL HAT a member of the White rural working class; a small farmer; a redneck; used chiefly in reference to such a person as a political force …1828 Amer. dial.
WOOL HAT BOY a member of the White rural working class; a small farmer; a redneck; used chiefly in reference to such a person as a political force …1836 Amer. dial.
WOOL HATTER a member of the White rural working class; a small farmer; a redneck; used chiefly in reference to such a person as a political force …1986 Amer. dial.


WORKMANLIKE – ADJECTIVES
AFFABROUS skilfully made; complete; finished in a workmanlike manner …1731 rare
GAIN handy, expert, skilful, deft, dexterous; workmanlike …a1300 Eng. dial.


WORKMANSHIP – ADJECTIVES
PAN-DAEDALIAN of all curious workmanship …1618 obs.

WORKMANSHIP – NOUNS
AFRO ENGINEERING shoddy, second-rate workmanship …1970s US sl.
OPIFICE the doing or making of a work; construction, workmanship …1616 obs.


WORKOUT- NOUNS
BUFF a workout with weights …1989 US sl.


WORKPLACE – NOUNS
SALTMINE a workplace …1976 US sl.


WORK SHIFT – NOUNS
AGONY SHIFT a work shift between the day and graveyard shifts, from about 4 pm to midnight …Bk1947 Amer. sl.
AUSTRALIAN DAYS night-work …1970 UK sl.
CAT-EYE a late-night work-shift …1977 US sl.
DARKIE a night shift …c1925 Aust. sl.
DARK-‘UN a 24-hour shift, worked by a wharf labourer …1957 Aust. sl.
DOGWATCH a night shift, esp. in a newspaper office, or to any late or early period of duty, or the staff employed on this …1901 sl., chiefly US
SWING a worker’s rest period or a shift system which incorporates such breaks; broadly, time off work …1917 US sl.
SWING SHIFT a work shift between the day and graveyard shifts, from about 4 pm to midnight …Bk1947 Amer. sl.


WORKSHOP – NOUNS
MANUFACTORY a factory or workshop …1692
OFFICINA a workshop; place of production …1835
OFFICINE a workshop; a laboratory; an office in a monastery …c1425 obs.
OPERATORY a workshop, a laboratory …1651 obs.

WORKSHOP – NOUNS, PERSON
MANUFACTURER an artificer, an operative in a factory or workshop …1719 obs.